MenuMenu

Campus News

'see blue.' on Two Wheels During 4th Annual Bike Week

Fri, 04/08/2016 - 10:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 11, 2016) — The University of Kentucky will celebrate its fourth annual Bike Week April 11-16 as part of Earth Days in the Bluegrass. Bike Week is presented by the UK Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) and Parking and Transportation Services (PTS).

 

Bike Week includes seven events throughout the week, as well as an interactive photo-based scavenger hunt. Events throughout Bike Week will educate students, faculty and staff about seeing blue on two wheels at UK, which has been designated as a Silver level Bicycle Friendly University.

 

“Since its beginnings in 2013, Bike Week has grown to include events that educate, encourage and celebrate bicycling amongst our campus community,” said Chrissie Tune, PTS marketing specialist and BAC education chair. “The week has something for everyone, whether they are interested in learning about campus bike resources and programs or whether they are a passionate cyclist looking to get more involved.”

 

The week’s schedule is:

  • All Week - Ride and Seek, Sustainability-Style
  • 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday, April 11 - Get Your DIY On! Fix-It Station Demonstrations
  • 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, – Periscope with a Bike Mechanic
  • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday, April 13 – Bike to Campus Day and On-the-Spot Safety Checks (rain date: April 20)
  • 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14 - Tour de Downtown Art
  • 7 p.m. Friday, April 15 - Bike-In Movie: The Late Night Film Series Presents "Freeheld"
  • 10 p.m. Friday, April 15 - Bike-In Movie: The Late Night Film Series Presents"The Hateful Eight"
  • 9 a.m. Saturday, April 16 – Donut Tour on Two Wheels

All Bike Week events are free. However, participants in either of the week’s group rides must sign up in advance, and riders on the Donut Tour on Two Wheels are responsible for purchasing their own donuts.

 

For more information about Bike Week, visit www.uky.edu/pts/bac/bike_week. To learn more about bicycling on campus, check out the PTS alternative transportation information here.

 

As a reminder, bicycles may only be parked at bicycle racks — located at all residence halls, classroom buildings and throughout campus.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Explores Central Kentucky's Ancient Trees

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 16:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today's program takes us outside to chat with Tom Kimmerer, formerly with the UK Department of Forestry and now a University Press of Kentucky author and chief scientist with a nonprofit group dedicated to the conservation of ancient trees in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/deep-roots-conversation-tom-kimmerer.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK to Host U.S.-China Forum on Applied Communication

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 15:45
LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 11, 2016) — The University of Kentucky will hold a U.S.-China forum for administrators and highly accomplished researchers in various subfields of applied communication from several universities in the United States and China from April 13-15, on UK’s campus.

 

The forum, which will promote academic conversations and explore research collaborations, will be co-chaired by Zixue Tai and Kevin Real, associate professors in the UK College of Communication and Information (UK CI); hosted by Dan O’Hair, dean of UK CI; and organized by Tai.

 

Discussions at the forum will surround topics like journalism and mass communication, political communication, civic communication, crisis communication, new media and virtual reality, health communication and media entrepreneurship.

 

This event will gather researchers from UK's CI, College of Arts and Sciences and College of Medicine, and host leading scholars from Indiana University, George Mason University, University of South Carolina, University of Alabama, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

Many prominent Chinese media and communication scholars who will be at the forum represent universities like Tsinghua University, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhejiang University, Jilin University, Beijing Normal University, Communication University of China and Guangxi University. Among these seven universities, six are distinguished as top 10 journalism and communication programs in China.

 

The applied communication forum is being presented by UK CI and the Confucius Institute. 

 

A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, UK Confucius Institute provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth. To keep up with UK Confucius Institute and future events, join the institute's listerv and follow them on FacebookTwitter and Snapchat (UKConfucius).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK BGPSA Receives MOSAIIC Award at Berea College Conference

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 15:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) — This week, several University of Kentucky students and administrators attended a conference at Berea College Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education. The conference, "Dialogue on Race and Education in the 21st Century," engaged participants in a dialogue on topics such as community policing, immigration and education, and racial politics in America.

 

The three-day event included panel sessions, plenary speakers, presentations and an awards luncheon.

 

The 2016 Multicultural Opportunities, Strategies and Institutional Inclusiveness Consortium (MOSAIIC) Awards Luncheon was held Wednesday, April 6, at Woods-Penniman Commons at Berea College.

 

MOSAIIC was organized by Charlene Walker, vice president of Bluegrass Community and Technical College Office of Multiculturalism and Inclusion. The consortium consists of eight Kentucky colleges who support each other in efforts to raise awareness of opportunities and strategies needed to promote inclusive college working and learning environments.

 

The University of Kentucky Black Graduate and Professional Student Association (BGPSA) was awarded one of this year’s three MOSAIIC awards.

 

“We are honored to have been awarded the MOSAIIC Award. Our MOSAIIC Award not only recognizes our efforts but the efforts of all the students that contributed to the success of the #UKCalltoAction Town Hall event,” said Erica Littlejohn, president of BGPSA. “We are grateful that our African/African-American peers trusted us to share their stories and to give black voices a platform to express their concerns about the current racial climate at UK.”

 

The MOSAIIC Award is presented to an organization, student, faculty, staff or community member who has shown a true commitment to diversity and inclusion in their communities and/or workplace.

 

“This award reinforces that our black voices are sufficient to call for change on UK campus and that our concerns do not have to be validated by other student groups before they are taken seriously,” said Ese Ighodaro, vice president of BGPSA. “We thank the Multicultural Opportunities, Strategies and Institutional Inclusiveness Consortium of Kentucky for hearing us and acknowledging our efforts.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Spanish Pianist Jordi Camell's Concert to Showcase Music from the Mediterranean

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 15:18

 

 

Jordi Camell playing Fantasia in C Major.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky School of Music will present award-winning pianist Jordi Camell in a concert featuring music from the Mediterranean Sea. The concert will begin 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in room 107 (former Tuska Gallery) in the Fine Arts Building. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

As part of the concert program, Camell will perform a variety of works by several pianists and composers from the Mediterranean region including Spanish musicians Isaac Albéniz, Frederic Mompou and Pau (Pablo) Casals and French musician Francis Poulenc. It will also include music from celebrated Spanish pianist and composer Enrique Granados on the centenary of his death.

 

Camell, a pianist with an extended professional career, is a lively musician open to all styles of music. He received his training in Tarragona, Barcelona, Paris and London. He recently performed his first solo show, "X-Ray, Radiography of an Interior Landscape." Camell is professor of piano and head of the Department for Classical and Contemporary Music at the Catalan Music University Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya.

 

During Camell's visit, he will also offer a master class at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in room 17 of the Fine Arts Building. This class is also free and open to the public.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Engineering's Hilt Inducted into AIMBE College of Fellows

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 13:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) — On April 4, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) inducted J. Zach Hilt, the William Bryan Professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, to its College of Fellows.

 

Membership in the College of Fellows consists of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers in the country. Hilt was elected by peers and members of the college for pioneering contributions to bionanotechnology, specifically the development of nanocomposite hydrogels as remotely controlled biomaterials and analyte-responsive drug delivery systems.

 

The formal ceremony took place during AIMBE’s 25th Annual Meeting at the National Academy of Sciences Great Hall in Washington, D.C.

 

Hilt is a three-time winner of the department’s outstanding teacher award and is also the faculty advisor for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) student organization. He joined UK in 2004 after receiving his doctoral degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Social Work Student Leaves Lasting Impression in Washington, D.C.

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 11:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016)  As a child, Karah Holbart often tagged along as her mom attended classes at the University of Kentucky College of Social Work. Those classes seeped in, inspiring Holbart to follow in her mother's footsteps. 

 

Now a junior in the same program, Holbart's goal is in focus: serving as an advocate and making lasting changes in people's lives. She hopes to be the "Jane Addams of our time,” referring to the leader in woman’s suffrage and one of the most prominent reformers of the Progressive Era. She's making progress toward that, most recently by advocating in Washington, D.C., through a semester long practicum at Independence Place, a nonprofit organization.

 

Independence Place operates with the core goals of supporting individuals with disabilities in many ways such as independent living, peer support, and individual and system advocacy. Independence Place serves over 50 counties in Kentucky and is the second largest center for independent living in the country. Holbart got to participate in individual and system advocacy by going to D.C. to talk to representatives, including Kentucky’s independent living specialist, and attend a national conference on Centers on Independent Living. The objective of the trip was to advocate for more funding and to raise awareness of certain bills that aid people with disabilities.

 

Holbart described her experience as getting to do “upfront, in your face system advocacy and lobbying for things we need.” She had the unique opportunity to meet important people, like Sen. Chuck Schumer, who helped pass the Americans with Disabilities Act. Holbart has gained an understanding of how advocacy works at the top level and how to proceed with this process in her future social work career. It also helped Holbart understand how current policies affect the population she is working with.

 

When asked about one of the most noteworthy parts of her trip, Holbart spoke about a meeting she attended with the Administration for Community Living. The meeting was led by people with disabilities ranging from being blind to using assistive technology to communicate, “These people are affected by the decisions they make and want to fix things because they know and understand the challenges faced.”

 

Holbart's takeaway from the experience is that that nothing will ever change if no one does anything about it. She explained, “We have to be a voice for the voiceless and stand up for people who can’t. We have to be their advocates and be that person. To experience it and a part of the change, reiterates how important it is what we are doing.” Holbart could not be more grateful for this opportunity to change lives and to be a part of the Independence Place community.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

College of Health Sciences Honors Panther, Atherton

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 10:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) —The University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences this week named alumna Kathy Panther to the Health Sciences Alumni Hall of Fame and welcomed its first Young Alumni Award recipient Lindsay Atherton.

 

Panther, a 1976 graduate of the Speech and Hearing program, is the current director of Inpatient Rehabilitation and the Brain Injury Program at the Frazier Rehab Institute in Louisville, part of KentuckyOne Health.

 

“The College of Health Sciences recognizes Kathy Panther’s outstanding professional record, personal reputation, and 30 years of distinguished service in and contributions to the field,” said Scott M. Lephart, Ph.D., dean of the College of Health Sciences. “Her work is innovative and impactful and we are proud to be her alma mater.”

 

While at KentuckyOne Health-Frazier, Panther and colleagues developed the Free Water Protocol, a practice that improves quality of life for patients with dysphagia by ensuring necessary hydration along with airway protection. Panther, who was the first speech-language pathologist in the United States to implement the protocol, identifies her patients as the motivation behind the effort.

 

“Listen to your patients and their families. Listen with an open mind and an open heart,” Panther, who received her Master of Science in Communication Disorders from UofL, said. “We changed our practice, which ultimately led to practice change for many clinicians around the world. Positive change came about when we learned to listen [to our patients].” 

 

Panther and her team have successfully managed thousands of patients in the 30-plus years since the protocol was implemented, and have instructed other health care professionals on using the protocol in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and long-term care facilities. Her Free Water Protocol and subsequent research, which has been published with ASHA Special Interest 13: Perspectives on Swallow and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) as well as the Advanced Healthcare Network for Speech and Hearing, advances the entire field of speech-language pathology.

 

Panther’s additional services to the field have national impacts as well. She is a prominent national presenter of accredited continuing education seminars and has served on American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) clinical supervision committees that work toward establishing more formal and consistent training programs for all speech-language pathologists within the health care environment.

 

Furthermore, Panther maintains strong connections to the Commonwealth and the University of Kentucky. At the state level, she has held multiple positions on the board for the Parkinson Support Center of Kentuckiana, including president and vice president. She was also appointed to a four-year term on the Kentucky Traumatic Brain Injury Trust Fund Board in 2014 by then-Governor Steve Brashear. At UK, Panther took an active role with the College of Health Sciences Dean’s Advisory Board under the leadership of former Dean Lori Gonzalez, participating on committees striving to increase alumni participation as well as committees aiming to increase awareness of the College. Panther’s team also helps train the College’s Communication Sciences and Disorders students at KentuckyOne Health-Frazier Rehabilitation facilities.

 

“Over the years, many of our students have requested and received clinical training at all Frazier locations and the students’ reports are overwhelmingly positive,” said Donna Morris, associate professor in the Division of Communication Science and Disorders at the UK College of Health Sciences. “Because of Mrs. Panther’s great knowledge and interest in the supervision of students, we are extremely fortunate that she maintains an active role in developing educational opportunities at their sites.”

 

Panther has twice been awarded the Clinical Achievement Award from the Kentucky Speech-language Hearing Association and was a national nominee from Kentucky for the Di Carlo Award, presented by ASHA for her outstanding clinical work in speech-language pathology.

 

The College of Health Sciences also welcomed its first Young Alumni Award recipient this year. The award recognizes a CHS alum who graduated within the last 10 years and who has already demonstrated emerging leadership skills and made significant contributions to his or her field. Atherton, a 2011 Clinical Laboratory Sciences graduate and a 2014 Physician Assistants Program graduate, is the first recipient of the Young Alumni Award.

 

Atherton is currently a physician assistant at UK HealthCare in the Division of Hospital Medicine/Internal Medicine. She manages inpatients on acute, telemetry, and progressive care floors. Atherton also has prior experience as a medical laboratory technician and laboratory assistant at UK Chandler Hospital and UK Good Samaritan Hospital, respectively.

 

While a student, Atherton was top in her class and received the Dean’s Service Award and the Clinical Laboratory Science Faculty Award. She served as a College of Health Sciences Ambassador and volunteered at the Refuge Medical Clinic.

 

As a working PA, Atherton remains involved with the Medical Laboratory Science program, guest speaking in multiple MLS courses.

 

 

###

UK College of Education Hosts Research Conference for Students

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 17:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) -- The University of Kentucky College of Education recently hosted the annual Spring Research Conference. The conference allows graduate and undergraduate students to present their research, whether it is completed, in progress or at the proposal stage. This event provides a welcoming context in which to receive feedback.

 

The day included presentations by students from the UK College of Education, University of Louisville College of Education and Human Development, and University of Cincinnati College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services, co-sponsors of the event.

 

“The purpose of the conference is to provide students an opportunity to present their research in a friendly environment and receive constructive comments on their work as well as their presentations,” said Rob Shapiro, associate dean for research, analytics and graduate student success at the UK College of Education. “It serves as a great learning experience for the students.”

 

Students gave presentations of their projects or used posters to present their findings. Sessions throughout the day focused on various aspects of research supported by the three colleges.

 

Sponsored annually by the three universities, the Spring Research Conference rotates among campuses each year.

 

For more information, visit https://education.uky.edu/adeanargs/spring-research-conference/ or contact Michelle Dye at michelle.traynor@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Wear Blue for the Welfare of Kentucky’s Children on April 8

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 17:29

 LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare employees seldom need convincing to wear blue in support of UK athletic teams.

 

But on Friday, April 8, wearing blue signifies support for a greater cause — the safety and welfare of children across the Commonwealth — as UK HealthCare and Kentucky Children’s Hospital observe Commit to Prevent Wear Blue Day, which brings attention to child abuse awareness. 

 

UK HealthCare and Kentucky Children’s Hospital employees can wear blue and join the official photo for UK Wear Blue for Child Abuse Awareness photo at 1 p.m. on April 8. The photo will take place in the Pavilion A Auditorium main lobby. Participants can use the hashtag #committoprevent in social media posts or make a pledge to safeguard children in their community by clicking here

 

According to Ginny Sprang, executive director of the UK Center on Trauma and Children, studies show adverse childhood experiences predict a host of short- and long-term health and behavioral consequences, including violence, smoking, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, risky sexual behaviors and more. In 2012, more than 15,000 children in Kentucky were victims of abuse and neglect. 

 

Commit to Prevent Kentucky recommends several actions to help prevent child abuse in Kentucky: 

  • Get to know the children in your neighborhood and make sure they are protected
  • Ask your faith-based organization to devote time to children's issues
  • Seek out information and resources on child abuse by calling 1-800-CHILDREN

If you suspect a child is a victim of maltreatment or abuse, call 1-800-CHILDREN. If you fear a child is in imminent danger, call 911. 

 

For more information on preventing child abuse, click here

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

VIDEO: Family Impacted by UK's Sanders-Brown Hopes to be Part of Alzheimer's Ultimate Cure

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 16:49

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) − Nearly 68,000 Kentuckians today are suffering from Alzheimer's disease, but the emotional and financial tolls are much higher. That's because, in the words of Linda Van Eldik, Alzheimer's is a "family disease."

 

"Alzheimer's affects the patient, of course, but as the disease progresses, it is also devastating for the people who love and care for that patient," said Van Eldik, director of the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

  

While a diagnosis of Alzheimer's or other age-related dementias brings an incredible amount of uncertainty to patients and their families, there is a valuable resource at the University of Kentucky providing information, support and hope. 

 

So say Tom Conley and daughters Terri and Susie, whose wife and mother Nancy was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2009.

 

"The care Nancy got while she was at Sanders-Brown and the clinical trials she participated in, I think slowed the disease down," said Tom.

 

Nancy passed away from breast cancer in November of 2014.  Looking back the Conley daughters feel grateful that their mother's last years were full of good memories.  

 

"I got my mother — my REAL mother — a few more years than I probably would have if she had gone untreated," added Terri.

 

The Conley family hails from Louisville, but they found care for Nancy in Lexington — at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

 

UK's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) was established in 1979 and is one of the original 10 National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers. SBCoA is internationally acclaimed for its work in the fight against age-related diseases.

 

Faculty and researchers work together within the framework of the Center's mission to explore the aging process and its implications for society. Research spans bench to bedside, from defining disease mechanisms in the brain and exploring cellular changes that lead to AD, to studies exploring healthy aging and ways to lower risk of dementia, to clinical trials testing potential new therapies that slow or stop the progression of age-related diseases of the brain.

 

"We are trying to cure Alzheimer’s and we know that here at the Sanders Brown Center on Aging we will be part of that cure," said Dr. Greg Jicha, professor of neurology at the UK College of Medicine and SBCoA.  "Whether it comes next year or comes five years from now or 20 years from now, we will be playing a central role in that ultimate goal."

 

Watch this video to learn how Sanders-Brown helped the Conley family extend Nancy's quality of life and why philanthropy is so integral to ensuring that UK researchers contribute to finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease while also helping other Kentucky families.   

 

As Tom Conley puts it, "You have a jewel right here in little old Lexington and we need to keep polishing it."

 

Media contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

Video ContactsAmy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Theatre to Conclude Season with 'Alice in Wonderland'

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 15:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Join the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance as it brings audiences a twist on the classic “Alice in Wonderland” in its final production of the season. “Alice in Wonderland” will run April 14-24, at Guignol Theatre.

 

Tumble down the rabbit hole with Alice into Wonderland, where nothing is as it seems. Alice’s whimsical adventure through Lewis Carroll’s mad world finds her in mind-bending debates with an enigmatic Cheshire Cat, a dubious caterpillar and tea party companion the March Hare. The cards are stacked against her when Alice finds herself face-to-face with the maleficent Queen of Hearts, a royal with a taste for beheading. Who are you? That’s the puzzle.

 

This production of "Alice in Wonderland" is a dark look through the rabbit hole, and may not be suitable for all audiences. It is recommended that children interested in attending

be at least 8 years of age.

 

“Alice in Wonderland” will take the Guignol stage at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, April 14-16 and April 21-23, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 17 and 24. Tickets are $15 for the general public and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. A processing fee will be added upon completion of transaction. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929. You can also visit their website at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Williams Named Robinson Center Director

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 15:04

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 7, 2016) — An agronomist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is the new director of UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability (RCARS). David Williams assumed the leadership position April 1.

 

Located in Breathitt County, the center uses a sustainable approach to enhance the goods, resources, services and economics of eastern Kentucky and its people. Center personnel engage in extension, instruction, research and development programs to help fulfill the center’s mission and help the region reach its full potential.

 

Williams will provide leadership on issues that will enhance long-term, value-added programs in eastern Kentucky. He will also manage personnel and resources at the experiment station, Robinson Forest and the Wood Utilization Center, which are all part of the college. In addition to the leadership position, Williams will continue his research on agronomic uses for industrial hemp.

 

“David Williams understands the center’s ability to empower the people of eastern Kentucky and is ready and willing to work with stakeholders to help the region and its people reach their full potential,” said Rick Bennett, associate dean for research and director of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.

 

A native of St. Albans, West Virginia, Williams received his bachelor’s degree from Eastern Kentucky University in technical horticulture. He earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from UK in crop science. He has been on the faculty at UK since 1997.

 

“I’m genuinely excited to become a part of the RCARS team and am looking forward to contributing to the mission,” Williams said.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

UK's Barnes Shares Marketing Expertise with Professionals, Students in Zambia

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 14:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Beth Barnes, professor in the UK College of Communication and Information, developed the outline of topics and gave three lectures during a two-day workshop in Zambia, Africa, titled "Planning Your Sales Promotion Campaign for Results."

 

“The workshop was to help marketers in Zambia use sales promotion more effectively through understanding some of the ways it can be used, the pros and cons of both price reduction and value-added techniques, and what we know about how consumers react to sales promotion offers in both the short- and long-terms,” Barnes said.

 

She delivered three talks on the first day of the workshop on sales promotion objectives, sales promotion techniques and consumer response to sales promotion. She also spoke on behalf of the U.S. Embassy at two events and held a Q&A session with topics including U.S. government and politics, U.S. higher education structure, opportunities for Zambian students and what the U.S. can learn from Zambia and vice versa.

 

Barnes prepared for this workshop by reflecting on the courses she’s taught at UK on the same topics and her knowledge of Zambia itself.

 

“I'm able to draw on my previous experience in Zambia to make [the talks] relevant for the current business situation there,” Barnes said.

 

Barnes plans to return to Zambia in the fall for her sabbatical semester.

 

“I plan to be working with the Zambia Institute of Marketing, so it's always useful for me to get to spend time with people working in marketing communication in the country,” Barnes said.

 

Her favorite part of the workshop was working with Zambian students.

 

“It was fascinating to hear what was on their minds and especially their perceptions of the U.S.,” Barnes said.

 

Barnes is currently teaching two UK courses, “Strategic Public Relations” and “Advertising to Multicultural Britain,” in London. She first made contact with ZAMCOM, a media-training institute in Zambia, through the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications in 2008 and has returned for various marketing and research projects since.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Legacy see blue. Day Taking Place April 16

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 14:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Alumni Association will host its annual Legacy see blue. Day on Saturday, April 16, at the Helen King Alumni House, located at 400 Rose St. The event, which is part of Alumni Weekend at UK, is for currently enrolled high school students who are UK legacies (a child whose mother, father or step-parent has earned a degree from UK).

 

Attendees will gain insight into the college admissions process and hear from current UK students about life as a Wildcat. Brunch is provided along with a guided walking tour of campus. Parking is available behind the Helen King Alumni House.

 

Registration and brunch begins at 9 a.m., April 16. The information session is at 9:30 a.m., followed by a student panel at 10:15 a.m., and a guided walking tour of campus at 10:45 a.m.

 

For information on Legacy see blue. Day, visit www.ukalumni.net/seeblueday16, email Kelly Hinkel at kelly.hinkel@uky.edu or call her at 859-257-7161. For more information about the Legacy Initiative Program, please visit www.ukalumni.net/legacy.

 

The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 7, 1912

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 13:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 195th diary entry from April 7, 1912, remembers McClure visiting the Colonial where she sees pictures of the beginning of the Great Flood of 1912 along the Mississippi River.

 

April 7th. Go to the Colonial, where we see pictures of the terribly high waters of the Mississippi.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

17th Annual BSU Talent Show Honors Lyman T Johnson April 16

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016)  The University of Kentucky’s Black Student Union will present its an annual talent show titled "The Apollo" hosted by Donnell Rawlings of "The Chappelle Show" and "Guy Code."

 

The legacy of Lyman T. Johnson is to be continued through the Black Student Union. Johnson inspired the organization’s annual event, which is in collaboration with the Student Government Association. "Volume 67: Continue the Legacy" is the show’s theme, symbolic in the representation of the years since Johnson was the first African-American admitted to UK.

 

Johnson was the trailblazer for diversity at the university. Even posthumously, Johnson is still making conquests for racial equality on campus by becoming the first African-American to have a residence hall named in his honor.

 

"The Apollo" follows the format of the original "Showtime at the Apollo" show at the historic Apollo Theater in New York City. This year’s show will feature 11 contestants from UK and Lexington community.

 

Tickets are available online and in-person at the Singletary Center ticket office (405 Rose St.) for $10. The show will begin with a comedy stand-up from the host at 7:30 p.m.

 

The Black Student Union was founded in 1968. The organization strives to provide a social, cultural and educational outlet for students on the campus of the University of Kentucky, with a focus on the minority community. The organization holds general body meetings 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

 

Like UK’s Black Student Union on Facebook and follow them on Twitter and Instagram, @uk_bsu. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

VIDEO: UK CAER 101 Inspires the Next Generation of Scientists

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 09:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Much has been reported about the lack of students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline across Kentucky and the nation.

 

Changing those statistics has been an on-going national challenge — a challenge in which the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has taken a leadership role.

 

The following video showcases how the UK CAER 101 program is helping to inspire the next generation of scientists at Yates, Cassidy and Russell Cave elementary schools here in Fayette County.

 

Video courtesy of UK CAER 

Helping to inspire those elementary students are current UK student participants in UK's Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE) program, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. UK's BPE program is a collaboration between UK CAER and UK's College of Engineering and seeks to inspire traditionally under-represented students to pursue leadership opportunities in STEM fields.

 

"Mentoring opportunities are available to incoming African-American, Hispanic or Native American engineering students at both the undergraduate and graduate level," said Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez, a research scientist at UK CAER and director of the BPE Mentoring program. "The BPE program has really allowed UK to engage in a unique mentoring opportunity for UK scientists. It also has allowed our students an opportunity to help build a pipeline of STEM learners in our community."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

 

Prepare Yourself for Tick Season

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 17:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — Excerpts from University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Sociology Mairead Moloney’s personal account of her horrifyingly prolonged battle with Lyme disease were printed in Tuesday’s Washington Post, in an article titled “I took all the right meds for Lyme, so why didn’t I get better?

 

“In full candor, writing about and publicly sharing this experience was very difficult for me,” Moloney said. “However, I am really grateful that it has received such widespread attention. It is my sincere hope that this piece moves the dialogue forward on what constitutes appropriate care for tick-borne illness. If even one person is helped by my story then I am happy.”

 

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection humans contract through the bite of an infected blacklegged or deer tick, which are exceedingly small and difficult to detect. According to an online article by the staff of the Mayo Clinic, “The bacteria enter your skin through the (tick) bite and eventually make their way into your bloodstream. In most cases, to transmit Lyme disease, a deer tick must be attached (to the skin) for 36 to 48 hours. If you find an attached tick looks swollen, it may have fed long enough to transmit bacteria.” 

 

According to the Mayo Clinic site, early signs and symptoms include:

· Rash. From three to 30 days after an infected tick bite, an expanding red area might appear that sometimes clears in the center, forming a bull’s-eye pattern. The rash expands slowly over days and can spread to 12 inches across. It is typically not itchy or painful. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.

· Flu-like symptoms. Fever, chills, fatigue, body aches and a headache may accompany the rash.

Later symptoms might appear weeks, even months after the bite. These include:

· Rash. The rash may appear in other areas of your body.

· Joint pain. Bouts of severe joint pain and swelling are especially likely to affect your knees, but the pain can shift from one joint to another.

· Neurological problems. Weeks, months or even years after infection, you might develop inflammation of the membranes surrounding your brain (meningitis), temporary paralysis of one side of your face (Bell's palsy), numbness or weakness in your limbs, and impaired muscle movement.

 

Less frequently reported symptoms may also occur. It is recommended that if you think you have been bitten and display some of the symptoms, to contact your doctor, even if the symptoms seem to disappear.  

 

According to the Center for Disease Control, Kentucky had 11 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in 2014. Incidence is particularly high in northeastern states, including Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. For a complete report of all states that you may visit during spring and summer vacation season, visit www.cdc.gov/lyme/stats/tables.html.

 

Moloney has her own advice for those living in or visiting areas known to have Lyme disease carrying ticks. While Kentucky has a comparatively low incidence rate of 0.2, she said, that is no guarantee you and your family are safe.

 

“While most ticks won’t make you sick,” Moloney said. “Lyme disease is rapidly on the rise. Between 1991 and 2015, the incidence of Lyme in the United States has doubled. (1) Worse, ticks carry many disease-causing organisms, some of which are difficult to detect and treat.”

 

Moloney offered the following tips:

· If you — or your pet — go outside, you are at risk. Lyme and related infections are present in all of the continental U.S. Ticks love grassy vegetation and patchy woods (2), and they don’t discriminate between rural and urban areas. In fact, Lyme has been found in ticks in New York City parks. (3)

· Wear tick repellent when you are outdoors. There are chemical and non-chemical varieties on the market. Moloney recommends the strongest formulation with which you feel comfortable.

· Perform daily tick checks, even if you’ve just been gardening or lounging in your yard. Ticks can be as small as poppy seeds, and they love to hide in hard to check areas like armpits, bellybuttons or in your body hair. Remove attached ticks immediately, and use proper technique. (4) www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

· If you develop a fever or a rash go to your doctor. (5) You should always err on the side of caution, as most people never see the tick or the rash. Early antibiotic treatment is effective for most people. (6)

 

References:

 

1. United States Environmental Protection Agency. “Climate Change Indicators in the United States.” www3.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators/health-society/lyme.html

 

2. National Science Foundation. “Ecology and Infectious Diseases: Lyme Disease on the Rise.” www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/ecoinf/lyme.jsp

 

3. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. “Healthy Environment: Ticks.” www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/environmental/ticks.shtml

 

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Prevent Lyme Disease." www.cdc.gov/features/lymedisease/

 

5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Symptoms of Tickborne Illness.”

www.cdc.gov/ticks/symptoms.html

 

6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Treatment.” www.cdc.gov/lyme/treatment/

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 6, 1912

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 194th diary entry from April 6, 1912, recalls McClure’s friends picking her up from the train station after her time at home in Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, with family.

 

April 6th. Have a fine time at home. Auntie gives me lots of narcissus and March flowers. Addie and Jessie Mit meet me at the station, but they are changed girls! They lead me and my two heavy suitcases up the most horrid looking alley! Marie and Adeline are hatless!

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Pages