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Steltenkamp to be Honored As One of the Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 15:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) – Health Data Management, the information resource for medical and information technology (IT) professionals, executives and administrators, is honoring 75 of the Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT, which includes Dr. Carol Steltenkamp, professor of pediatrics at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and chief medical information officer (CMIO) at UK HealthCare.

 

The awards are broken into three categories: thought leaders, provider/payer executives and CIOs/IT leaders. All 75 health care providers will be honored at The Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT conference which will be held May 12 in Boston.

 

Steltenkamp is chair of the Kentucky eHealth Board which successfully launched and maintains the Kentucky Health Information Exchange (KHIE). She also is the principal investigator for more than $10 million in health care information technology (HIT) grant funding including the foundational grant establishing the Kentucky Regional Extension Center from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (HHS/ONC). 

 

As the first CMIO at UK HealthCare, Steltenkamp selected and ultimately led implementation of an electronic health record system across the clinical enterprise. She then became a leader for HIT in Kentucky and was named chair of the Kentucky eHealth Board, a position she still currently holds. Steltenkamp also has been an active volunteer member of the Health information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) for many years.

 

"Dr. Steltenkamp is a shining example of excellence within the UK HealthCare enterprise,” said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs.  

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

 

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UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Parking and Transportation Announces Student Parking Permit Sales Dates

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 14:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2015) — As announced last week, University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) will offer a wide variety of options for campus mobility for the 2016-2017 academic year. As the menu of campus transportation choices continues to improve and expand, students may find that bringing a motor vehicle to campus is not a necessity.

 

For those students who do choose to bring a motor vehicle to campus, PTS is announcing its 2016-2017 student parking permit sales calendar. The permit sales dates are staggered to provide applicants with a better customer service experience.

 

Students will be able to apply for various parking passes beginning at noon on the following dates.

June 1-June 15: Accepting commuter permit renewal applications

June 6-June 17: Accepting residential permit applications from returning students

June 16–until supply exhausted: Accepting commuter permit applications from all eligible students.

June 20-until supply exhausted: Accepting residential permit applications from all eligible students.

July 1-until supply exhausted: Accepting applications from all eligible students K permits and off-peak (formerly evening) permits.

 

PTS will communicate more information on permit application as these dates approach, in addition to parking information specific to Bluegrass Community and Technical College Cooper Campus students .

 

Eligible students are encouraged to purchase permits online at www.uky.edu/pts. Students may also purchase permits in person at Parking and Transportation Services, located at 721 Press Ave., or by mailing printable application forms.

 

For more information, visit the UK Parking and Transportation services website.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Re(cycle) Bikes with PTS Bike Donation Stations

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 14:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) —  Are you moving out of your residence hall and no longer have a need for you bicycle? Instead of leaving it behind, donate it! In partnership with University of Kentucky Recycling and their Give and Go campaign which encourages students to donate and recycle various items during move-out, UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is encouraging students to donate their unwanted bicycles instead of leaving them at the bike racks on campus.

 

Bicycle donation helps expedite the abandoned bike process and frees up space on campus bike racks. Bikes donated through this process will go to a foster care program, become a part of the Wildcat Wheel Bicycle Library or go to the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, depending on their condition.

 

Kevin Joiner of Wildcat Wheels says bike donations help provide students with the parts they need to fix their bike.

 

“When we get donations, it helps us be able to provide students with the parts they need to get back on the road again. What is even better than being able to scrap abandon bikes is when they are fixable. It is a great feeling to be able to fix up an old unused bike then see it out in the world again with a person riding,” Joiner said.

 

If you would like to donate your bike, pick up a Bicycle Donation Waiver and bike donation marker at your residence hall’s front desk. Tie the marker to your locked bike, and put the completed form and your bike lock key in an envelope and drop it in the green donation bin.

 

If you would like to keep your bike lock, drop your bike off at Wildcat Wheels, in the basement of Blazer Hall, during the following windows:

  • Monday, May 2                    4-7 p.m.
  • Tuesday, May 3                   4-7 p.m.
  • Wednesday, May 4             4-7 p.m.
  • Thursday, May 5                  4-7 p.m.
  • Friday, May 6                        noon-3 p.m.

If you choose not to participate in the Bike Donation Station and are leaving campus for the summer, remember to take your bicycle with you. Abandoned bicycles are subject to impoundment, even if they are parked in a legal bicycle space.

 

If a bicycle is impounded, the owner will have 90 days to claim it at PTS and pay all citation and impoundment fees. Bicycles unclaimed after 90 days will be disposed of in accordance with university regulations.

 

PTS identifies abandoned bicycles before impounding them, and will wait a minimum of five days before removing bicycles that have been tagged. If a student or employee who is on campus during the summer months discovers a tag on their bicycle, simply removing it will notify PTS staff that the bicycle is actively being used.

 

For more information about alternative bicycle transportation visit this website.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

U.S. Energy Secretary Moniz Visits UK for Energy Innovation Forum

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 14:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — Last week, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) hosted a Regional Energy Innovation Forum, featuring U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. The purpose of the forum was to explore the ways universities, industries, Department of Energy’s (DOE) national labs and other institutions can take full advantage of emerging energy technologies to drive regional economic development.

 

Marking a rare visit to campus by a U.S. cabinet secretary, Moniz, along with other leaders from state and local governments, DOE, industry, academia and non-governmental organizations, discussed paths forward to accelerate innovation and create regional partnerships to meet energy needs now and in the future.

 

“Innovation is at the core of what we need to do to continue productivity growth in this country to pursue our so-called ‘all of the above’ energy strategy,” Moniz said during his keynote remarks. “We are looking to link this to investable opportunities to scale the innovation system and scale the clean energy future. We all understand that coal country, coal supply chain, is under considerable stress and that’s where we think the innovation agenda is going to be absolutely central to hopefully alleviating that stress and contributing to the kind of clean energy feature that we want. So coming here, not simply to Kentucky, but coming to a university that’s so central to that coal innovation agenda, obviously makes a lot of sense.”

 

The forum featured multiple panels on innovation, job creation and the overall economic impacts of coal utilization. The panelists included top coal utilization experts from around the country. 

 

“As we all know energy utilization is an issue that does not have simple answers and it will take all of us working together to develop the energy answers of tomorrow,” said UK President Eli Capilouto in his opening remarks. “As academics, we embrace these complex problems, we make them our own. And we in higher education, if we do our jobs correctly, bring together stakeholders to not only engage in a dialogue, but to partner to provide sustainable solutions.”

 

A central theme of the meeting was the need to develop an energy innovation platform that utilizes the resources and technology specific to differing regions and resources around the country, rather than trying to develop national solutions to a complex problem.

 

“We have consistently advocated for a regional approach as key to meeting current and future energy needs,” said Rodney Andrews, director of CAER. “Bringing together industry leaders, scientists, government leaders and other thought leaders to spark a dialogue about Appalachian and Illinois Basin areas offers a path to continued innovation to utilize all of our energy resources. It is a path on which UK and CAER will be an active leader and partner.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

You're Invited to the UK Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 14:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research, along with SPUR (the Society for the Promotion of Undergraduate Research), will host the annual Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars 3 to 6 p.m. today, in Memorial Coliseum.

 

The Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars will feature over 350 undergraduates from all disciplines, along with their faculty mentors, displaying and discussing their research projects through poster, oral and creative presentations. It not only provides a great learning experience for the participants, but for the attendees as well, who gain more knowledge about the world around them, as well as the depth of undergraduate involvement in research at UK.

 

Showcase will kick off with remarks from Jay Van Doorn, president of SPUR, and Diane Snow, director of the UK Office of Undergraduate Research, followed by the presentation of the Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship and SPUR’s Faculty Mentor of the Year Awards. There will also be a performance by percussion student Alex Smith.

 

UK College of Medicine student Eseosa Ighodaro, a former UK undergraduate researcher, will serve as keynote speaker.

 

“I presented my research findings at several meetings including the National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR), the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), and the Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars,” Ighodaro said. ”With these positive enriching experiences, I decided to pursue a career as a physician-scientist in biomedical research. My undergraduate biomedical research training experiences laid the foundation for my career as a physician-scientist. I encourage all undergraduate students interested in research to take full advantage of the numerous opportunities offered to you at UK and beyond.”

 

A reception and presentations will follow the formal remarks, with poster viewing on the floor of Memorial Coliseum and oral presentations on concourses A and B. 

 

The Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars is open to the public; students, faculty and staff are highly encouraged to attend. For more information, including the program abstract, visit www.uky.edu/academy/showcase.

 

The Office of Undergraduate Research is a part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education at UK.

 

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

Faculty, Teaching Assistants Honored at 2016 Faculty Awards Ceremony

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 14:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — Provost Tim Tracy honored five faculty members and four teaching assistants with Provost's Outstanding Teaching Awards at the 2016 UK Faculty Awards Ceremony. The William B. Sturgill Award and the Albert D. and Elizabeth H. Kirwan Memorial Prize were also awarded at the ceremony. The ceremony took place Thursday, April 21, in the Lexmark Public Room in the Main Building.

 

The William B. Sturgill Award was awarded to Carl Mattacola, a professor in the rehabilitation sciences program in the College of Health Sciences.

 

The Albert D. and Elizabeth H. Kirwan Memorial Prize was awarded to Gary J. Ferland, a physics and astronomy professor in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 

Annual outstanding teaching awards recognize faculty and graduate teaching assistants who demonstrate special dedication and outstanding performance in the classroom or laboratory. Recipients were selected via nomination and reviewed by a selection committee based in the Provost's Office of Faculty Advancement.

 

Winners received cash prizes of $5,000 for regular and special title series faculty and $1,000 for teaching assistants.

 

The Outstanding Teaching Faculty Award recognized regular and special title series faculty for outstanding teaching performance. The 2015 winners are:

The Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award recognized teaching assistants for exceptional performance in the classroom or laboratory. The 2015 winners are:

  • Patrick Herald, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English
  • Alyson Hock, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology
  • Jo Mackby, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Linguistics
  • Francesco Masala, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Hispanic Studies

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Gaines Fellows' Projects Focus on Video Games, Theater

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 13:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2016) — Two current University of Kentucky Gaines Fellows, David Cole and Abby Schroering, have successfully completed their jury projects, a requirement to complete the first year of their fellowship, by creating podcasts on two culture fields with experts from right here in Lexington.

 

Cole, a junior English major from Monticello, Kentucky, has created a series of “Zen podcasts” that explore the world of video games. The podcasts, which are not heavily edited, lets the conversation of his interviews with local video game developers flow naturally. The goal for these podcasts is to showcase the developers and their video games to a larger audience and prove that Lexington is producing both high quantity and quality artistic work that very few cities of its size can claim.

 

“This Week in Video Games,” Cole's  series, is produced through the Gaines Center for the Humanities and his own website for critical writing about video games, “The Year 200X.” In the first season of the podcast, Cole entrenched himself into a community of game developers local to Lexington that have begun to make a real name for themselves. The series uses personal one-on-one interviews to explore how each of these developers got into their field and the steps they are taking to succeed without having to leave the city.

 

Schroering, a junior theatre and English major from Louisville, Kentucky, has also created a podcast series with the aim of making classical theater more accessible and entertaining to the general public. It is currently available on iTunes and Stitcher. A new episode is released every month.

 

"'Theater Classics of the World,’ or 'Theater Cow,' for short, focuses on a different classical play each episode. The first season investigates ‘Oedipus Rex,’ ‘Macbeth,’ ‘Tartuffe,’ ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ and ‘The Cherry Orchard’ through plot summaries, dramatic readings and expert interviews. The first season features several professors and performers from UK,” Schroering said.

 

Cole’s and Schroering’s jury projects are part of the John R. and Joan B. Gaines Fellowship in the Humanities. The focus of a Gaines Fellow's jury project is local and immediate: the conception and presentation of a project that might enhance the civic culture of Lexington or the fellow's hometown. Junior Fellows work on their jury projects for several months, making final proposals in the middle of their spring semester.

 

The Gaines Fellowship in the Humanities, part of the UK Academy for Undergraduate Excellence in the UK Division of Undergraduate Education, is a one-of-a-kind undergraduate program designed to enrich the undergraduate experience in the humanities in a culture where science and technology are increasingly dominating. The fellowships are awarded in recognition of an outstanding academic performance, a demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, an interest in public issues and a desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Students Create Murals For New Residence Halls

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 13:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — Six University of Kentucky students were recently selected by a panel of judges from UK Housing partner Education Realty Trust (EdR) to have their artwork featured in two new campus residence halls. Students were given specific colors and themes and instructed to submit one of more designs to be judged.

 

The winning designs were created by six architecture and interiors students in the UK College of Design. Those winning designers are:

  • Lucas Brown, an interiors senior from Ashland, Kentucky, who created a design for Limestone Park II;
  • Lauren Delventhal, an architecture junior from Lexington, who created a design for Limestone Park I;
  • Cara Kruse, an interiors sophomore from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who created a design for Limestone Park I;
  • Felicia Perkins, an architecture junior from Owen County, Kentucky, who created a design for Limestone Park I;
  • Thomas Ramirez, an architecture junior from Moreno Valley, California, who created a design for Limestone Park II; and
  • Mallory Stein, an interiors junior from Edgewood, Kentucky, who created a design for Limestone Park I.

The student designers were excited to get a chance to leave their own creative mark on the university, and they welcomed the opportunity to compete. "I thought it would be a great way to add student artwork to the university. I also thought it would be a great opportunity because I have never submitted my artwork to a competition before," Cara Kruse said.

 

Lucas Brown is an old hat at the competition. This will be the third mural by the graphic designer selected to adorn a UK wall. His newest winning mural design has UK in the center of various colored shapes and is meant to reflect the campus life and student spirit found at UK.

 

"To me, those things involve excitement, diversity, fun and change, which are all elements I tried to evoke within my mural while keeping UK the main focus of the design," Brown said. "The shapes are meant to seem as if they are moving, and the colors and variation of shapes symbolize diversity and excitement."

 

Lauren Delventhal's mural concept is also centered around the sense of school spirit on campus. Delventhal uses cheerleaders in her image to display this spirit and to show support of the university, but she hopes viewers interpret the cheerleaders in her image in a broader sense that includes all members of the campus community and even Big Blue Nation.

 

"From growing up in Lexington, I was already familiar with the Big Blue Nation's spirit. It was like a buzz of excitement you could feel throughout the city. When I came to campus, that buzz was even more evident," Delventhal said. "I think many students would agree that this encouragement does not only occur on the sidelines of sporting events, but is also felt from professors, staff and students here at UK. I want people to look at this image and feel like they can get through their next tough exam or hard project because they have the Big Blue Nation behind them cheering them on."

 

To make Cara Kruse's mural something that people would remember, she decided to make a simple and bold image that had a clear message. Kruse wanted her work to represent Kentucky and the culture of the state and chose to create an abstract image of horse racing.

 

"I started by thinking about things that reminded me of Kentucky as a state and also things that I had experienced as a student at the University of Kentucky. The first thing that came to mind was horse racing and the culture that it brings to the state," Kruse said. "I found an iconic image of American Pharaoh racing and decided that is what I would use as inspiration for my mural. I decided to create an abstract image that made the image timeless because it could represent any era of horse racing."

 

Felicia Perkins chose to depict the university's beloved Wildcat in a new way in her mural as a nod to the evolution of the university and its iconic imagery.

 

"With UK's current rebranding I wanted to create something that combined aspects of UK's old identity with the CMYK theme that we were given. The Wildcat has always been UK's iconic mascot and its representation is ever changing so I chose this to be the focal point of my mural," Perkins said.

 

Thomas Ramirez selected a visual image related to campus that is also recognizable to all members of the UK community. His work depicts the university's two towering residence halls. He hopes his work will help viewers imagine things in a new and fun way.

 

"The mural is an homage to the Kirwan and Blanding Towers on campus. It takes the existing dorms and introduces a new arrangement of forms to change the scale and appearance of the buildings. To me, it makes me think of a big jungle gym," Ramirez said.

 

Like Perkins and Ramirez, Mallory Stein also picked an image specific to campus life at UK. Her mural depicts an early evening spent watching the Wildcats at Commonwealth Stadium with an image of the field, the stands and a Jumbotron from one of the endzones.

 

All the designers were thrilled to have the opportunity to have their work featured in a student residence hall, and to be part of this competition that provided $500 to each winner.

 

"It's an honor to have new incoming students to see my work and appreciate UK's efforts to create fun and creative spaces for them," Brown said. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 27, 1912

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 10:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 208th diary entry from April 27, 1912, recalls how McClure spent the day with her friends and a house meeting being called by the senior girls at Patterson Hall.

 

Apr. 27th. Addie and I go to town in the afternoon. She is white as to the extremities, and "thin" too. I write an announcement on the bulletin board in the name of the Senior girls, and we have a "housemeeting" in the abuse of the authorities. We express our opinions and at least show how we stand. Later Mamie McCann, Phyllis, Addie, and I take in the Colonial where we stay for a second "big black crow in the sycamore tree", then the Princess where the cavalry horses splash water on us, and the fire department splashes water on Haus and Fritz. Jessie Mit and Phyllis spend the night.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Police Department Issues Crime Bulletin for Strong Arm Robbery on Campus

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 02:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Police Department has issued the following Crime Bulletin.

 

In the interest of safety, University of Kentucky Police Department has issued a Crime Bulletin for the UK community.

 

  • At approximately 12:15 a.m. Tuesday, April 26, 2016, a strong arm robbery was reported to have occurred in the area of Good Samaritan Hospital at South Limestone and Maxwell.  The female victim was smoking, when the unidentified suspect approached her from behind and pushed her to the ground and took her cell phone. The suspect fled the scene and was described as a black male, approximately 50 years old, 5’7”, thin build, with short hair and wearing a blue shirt.  The victim was not a student.

 

University of Kentucky Police Department has issued this Crime Bulletin for the UK community in compliance with the “Timely Notice” provision of the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998.

 

If anyone has any information regarding this incident, please contact UK Police at 859-257-8573.

 

The University of Kentucky values a safe community for all students, staff, faculty, and visitors. In the interest of promoting a safe and secure campus environment, UK Police offer the following safety precautions:

  • If you see something, say something. For emergencies, call 911.
  • Carry a cell phone to be able to call for help in emergencies.
  • Do not travel alone after dark; walk with a friend or with a group. 
  • Whenever possible, look out for your friends when you go out together; walk together and make sure that everyone gets home safely.
  • Download and use the LiveSafe Application
  • Request a FREE SAFECATS student safety escort or coordinate after-hours on-demand bus service during the fall and spring semesters by calling (859) 257-SAFE(7233).
  • Park in well-lit areas when possible.
  • Turn over any requested items (purse, wallet, etc).
  • Make statements with authority – “BACK-OFF! STOP! NO-WAY!” You deserve to be respected.

 

 

Barnstable Brown Kentucky Derby Eve Gala Announces Celebrity Lineup

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 16:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) – The Barnstable Brown Kentucky Derby Eve Gala, benefiting the Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center at the University of Kentucky, will be 8 p.m., Friday, May 6 in Louisville. 

 

The celebrity packed gala, known for its musical extravaganza, has raised and donated approximately $11.2 million to the center at UK over the past nine years.

 

Internationally recognized as the “premier” Kentucky Derby gala and counted among the “Ten Best Parties in the World” by Condé Nast, the celebrity lineup for the 28th annual gala will include:

 

· Kid Rock

· Alabama Shakes

· Kate Upton

· Megyn Kelly

· Aaron Rodgers

· Lindsey Vonn

· Boyz II Men

· Jon Voight

· Johnny Galecki (Big Bang Theory)

· Stephen Amell

· Taylor Kinney

· Robert Herjavec (Shark Tank) and Kym Johnson (Dancing with the Stars)

· Brian McKnight

· Richie Sambora and Orianthi

· Elin Nordgren 

· Jordan Smith (Winner of The Voice)

· Terri Clark

· Tanya Tucker

· Travis Tritt

· Gretchen Wilson

· Liam McIntyre

· Gayle King

· Clay Walker

· Mary Wilson

· Montgomery Gentry

· Bode Miller

· Joey Fatone

· Taylor Dayne

· Sean Payton (Head Coach of New Orleans Saints)

· Teddy Bridgewater (Minnesota Vikings QB, formerly of University of Louisville)

· Star Jones

· Ray J

· Randall Cobb (Green Bay Packers, formerly of University of Kentucky)

· Clay Matthews (Green Bay Packers)

· Marshawn Lynch (Seattle Seahawks)

· Carson Kressley

· University of Kentucky Basketball Stars:

o Tyler Ulis

o Alex Poythress

o Jamal Murray

o Skal Labissiere

· University of Louisville Basketball Stars:

o Trey Lewis

o Damion Lee

· D'Angelo Russell (Los Angeles Lakers)

· Terrence Jones (Houston Rockets)

· Nerlens Noel (Philadelphia 76ers)

· Jay Williams (ESPN, former Duke and NBA basketball player)

· Julius Randle (Los Angeles Lakers, formerly of University of Kentucky)

· Devin Booker (Phoenix Suns, formerly of University of Kentucky) and his father, retired NBA player Melvin Booker

· Crystal Taliefero (Billy Joel Band Member)

· Charissa Thompson (EXTRA)

· Russ Smith (Memphis Grizzles, formerly of University of Louisville)

· Luke Hancock (University of Louisville basketball)

 

The star-studded bash is held at the Louisville home of Patricia Barnstable Brown, who co-hosts the event with her twin sister Priscilla Barnstable. The gala was founded by the twins, along with Patricia’s late husband Dr. David E. Brown. 

                                                                         

Media inquiries: Chris Barnstable-Brown, chris.barnstable.brown@gmail.com and Corky Coryell, ccoryell@wyattfirm.com

"see blue." #selfie: Chanel Friday

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 16:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie  a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, a 2016 founding member of a the new Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority Inc., Chanel Friday.

 

Friday is a senior ISC major from Kennewick, Washington. Last month, Friday saw a vision she had for a different kind of sorority come to life  the Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority Inc. Friday is involved in numerous organizations around the University of Kentucky, ranging from 4 Paws for Ability to UK 101 peer instructing. Get to know this focused, compassionate and valiant leader in her "see blue." #selfie!  

 

UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

Chanel Friday: I am a senior and my major is integrated strategic communication.

 

UK: Where are you from?

CF: Kennewick, Washington.

 

UK: Tell me about your position in Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority Inc.

CF: I'm actually just a regular member now since we had elections for the upcoming year. I'll be an alum since I'm graduating. I am one of two pioneer founding members! The other is Julia Vega! 

 

UK: When did you have the vision for founding this sorority at UK?

CF: My sophomore year — so spring 2013! That's when Julia and I had the thought to start a new greek organization. We officially made contact with nationals fall of 2013.

 

UK: What makes you so passionate about this sorority? 

CF: I am passionate about it because I believe in all their tenants — scholarship, service, sisterhood, leadership and multiculturalism. I am especially passionate about the multicultural aspect of the sorority because I feel like its something the university needed to bridge the gap between a lot of cultures on campus.

 

UK: How many other school have this sorority?

CF: There are 36 chapters on various university campuses. We also have 24 graduate, alumnae and professional chapters across the states.

 

UK: What else are you involved in? 

CF: I am the overall leadership director at the Visitor's Center and a tour guide. I'm a Johnson Center facility manager and a UK 101 peer instructor. I did SeeBlueU orientation, I am the co-homecoming chair for STAT/Team Wildcat and also fostering my second 4 Paws for Ability dog, Apex. 

 

UK: Since you're also a tour guide at the Visitor's Center, what has been one experience that stands out to you when you think back on all the tours you've given of campus?

CF: It was Valentine’s Day and I knew my dad was going to be on campus. I told him a few days before that I had a tour at 10 a.m. We were passing through Maxwell Place and I saw my dad’s car parked outside. I was stopping to talk about Dr. Capilouto and the work he has done for the university. I could see my group starting to smile. I turned around and my dad was walking towards me with flowers and a huge stuffed owl. It was kind of embarrassing but definitely something I’ll never forget. I had to carry the owl and flowers the rest of my tour. My tour group thought it was cute!

 

UK: How long does it take you to get ready in the morning?

CF: Are we talking Monday, Wednesday and Friday? I usually have more time then, so like 45 minutes. Tuesday and Thursdays I have class at 9:30 a.m., so I like to sleep later and give myself 15-20 minutes. That also includes getting my dog ready for the day.

 

UK: What is your biggest fear? 

CF: I don't like masked creatures or scary movies! Halloween is a tough time for me. I don’t do scary movies, no thank you!

 

UK: If you had a memoir about your life, what would the title be? 

CF: Hot Mess.

 

UK: If you could have a super power, what would it be?

CF: I ask my tours this every week! I stole this from one of the students — the ability to pull anything out of my pocket. Anything you needed. I thought that would be cool as a super power!

 

UK: If you could make anything a national holiday, what would it be?

CF: National Pet an Owl Day because owls are my favorite animal!

 

UK: Since it's dead week and finals are coming up, where are you going to be studying? 

CF: I will probably be between Willy T and different Starbucks locations around Lexington. I switch it up for different scenery. Last round of finals — can’t wait!

 

UK: What is your go-to dance move?

CF: I just do what Drake does in Hotline Bling. Just feel it!

 

UK: What are the top three played songs on your iTunes list? 

CF: “Work" by Rihanna, "Grove Street Party" by Waka Flocka and "How Deep is Your Love" by Calvin Harris.

 

UK: If you could witness any event in history what would it be? 

CF: Anything to do with the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr.…I would like to hear one of his speeches.

 

UK: What would you do if you won a million dollars? 

CF: First, I would put some into savings and then I would buy my parents anything they wanted … house, cars, anything. I would give back to them. I would put some away for my children’s college fund and donate to UK College of Communication because Gatton is cool, but the College of Communication is awesome, too! Then I would donate some to various charities and I would travel.

 

UK: What is one word or phrase you're guilty of saying too often?

CF: "And things like that" or “does that make sense?"

 

UK: What would you tell an incoming freshman? 

CF: I think that one piece of advice I would pass on would be to never be afraid to ask for help. I have found that when I ask the outcome is always 100 times better than me trying to suffer through it on my own. If you genuinely need help, don’t be afraid to ask for it.

 

UK: You are happiest when…

CF: It's a nice day and everything is going right with your day — your friends are good ... life is great!

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

 

May Graduates: Register for Commencement by Friday, April 29

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 16:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — May graduates: the deadline to register for the May 8 University of Kentucky Commencement ceremonies is quickly approaching!

 

Students who plan to participate in the Commencement ceremonies should register at www.uky.edu/Commencement by Friday, April 29. After that, students who have not registered will not be guaranteed to have their names appear on the screen during the ceremonies as they walk across the stage.

 

The May 2016 Commencement ceremonies will take place at the following times:

  • 9 a.m. — First Undergraduate Ceremony featuring the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; Gatton College of Business and Economics; College of Education; College of Engineering; and College of Nursing
  • 2 p.m. — Second Undergraduate Ceremony featuring the College of Arts and Sciences; College of Communication and Information; College of Design; College of Fine Arts; College of Health Sciences; College of Public Health; and College of Social Work
  • 7 p.m. — Graduate and Professional Ceremony

For more information, visit the Commencement FAQs page.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

 

College of Education Prepares Graduates for Life After UK

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 16:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — Elementary education majors poised to graduate from the University of Kentucky College of Education will soon begin the process of finding a teaching position. Several Lexington principals and school leaders recently played a role in helping the students prepare.

 

A seminar was held at Veterans Park Elementary where students learned about the application and interview process from Amy McVey, principal of Veterans Park, and Cindy Godsey, human resources associate director at Fayette County Public Schools.

 

The students then broke into smaller groups to participate in mock interviews with principals who had volunteered their time.

 

"I hope the student teachers gained some insight into what is sometimes a scary and intimidating process," said Jennifer Hutchison, principal of Picadome Elementary. "Hopefully, by asking us questions about the process, we can lessen the anxiety so they can relax and be themselves during the interview process."

 

Hutchison said she looks for a growth mindset, the ability to get along well with others and leadership skills when she interviews candidates.

 

Joni Meade, an elementary education instructor who organized the event, said she hears from principals that the mock interviews are not only beneficial to the UK students, but also to the principals in getting to meet so many new candidates.

 

The seminar was not the students’ first contact with area schools. They spend many hours at various schools during observations, practicums, volunteer opportunities and student-teaching.

 

“Many students visit our school from the College of Education,” Hutchison said. “I feel a responsibility to provide them the opportunity to develop their craft and to demonstrate to them how an effective school operates and good teachers teach. I want them to see what it takes to be a teacher in today’s society. I want the students who leave my school to say ‘that is a place I want to work.’”

 

Several students provided feedback about the applications and interviews seminar:

 

"With our graduation from UK's College of Education fast approaching, it was helpful to be able to talk with local principals and other school officials about what they are looking for in new teachers," Sarah-Kate Vaught said. "They were all very encouraging and were willing to answer any questions we had. I learned several new tips to remember as I begin looking for jobs."

 

Laryssa Oldham said, “I would like to share how helpful today was! The University of Kentucky College of Education gives us all of the tools necessary to thrive and succeed in the field of education. It feels great to have the support from our mentors and the community of the program behind us as we go from student to teacher. I am thrilled to begin my journey after graduation and the interviewing and hiring session gave me the confidence I need to find my place in the district. I am so thankful to be a part of the education program at UK!”

 

“Today was extremely beneficial for all of us who are graduating in the hopes of getting a job for next year,” Rachel Allen said. “It was nice to be able to ask questions to administration from all over the county and practice for a real interview.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

Team Race Assured Finished in the Money at Idea State U Finals

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 15:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky’s student entrepreneur team Race Assured placed fourth at the Idea State U finals competition this past weekend at the Griffin Gate Marriott in Lexington. The team of Julia Fabiani, an undergraduate in equine science and physiology; Stefanie Pagano, a graduate student in biomedical engineering; and Ben Martin, a graduate student in finance and agricultural economics, received $7,500 for their win in the business plan category.

 

Three additional UK teams that also qualified with wins at regionals competed at finals, which included presenting their business plan or model to a panel of judges, a written proposal, marketing video, display and elevator pitch. The Kentucky Office of Entrepreneurship, part of the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, oversees Idea State U.

 

The Race Assured team presented a business plan for a blood test, which can potentially predict injuries in horses well before serious problems occur. The team also won the Georgia Bowl intercollegiate entrepreneurship competition hosted by Georgia Tech.

 

UK Venture Challenge winner Caitlin Halliwell, a senior in equine business management and merchandising graduate Allison Burke with Serandu Custom Riding Boots, presented their plan for a customized equestrian boot using 3-D scanning. 

 

Ultimate Angler, including pharmaceutical sciences doctoral candidate Jarrod Williams, and MBA candidates Alan Sparkman and Mike Rudy, is a website to better connect professional fishing guides with their potential clients.

 

Computer engineering sophomores Andrew Dharamsey and Cassady Ritter, who placed second in UK Venture Challenge, presented the Talkables smart pet collar that enables one's pet to communicate with you at strategic places throughout the home.

 

UK’s student entrepreneur teams are mentored and coached through the UK Venture Challenge annual competition and the Venture Studio Bootcamp. Venture Challenge is part of iNET in the College of Communication and Information. Venture Studio Bootcamp is part of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network, in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Goldstein Drafts Editorial on Carotid Artery Screening for JAMA Internal Medicine

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 15:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) – An editorial by University of Kentucky’s Dr. Larry Goldstein concerning the use of screening tests to detect narrowing of the carotid artery was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine last week.

 

With more than 35 years of practice, Goldstein is the chair of the Department of Neurology at the UK College of Medicine and co-director of the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute.

 

Practice guidelines developed by professional societies to screen for narrowings in this major artery supplying blood to the brain are intended to summarize the best available evidence for specific questions to support clinical decisions.  However, noted Goldstein, guideline recommendations from different organizations or groups can vary in minor or substantial ways.  

 

"Evidence-based medicine is a linchpin of contemporary clinical practice,” said Goldstein. "However, these disparities among guidelines can lead to considerable uncertainty and variability in clinical practice."

 

According to Goldstein's editorial, screenings for carotid disease are offered in a variety of settings, yet there is no validated proof showing it is useful for identifying those in the general population who do or do not have a clinically important ACAS. There is a high proportion of carotid imaging studies performed for uncertain indications.

 

Goldstein wrote that “[S]creening for a disease or condition is rational only if its identification has a meaningful impact on patient management."  In the case of narrowing of the carotid artery that is not associated with symptoms, the best approach is currently uncertain.   “Specific educational programs, the use of alerts embedded into the electronic health record and audits with feedback, among other interventions, may be helpful in reducing inappropriate testing.” 

 

Knowing the dilemmas that they are now facing, it can be difficult for physicians to understand when it is appropriate to recommend testing.  Issues facing clinicians include:

·       How can inconsistent guidelines be balanced?

·       How are these complicated issues being presented and discussed with patients who look to their clinician for guidance?

·       Should a screening test be performed in the face of equivocal, limited, or conflicting data regarding the intervention that would be considered if the condition was detected?

·       To what degree should the potential for false-positive or false-negative test results and the attendant need for confirmatory testing be factored into the decision?

 

According to Goldstein, "despite the available evidence from randomized trials and practice guidelines, decisions regarding whether to proceed with testing are often a matter of informed opinion."   

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

World Music Concert Transports Audiences From Kentucky to Southeast Asia

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 14:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — Join the University of Kentucky School of Music for an evening of world music and dance from Kentucky, Africa and Southeast Asia at the UK World Music Concert beginning 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 28, in the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

The UK World Music concert always represents music and dance from multiple continents, and this semester’s show follows that tradition!

 

This spring’s concert will open with the UK Bluegrass Ensemble, led by Ellyn Washburne, who will play traditional Appalachian, gospel and folk favorites including “Shuckin’ the Corn” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” Next, Endras Tia Fadhilah will perform “Tari Ngarojeng,” an Indonesian dance that is widely performed in the outskirts of Jakarta. Another performance will feature esteemed visiting UK School of Music faculty member Thomas Turino with the Mbira Wildcats, who will play traditional Zimbabwean mbira music. Then, the audience will be transported to China with an erhu duet by Elaine Cook and Elizabeth Yanarella, a guzheng and erhu duet featuring Elaine Cook and Qi Yu, and a guzheng solo by Qi Yu.

 

Randy Raine-Reusch plays a few of the 700 world instruments from his collection.

 

The concert will also feature several visiting performers. Canadian composer and performer Randy Raine-Reusch, who specializes in East and Southeast Asian wind and string instruments, will present demonstration-performances of the Thai khaen and Sarawaian keluri. From Illinois, honored guests Jiaqi Li, Pei-Han Lin and Jui-Ching Wang will play several traditional Chinese pieces on xiao, dizi and piano. Also Northern Illinois University's Northern Wind Trio will feature the throat singing and horse-head fiddle talents of Tamir Hargana, the guitar skills of Zac Economou, and percussionist Aaron Marsala’s artistry on hand pan and didgeridoo.

 

A performance by Northern Wind Trio.

 

The concert will conclude with a rousing fusion finale that will include a number of the artists listed above. Don’t miss this exciting evening of performances from all around the globe!

 

For more information about these events, call 859-257-4912 or email Erin Walker, lecturer of world music, at ewalk@uky.edu.

 

The UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 26, 1912

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 13:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 207th diary entry from April 26, 1912, recalls McClure and her friend Phyllis waiting out a storm in hopes of going to see Tap Day exercises, annual rituals done by senior societies on campus.

 

April 26th. Phyllis and I want to go see Tap Day exercises, but it storms and we come home, after which it storms still worse.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK, Department of Education Recognize Female High School Students for Computing Achievements

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 13:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) — As part of an effort to encourage more young women to choose careers in technology, the University of Kentucky and the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) together with the Department of Education's Student Technical Leadership Program (STLP) recognized 13 female high school students for their accomplishments and aspirations in computing and technology. The award ceremony took place Friday, April 22, at Rupp Arena in Lexington. 

 

One high school educator, Patty Stinson from South Warren High School in Bowling Green, Kentucky, was also recognized for her efforts in encouraging her students. 

 

The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing is a program of the NCWIT, a coalition of over 450 universities, corporations and organizations dedicated to increasing the meaningful participation of women in computing. The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing was created to acknowledge the computing aspirations of young women, introduce them to leadership opportunities in the field, and generate visibility for women’s participation in computing-related pursuits. Award winners were selected for their outstanding aptitude and interest in computing and desire to pursue computing-related studies of occupations.

 

The NCWIT Aspirations in Computing program is sponsored nationally by Apple, AT&T, Bank of America, Bloomberg, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Intel, Microsoft and Qualcomm with additional support from Google, Intel, Motorola Solutions Foundation, Symantec and Northrop Grumman.

 

The Kentucky area 2016 winners are:

  • Annika Avula, Bowling Green High School
  • Elizabeth Brumfield, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School
  • Rachael Buckel, Mercy Academy
  • Hallie Carter, Fulton City High School
  • Allyson Douglas, South Warren High School
  • Nada Kaissieh, Thomas Nelson High School 
  • Eileen Price, Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science
  • Sarah Schwartz, DuPont Manual High School
  • Haleigh Snapp, George Rogers Clark High School
  • Symone Whalin, Larue County High School
  • Daniela Zieba, Sayre School
  • Marissa Kappel, Larue County High School (runner-up)
  • Allanah McBride, Kentucky School for the Deaf (runner-up)

“These awards are very important as they honor high school women for their computing-related achievements," said Sue Scheff, chair of the Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative project. "We strive to increase girls’ interest in the STEM fields, especially computer science where in 2012 only 18 percent of computer and information science undergraduate degrees nationally were awarded to women.”

 

UK, STLP and the NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing together represent a collaborative effort by dedicated volunteers. Find out more at www.ncwit.org.

 

For information on the Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative, visit http://kgsc.org

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

 

Survive the Night/Roll for the Cure to Benefit Markey Cancer Center

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 13:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2016) – This June, taking your bike for a ride could help save lives.

 

UK HealthCare and the Lexington Cancer Foundation are teaming up to present the Survive the Night Triathlon and the Roll for the Cure on June 17-18. All proceeds from these events will benefit the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, providing funding for patient care, research and more.

 

Survive the Night is a unique overnight triathlon relay created by Markey radiation oncologist Dr. Jonathan Feddock, who is also an avid triathlete himself. Participants will swim, bike and run for a combined 140.7 miles. Participants can choose to compete solo or put together a team of up to 10 people to complete the relay.

 

Roll for the Cure is the Lexington Cancer Foundation's annual bike event to raise awareness and funds for cancer care. Participants can choose the length of their ride: 95, 50, 35, or 10 miles through Kentucky Horse Farms, or a short Family Fun ride around Commonwealth Stadium. The longer rides will include rest stops at Buffalo Trace and Woodford Reserve.

 

Survive the Night begins Friday, June 17 at 7:30 p.m. beginning at Commonwealth Stadium on the UK campus. Registration is $450 per team through April 30 and $500 per team thereafter until May 30.  

 

Roll for the Cure will also begin at Commonwealth Stadium, starting on Saturday, June 18 with the 95- and 50-mile rides at 8 a.m. The 30- and 10-mile rides will begin at 10 a.m. and the Family Fun ride begins at 11 a.m. Registration for the longer rides is $75 and the Family Fun ride is $10.

 

For more information or to register for Survive the Night or Roll for the Cure, visit lexingtoncancerfoundation.org.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

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