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A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 15-16, 1912

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 12:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 198th, 199th and 200th diary entries from April 15 and 16, 1912, recount days spent making skirts and discussing music with friends.

 

Apr. 15th. Annie Louise and I turn seamstresses and make white skirts in the afternoon.  Jessie Mit and Phyllis have to do most of mine.

 

Inserted along with the April 15, 1912, diary entry is a photograph of eight girls in white shirtwaists and black ties.

 

I take all the measurements and then read the directions! But, for a wonder, I did it right.  Addie takes the order to Mr. Battaile for me.

 

Apr. 15th. Well if I didn't forget to put in Nordica, who Addie, Phyllis, and I enjoyed immensely, and whom we saw through Mr. Halbert's and a kind lady's glasses.

 

Apr. 16th. No Logic, and Addie, Annie, Mr. Hart and I have a lengthy discussion of music, etc., on the Library steps. Dean Hamilton is shocked, but she introduces Mrs. White who advises Addie never to teach if she doesn't want to, and repeats it several times.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UPK's 'Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage' Honored

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 12:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016)University Press of Kentucky (UPK) author and former University of Kentucky anthropologist John van Willigen has been recognized by the Southern Anthropological Society for "Kentucky’s Cookbook Heritage: Two Hundred Years of Southern Cuisine and Culture." The book was awarded an honorable mention for the James Mooney Award for its contribution to anthropological scholarship on the South and Southerners.

 

Presented annually, the Mooney Award includes a $500 cash prize and certificate of recognition to be presented to the winning author at an awards ceremony. In addition, an Honorable Mention Award is presented, which includes a certificate of recognition. It was created in honor of James Mooney, the prominent American ethnographer who lived with the Cherokee people during the late 19th century.

 

In "Kentucky’s Cookbook Heritage," van Willigen examines the cookbooks from the Commonwealth from the last two centuries and analyzes the cooking technology used, how food was prepared, and the changes in social dynamics for preparing and consuming food, as well as, of course, what Kentuckians ate. He also explores how the cookbook enterprise has been more broadly structured by gender, class and ethnicity in the state.

 

Van Willigen surveys a wide array of community and charity cookbooks, including Lettice Bryan’s "The Kentucky Housewife" (1839) and celebrity Louisville caterer Jennie C. Benedict’s "The Blue Ribbon Cookbook" (1904), and encompassing many recognizable faces such as Duncan Hines and the Montgomery County native who would become the original Aunt Jemima. Of course, no study of cookbook culture would be complete without recipes. "Kentucky’s Cookbook Heritage" features more than 80 sample recipes spanning the Commonwealth’s history, making it both an informative and useful addition to the library of anyone who cares about food in the Bluegrass State.

 

Professor emeritus of anthropology at UK and the author of "Food and Everyday Life on Kentucky Family Farms, 1920–1950" among other books, van Willigen is the first UPK author to be recognized for the Mooney Award. It was presented at the 51st annual meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society held April 9, in Huntington, West Virginia.

 

Van Willigen joined this year’s winner, "Cherokee Reference Grammar" by Brad Montgomery-Anderson, and the other honorable mention recipient, "Constructing Histories by Asa R. Randall, in accepting the award. "This venerable prize is well respected among anthropologists," van Willigen said. "I am honored."

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’s editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production, and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Long-time UK Academic Leader Taking Post at Colorado State University

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 09:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — A long-time leader in undergraduate education and academic success at the University of Kentucky is taking a top post at Colorado State University.

 

Benjamin C. Withers, UK’s associate provost for undergraduate education and interim dean of undergraduate studies, is taking the position of dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins. He begins at CSU July 1.

 

Colorado State University is the state's land grant university, and the flagship university of the Colorado State University System. The institution has more than 32,000 students and more than 1,500 faculty in eight colleges. The College of Liberal Arts has more than 4,500 undergraduate majors and graduate students. It has 13 departments and schools. The college has 238 faculty and is the largest college on the CSU campus.

 

“Ben has been an outstanding leader and passionate advocate for student success at all levels at the University of Kentucky,” said UK Provost Tim Tracy. “Our loss truly is the gain of another outstanding institution in Colorado State University. Ben has been at the forefront of incredible gains we have made in recent years in academic and student success. He will, I know, bring a true passion for students and lifelong learning to CSU.”

 

Withers has been in his current position since 2012 and at UK since 2004. Previously, he was director of the UK Honors Program and chair of the Department of Art (now the School of Art and Visual Studies) in the College of Fine Arts.

 

In the last three years, UK has achieved new records for first-to-second-year retention as well as nearly historic highs in four-year and six-year graduation rates, even as enrollments have reached record levels of more than 30,000 students.

 

Among many accomplishments, Withers led a re-organization of undergraduate studies that included restructuring advising and career services. He also has been instrumental in the creation of a new UK Honors College, capped by the largest gift in UK’s history of $23 million from Tom Lewis last year.

 

"As a native Kentuckian, I very much appreciate the opportunity to have worked at UK and to learn from the many talented faculty, staff and students that we have here,” Withers said. “I will miss my colleagues across campus mightily. At the same time, I'm excited about what lies ahead, and I'm grateful to Provost Miranda and the folks at CSU for their confidence in my leadership."

 

Withers, a native of Cynthiana, Kentucky, has a bachelor’s degree in art history from Carleton College, where he was Phi Beta Kappa. He has his master’s degree and doctorate in art history, both from the University of Chicago.

 

Prior to coming to UK, Withers taught at Indiana University-South Bend. In addition to his administrative accomplishments, Withers is an outstanding scholar as well, authoring three books, numerous articles as well as book chapters and reviews.

Conference on Military Behavioral Health Sponsored by UK College of Social Work

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 15:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Social Work, Office of Professional Development and Continuing Education, will host the Second Annual Military Behavioral Health Conference from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday, April 29, at the Campbell House, located at 1375 South Broadway in Lexington. Registration and breakfast will take place at 8 a.m.

 

This year's opening plenary speaker will be Carl E. Smith, chief of Combat and Operational Stress Control Training Branch for the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School in Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The afternoon plenary speaker will be Lt. Col. Lloyd Jackson, team leader for the Veteran Health Administration Records Control Schedule Vet Center in Lexington.

 

Breakout sessions at this year’s conference will include "Moral Injury," "Traumatic Brain Injury/Polytrauma: the Caregiver’s Perspective," "Suicide Prevention," "VA Behavioral Health Services," "Veteran Geriatric Care," "Military Culture" and "Understanding the Sexual Predator."        

 

Continuing education credits for the conference are approved by the Kentucky Board of Social Work, the Kentucky Board of Psychological Examiners, the Kentucky Board of Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselors, and the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage and Family Therapist Board.

 

The cost to attend the conference, if registering prior to April 29, is $120 that includes a light breakfast and buffet lunch. If registering the day of the conference, the cost will be $160. Credit cards are accepted. Students are invited to attend the conference at the student rate of $50. Students are to register via email with Christina Gevedon at Christina.Gevedon@uky.edu.

 

If interested in a vendor table for your organization at this conference, please contact Christina Gevedon at Christina.Gevedon@uky.edu.

 

To register, participants can visit http://ceu.uky.edu.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

How Medical Students Learn in Swaziland

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 15:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) – The Community Faculty Program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine hosted its 22nd Annual Community Faculty Conference for community faculty, campus faculty colleagues, administration, professional staff and regional Area Health Education Center (AHEC) staff April 8-9. But some people may be surprised by the distance some community faculty travel for the conference and the chance to meet their UK colleagues in person.

 

Dr. Pawelos Beshah from Swaziland, a small landlocked African nation, attends the conference each year. Beshah serves as a preceptor in the physician assistant program and volunteers to provide medical education to third- and fourth-year medical students who travel to the his homeland, providing a unique experience for the UK medical students.

 

In January 2016, six UK students spent several weeks being trained at Releigh Fitkin Memnia, Beshah's home hospital. Students who are passionate, skilled and knowledgeable get hands-on experience and some may be allowed to see patients on their own and take on some of the workload. Though Beshah works in the pediatric department, he gives students the chance to explore other specialties, including emergency medicine, where they experience a variety of health issues caused by accidents and traumas. Students also spend time in the operating room (OR) gallery, watching surgeries and occasionally assisting surgeons. Students get experience in an inpatient and outpatient setting.

 

Students who travel to Swaziland to complete their rotation, have an opportunity to work with patients with unique needs and illnesses. As of 2012, Swaziland had the highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the world, with 25.8 percent of the population diagnosed with the disease. This population is affected by unique complications and HIV-related conditions that many medical students don't experience in the U.S. In addition to health disparities that provide unique patients, students also experience a culture very different than their own. The population of Swaziland is overwhelmingly Christian, however, there is a different family structure, many people in the state practice polygamy. Doctors must navigate any family turmoil created by this arrangement.

 

Beshah says he appreciates having the opportunity to contribute to the United States by helping train new doctors. He also believes he gets just as much out of volunteering his time as the students. "When you teach, you learn twice," he said. For the past 10 years Beshah has had the opportunity to learn many skills twice and has helped train about two dozen UK medical students.  

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

 

Conference on Fiscal Federalism Coming to UK

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 14:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics and the Martin School’s Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (IFIR) is co-hosting a conference on Fiscal Competition and Fiscal Federalism beginning 8:30 a.m. Monday, April 18, in Gatton Building room 311.

 

Conference co-chair and Martin School faculty member David Agrawal said, “We were pleased to be able to attract an exceptional group of internationally acclaimed public finance scholars to discuss fiscal competition and related issues. Their attendance reflects well on the speakers recognition of the public finance research and academic programs of the Martin School and the Department of Economics.”

 

“This event provides our faculty and graduate students a unique opportunity to hear presentations by, and interact with, world class public finance scholars," said William Hoyt, conference co-chair and Department of Economics chair. He also indicated that the conference will draw economists and scholars from other colleges and universities in Kentucky to take advantage of this rare opportunity to hear from public finance economists who are conducting cutting-edge research on current domestic and international fiscal policy issues.

 

The all-day conference includes presentations by several internationally renowned public finance economists including Thiess Büttner of University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Holger Sieg of University of Pennsylvania, Marius Brülhart of University of Lausanne, John Wilson of Michigan State University, Marko Köthenbürger of ETH Zurich, and David Wildasin of UK. Topics include inter-jurisdictional competition, fiscal competition with unemployment and the elasticity of taxable wealth among other public finance issues. The conference provides opportunities for presenters and participants to interact in the sharing and dissemination of research findings regarding fiscal federalism and related topics.

 

This conference is one of a series public finance and fiscal federalism conferences and workshops that have been sponsored by the IFIR since 2005. The IFIR is a joint undertaking of the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration and of the Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy at Morehead State University.

 

The Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations is dedicated to basic and applied research dealing with the relationships among governments and their organization in federal structures. One of the IFIR's goals is to encourage and support the research activities of faculty and students at home institutions. The IFIR also seeks to engage the broader community of scholars and policymakers with shared interests in federalism and intergovernmental relations. In addition to conferences and workshops, the IFIR has supported basic and applied research on contemporary fiscal federalism issues of concern to academics, policy makers and the broader society. The IFIR research and activities' topics reflect the interests of affiliated faculty and students, as well as the imperatives of public policy.

 

To RSVP for this conference, complete this online form and email it to Katie Sanders at katie.sanders@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Weston Loyd, weston.loyd@uky.edu, 859-257-8716; Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200

 

New Technology Helps Patients Get Better and Stay Well

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 14:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) − Every year, tens of thousands of people are hospitalized for various ailments, and each of them require daily in-hospital visits from doctors, nurses, and other health care staff to manage their care. They often are prescribed a dizzying array of new medications for a diagnosis they're unfamiliar with. And, once they're well enough to go home, they're inundated with detailed instructions for post-discharge care. Is it any wonder some of these patients and their families are overwhelmed and confused?

 

Countless studies have decried the low level of health literacy among U.S. adults. One of them estimates more than a third of all U.S. adults have only a rudimentary level of proficiency, and in Kentucky some regions have a dismal 82 percent health illiteracy rate.  For health outcomes to improve and the rate of needless (and expensive) readmissions to decline, experts say, the system needs to move away from the traditional model where patients are passive recipients of health care.

 

With that in mind, the interdisciplinary patient education committee and the staff of the Don and Cathy Jacobs Health Education Center set out to find ways to engage and inform patients more effectively, making them partners in their own care. According to Judi Dunn, RN, BSN, they found their answer in a technology-based patient engagement system called the Get Well Network (GWN) that is currently being piloted in the hospital's eighth floor cardiovascular inpatient unit. 

 

The idea behind the GWN is three-fold: provide consistent, clear information to the patient and his/her family about their diagnosis and their care, assist staff in providing consistently high-quality instruction to their patients, and prompt patients to ask questions where they have knowledge gaps, all of which improves the care transition from hospital to home.

 

"Patients are overwhelmed and feel out of control on top of being sick," said Dunn, patient education manager for UK HealthCare. "We think the GWN will empower them to learn about their illness and ask questions about their care, which has the potential to improve health outcomes for these patients.  Since that also reduces costs, it's the ultimate win-win."

 

The GWN interfaces automatically with the Electronic Health Record (EHR), which improves care coordination and streamlines workflow for clinical staff.

 

"For example," Dunn explains, "once a physician orders a medication for a patient, that order goes into the EHR and flows into the GWN.  A patient looking at the GWN monitor in her room will see 'This is the new medication you'll be taking, this is what it looks like, this is what it's intended to do, and here are some side effects to look for.' The GWN will let the nursing staff know when that patient has reviewed her information, and a nurse can follow up with that patient to reinforce the message (called teach-back) and address any of her concerns."

 

Dunn recounts one nurse who, upon checking the EHR, realized that her patient had watched the seven health videos assigned to her seven times.  "It turns out that the patient watched them alone, and then made her family watch them with her," Dunn said.  "She told her nurse that the videos made it easier for her to remember what her doctor had told her."

 

And that is precisely what philanthropists and longtime UK HealthCare advocates Don and Cathy Jacobs were looking for when they offered to underwrite the GWN pilot program.

 

"Don and Cathy just happened to stop by as we were watching a demo of the GWN and they immediately saw its potential," explained Dunn. "They've made it their goal to help our Health Education Center become more 'virtual' to reach as many people as possible, and funding the pilot project was an important step towards achieving that."

 

The Get Well Network has several other clinical features, including a extensive health video library with more than 600 titles, bios on a patient's care team, and a virtual messaging system that allows the patient to request things like a visit from a chaplain or from Carmine, the 8th floor's exclusive therapy dog.

 

Brent Krein, a UK HealthCare informatacist, says the 8th floor was a natural place to test the Get Well Network due to the unit's culture of innovation. As the IT point person for the project, Krein worked with staff on the floor to adapt the technology's design to UK HealthCare's special needs and culture. He's clearly passionate about this project and its potential to change the way patients view their care.

 

"Let's face it," he says, "the hospital is one of the worst places to be. You're sick, you're lonely, and the only introduction you have to your providers is the whiteboard on the wall listing the names of your medical staff." 

 

"Now, patients can captain their own ship, connect more fully with the world outside, and not feel embarrassed that they don't understand something about their illness or their care."

 

In addition to the GWN's numerous clinical benefits, the technology provides access to outside entertainment and learning, including Facebook, movies, and lists of nearby hotels, restaurants, parking, and other amenities for visitors. Krein describes the joy of introducing the Get Well Network to one patient who had been hospitalized for several weeks.

 

"He had been very down in the dumps, but when we showed him that he could access his Facebook page and he saw all the 'Get Well Soon' messages posted by his friends, he looked like a kid on Christmas," Krein said. "That may seem like a small thing, but it was no small thing for him, and it completely changed his outlook."

 

Assuming long-term outcomes match initial successes, the GWN will be rolled out to other patient units, starting with the planned units on the ninth and tenth floors. Ultimately, says Krein, the team hopes to make the clinical features available to patients at home, providing seamless access to information and self-care advice.  

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, laura.dawahare@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

McDaniels to Speak on African-American Archives, Reconstruction

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 14:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — Pellom McDaniels III will present a mini-exhibition and give a talk titled “What Must Be Remembered: African Americans, Archives and the Era of Reconstruction” 2 p.m. Friday, April 15, in the Great Hall of Margaret I. King Library. This event, presented by University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center, is free and open to the public.

 

McDaniels, a former professional football player, currently serves as the faculty curator of African American Collections at the Stuart A. Rose Library and assistant professor of African American studies at Emory University, where he received his doctoral degree. His scholarly interests include African Americans and World War I, 19th and 20th century notions of black masculinity, African Americans and the intersection of sports and civil rights, and the politics of representation in African-American art. McDaniels is the author of “The Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy,” which was published by the University Press of Kentucky.

 

This talk is being presented in conjunction with programming from LEXengaged Living Learning Program, who used McDaniels' book to create lessons on Lexington's East End for William Wells Brown Elementary School.

 

UK Special Collections Research Center is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center and the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection. The mission of the Special Collections Research Center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

The University Press of Kentucky is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’s editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production, and marketing departments of the press are found at the UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

For more information about this event, contact Education Archivist Matthew Strandmark at mstrandmark@uky.edu

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Debate Team Finishes Season Strong at Nationals

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 13:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — Completing one of the most successful years in the history of the University of Kentucky Debate Team, the team recently competed at the 70th National Debate Tournament at the University of Binghamton, part of the State University of New York system..

 

For the first time in school history, three partnerships from the UK Debate Team — Donald Grasse and Theo Noparstak; Ava Vargarson and Jonathan Geldof; and Marcel Roman and Holmes Hampton — reached the elimination rounds. Emory University was the only other school to match that accomplishment.

 

Grasse and Noparstak reached the elite eight after finishing the preliminary rounds as the sixth seed at the tournament. It was UK's first appearance in the elite eight since 2009. The eventual champion was Harvard University.

 

"This year was about the seniors," said David Arnett, director of the UK Debate Team. "This is a group who took a chance on Kentucky when we were rebuilding from the ground up. Four years later we’re a top five program. What can you even say about that? I’m extremely thankful to have been part of it and couldn’t be more proud of the team."

 

Later this month the team will host the 45th High School Tournament of Champions at UK. More than 1,000 participants from 35 states and three countries are expected to compete. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Partners with HMR to Promote Healthy Weight to Kentuckians and UK Community

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 13:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) – Jeanne Bouvier, a retired UK HealthCare nurse of 25 years, didn't know how her weight gain could have happened to her.  She thought, "I'm a nurse and should know better. How did I let this get away from me?" She realized she had to get over thinking that way and do something about it before it started to affect her overall health.

 

"We are all human. Weight gain can happen to anybody," Bouvier said.

 

Bouvier has been active all her life but about three years ago, she noticed it was getting harder to do physical things. It bothered her that while participating in a football clinic to better understand the game her son, a walk-on wide receiver for UK played, she lacked the strength and stamina to take part in the mini drills.

 

She saw displays for Health Management Resources (HMR) in UK Chandler Hospital and decided to attend an introductory session. "I'm sold on the program," Bouvier said. "HMR has teased out all the ideas that work and thrown out the fads and other junk. If you are serious about losing weight, HMR is a serious program. It will work if you do the things they ask of you."

 

The HMR Program for Weight Management, a medically supervised weight loss and weight management program, has operated in cooperation with the University of Kentucky since 1985, bringing its proven lifestyle-based approach to central Kentuckians, helping them lose significant weight and teaching the skills to keep the weight off long-term. HMR was recently named a No. 1 Best Fast Weight Loss Diet in U.S. News & World Report's Best Diets of 2016 rankings.

 

Dr. L. Raymond Reynolds, professor in the Department of Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine at the UK College of Medicine, serves as medical director for the local clinic and also serves on the national medical board. Additionally, Reynolds is program director of the Endocrinology Fellowship at UK and was named as one of the Best Doctors in America 2015-2016.

 

"The HMR program is clearly the premier weight management program in the U.S., due to continuous improvements based on experience, data analysis and a dedicated, passionate skilled staff. HMR has helped thousands of people with wide variety of concerns achieve a greater quality of life," Reynolds said.

 

Kim Berryman, a registered dietician and program operations specialist at HMR in Lexington, says the program provides the jump start many people need when beginning a healthier lifestyle program.

 

"The program achieves fast weight loss in a livable way, by encouraging people to eat more and stay satisfied. This makes it easier to stick to the program in both the short and long-term."

 

Berryman adds, "A common misconception is that losing weight quickly is not healthy, not sustainable, and will just lead to future weight regain. To the contrary, numerous clinical studies demonstrate that following a lifestyle change program which promotes fast initial weight loss can result in better long-term success."

 

HMR has three phases. Phase 1 is very highly structured, but time limited, with a high level of support and accountability. The objective is to follow the diet 100 percent, which results in rapid weight loss. Phase 2 is more relaxed, as the focus becomes learning and practicing healthy behaviors to maintain the weight loss. In phase 3, participants begin managing a healthy lifestyle on their own, with more flexible options for support and accountability. UK employees who participate in the program will receive a 50 percent discount on Phase I classes.

 

The program is having a profound impact on Richard Pitcock, an accountant for some of UK's medical and surgical departments, and his wife Donna.  Richard knew he was overweight but for the first time in his life, he was called obese. The word 'obese' resonated with him. He never thought of himself in this way.

 

"My wife and I have three grandkids and we knew we needed to do something about the extra weight so we can feel good and be active with them," Pitcock said. "I've read about HMR in some UK publications and I have a friend who has been successful with the program."

 

"The program is easy for me and my wife because we do it together - we attend meetings, grocery shop and exercise together."

 

Richard and Donna Pitcock are strongly committed to their weight loss program and made it a goal to burn 2,000 calories a week. In addition to biking, they like to walk and they participate in many 5K walks for charity, completing 10 so far this year.

 

Richard's office at UK's Coldstream campus is on the third floor of a six floor building and he says he always takes the stairs, even visiting the restroom on another floor, averaging 17-18 flights of steps a day.

 

Last July, Richard and Donna decided they wanted to add a new activity and discovered a new found passion for ballroom dancing. 

 

"Dancing involves the whole body and you have to focus on the core and frame. It's fun and challenging and forces you to concentrate on movement. We'll do it for the rest of our lives," Richard Pitcock said.

 

[video]

 

His biggest challenge with the program right now is finding a good balance with his exercise, weight, and calories burned. After losing over100 pounds, Richard's waist size went from 46 inches to 34 inches and his 34 inch pants are loose. Now that he has exceeded his weight loss goals, he is currently trying to gain a few of the pounds back.

 

Even if Richard gains back a few pounds, he still has to wear a heavily padded double-belly for his extracurricular activity of playing Santa Claus for UK's annual Circle of Love, a program that provides Christmas gifts to underserved children in Fayette County and Central Kentucky. As Santa, he also visits with patients at Kentucky Children's Hospital for their annual Breakfast with Santa. He thinks he may have to buy a full fat suit for next year.

 

The Pitcocks and Bouvier say the HMR program is not hard because there is a lot of support and supervision as long as you stay committed to the program.

 

"It's just so much easier now to get through my day," Bouvier said. "I have more stamina and don't think twice about taking the stairs; and my clothes fit. I'm actually the same size now as the day I married. Will power and going it alone will not get you through the long-term. You need ongoing support and a way to be held accountable."

 

Richard Pitcock adds that at age 68, he and his wife are 'well-seasoned' adults in the HMR program, so age is not a factor for starting a diet and exercise program. He says it's more important to just get started.

 

 "Attending the meetings is crucial because it causes accountability and you learn a lot from the discussions."

 

To learn more about HMR, go to www.hmrprogram.com and connect with HMR on Twitter, Facebook, and You Tube. To connect with HMR Weight Management Services in Lexington, contact Kim Berryman at 859-422-4671.

 

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 13-14, 1912

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 12:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 196th and 197th diary entries from April 13 and 14, 1912, recall McClure doing some spring cleaning at Patterson Hall, reading a book by Florence L. Barclay and having a feeling of pride in her friends' accomplishments.

 

April 13th. Housecleaning! We do it all very thoroughly, floor, windows, and all. Decide we want a change, which we proceed to get — and I change back in about three minutes!

 

April 14th. Read "The Following of the Star." Don't like it much. The girls are all proud of their "K"s and we are all proud of the girls. They're wishing for some cold weather.

 

Inserted along with the April 14, 1912, diary entry is a newspaper clipping detailing the success of an edition of the school newspaper, The Idea, organized and executed by a group of all female students.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

On-Campus Housing Available for Students Enrolled in Summer Session Classes

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 11:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) — Students planning to take classes during Summer Session I or Summer Session II at the University of Kentucky may apply for housing in Woodland Glen II. Housing is available for either session or both, depending on the student’s class schedule.

 

Woodland Glen II will only be available for summer session students. The residence hall is a two-bedroom suite style.

 

To apply, students should log on to their myUK portal with their link blue username and password. Students should then select Undergraduate Housing located under the myInfo tab and fill out the summer 2016 housing application.

 

Summer Session I move-in date will be 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 8, and move-out date will be by noon Wednesday, June 8.

 

Summer Session II move-in date will be 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 7, and move-out date will be by noon Friday, Aug. 5.

 

Students who have a summer internship may also apply to live on campus. For more information, contact summer conference housing at uksch@uky.edu.

 

More information on summer session housing, including rates and step-by-step instructions, can be found at www.uky.edu/summer

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Two UK Students Selected for Princeton in Asia

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 10:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2015) — A University of Kentucky senior and recent graduate have been selected for fellowships from the Princeton in Asia program. As part of the program, biochemistry senior Calvin Hong and 2015 arts administration and Spanish graduate Brittney Woodrum will teach in Hong Kong and Myanmar respectively.

 

Princeton in Asia (PiA) sponsors more than 150 fellowships and internships in 20 countries and is the oldest and largest organization of its kind, unique in its scope, size, century-long expertise and emphasis on service. The essence of PiA is to provide transformative, service-oriented experiences for bright, talented graduates and to serve the needs of Asia as determined by host institutions and Asian partners. PiA arranges fellowships and internships with Asian host organizations in the fields of education, health, international development, environmental advocacy, journalism, engineering, technology, law and business.

 

PiA Fellowships are the means of fostering person-to-person diplomacy, enhancing mutual understanding, serving vulnerable communities with unmet needs and providing transformative experiences for fellows and host communities.

 

 

Calvin Hong, the son of Boi and Fang Du Hong of Lexington, is a 2012 graduate of Henry Clay High School. He will graduate with a bachelor's degree in biochemistry and a minor in Spanish in May.

 

Hong believes his PiA experience in Hong Kong will be as much a learning experience as a teaching one. "With the program, I hope to refine my teaching skills and gain a greater understanding for other cultures. By doing so, I hope to implement my newfound skills when I become a professor of chemistry."

 

At UK, Hong participated in undergraduate research as a member of the lab of J. C. Hubbard Professor of Chemistry John Anthony. His research found him synthesizing various pentacene derivatives in an effort to create novel n-type semiconductors. In addition, he was tasked to create a thiophene derivative to aid with polymer linkage.

Hong is very thankful for his opportunities working with Anthony, as well as Alumni Association Endowed Professor of Biological Chemistry D. Allan Butterfield and Director of UK Writing Center and Senior Lecturer of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies Judith Prats.

 

"Professor Anthony was the first professor who showed me how impactful chemistry could be. Using fundamentals of basic science, he showed me how chemistry can be used to help combat larger problems, like climate change. With this incredible success, Dr. Anthony has never forgotten his upbringing and the importance of contributing to society," Hong said.

 

"In regards to Professor Butterfield, his personal advocacy for minorities in the sciences was personally inspiring to me. His loving nature and enthusiasm for teaching has inspired me to go into teaching myself. He’s selfless, whimsical and all-in-all a great professor. Finally, I would like to thank Professor Prats. Having known her for four years, I can safely say that she is one of the most caring people that I have ever met. Her dedication to her students is simply amazing. Although I’m majoring in the sciences, Professor Prats has always reminded me of how important the liberal arts are as well. Her altruistic personality has morphed me into who I am today."

 

After his time of service with PiA, Hong plans to pursue a doctoral degree in chemistry. As part of his future research he hopes to innovate new compounds for solar panels.

 

Brittney Woodrum, the daughter of James and Sherry Woodrum of Winchester, Kentucky, is a 2011 graduate of George Rogers Clark High School and 2015 graduate of UK. Woodrum, who is currently teaching English in Guadalajara, Mexico, as a Fulbright Scholar, will use her PiA Fellowship to travel to Yangon, Myanmar, to teach English and basic computer skills to the Buddhist nuns at the Dhamma Moli International Buddhist Education Center (DIBEC).

 

"I believe teaching offers a great opportunity to learn about a new culture, and I am extremely excited to see what lessons my next adventure brings," Woodrum said.

 

While at UK, Woodrum was very active in Student Activities Board, productions by the UK Department of Theatre and Dance and Education Abroad. She pursued her degree in arts administration as a way to exercise her love of the arts and ended it with an even greater passion for nonprofit organizations, giving her what she believes is a perfect foundation to enter the nonprofit sector.

 

After completing her service with PiA, Woodrum plans to attend graduate school. "I eventually hope to pursue an international administration degree to better prepare me to work with larger NGOs."

 

UK students interested in PiA may apply through the university’s Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the office assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UPK Book Examines Lincoln’s Last Moments

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 08:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2016) According to a palm reader, 14-year-old John Wilkes Booth had one of the worst hands she’d ever seen. Born under an unlucky star, he would live “grand, fast and short,” and have many enemies. Her prediction would ring true when, on April 14, 1865, Booth fired his derringer point-blank at President Abraham Lincoln, shots rang out from inside the playhouse, screams ensued and the 16th president of the United States was mortally wounded.

 

Dr. Charles Leale, a 23-year-old Army surgeon who had finished medical school 45 days prior, rushed to Lincoln’s box as members of the audience attempted to capture the fleeing Booth, who was escaping through the theater armed with a bowie knife inscribed with the words “Liberty” and “America.”

 

Four blocks away, an acrobat performing in a staging of “Aladdin!” was scheduled to appear around 10:30 at Grover’s National Theatre, its entrance illuminated to celebrate the Union victory; instead, theater manager C.D. Hess appeared onstage and broke the grave news to the audience: “President Lincoln has been shot at his private box at Ford’s.”

 

As President Abraham Lincoln’s body was carried across the street from Ford’s Theatre to Petersen’s boardinghouse, Capt. Oliver Gatch, one of the men who bore the president, was surprised to hear the swarm of people on 10th Street fall silent. Gatch and the other bearers moved so slowly and cautiously that artist Carl Bersch was able to sketch the entire scene from his balcony.

 

The injured president was carried to a small, cramped back bedroom where one week ago, his assassin had also slept under the same checked-and-flowered quilt. Upstairs, boarder John Mathews, a lifelong friend of Booth’s, discovered the Booth’s manifesto and burned the evidence in his bedroom fireplace. Downstairs, the Petersen children performed their services hurriedly, carrying bottles of hot water to the doctor and providing cloth napkins to soak up the blood. When 14-year-old Pauline Petersen overheard Booth’s name, she carried the tea tray into the parlor, all the while trying to conceal her panic at the fact that the president’s attacker was a frequent tenant at her family’s establishment. Meanwhile in the death room, Mary Todd Lincoln sobbed, “Kill me. Shoot me too!” as artists asked the doctors to pose for their paintings of the deathbed scene.

 

On one of the most horrific days in American history, ordinary Washingtonians would play extraordinary roles in the aftermath of Booth’s crime. Their accounts complete the picture of the president’s last moments in “Lincoln’s Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America’s Greatest President.” The new book published by University Press of Kentucky (UPK) and written by award-winning crime reporter Kathryn Canavan is the perfect read on the 151st anniversary of President Lincoln’s death.

 

Canavan was “stunned” when she learned that in 150 years, no one had ever written a book about what else was happening inside Petersen’s boardinghouse on the night President Lincoln died. She set out to “find the true stories of the workers, boarders and neighbors who witnessed what went on in the death room and behind the scenes.”

 

After many years in journalism and crime writing, Canavan began her investigation on the most consequential crime in American history. She went beyond most other scholars who have written books about Lincoln’s assassination as she “mined diaries, letters and interviews for details that might have otherwise been lost to history.”

 

With vivid prose and a journalist’s eye for detail, Canavan revisits Washington, D.C., in the spring of 1865 to tell the story of Lincoln’s death from the perspective of those who have received surprisingly little attention from history: the citizens who witnessed it. “Lincoln’s Final Hours” reveals not only the tragedy at Ford’s Theatre, but also the personal and political motivations of the Petersen family and their boarders, and the planning of Booth’s conspiracy.

 

William Petersen, the boardinghouse owner who was suspiciously absent during the tragedy, was found asleep in his tailor shop. Upon returning to the tumult, he was appalled to find blood, mud and dirty basins mucking up his house. He later tried to bill the federal government for using his boardinghouse as a makeshift hospital, including the use of every tool as well as his time, before the president was buried in the ground. Also profiting on the night of April 14, his precocious 15-year-old son Fred, earned $1.12 in less than 10 minutes when he cut squares of plain white paper and dipped them in blood from the front hallway, selling them as souvenirs.

 

Yet, Lincoln’s death is merely the beginning of the story. To uncover the far-reaching impact of that infamous night, Canavan links seemingly disconnected events such as public deaths at the Smithsonian and at a famous Broadway nightclub, as well as a high-society murder in Albany, New York. From the actor who played the bailiff in “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theatre on that fateful night to the merchant tailor who sat in the audience, ordinary citizens were thrust into history. Using letters, diaries, interviews, public records and newspaper accounts, Canavan’s thorough research stretches our imagination beyond the room where Lincoln would take his last breath to recall the fascinating stories that followed.

 

Kathryn Canavan is a former independent researcher and freelance writer for USA Today and The Philadelphia Inquirer. She lives in Wilmington, Delaware.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’s editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production, and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Special Collections Learning Lab Interns Present Work on Lexington's Architectural History

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 08:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — Students from the UK Libraries Special Collections Research Center Learning Lab program will present their yearlong projects 3-4 p.m. Thursday, April 14, in the Great Hall of Margaret I. King Library. The students have been engaged since the beginning of the academic year in processing the Frankel and Curtis Architectural Drawings Collection. A reception will follow the presentations.

 

“The interns have created some really fascinating tools and projects that document the city’s architectural history and economic development and we would love to share this with the broader campus community,” said Learning Lab Manager Stacie Williams.

 

The Learning Lab internships allow students from all fields of study to spend an academic year learning and working in the Special Collections Research Center. They evaluate and catalog primary source archival documents, and produce original research on the subject matter.

 

UK Special Collections Research Center is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center and the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection. The mission of the Special Collections Research Center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

ICT Facilitates Periscope Broadcast with Wildcat Wheels to Celebrate 4th Annual Bike Week

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 14:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Information Communication Technology (ICT) program facilitated two Periscope broadcasts as part of campus’ fourth annual Bike Week, which gave students and employees the opportunity to ask a bike mechanic questions about repairs and spring tuneups.

 

Bike Week — April 11-16 — is an initiative presented by the UK Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) and Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) that encourages cycling on campus. The two organizations achieve this by inviting students and employees to attend a variety of interactive and entertaining activities each spring.  A few of the events returning from previous years included a downtown bike ride tour to check out various Lexington murals, a DIY bicycle repair station on campus, and bike-in movies. A new event this year was the live Q&A broadcast with a bike mechanic from Wildcat Wheels.

 

“Bicycling continues to grow as a means of transportation on campus," said Chrissie Tune, PTS marketing specialist and BAC education chair. "Bike Week is all about educating members of the UK community about campus and local bike resources, as well as encouraging people who aren’t sure if getting around on two wheels is for them. The Periscope partnership with ICT allows us to educate students and employees about a few bike repair basics, as well as spotlighting a valuable campus amenity in Wildcat Wheels.”

 

The ICT Student Association (ICTSA), a student organization in the College of Communication and Information, encouraged peers to submit questions to the program’s Twitter handle. ICTSA also promoted Bike Week in classrooms, provided the necessary technical support for the Periscope broadcast, and shared questions with Wildcat Wheels' bike mechanic, Jerran McBreen.

 

“I’ve been a mechanic for almost five years now. I became a mechanic because as a kid everyone around me rode bikes, but no one knew how to fix them. I always liked fixing things and as an aspiring car mechanic I wanted to start somewhere to test the waters of mechanics,” McBreen said. “Wildcat Wheels grabbed my attention because of what it does for the campus. This was a great opportunity for me to fix bikes, help others, and teach them a few things, while avoiding the retail part of the bike industry.”

 

Wildcat Wheels is a campus bike shop that provides free bicycle use and repair assistance to students, faculty, and staff at the University of Kentucky. This program is funded by Parking and Transportation Services and managed by the Office of Sustainability.

 

Majors and non-majors interested in ICT can join the ICT Student Association. The group’s primary purposes are to facilitate communication between students and faculty in the ICT program and coordinate opportunities for student participation in ICT-related programs and activities. Contact ICTSA faculty advisor Deloris Foxworth at Deloris.Foxworth@uky.edu if you’re interested in becoming a part of the student organization. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Parking and Transportation Services’ Bike Voucher Program Cycles Into Second Year

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 14:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — Last year University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) implemented a pilot bicycle voucher program to encourage employees to consider alternatives to driving a vehicle to campus. The tremendous success of the program — spearheaded by the university’s Bicycle Advisory Committee — in its inaugural year has prompted PTS to renew the bike voucher program.

 

Last year —  in the voucher program’s first year — PTS selected 100 bike voucher recipients from a pool of 462 applicants. The 100 qualified recipients each received a $400 voucher, redeemable at participating local bicycle shops, in exchange for not bringing a motor vehicle to campus for two years.

 

In order to receive the voucher, participating students and employees must sign a car-free commitment that will restrict them from purchasing a motor vehicle parking permit for two years. Vouchers are awarded with the goal of removing motor vehicles from campus. To that end, priority will be given to students and employees who have had a vehicle parking permit for the past fiscal year (July 1 - June 30), but those new to the university will also be given consideration.

 

The one-time use vouchers may be used toward the purchase of a bicycle or gear and accessories to outfit a bike that the employee or student already owns. Program participants will also receive 10 scratch-off parking passes —  one-day permits that may be used on occasions when participants must bring a motor vehicle to campus. Participants will have the opportunity to purchase up to 40 additional scratch-off permits per fiscal year.


PTS will begin accepting applicants for the bicycle voucher program today, Wednesday, April 13. The application window will close Thursday, June 30. Faculty, staff and students who wish to participate and who have already purchased a 2015-2016 parking permit may return it for a pro-rated refund.

 

Prior to receiving the bike voucher, participants must attend a short program orientation covering basic bicycle safety and regulations, as well as campus and community resources for bicyclists.

 

Residential students are not eligible for the bicycle voucher program, but are encouraged to sign up for use of a bicycle through the Big Blue Cycles fleet.

 

UK employee and bike voucher recipient Steve Ivey said the program saves him time and adds physical activity to his daily routine.

 

“I live about four miles from campus. Counting the time it takes to walk to the parking garage, exit the garage and navigate campus traffic during the evening rush hour, the bike ride home takes about the same amount of time,” said Ivey. “Plus, it’s a great way to build some extra physical activity into my day while contributing to some parking and traffic solutions on campus.”

 

The bicycle voucher program — along with other PTS programs such as BluPass — is part of a suite of alternative transportation options available to the UK community. The programs are designed to simplify the process of shifting from driving a single-occupancy vehicle to campus to an alternative form of transportation, and to reward those individuals who make the change in their routine.

 

Kristen Mark, UK employee and bike voucher recipient, encourages those considering the bike voucher program to give it a try.

 

“Don’t be discouraged by relying on your bike and giving up your parking pass. We got 10 free day passes, and I have used all of them, because there were some days where it was too icy or too cold to realistically ride in,” Mark said.

 

To learn more about the bike voucher program or to submit an application, visit www.uky.edu/pts/alternative-transportation_bicycle-voucher. To learn more about the Transportation Master Plan, visit www.uky.edu/evpfa/node/39.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Health Colleges Student Diversity Services Expands Mission, Changes Name

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 13:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — For many years, University of Kentucky Health Colleges Student Diversity Services (HCSDS) —  a unit under the Office for Institutional Diversity — has been committed to increasing and supporting the diversity of student populations within UK's health colleges community. HCSDS has also provided all health college students, faculty and staff with educational opportunities to engage in meaningful dialogue across cultural differences.

 

Because of the phenomenal job HCSDS has done in serving their students’ needs, the office and mission of HCSDS are expanding.

 

HCSDS Director Chassity Holliman-Douglas says this expansion will aid in increasing diversity on campus.

 

“I am excited that our university has understood the need for an expansion of our services in order to create a more diverse environment than ever before,” Holliman-Douglas said. “Their commitment to this expressed need is what will aid in our current transition as well as continuing to increase the diversity of our campus, so that it more closely resembles society’s makeup.”

 

While HCSDS will continue its commitment in its full capacity, the office is expanding its mission to provide essential services and educational programming to all graduate and professional students at UK. With this expansion, the office will operate under a new name —  the Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives (CGPDI).

 

“This expansion comes as an answer to the needs and requests for more dedicated support and resources for underrepresented graduate and professional students across the university as well as continuing the institution's commitment toward building a culturally engaging campus environment,” said Holliman-Douglas.

 

“The expansion of Health Colleges Student Diversity Services to cover all underrepresented graduate and professional students supports the university’s commitment to building a more diverse and inclusive community,” said Interim Vice President for Institutional Diversity Terry Allen. “The expansion of the office will also bring about an expansion of staffing as well as space. Additional information in that regard is forthcoming as the transition proceeds.”

 

CGPDI will focus on the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students in UK's graduate and professional programs as well as the cultural diversity development of all members of the campus community. 

 

The mission of the CGPDI is to connect students to essential tools and resources, assist the university in promoting academic excellence, build inclusive communities, and support the professional development of underrepresented graduate and professional students, with the ultimate goal of developing leaders in academy, industry, and society.

 

Holliman-Douglas hopes the expansion will give graduate and professional students a supportive environment and a dedicated space for underrepresented students in all graduate and professional disciplines as students in a recent town hall requested.

 

“We anticipate the new Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives to serve as an additional space where graduate and professional students can thrive in a welcoming and supportive atmosphere, actively engage in dialogue with students from disparate backgrounds, and participate in co-curricular programming to enhance students' academic success, cultural competency, commitment to advocacy, and overall professional development,” said Holliman-Douglas.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Markey Receives Funding to Improve Community Cancer Education in Eastern Kentucky

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 13:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — University of Kentucky researchers Robin Vanderpool and Mark Dignan are leading projects funded by the National Cancer Institute’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities to continue Markey Cancer Center’s community-based efforts aimed at reducing cancer rates in Appalachia. Both programs are funded for three years.

 

Appalachian regions, particularly in Eastern Kentucky, have disproportionately high rates of both incidence and mortality due to cancer when compared to other regions in the United States. Poverty, lack of access to health care, poor diet, tobacco use, and lack of exercise conspire together to produce high rates of preventable cancers in Appalachia.

 

The UK Markey Cancer Center brings together numerous disciplines and universities throughout Appalachia to research and implement community-based solutions to help reduce the rate of cancer in the region. The additional funding received supports two projects: the National Outreach Network (NON) and a Geographical Management of Health Disparities Program (GMaP). 

 

The NON program provides funding to support a community health educator (CHE) who will be strategically integrated into Markey Cancer Center’s cancer prevention and control activities. Through NCI’s National Outreach Network, the CHE is linked to a collection of evidence-based resources and programs to increase access to accurate and culturally tailored cancer information, education and outreach activities to improve local cancer health disparities.

 

The CHE role will enhance coordination of cancer prevention and control activities with the Markey Cancer Center, GMaP investigators, Kentucky Cancer Program (KCP), Kentucky Cancer Consortium, and other state, regional, and local community partners. Mindy Rogers, who recently served as regional cancer control specialist with KCP in the Cumberland Valley region of the state, will serve as the NON CHE covering Kentucky’s Appalachian communities.

 

GMaP includes partners at the cancer centers of Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia, as well as health disparities researchers at the University of South Carolina. GMaP will focus on increasing research training opportunities in our region, mentoring students and investigators early in their careers, and work with the NON CHE to reach out to the community.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

UK Welcomes First Multicultural Sorority to Campus

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 11:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2016) — Scholarship, service, sisterhood, leadership and multiculturalism — these are the tenets of Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. The Alpha Omicron colony of Theta Nu Xi was recently established on the University of Kentucky campus.

 

Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. was founded at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on April 11, 1997. The founders established a mission to promote leadership, multiculturalism and self-improvement through academic excellence, involvement in and service to the campus and community, as well as being living examples of sisterhood across different races, cultures, religions, backgrounds and lifestyles.

 

Katelyn Lauber, president of the Alpha Omicron colony of Theta Nu Xi at UK, said, “Our mission statement embodies everything that we believe in.”

 

A core group of 15 women went through the process of establishing their colony on UK’s campus. The women first became involved with Reaching out to Empower Ambitious Ladies (REAL) — an interest group of Theta Nu Xi.

 

“Through REAL, we were able to build a strong foundation and incorporate Theta Nu Xi’s tenets with what we wanted a student organization to look like, which was to help empower women on campus and in the community and to build leadership skills through service,” said Julia Vega, UK senior and sister of Theta Nu Xi.

 

Shortly after, the core group of women held a recruitment week in November 2015.

 

“More girls started coming to our interest meetings and from then on we were able to go through the regular process of establishing a sorority,” Vega said.

 

The group of 15 women officially became the Alpha Omicron colony of Theta Nu Xi on March 7, 2016. They are the longest line in Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. history as well as the first and only multicultural sorority at UK.

 

Loretta Stafford, Theta Nu Xi publicity chair, believes the process of establishing a colony on UK’s campus helped each woman learn a lot about themselves.

 

“The whole process of joining and establishing this sorority on campus has definitely been one of the biggest areas of growth we’ve experienced. People are different not only in the way they look or their religion but in their way of thinking and their way of reasoning,” said Stafford. “It’s a good thing to embrace those differences and learn how your characteristics can help complement those differences.”

 

Senior Theta Nu Xi sister Chanel Friday says being in a group with women different from herself has taught her many valuable lessons.

 

“I think multiculturalism is something that we tend to forget about. We should be educating ourselves on different cultures,” Friday said. “It is really beneficial in the sense that you get to learn from someone who’s from a different culture, and they can educate you on their culture and traditions.”

 

Friday, along with the rest of the Alpha Omicron colony, would like to see more inclusion between various groups on campus.

 

“We really want to see a change and cultural shift and more inclusion with all groups on campus. We want to be involved with all types of organizations on campus,” said Friday. “We want to go out and do things with big organizations and small organizations to bridge the gap. We want to get to know more people and create an all-inclusive environment for Greek and non-Greeks alike.”

 

As part of their Founders Week, Theta Nu Xi will be hosting an interest session tomorrow night, April 14 at 5 p.m. in Room 214 of White Hall Classroom Building. If you can’t make it to the interest session but are interested in learning more about Theta Nu Xi, contact uk.tnx1@gmail.com.

 

Follow the Alpha Omicron colony of Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. on Twitter and Instagram.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

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