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VIP Center Establishes Bias Incident Support Services

Fri, 03/25/2016 - 10:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 28, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Division of Student Affairs Violence Intervention and Prevention (VIP) Center has expanded its scope of services to provide support and advocacy to those who have experienced violent, threatening or harassing behavior based on an aspect of their identity or perceived identity including:

  • Ability (physical, psychological and cognitive)
  • Age
  • Ancestry
  • Citizenship or immigration status
  • Gender
  • Gender expression
  • Gender identity
  • Ethnicity
  • National origin
  • Parenting and pregnancy status
  • Race
  • Religion
  • Religious practice
  • Sexual identity
  • Sexual orientation
  • Veteran status

Bias Incident Support Services (B.I.S.S.) includes support at the time of crisis and resources to support the physical, emotional and academic well-being of the individual or individuals impacted. In addition, advocates can provide information and assistance with reporting options, both on-campus and off-campus. B.I.S.S. focuses on the negative impact on the targeted individual or group.

 

B.I.S.S. are available to all UK undergraduate, graduate, doctoral and professional students, faculty and staff. A bias incident is any activity that intimidates, demeans, degrades, marginalizes or threatens individuals or groups based on their identities or perceived identities. A bias incident can occur whether the act was intentional or unintentional, and may or may not be a legal act.

 

“This is expansion is in direct response to marginalized students who communicated to administration their need for a place of comfort, advocacy and support in those instances when they’ve been the targets of bias and hate,” said Carol Taylor-Shim, bias incident response coordinator. “We know that a sense of safety and belonging is what keeps students, staff and faculty here at UK. It is our obligation to do all we can to provide that.”

 

Advocates are available to discuss individual concerns regarding confidentiality to ensure that those reporting are well informed of their rights and limitations of confidentiality. B.I.S.S. provided by the VIP Center are confidential unless there is a legal reporting requirement.

 

Those seeking services may call 859-257-3189 or email Carol Taylor-Shim (carol.taylor@uky.edu) to arrange an appointment or stop by the VIP Center in Frazee Hall 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday to schedule an appointment.

 

Visit the VIP Center’s website for more information about Bias Incident Support Services (B.I.S.S.). 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Session to Provide Information on Fulbright Opportunities for Students

Fri, 03/25/2016 - 10:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 28, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards is hosting a kick-off event for those who are interested in applying for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

 

A panel of UK and Fulbright alumni will be present to discuss the application process and their experiences abroad with the program on the date the program begins accepting applications for 2017-18. Hear from Alex Brooks, museum manager at the 21c hotel in Lexington, who studied in England; Mallory Powell, communications director at the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, who taught English in Vietnam; graduate student Ryan Voogt, who conducted history research in Romania; and Brittany Woodrum, who is currently teaching English in Mexico.

 

The kick-off event will take place from 12:30-1:45 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in the William T. Young Library Gallery. Lunch will be provided. To reserve a seat, email Jennifer Stevens at jennifer.stevens@uky.edu.

 

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding.

 

A second information session for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program with Lora Seery, senior program officer for the program, will be held 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 28, at the James W. Stuckert Career Center. To reserve a seat for this event, email Jennifer Stevens at jennifer.stevens@uky.edu .

 

Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Talks Bad Bugs, Good Bugs

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 17:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 25, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today he talks to UK entomologist Jennie Condra and graduate student Bernadette Mach about ways to protect your trees from ash borers and how to attract beneficial insects to your yard. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/bugs-bugging-your-trees-uk-entomologist-has-answers.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

DanceBlue 2017 Committee Applications Now Available

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 16:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 28, 2016)  Over the past 11 years at the University of Kentucky, DanceBlue has raised $9.8 million for the Golden Matrix Fund, which benefits the Kentucky Children’s Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic. But, DanceBlue is defined by something much greater than the number it has raised. The no-sitting, no-sleeping 24-hour dance marathon is a way to get involved on campus with a dedicated, passionate group of students who collaborate throughout the year to prepare for the 2017 event.

 

There are three committee applications available now:

 

Family Relations Committee - Members volunteer weekly with the clinic patients, attend and put on seasonal parties for the families and act as the hands and feet of the organization with the families DanceBlue exists to serve.

 

Morale Committee – Members act as the liaisons between student dancers and committee during the marathon by leading a morale group of 20-25 students. Throughout the year, morale attends mini marathons with the rest of committee at high schools across the state. They also table throughout the year during different DanceBlue initiatives, attend community events, and help all areas of committee when needed.

 

Corporate Committee – Members work with the corporate chair and coordinators to secure corporate donations throughout the year. In the fall, this committee works to put on the DanceBlue Silent Auction event. After this event, all efforts move toward acquiring corporate donations to benefit the final total, as well as the marathon as a whole.

 

Once students are back on campus for the fall 2017 semester, applications will be released to the two other committees — programming and operations.

 

Programming Committee – Members plan each minute of the 2017 marathon. Programmers work with partners, as well as the programming chair and coordinators to bring fun events to the marathon for the dancers, crowd and everyone else involved.

 

Operations Committee – Members work to plan, organize and put on the DanceBlue 5K that takes place in the fall. After, they work to plan and organize for the 2017 dance marathon. The marathon is put on by this committee, from set up, check in and breakdown, they make sure DanceBlue happens!

 

For those interested in any of these committees, do not hesitate to apply. DanceBlue encourages everyone to apply to any and all opportunities that peak their interest.

 

“What you learn from your involvement with DanceBlue committee is hard to put into words," said Allee Williams, DanceBlue public relations chair. "You learn how to love a cause and the people around you much deeper. You learn how to commit to something bigger than yourself and see it through. You learn that kids much younger than you are much stronger and more inspiring than imaginable. Ultimately, DanceBlue changes your heart, mind and gives you some pretty great dance skills while you are at it. I would do committee for the rest of my life if I could. Do not miss out, come to the Committee Information Session and apply while you can!”

 

Students can now apply for committee positions for DanceBlue 2017 applications until April 8 at www.danceblue.org or by searching for DanceBlue on Orgsync.

  

Students are invited to come find out more at a Committee Information Session on March 31, in 106 White Hall Classroom Building. Sessions will be held at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. 

 

Give to DanceBlue here and connect with DanceBlue on Facebook at www.facebook.com/danceblue and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKDanceBlue.

 

DanceBlue is a program housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote lifelong community service. For more information about the CCO, visit www.ukcco.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Old Crow Medicine Show Comes to Singletary Center

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 16:20

 

Old Crow Medicine Show performing "8 Dogs 8 Banjos" at the Grand Ole Opry.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 28, 2016) — Old Crow Medicine Show is coming to the University of Kentucky Singletary Center for the Arts for two nights this week. The Grammy Award-winning country music group will perform at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 30, and will follow with a sold-out performance Thursday, March 31.

 

Old Crow Medicine Show started busking on street corners in 1998 in New York state and north through Canada, winning audiences along the way with their boundless energy and spirit. They eventually found themselves in Boone, North Carolina, where they caught the attention of folk icon Doc Watson while playing in front of a pharmacy. He invited the band to play at his festival, MerleFest, helping to launch their career. Shortly thereafter, the band was hired to entertain crowds between shows at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee.

 

It's been over 15 years since these humble beginnings. The band has gone on to receive the honor of being inducted as members of the Grand Ole Opry, and have won two Grammy Awards: Best Folk Album for "Remedy" (2014) and Best Long Form Music Video for "Big Easy Express" (2013). Additionally, their classic single, "Wagon Wheel," received the Recording Industry Association of America's platinum certification in 2013 for selling more than 1 million copies. 

 

This concert is presented by Emporium Presents. Tickets for Old Crow Medicine Show are $39.50. Tickets purchased the day of the show will be $42. A processing fee will be added upon completion of transaction. Tickets can be purchased at the Singletary Center box office in person, by phone at 859-257-4929, or online at www.scfatickets.com. Tickets for the March 31 show are sold out.

 

A part of the UK College of Fine Arts, the Singletary Center for the Arts presents and hosts around 400 artistic, cultural and educational events annually for the university community, Lexington community and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

Boot, Scoot and Boogie Across the Finish Line with UK Ag Ed

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 15:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 25, 2016) — Run, walk, jog or dance your way through the Boot, Scoot, and Boogie 5K for Ag Ed Saturday, April 16, at Spindletop Hall. The University of Kentucky Agricultural Education Society will be hosting the race recognizing the 100th year anniversary of agricultural education courses being taught on campus. The race is set to begin at 9 a.m.

 

Registration for the family friendly event can be done online until 11:59 p.m., April 15, with a racing fee of $30 per racer. Race T-shirts are guaranteed if registered by April 3, and can be picked up on race day with a race packet at 8 a.m. upon arrival at Spindletop for pre-race festivities.

 

All proceeds from participation and sponsorship of the 5K will be used to meet the Ag Ed Socitey’s goal of $100,000 for an endowed scholarship fund for agricultural education students at UK.

 

Race day festivities will include music from 98.1 WBUL-FM “The Bull,” raffle prizes, awards for overall male and female in each age group, and finisher medals for those runners representing the theme.

 

For more information on the Boot, Scoot and Boogie 5K for Ag Ed, contact Rebekah Epps at rebekah.epps@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 MEDIA CONTACT: Ashley Cox, aco264@uky.edu, 513-464-2548.

UK Big Blue Family VIDEO: Colleagues in Liver Disease Research, and in Life

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 10:41

 

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 25, 2016) — When you ask Brett Spear about what he most admires in his wife and colleague, Martha Peterson, a smile instantly appears on his face.

 

The pair, both professors in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, has been married for 32 years and has two sons. Yet, because they have different last names, not everyone on campus recognizes their connection. 

 

“When I meet people on campus, and they talk about how, ‘oh I just love Dr. Peterson,’ or ‘Martha's great, I was on a committee with her,’ and they'll say this and they don’t know I'm her husband,” Spear said. “So it's really fun when I can hear that and I can say, ‘oh I know, she's my wife!’”

 

Peterson, who also serves as senior associate vice president for research at the University of Kentucky, most admires the passion and creativity in her husband. 

 

“Brett is so passionate about a number of different things,” Peterson said. “He’s very passionate about the graduate students and he’s the creative one. He’s the one most likely to think outside the box when it comes to trying to approach a problem a slightly different way.” 

 

Spear and Peterson met in graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once they graduated and ultimately completed post-doctoral training, they knew it would be a challenge finding two positions in the same general field at the same institution. 

 

“I was actually six months pregnant when I came to interview so I didn’t have a whole lot of time,” Peterson said. “But Kentucky had more than one position in molecular biology, a really broad area that we were both qualified for, and they did a really good job to recruit the both of us.”

 

“It was our first time in Lexington or Kentucky,” Spear said. “We didn’t know a lot about the university, but we really enjoyed talking to the faculty and so I think both of us thought this would be a good group of people to work with, both professionally, but personally, as well.”

 

“When we moved here in 1989 our son was six months old and we got the labs going and we've been here ever since,” Peterson said. 

 

Each professor has slightly different research interests. Spear studies liver disease and liver cancer, while Peterson looks at gene regulation, calling RNA her “favorite molecule.” But the two came together 12 years ago for a research project related to liver disease.

 

“Martha's experience really was relevant to this project so we actually started working together on that project,” Spear said. “Fortunately for us the project really took off, it's been very successful, so we've continued to collaborate since that time.”

 

Their collaboration led to a successful cloning of a gene related to liver cancer. Though they celebrated the feat, the discovery led to more questions.

 

“We've learned a lot of new things but we've also learned that it's a lot more complicated than we thought,” Spear said. “That's the challenge of basic research, you make a discovery and you think you've made some progress, and you have but it just leads to more and more questions.”

 

“That’s why we love it,” Peterson added. 

 

The couple is committed to continue working together in hopes of fighting an illness that more and more Kentuckians are facing. 

 

“Ultimately, I think that it will have an impact, and this is an important area,” Spear siad. “Liver disease is a growing disease in Kentucky so we have to figure out what causes the problems. We know that what we do may not have an impact for a long time, because going from understanding the molecular aspect of the disease to treatment is a long road.”

 

“But it’s a necessary first step,” Peterson said. “I like to think that this is fundamental knowledge that we need to have in order to help somebody else solve those problems.”

 

“These are complex diseases and we are learning more every day, but I still think we have a way to go,” Spear said.

 

Yet, they are determined to keep working to solve these lingering questions, together, as a team.

 

“In some ways we complement each other, the different ways we think,” Spear said. “We work together well, not only in marriage but as colleagues as well!”

 

“I think there are plenty of married couples who could not work together very well, but it works for us,” Peterson said. 

 

Click on the video above to discover how these two researchers met in the first place and watch their “Big Blue Family” story.

 

This video feature is part of a special series produced by UKNow focusing on families who help make up the University of Kentucky community. There are many couples, brothers and sisters, mothers and sons and fathers and daughters who serve at UK in various fields. The idea is to show how UK is part of so many families’ lives and how so many families are focused on helping the university succeed each and every day. 

  

Since the "Big Blue Family" series is a monthly feature on UKNow, we invite you to submit future ideas. If you know of a family who you think should be featured, please email us. Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

LiveSafe Video Contest Could Score Student Winner $2,500

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 19:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 24, 2016) — University of Kentucky students are eligible to enter a national student video contest sponsored by LiveSafe, the company that developed the LiveSafe safety app that is available to all UK students and employees on campus.  The winning entry will receive $2,500 and dinner with reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian. The winning entry's campus safety or police department will also receive $2,500.

 

Students can enter the contest as an individual or group.  LiveSafe asks that the video demonstrate the use and value of LiveSafe at the participant's school and the video should be no longer than 90 seconds.  It should be posted to YouTube and the URL link emailed to video@lifesafemobile.com. For more information on the contest, visit https://s3.amazonaws.com/livesafe-html-emails/VideoContest/LiveSafe-VideoContest-Feb2016.pdf. The contest ends April 15, 2016.

 

Sponsored by UK Police and UK Student Government, the LiveSafe app launched on campus one year ago offering an exceptional new layer of security for the campus community.

 

LiveSafe makes it easy for people to share information about potential crimes and unsafe situations with campus police using their smartphone. Through their devices, users will be able to report GPS-tagged information with added pictures, video and audio clips. Another popular feature of the app is the “SafeWalk,” which allows users to virtually walk together through the app. Users can request, through the app, that a friend follow their GPS location until they arrive safely at their destination.

 

So far, nearly 5,200 people have downloaded the safety tool.  UK Police have received more than 100 tips, and nearly 1,000 users have utilized the SafeWalk feature.

 

LiveSafe empowers both citizens and law enforcement to make their community safer. Through LiveSafe, law enforcement can better identify and assess threats, prevent crimes and save lives, thus enhancing overall safety.

 

UK LiveSafe is available as a free download from iTunes or Google Play for iPhone and Android devices. The UK LiveSafe mobile app can be downloaded to smartphones in just three easy steps:

 

1.          Open Google Play or the Apple App Store on your phone. Search for "LiveSafe" and download the option with the blue shield.

2.          Tap "Sign up." Fill in your profile information and create a password.

3.          The University of Kentucky may pop-up if you are close to campus. If so, tap "Yes." Otherwise tap "Change" to select your school.

 

More information about the UK app is available at the UK Crisis Management and Preparedness website: http://www.uky.edu/EM/LiveSafe.html. More information in general about LiveSafe is available at http://www.livesafemobile.com/.

 

The mobile app company is based in Virginia and was co-founded by Virginia Tech shooting survivor Kristina Anderson. Though primarily focusing on higher education, the mobile app partners with high schools, sports arenas and the military.

Public Health Researcher Awarded Grant to Examine Lung Cancer Screening Behaviors in Appalachia

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 16:26

Lexington, Ky. (March 24, 2016) — University of Kentucky College of Public Health researcher Kate Eddens received a grant from the Kentucky Lung Cancer Research Program to investigate how social ties and communication networks influence Appalachians’ lung cancer screening behaviors.

 

Eddens, an assistant professor in the Department of Health Behavior, will examine the social models and communication networks that inform Appalachian residents’ attitudes toward lung cancer screening and cancer screening behaviors. The $150,000 grant will support the research and subsequent interventional efforts to promote discussions about lung cancer with health care providers.

 

Kentuckians experience the highest rates of lung cancer in the nation, and the disease is most prevalent in the state’s Appalachian region. According to Eddens, Appalachians rely on strong social and community networks to obtain and disperse information. In addition to measuring knowledge and attitudes about lung cancer screening and intention to screen, the study will describe community and social support networks Appalachians use to formulate attitudes and make decisions about lung cancer screening.

 

“Through this project, we hope to create effective, translational interventions that we can then implement through the natural advice and discussion networks that already exist in Eastern Kentucky communities to promote shared decision-making regarding lung cancer screening,” Eddens said. “Ultimately, this will reduce the tremendous burden of lung cancer death in Appalachian Kentucky among those at greatest risk of lung cancer.”

 

In 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services task force recommended annual lung cancer screening for high-risk adults. A new preventive procedure, lung cancer screening was approved for coverage by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in February 2015. While lung cancer screening isn’t appropriate for everyone, Eddens hopes to promote more discussions about screening among high-risk adults in Appalachia.

 

“For those of us who want to help reduce the burden of lung cancer in Kentucky, understanding how the people in an individual’s life influence what they think, feel, and do about lung cancer and lung cancer screening will help us to build the best interventions promoting discussion of screening with a health care provider,” Eddens said.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

 

PTS Program Collects More Than 2,500 Pounds of Donations for Big Blue Pantry

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 15:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 24, 2016) — Through a pilot program — Donations for Citations — University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) accepted non-perishable goods Feb. 29 thru March 11 in exchange for waiving one regular parking citation of $25 or less.

 

The program was a tremendous success. Through Donations for Citations, participants donated 2,441 pounds of food and 381 pounds of personal care items to the Big Blue Pantry — a program that serves UK students who are experiencing food insecurity or hunger.

 

“Overall, I am very impressed with the UK community. Obviously, some of the motivation for donating was getting a parking citation waived but most people went above and beyond donating the minimum,” said Chrissie Tune, PTS marketing coordinator.

 

A total of 337 individuals participated in Donations for Citations — 228 students, 77 employees and 32 visitors.

 

Manning Kulis, Big Blue Pantry student director, said Donations for Citations will benefit the pantry tremendously.

 

“The Donations for Citations program was very successful. It’s crazy to see this amount of food in one space. This food will last us the rest of the spring semester and throughout the summer when we’re open and even into next semester. Having a good startup amount in the fall will be really helpful,” Kulis said.

 

During the second week of the program, Big Blue Pantry saw a 53 percent increase in customers. Tune and Kulis hope the program helped raise awareness of the resources Big Blue Pantry provides.

 

“There were some people that I interacted with personally that didn’t know the Big Blue Pantry existed so we were able to educate them about that as a campus resource,” Tune said.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Grad Helps Return Nation's Capitol Building to Original Grandeur

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 14:21

 

Video courtesy of Architect of the Capitol.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 24, 2016) — Just a few drops.

 

In 1999, a few drops of water found their way to the rotunda floor from the upper levels of the U.S. Capitol Building.

 

Those drops would set in motion what is now known as the U.S. Capitol Dome Restoration project.

 

And the success of this multi-year, nearly $60 million dollar project will not go unnoticed, as the building will be on display to the world when the nation's 45th president is sworn into office on the building's steps in front of more than a million spectators and millions more watching the ceremony in live TV broadcasts around the globe Jan. 20, 2017.

 

Helping to ensure the dome returns to its original splendor by that fated date is Project Manager and Capitol Jurisdiction Project Executive for the Architect of the Capitol Eugene Poole Jr., a 1985 architecture graduate of the University of Kentucky and native of Hopkinsville, Kentucky.   

 

"It is an awesome honor to serve as an ambassador for the United States Capitol building and a tremendous responsibility," Poole said. "In 1985 when I was in college at UK, if anyone were to have told me that I would, (in the future), become the project manager for the iconic Dome Restoration project and be the jurisdiction executive for the U.S. Capitol building, I would have laughed and said, 'No way!'; but, here I am, and it’s simply awesome!"

 

Since 1999, several years of study and numerous pilot projects were initiated to extensively assess the overall condition of both the interior and exterior dome shells. The project design required many trade professionals and industries coming together to fully assess, vet and define the project scope requirements before initiating the design protocol and subsequently drafting the statement of work and execution. In 2008, Poole was assigned as project manager with the responsibility to manage various phases of the U.S. Capitol dome project, including the interim painting phase and the two-year Dome Restoration Design Revalidation. In 2012, he managed procurement actions for the issuance and award of the complete restoration of the U.S. Capitol dome.

 

"Our main goal was to ensure that we performed the work in a responsible manner that is consistent with industry standards while also protecting the existing historical fabric, performing great historic preservation, minimizing any impact to the daily business of Congress, and keeping the project safe for all workers and consultants," Poole said.

 

The execution of the Dome Restoration project is being accomplished in three phases:

· Exterior: Repair of existing iron exterior cracks by metal stitching, removal of 150 years of built-up paint to reveal intricate details, preparation of iron substrate, and repainting the exterior dome shell with a high performance epoxy coating system.

· Interior: Upgrading of electrical, mechanical, fire alarm, communications and lighting systems in the interstitial space of the dome.

· Rotunda: Removal of 150 years of built-up paint from the inner dome coffers to reveal the intricate and delicate details of the 1850s iron work that expresses the masterful levels of artistry during that era.

 

The project also calls for the repair of iron work, upgrading mechanical and ventilation systems, and replacing the entire rotunda lighting system with energy efficient lighting. For information on the current phase of the project, visit www.aoc.gov/dome/project-updates. To see photos of the restoration process, the dome prior to restoration and other restorations in the building's history, visit www.aoc.gov/dome/images

 

As the jurisdiction executive and project manager for the Architect of the Capitol leading the building's central project, Poole's days are hectic. He reviews construction reports; coordinates any issues with task leaders; reviews contactor submittals and provides guidance recommendations; reviews requests for information; reviews product data and samples; performs routine site inspections and observations; reviews contractor payment applications; executes and signs modifications for potential change orders; coordinates with onsite safety personnel; develops weekly and monthly reports; briefs upper level management on current project status; reviews project schedules and payment applications, as well as a myriad of other daily tasks to keep the project on track, safe and productive and maintain construction quality requirements.

 

Poole's studies and work experience made him the perfect fit to take on such a monumental restoration. His interest in architecture started early and even shaped his college choice.

 

"I chose architecture because even as a child, I was interested in the built environment. I was very curious and precocious about how things fit together and at age 12, I knew I wanted to be an architect," Poole said. "I chose the University of Kentucky because of its outstanding accredited program and world class professors, many of whom have made significant strides globally in the architecture profession and overall construction industry. The UK College of Architecture (now UK College of Design) faculty comprises a diverse and mainly eclectic group of industry professionals that both challenge and provoke the thought process while simultaneously stimulating and demanding the best personal performance of each student."

 

And while he did find time to attend the occasional UK basketball game, Poole, like many other UK architecture students who followed him, spent most of his waking hours designing and constructing models in the studio and working in the wood shop. He also recalls many of the lessons and advice faculty offered him along the way, from scholarship recommendations by then-dean, Anthony Eardley, to encouragement to explore sustainable design by Richard Levine, to lessons in how to navigate the architecture profession and educate the public from Professor Clyde Carpenter, to advice on how to manage projects from a legal perspective from John Russell Groves.

 

After graduation, Poole's architecture and Air Force ROTC studies at UK propelled him to a valuable military career in the field of design.

 

"I knew that as an officer, I could immediately assume high levels of responsibility and be exposed to cutting-edge technologies within the industry, experience networking opportunities, and realize worldwide travel which allowed me to see, experience and study different cultures and their approaches to design given their geographic locations," Poole said.

 

His military service took him throughout the United States and overseas to Guam, Japan, Korea, Saipan, England and Germany and afforded him many opportunities. "As an Air Force officer, (captain), I was an architect during my entire Air Force career and experienced an enormous level of responsibility and accountability as I managed millions of dollars of construction and executed all types of new construction, renovations, upgrades, retro-fits, demolitions, building reassignments, restorations and horizontal construction for the Department of Defense."

 

While he may have never imagined taking on leadership of the U.S. Capitol Dome Restoration project, Poole is honored to take on such an important project for an icon of U.S. history and government.

 

"The most rewarding part of my job is the visual actualization of the work being performed and the three dimensional results of those efforts. It is extremely gratifying to design a project, then, watch that project become a reality," he said. "Restoration of this historic building is the pinnacle of my professional career."

 

And Poole's advice for young architects hoping to achieve the success he has in his career?

 

"Study, study, study. Success = Preparation + Opportunity. When you strive to do your best, eventually, your hard work will be noticed. To do anything great, preparedness, commitment, passion and your total commitment to a vision principle must be in place. You must have both feet firmly planted and demand nothing less than excellence from yourself in all of your pursuits."

 

 

U.S. Capitol Dome

 

Historical Facts

January 2016

 

· The U.S. Capitol dome has 36 structural ribs on its outer shell, (cupola). Each rib is set 10 degrees apart to make up 360 degrees.

 

· The U.S. Capitol dome is made of cast iron and weighs 8,909,200 million pounds.

 

· The U.S. Capitol dome stands at 288 feet high.

 

· Abraham Lincoln was the sitting president during construction of the redesigned iron dome of the U.S. Capitol.

 

· The top of the U.S. Capitol is 209 feet lower than the Washington Monument.

 

· The custom of flying the flags 24 hours a day over the east and west fronts was begun during World War I.

 

· Thomas U. Walter designed the U.S. Capitol dome and was the architect for the House and Senate building extensions.

 

· George Washington himself laid the cornerstone for the Capitol on Sept. 18, 1793, in a Masonic ceremony. 

 

· Congress first met in the U.S. Capitol building on Nov. 17, 1800.

 

· The U.S. Capitol Building Rotunda is used for inaugurations and distinguished individuals lying in state.  

 

· The iron used to build the U.S. Capitol Dome in 1856 cost approximately $0.07 cents per pound. 

 

· There are no back doors on the U.S. Capitol building; each entrance is called a “front” entrance; there are four main fronts (north, south, east and west).

 

· The Statue of Freedom was cast in bronze. It was cast in five sections. It is 19 feet 6 inches tall. The Statue of Freedom faces “east” atop the U.S. Capitol building and weighs 15,000 pounds (7 ½ tons).

 

· The U.S. Capitol was burned by the British in the War of 1812, however, a well-timed storm put out the blaze.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Orchestra to Perform with Acclaimed Concertmaster, Violinist David Kim

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 13:58

 

David Kim performs with the El Camino Youth Symphony.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 24, 2016) — The Philadelphia Orchestra Concertmaster and violinist David Kim will perform with the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of John Nardolillo, 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 25, in the Singletary Center for the Arts. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

The concert will feature a performance with Kim of Violin Concerto in D Major (Op. 77) by Johannes Brahms. The orchestra will also perform Edward Elgar's "Enigma Variations." Leading up to the concert, Kim will also present a master class, which is free and open to the public, 7:30 p.m. tonight (Thursday), March 24, at the Singletary Center Concert Hall.

 

David Kim is an accomplished violinist who has served as the concertmaster of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1999. He began playing the violin at age three, started studying with Dorothy DeLay at age eight, and went on to obtain his bachelor's and master’s degrees from the Juilliard School. Kim appears as a soloist each season with the Philadelphia Orchestra and numerous orchestras around the world. He also appears internationally at such festivals as Grand Teton, Brevard, MasterWorks (U.S.) and Pacific (Japan).

 

Since Nardolillo took the conductor's podium of the UK Symphony Orchestra, it has enjoyed great success accumulating recording credits and sharing the stage with such acclaimed international artists as Itzhak Perlman, Lynn Harrell and Mark O'Connor, as well as the Boston Pops. In addition to its own concerts, UK Symphony Orchestra provides accompaniment for much of the UK Opera Theatre season. UK's orchestra is one of a very select group of university orchestras under contract with Naxos, the world's largest classical recording label.

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra is housed at the UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Economics of Politics is Topic of March 30 Event at Gatton

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 12:04

LEXINGTON, Ky., (March 25, 2016) — Alex Tabarrok, professor of economics at George Mason University, will deliver a talk titled, "Democracy and Voting in a Free Society: Some Economics of Politics," from 5 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 30, in the Kincaid Auditorium of the new Gatton College of Business and Economics building at the University of Kentucky. Tabarrok, who holds the Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics at the Mercatus Center and serves as director of the Center for the Study of Public Choice, also is a senior fellow at the Independent Institute.

 

Tabarrok will discuss voting systems and their many unusual and paradoxical properties. In his presentation, he recognizes the strengths and weaknesses of voting and how this may influence views about the role of democracy in a free society and in an economy.

 

Tabarrok's appearance is presented by the John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise, the BB&T Program for the Study of Capitalism and the Gatton College.

 

Admission is free and open to the public.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750.

 

Gatton Hosts Yale Prof for Discussion on Fighting Poverty

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 11:08

LEXINGTON, Ky., (March 24, 2016) — Dean Karlan, professor of economics at Yale University and founder and president of Innovations for Poverty Action, will speak at the Kincaid Auditorium in the University of Kentucky's new Gatton College of Business and Economics building on Friday, April 1. His presentation, "Pragmatic Optimism in the Fight Against Poverty," is scheduled for 3 to 4 p.m. and is expected to include a question and answer session.

 

Innovations for Poverty Action is a nonprofit organization dedicated to discovering and promoting effective solutions to global poverty problems.

 

Karlan's appearance is presented by the UK Economics Society, the Department of Economics, and the college. The Gatton College also is home to the UK Center for Poverty Research.

 

Admission to the event is free and open to the public.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:  Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750.

UK to Host Conversation About Sustainable Food Systems

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 10:16

LEXINGTON, Ky., (March 24, 2016) — Scholars, community members and students are invited to convene at the University of Kentucky April 7 for the 2016 Food Studies Symposium. The event is a cross-disciplinary conversation about sustainable food systems scholarship, research and curriculum. Participants will help shape the future of food systems studies at the university.

 

A panel discussion, “Building a Campus-wide, Multi-stakeholder Initiative/Program on Sustainability and Food Systems Studies: Learning from Our Leaders in the Field,” will be held from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. EDT Thursday, April 7, in the E. S. Good Barn, followed by a reception. The event is free and open to the public. The goal is to share current food scholarship, build collaborations, identify opportunities, stimulate research and envision an interdisciplinary foods program.

 

Invited speakers include Peggy Barlett, faculty liaison to Emory University’s Office of Sustainability Initiatives; Tom Kelly, founding executive director of the Sustainability Institute at the University of New Hampshire; and Jane Kolodinsky, former chair of the University Food System Initiative Steering Committee and chair of the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics at the University of Vermont.

 

Emory University has made sustainability a core commitment, and as faculty liaison, Barlett focuses on curriculum innovation. She has written and edited several books, including "Urban Place: Reconnection with the Natural World." Barlett holds a doctoral degree in anthropology from Columbia University.

 

Kelly, in collaboration with faculty, staff, students and members of the community, develops policies, programs and practices in biodiversity, climate, culture and food. He is co-editor and co-author of "The Sustainable Learning Community: One University’s Journey to the Future." He holds a doctoral degree in international relations from Tufts University.

 

Kolodinsky is passionate about applying the concepts of demand, consumer behavior and marketing principles to improve well-being. As a department chair, she oversees degree programs that include community entrepreneurship, applied design, green building and community design, and community development and applied economics. She holds a doctoral degree in consumer economics from Cornell University.

 

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Sustainability Challenge Grant, The Food Connection at UK and the Tracy Farmer Institute for Sustainability and the Environment. More information is available online at www.tfise.uky.edu/node/387.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324.

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: March 23, 1912

Tue, 03/22/2016 - 16:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 184th diary entry from March 23, 1912, recalls spending the night with a friend.

 

March 23rd. Spent the night with Evelyn.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Confucius Institute, Education Abroad Launch New China Seminar Grant

Tue, 03/22/2016 - 16:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2016) — In collaboration with University of Kentucky Education Abroad, the UK Confucius Institute will provide annual funding to support the development and implementation of a summer, UK faculty-directed education abroad program in China.

 

The program should be at least four weeks long and prominently feature some form of high-impact educational programming, such as undergraduate research or service-learning. Program proposals should leverage UK’s existing strengths and partnerships in China (i.e., Fudan University, East China Normal University, etc.).

 

"The idea of the Confucius Institute working with Education Abroad is brilliant and innovative," said Huajing Maske, director of the UK Confucius Institute and executive director of the Office of China Initiatives. "We are leading among our peers in benchmark universities by working together to leverage our resources and synergy, broadening and developing new programs for UK and its Chinese partners. We hope that these high-impact programs will play a significant role in enhancing learning and teaching on the UK campus and in China."

 

All travel and program development must be completed by the start of the academic year in which the program is to be offered (i.e., September for a summer program) and should intend to enroll approximately 10-12 students. Faculty members must be serving in a representative capacity of their academic unit.

 

"We’re delighted to partner with the UK Confucius Institute to develop another Education Abroad program in China, especially those programs that embed high-impact experiences," said Anthony Ogden, executive director of UK Education Abroad and Exchanges. "We’re confident that when we embed high-impact experiences in education abroad, student learning and development are enhanced."

 

The grant provides two-fold support. UK Education Abroad will provide a $2,500 program development grant to support the UK faculty member or instructor to travel to China for the purpose of establishing the proposed program. UK Confucius Institute will provide $14,000 toward the total cost of the program to lower the program fee assessed to participants.

 

Requirements

  • Applications will only be considered for new and credit-bearing programming. Previous recipients or existing programs are not automatically excluded. 
  • Applications should be for new, China-based programs of at least four weeks in duration that prominently feature some form of high-impact educational programming. Only summer, stand-alone programs are eligible.
  • Applications must be supported by a letter from the appropriate college dean or department head explaining how the project contributes to the international goals of the strategic plan of the college/unit. Matching funds are not required, but are encouraged.

Proposals will be evaluated based on different criteria including, but not limited to:

  • overall viability, academic need and sustainability of the proposed education abroad program;
  • degree to which the proposed program will promote global competency and/or have a positive impact on the overall internationalization of UK; and
  • extent to which the proposed program promotes the UK International Center’s goals for diversifying education abroad programming.

To read the complete evaluation criteria and other details, download the application form here.

 

A selection committee will evaluate all applications and make a recommendation to the Education Abroad Committee of the International Advisory Council for final determination within four to six weeks of the application deadline.

 

Deadline to submit proposals for summer 2017 programs is 5 p.m., May 1. Deadline to submit proposals for summer 2018 programs is 5 p.m., Nov. 1.

 

Questions, applications and supporting materials should be sent to Huajing Maske via email at huajing.maske@uky.edu. Faculty members are encouraged to discuss potential program ideas with UK Education Abroad prior to submission.

 

A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, UK Confucius Institute provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth. To keep up with UK Confucius Institute and future events, join the institute's listerv and follow them on FacebookTwitter and Snapchat (UKConfucius).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

May Graduates: Apply to be Undergraduate Student Speaker at Commencement

Tue, 03/22/2016 - 15:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2016) — Keeping with tradition at the University of Kentucky, an undergraduate student will be selected to speak at each of two undergraduate Commencement ceremonies, which will take place at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 8, in Rupp Arena.

 

Students interested in speaking must submit their applications by Monday, March 28.

 

To be considered, applicants must be receiving an undergraduate degree from UK at the May 8 ceremony. Additionally, the applicants must have contributed to UK through campus or community activities and through their fields of study. Applicants must also demonstrate strong public speaking skills.

 

Undergraduate students who wish to apply must submit a résumé, information sheet and a copy of their proposed speech no longer than three typed, double-spaced pages. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the selection committee. The committee may contact any applicant for a 15 minute interview and speech demonstration.

 

 Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

 

All May graduates should register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UKSGA Announces Applications for Summer Internships in D.C. and Frankfort

Tue, 03/22/2016 - 15:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2016)  The University of Kentucky Student Government Association (UKSGA) is excited to announce that applications for summer internships in Washington, D.C., and Frankfort are now available.

 

"The internships sponsored by UKSGA and so graciously provided by our state and federal officials extend the university's reach beyond the Commonwealth," said UKSGA Director of Government Relations Boone Proffitt. "They give students the opportunities to expand their worldviews while introducing them to valuable connections and lessons they can carry on post-graduation."

 

Students have the opportunity to apply for internship positions in the offices of Kentucky's U.S. senators and representatives and in Kentucky’s Office of Secretary of State. Listed below are the available internships for summer 2016. Application materials specific to each office are also linked below.

· Sen. Rand Paul

· Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-02)

· Rep. Hal Rogers (R-05)

· Rep. Andy Barr (R-06)

· Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes

 

If selected, students will receive a stipend to help defray costs of working in Washington, D.C., or Frankfort. The stipend for the D.C. internships is $1,500 and the stipend for the Secretary of State internship is $400.

 

In addition to the office-specific forms, fill out the SGA application form, and submit a résumé and cover letter (one-page each) to Boone Proffitt at government@uksga.org. You must submit all application materials (both SGA and office-specific forms) by 5 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in order to be considered. If you have any questions regarding the information above, contact Boone Proffitt at government@uksga.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Center for Research on Violence Against Women to Kick off Lecture Series Tomorrow

Tue, 03/22/2016 - 15:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2016) — Tomorrow, endowed faculty with the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW) will launch a new lecture series called "Researching Violence: A Series Addressing Research Challenges, Strategies, and Practices."

 

The first talk of the series, "Measuring Intimate Partner Violence: Problematic Assumptions and Downright Fallacies," will be given by Diane Follingstad, director and endowed chair of CRVAW, at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 24, in the James Hardymon Theater of the UK Marksbury Building. The talk is free and open to the public.

 

The endowed faculty are focused on producing excellent research designed to improve the quality of life of those affected by forms of violence that disproportionately involve women, and ultimately preventing such violence. They are also highly motivated to share their expertise and experience with others to promote research efforts in Kentucky and beyond.

 

The series will present various topics over the next two years regarding the challenges of conducting research on violence against women and strategies utilized in their research. The focus will be on conceptual and practical approaches in the field of violence against women rather than presenting research findings of specific studies. The goal is to provide information to researchers, students and organizations’ personnel that may enhance their own planning and projects. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

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