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UK Director, Professor Receives McClure Excellence in Education Award

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 17:10

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016) — Jeff Huber, University of Kentucky School of Information Science director and professor, was selected by the Medical Library Association (MLA) to receive the 2016 Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award for his contributions to the field of health sciences librarianship.

 

The award was established in 1998 and honors professionals “who demonstrate skills in one or more of the following areas: teaching, curriculum development, mentoring, research or leadership in education at local, regional or national levels.”

 

“We are honored to be awarding the Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award to Dr. Jeffrey Huber, director and professor at the University of Kentucky School of Information Science. The award is given to outstanding library educators in the field of health sciences librarianship and informatics,” said MLA President Michelle Kraft.

 

“The many letters of support from former students exemplify Dr. Huber’s dedication and focus to developing the next generation of health sciences librarians. His commitment to the profession is reflected through his service to MLA as an editor for JMLA, member of MLA juries including the Janet Doe and Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, and his many publications. It is a privilege to honor Dr. Huber’s devotion to his students as well as to the profession with this award.”

 

Huber joined the School of Information Science in 2008 as an already established leader in the health information profession. By 2013, the school held a top 5 ranking in health librarianship according to U.S. News & World Report. Huber has done extensive research about information access for public health professionals and health care consumers, community health informatics, health literacy, and HIV/AIDS information and communication.

 

Dan O’Hair, dean of the College of Communication and Information, said, “It is a distinct honor for Dr. Huber to be named as this year’s recipient of the prestigious Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education award by the MLA. The college is very proud of Dr. Huber’s many accomplishments and knows that this award is well deserved.”

 

This year marks Huber’s 15th year serving as a member on the editorial board for the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), a peer-reviewed quarterly journal authored by field professionals to advance the practice and research of health sciences librarianship. His most recent contribution to the journal, “Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians” (2014), outlines the adaptation and evolution of the health sciences librarian role and responsibilities as health disparities in the United States increase. Huber co-authored the article with mentee, MLA colleague and award nominator, Robert Shapiro.

 

“Dr. Huber continues to inspire countless students, at UK and across the country, to use the knowledge developed in library and information science programs to impact the health of individuals and communities. I can think of no greater achievement in our field,” Shapiro said.

 

Huber will be recognized at the MLA Presidents’ Awards Dinner scheduled for May 17, at Mosaic ‘16 in Toronto, Canada.

 

“Today, the effective delivery of health care requires an informed citizenry at multiple levels and I have strived to contribute to that effort,” Huber said. “I am honored to be named the 2016 recipient of MLA’s Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award.”

 

Huber received his Master of Science in Library Science from the UK School of Library and Information Science in 1987 and his doctoral degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1991. He joined MLA in 1990 and became an active committee member in 2001.

 

The MLA believes that quality information is essential for improved health. MLA aspires to be the association of the most visible, valued and trusted health information experts. To that end, MLA fosters excellence in the professional practice and leadership of health sciences library and information professionals in order to enhance the quality of health care, education and research throughout the world.

 

The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a Master's of Science in Library Science, School Media Certification, Master's of Science in Information Communication Technology, bachelor's degrees in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

FCPS Superintendent to Hold Listening Sessions on UK Campus

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 16:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — Fayette County Public Schools Superintendent, Emmanuel “Manny” Caulk, is seeking input on the future direction of the school district. In partnership with the University of Kentucky Office of Community Engagement, Caulk is hosting two listening sessions this month for any and all UK employees with an opinion about the current state of the Fayette County Public Schools.

 

The superintendent’s “Listening, Learning and Leading” entry plan has included quantitative and qualitative data collection through school and program visits, one-on-one meetings, surveys, and an organizational and structural review of the district across 10 domains. External agencies also conducted curriculum and program audits in career and technical education, and the services provided for students with special needs, students identified as gifted and talented, and students learning English as a second language.

 

Caulk is holding feedback sessions for community members from across Fayette County to inform his recommendations for making sure that every student achieves his or her unlimited potential. Two listening sessions are being held specifically for UK employees:

  • 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 16, in the Lexmark Room, 209 Main Building
  • 1 p.m. Thursday, March 24, in the Lexmark Room, 209 Main Building

Please RSVP by email to rodney.creager@uky.edu or by phone at 859-257-7144 no later than March 15. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

UK Debate Team Heads to National Finals With a Top 16 Ranking

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 15:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The similarities between coaching a nationally ranked basketball team and coaching a nationally ranked debate team are undeniable.

 

First, there is recruitment — spring and summer weeks on the road that slip into months without notice, traveling from one talented high school student’s living room to the next, exhorting the opportunities of their institution.

 

Then, there is the agonizing choice between one gifted youngster and another, all the time recognizing that there are dozens of coaches out there anxious to steal your rising star. At some point in this time frame, both the athletic and the academic coaches judiciously distribute the available scholarships.

 

Teams are finally assembled and months of practice begin — one team in the gym, one team in the library, but both making freshman mistakes, learning to trust their team and their coach, finding a way to win, and celebrating together when it all finally gels.

 

Then, the coaches and teams face competition season’s mind-numbing months on the road … together, because that’s the only way to survive the ordeal. They travel from one competition to the next, practice constantly, and sacrifice. Through it all, they are still university students, with classes to attend, exams to take, and family to visit.  

 

At the end of the regular season, if these students and coaches have learned enough and sacrificed enough, they are rewarded with the final challenge, post-season tournaments and a shot at championship glory.

 

For the first time since 1994, the University of Kentucky has a nationally ranked (top 16) debate team on its way to the national finals in a few weeks with two first-round “byes” in its pocket, and UK Debate Coach David Arnett could not be more proud. After all, as in a basketball tournament, a debate tournament bye is earned by a consistently excellent performance throughout the season.

 

“Each member of my team spends an average of 40 hours each and every week, from July through April, actively practicing and competing,” Arnett said. “Most of that time is spent in library research, which is comparable to an athletic team’s intense gym practice. That doesn’t include the time they devote to their classes.

 

“It’s a long, grueling, unforgiving experience, but not without its rewards, especially when it takes you to the finals,” Arnett said.

 

An average of 50 to 60 universities and colleges will be represented at the National Invitational Debate Tournament, held this year in Binghamton, New York. UK will compete with three two-person competition teams; two of UK’s teams won first-round byes. Only two other schools, the University of California, Berkeley, and Emory University, are represented by two teams with two first-round byes. Only six schools qualified three teams to the National Debate Tournament. 

 

UK’s 10-person tournament debate team includes senior Donald Grasse, senior Jonathan Geldof, junior Ava Vargason, sophomore Theo Noparstak, senior Marcel Roman, sophomore Holmes Hampton, junior Amar Adam, freshman Calen Martin, freshman Jacinda Rivas and freshman Cameron Baller.

 

Grasse, Geldof, Vargason and Noparstak received the first-round byes. Roman has qualified for the National Debate Tournament four times, while Hampton has qualified twice.

 

The debate team is housed in the UK College of Communication and Information, but the debate students’ majors are all across the board. Some are fairly predictable, like political science or pre-law, others not so much. Varguson, is a junior majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in gender studies, Arnett’s first in 20 years of coaching, and “she’s killing it,” Arnett said. “Ava is the first female with a first round tournament bye since 1986.”

 

The team’s cumulative grade-point average is an enviable 3.8.

 

Debating is more than just public speaking, although the same confidence is required, said Arnett. The team must research both the pros and the cons of an issue, because each competitor must be able to attack and defend either point of view with cold hard facts. They must be physically prepared as well; a typical tournament lasts for three 12-hour days.

 

The nation’s university-affiliated debate teams all receive a very broad topic in July that will be the topic of the national debate in April, nearly a year later. The questions are deliberately vague and complicated, like “Should America reduce its armed forces worldwide?”

 

“And no one knows if they will be defending the pro or the con point of view. So the students have to keep up with current events at the micro level. They have to predict what the opposition will bring up. It makes for a long, arduous experience,” Arnett said.

 

“But I believe with this team, we can take it all the way."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK, Coalition Create Guidelines to Help Students Obtain Violence Protective Orders

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 15:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The College of Arts and Sciences' Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women (OPSVAW) at the University of Kentucky and the Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence (KCADV) Monday jointly released guidelines for how schools and universities can effectively ensure that students can access interpersonal protective orders (IPOs). 

 

IPOs were created through HB 8 of the 2015 General Assembly, which became effective Jan. 1, 2016. They extend civil protections to victims of dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.

 

”The passage of 2015 HB 8 was an extraordinary accomplishment; it means little, however, if our students don’t know that civil protective orders are now available to them. The true effectiveness of our legislative effort, then, is wholly dependent upon what we can teach our students and what we can guide our educational institutions to do. That is the ultimate purpose for these new guidelines,” said Carol E. Jordan, executive director of the OPSVAW.

 

“This is an opportunity to finally protect some of our most vulnerable citizens. Students living in campus housing or attending classes will now be able to go about their daily lives without being in constant fear,” said Sharon Currens, KCADV executive director. 

 

Access to civil protective orders for high school and college students is a critical part of Kentucky’s response to dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. National studies have suggested that one in five women may be sexually assaulted while in college, and that women within the typical age bracket of college students experience the largest per capita rate of nonfatal intimate partner violence and the highest rate of stalking.

 

Finally, the U.S. National Crime Victimization Survey reported that women aged 16 to 19 are four times more likely than the general population to report rape or attempted rape.

 

“These data represent a clarion call for ensuring that high school and college students have access to IPOs,” Carol Jordan said. “Each statistic comes with a name and a face — a person who we need to protect.”

 

“The availability of protective orders for students will present schools across the Commonwealth with the opportunity to do just that. Instead of dating violence going undetected and unaddressed, IPOs will give school administrators and staff a powerful and effective tool to deal with these potentially dangerous situations. A court order will clarify which protective measures the court deems appropriate and thus will give a school the framework upon which to craft a plan which creates a safe learning environment for students and staff,” said Mary Savage, KCADV’s legal counsel.

 

The partnership between the OPSVAW and the KCADV has produced two resource documents for schools: one designed for post-secondary institutions (colleges, universities and community/technical colleges) and the second tailored to secondary institutions (K-12).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Spring Break Parking and Transit Changes

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 09:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — During Spring Break, demand for student parking and transportation is greatly reduced. As a result, Parking and Transportation Services reduces campus bus service and eases restrictions on most student parking lots.

 

Most student lots will require any valid permit, which may include employee permits, with the following exceptions that will remain on control for the specific permit for the lot: R6, R8, R16, R17, and R18. All Employee (E) lots will remain on control as normal. All lots will resume normal control on Monday, March 21.

 

The Purple Route (UK HealthCare Shuttle), the Pink Route (Kentucky Clinic Shuttle) and the MoveWell Shuttle will continue to run their normal schedule. One campus bus will operate on the Break Route from 7 a.m.to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. All other campus bus service, including the Lextran Blue and White Routes (Route 14), will cease during Spring Break.

 

The On-Demand Night Service will run on Sunday, March 20, with service beginning at 7 p.m. All other campus bus service will return to normal operations on Monday, March 21.

 

For more information, visit www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_break-parking_spring-break.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Student, UK Nursing Researcher Help Launch Citywide Substance Abuse Resource

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016) — When an individual with a substance abuse disorder reaches out for help, the opportunity for intervention is transient.

 

“That moment when somebody is willing to go to treatment is actually a very fleeting moment in time,” said Alex Elswick, a University of Kentucky graduate student who is in long-term recovery from heroin addiction. 

 

Elswick, who advocates for the local nonprofit Voices of Hope-Lexington, understands the importance of simplifying access to substance abuse treatment. At many low points in his struggle with pain relievers and heroin, Elswick contacted his family members seeking treatment, but changed his mind when he considered the reality of a grueling recovery process.

 

In a collaborative effort to connect individuals with drug treatment resources, Elswick and Amanada Fallin, an assistant professor in the UK College of Nursing and vice president for Voices of Hope-Lexington, joined a coalition of community members and city government officials to develop an online treatment database, GetHelpLex.org. The coalition leveraged an existing database at UK to build an online database of treatment resources and facilities around Central Kentucky. The user-friendly website was created in October 2015 to facilitate a customizable search for treatment resources based on a variety of features, including insurance coverage, gender, and preferences for inpatient or outpatient services.

 

“The value of this locator is that it’s simple, it’s straightforward, and it gives you legitimate options,” Elswick said.

 

According to Fallin, a lack of community awareness further complicates the process of connecting people to treatment resources. Google searches conducted by frantic family members during the critical moment when their loved one reaches out for help can turn up facilities that no longer exist, have long waiting lists or are not in close proximity.

 

“GetHelpLex.org is an example of a successful, cross-sector collaboration to put the university’s existing data into the hands of patients and their families in a usable format,” Fallin said.

 

GetHelpLex was created with support from the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention Program (SAVI), Voices of Hope-Lexington, OpenLexington, LexLadiesCode and Code for Boston. David Maynard, an addiction specialist in the UK HealthCare trauma department, contributed data for the database.

 

Elswick hopes GetHelpLex.org will connect more people dealing with substance use disorders with resources. He knows the devastation of addiction first-hand. In a matter of nine months, Elswick’s addiction took him from studying to take the LSAT in his Centre College dorm to homelessness.

 

Elswick experienced a number of cycles of recovery followed by relapse before graduating from Centre College and pursuing his master’s degree in counseling at UK. Elswick now shares his story and promotes recovery resources to give hope to others who want to break the chains of addiction.

 

“One of the things I learned in recovery is you can only keep what you have by giving it away,” Elswick said.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Dining Adjusts Operating Hours During Spring Break

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016)  Spring Break begins today, Friday, March 11. Although many students will be leaving Lexington for the week, some are sticking around campus.

 

To accommodate students, faculty and staff who will be on campus throughout the break, UK Dining has adjusted hours of operation at all campus dining locations. The image below reflects the adjusted hours.

 

For more information and to view the altered hours, visit https://uky.campusdish.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK's Rick Honaker Awarded $1 Million for Rare Earth Elements Recovery

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 14:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory has awarded nearly $1 million to Rick Honaker, professor and chair of the University of Kentucky Department of Mining Engineering, to develop a mobile pilot-plant facility for the recovery of rare earth elements from coal.

 

Honaker and his team, which includes collaborators at Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, will develop and test a mobile processing facility that can efficiently recover the rare earth elements present in coal and coal byproducts in an environmentally friendly manner.

 

"Previous research conducted by UK scientists and others have found that the critical materials needed for renewable energy technologies, such as cell phones and other electronics, are found in coal and coal byproducts at concentrations that may be economical to recover," Honaker said.

 

Rare earth elements, or REEs, are a series of chemical elements found in the Earth’s crust. Due to their unique chemical properties, REEs have become essential components of many technologies spanning a range of applications including electronics, computer and communication systems, transportation, health care and national defense. The demand, cost and availability of REEs has grown significantly over recent years stimulating an emphasis on economically feasible approaches for REE recovery.

 

The U.S. has 10.9 million tons of rare earth resources in coal deposits located in just five western and four eastern states, including Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia, according to the U.S. Geological Survey Coal Quality Database.

 

"If advanced separation technologies become available, the resource base will increase substantially," Honaker said.

 

With those technologies, the coal industry could potentially produce approximately 40,000 tons of REEs annually, which is more than twice the amount consumed in the U.S.

 

As Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers (KY-05) supported funding for REE recovery projects in the federal budget for fiscal year 2016.

 

“Our coal-producing states are working diligently to recover from the devastating loss of coal mining jobs in today’s economy. In fact, Kentucky alone has suffered the loss of nearly 11,000 coal mining jobs since 2009. Experimental projects, like UK’s mobile REE recovery plant, could save and create new coal-related jobs and opportunities in eastern Kentucky,” said Congressman Rogers. “I applaud Professor Honaker and the vision of UK’s leaders to find new applications for coal and coal byproducts for the development of everyday technologies, such as smart phones, computers and rechargeable batteries. This effort to find more uses for our country’s most plentiful resource could put many people back to work in the coalfields.”

 

Honaker's project is one of only 10 projects awarded and is the only one that is focused on physical concentration methods as a means for recovering REE directly from the coal sources rather than from a coal combustion byproduct.

 

The DOE is funding $999,797, while $320,212 will come from other project partners. Total funding for the mobile facility design is $1,320,009 in Phase I. The team will also work with industrial participants, which include Arch Coal, Blackhawk Mining, Bowie Refining, Eriez Manufacturing and Minerals Refining Company. If Phase I is successful, Phase II ($6 million) will involve construction and testing of the mobile facility.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Chef Russell Moves From Boone Center to The Club at Spindletop

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 13:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016)The Club at the University of Kentucky's Spindletop Hall has named Chef Seth Russell the new culinary director. Russell has served as the executive chef at the Hilary J. Boone Center for the past five years. 

 

He spent his formative years in Lexington and Versailles and steadily worked his way into higher profile establishments such as Amelia’s Field, Roy and Nadine’s, and Dudley’s. He later traveled to France for a year apprenticeship in a Michelin-starred inn in the Burgundy region of France and ultimately graduated near the top of his class from the French Culinary Institute in New York City.

 

Russell returned to Lexington to begin work at Idle Hour Country Club as a pastry chef and assistant chef. In 2008, he joined the Boone Center team and was named as executive chef in early 2010.

 

"It has been a great pleasure working with Chef Russell as he has developed a culinary team that consistently delivers high quality, handcrafted food to the members and guests of the Boone Center," said Gerald Marvel, general manager of Spindletop and the Boone Center. "I’m elated to have him bring the same talents to bear for the dining pleasure of the members of The Club at UK’s Spindletop Hall. His food is really fabulous!"

 

Drawing inspiration from around the world, Russell sources the freshest local ingredients to put a twist on traditional Kentucky cuisine.

 

"I am excited to bring my culinary expertise and love for great food to our members of The Club," Russell said. 

 

The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall is running a spring promotion that allows 50 percent off membership initiation fees for UK faculty and staff through April 30. For more information, visit the employee discount site at http://spindletophall.clubsoftlinks.com/upload/O8hynfc-l9Mst.pdf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

 

 

 

The Club at Spindletop Hall Offers Special Promotional Rate

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 18:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016)The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall is kicking off its annual spring promotion, offering 50 percent off membership initiation rates for faculty and staff of the University of Kentucky though April 30. In addition to a lower initiation rate, the monthly dues can be payroll deducted.

 

Club amenities include:

· Year-round programming such as family activities, Book Club, Wine Club, Bourbon Club, Gardening Club, and more

· Various membership levels for families, couples, single parents, individuals and seniors

· Chipping and putting greens; swimming pools; tennis courts; volleyball courts; picnic areas; exclusive access to Lexington's Legacy Trail; outdoor event space; and access to Spindletop Hall Mansion

· World-class dining at Roxie's, the upscale casual member dining room; dining on the Veranda in spring, summer and fall; and the Tiki Bar and Grill during the summer

 

The Club also announces Chef Seth Russell as the new culinary director. He has served as the executive chef of the Hilary J. Boone Center for the past five years.

 

Status as faculty, staff or member of the UK Alumni Association is a requirement for membership with The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall, but alumni status is not required to join the Alumni Association as an associate member.

 

For more information, visit the employee discount site at http://spindletophall.clubsoftlinks.com/upload/O8hynfc-l9Mst.pdf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Conference to Highlight Changes in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Fields

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 16:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Medicine Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery and the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute will host an accredited event to bring health care providers up to date on care practices dealing with neurology and neurosurgery.

 

On April 29, health care providers who treat patients with neurological issues from primary care physicians to occupational and physical therapists are invited to join the Practical Update in Neurology and Neursurgery — several forums discussing new evidence-based practices in neurology. Presentations will cover advances in medical management for headache, memory complaints, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and acute ischemic stroke.

 

The event is free, but participants must register through CE Central before April 11 to reserve a spot. Onsite registration and breakfast will start the day at 8 a.m. in the Pavilion A auditorium of the U.K. Albert B. Chandler Hospital with the welcome and introduction beginning at 9:30 a.m. The event ends at 4 p.m. Participants attending this event will receive free validated parking in the hospital parking garage at the corner of South Limestone and Leader Avenue

 

To register visit http://www.cecentral.com/live/11652

 

For questions regarding this event please call 859-218-5074 or email ukneuroeducation@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Percussion Group Showcases University Composing Talents in Concert

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 16:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Percussion Group (UKPG), a smaller chamber group known for performing cutting-edge percussion literature written for smaller forces, will perform a free concert at 7:30 p.m. tonight (Thursday), March 10, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall.

 

The upcoming UKPG concert will feature five extremely musical and physically demanding works for the performers. The program begins with Ivan Trevino's "Catching Shadows," originally written for a marimba duet. The opening will be followed by a premier performance of "The Koala Superdeep Borehole" by C. Snow (Connor Shafran), a UK music and German studies senior from Richmond, Kentucky. The concert will continue with "Volcán de Fuego" by UK doctoral student Francisco Perez, "Mallet Quartet" by Steve Reich and Ryan George's "Consider the Birds," which uses musical "murmurations" built around evolving figures. In addition to UKPG performing work by Perez, he will also serve as a featured conductor for the concert. Perez is a native of Pflugerville, Texas.

 

Chamber percussion performance is a specialized field, and requires a number of skills not normally required for the performance of symphonic or solo music. The percussionists of UKPG develop a close intimacy of shared musical experience, moving into a zone that is not often experienced when a conductor is leading them. They make on-the-spot musical decisions and perform spontaneous gestures, which turns the music into a conversation between the performers.

 

Members of UKPG are drawn from the UK Percussion Ensemble, conducted by James Campbell. The ensemble is nationally recognized for its excellence and innovative programming.

 

For more information on the UK Percussion Group concert, contact James Campbell, director of Percussion Studies at UK School of Music, at 859-257-8187.

 

UKPG is one of several ensembles housed at the UK School of Music in the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Thro Elected to Board of National Organization

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 15:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — University of Kentucky General Counsel William E. Thro has been elected to a three-year term on the Board of Trustees of the National Education Finance Academy, formerly named the National Education Finance Conference. 

 

Based at the University of Cincinnati, the mission of the National Education Finance Academy is "to provide a forum truly focused on school finance to enhance education for both young and adult learners. The conference provides a venue for collaboration among legislators, postsecondary education, school district and state agency personnel, professional organizations, and researchers concerned with the importance of equity, adequacy, and efficiency concepts that affect state, local, and federal revenue generation, distribution, and expenditures."

 

Thro has written extensively on constitutional issues in educational contexts with a particular emphasis on school finance litigation. His scholarly work has been recognized with Stetson University's Kaplin Award for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy Scholarship, the National Education Finance Conference’s Distinguished Research Fellow Award, and the National Association of College and University Attorneys’ Fellow Award.

 

A former solicitor general of Virginia, Thro has a distinguished record of service to academic, professional and civic organizations including serving as president of the Education Law Association, chair of the Virginia Bar Association’s Appellate Practice Section, board chair for a local Red Cross Chapter, and editorial board chair for the Journal of College and University Law, to name a few. He joined UK's Office of Legal Counsel in 2012.

 

In addition to being elected to the National Education Finance Academy's Board of Trustees, Thro also presented on recent developments in school finance litigation during the organization's sixth annual conference Feb. 10-12 in Jacksonville, Florida.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

First Major Touring Exhibit of Contemporary Emirati Art Makes Final Stop at UK's Bolivar Gallery

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 14:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016)"Past Forward: Contemporary Art from the Emirates," the first major touring exhibition of Emirati art, is opening at the University of Kentucky’s Bolivar Art Gallery on April 16. The exhibition, organized by Meridian International Center and the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), tells the story of the UAE’s rich history, culture and rapid development. The exhibition will be on display in Kentucky — the final stop in the exhibition’s 18-month national tour — through May 13.

 

A special highlight of "Past Forward" is the display of works that showcase facets of Emirati culture, including a strong equestrian heritage and a culture deeply rooted in hospitality. Similar to Lexington, horses are intrinsically woven into the fabric of Emirati culture. The UAE is home to some of the world’s most famous horse racing tournaments including the Dubai World Cup, and the country’s founding father, Sheikh Zayed, led the country in promoting purebred Arabian horses to the world. The UAE — which is home to more than 200 different nationalities — and Kentucky share a proud culture of hospitality that makes visitors feel at home.

 

"'Past Forward’ presents the UAE’s culture and history as told through the eyes of the country’s best contemporary artists, and how the country has preserved its traditions while developing into the modern, open and tolerant place it is today," said UAE Ambassador to the United States Yousef Al Otaiba. "'Past Forward’s final stop in Lexington, Kentucky, is the last chance to view some of these talented Emiratis’ artwork in the U.S., and we are excited to share this moment in a city where we have so much in common."

 

The UAE and the U.S. share close bilateral ties, and the "Past Forward" touring exhibition and auxiliary programming is a reflection of the two countries’ friendship. During the week leading up to the exhibition’s opening in Lexington, a delegation of featured artists from the UAE will participate in public programming and arts outreach on the University of Kentucky campus and around the community.

 

The exhibition showcases over 50 paintings, photographs, sculptures, video installations and other media by 25 notable Emirati artists that emphasize core elements of life in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Emirati artists are a multifaceted group of men and women who have maintained a sense of national identity while also promoting their vision and aspirations for the future. Early proponents of contemporary art in the UAE forged a path for the art world over 40 years ago, making the discipline a key aspect of today’s culture.

 

"We are thrilled to host this incredibly important exhibit. It is a tremendous vote of confidence by the UAE to enable the School of Art and Visual Studies to showcase more than 25 leading Emirati artists,” said University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts Dean Michael Tick. "The scope of this exhibit not only allows us to strengthen our programming for the benefit of the students of the University of Kentucky as well as the entire community, but also showcase our new state-of-art building."

 

"Past Forward" showcases works by several of these pioneers, who draw inspiration from the country’s rich history, diverse society and unique environment. Immersed in a fast-moving, transitional space, Emirati artists still remain deeply connected to their roots. "Past Forward" leads visitors on a visual journey from artistic beginnings in the United Arab Emirates to the country’s evolution into a vibrant regional art center. It also provides an intimate view of life in the UAE that characterizes the nation’s past, present and future.

 

"'Past Forward’ will provide a unique opportunity for people in Lexington to learn about the UAE’s cultural heritage through the eyes of Emirati artists," said Meridian International Center President and CEO Ambassador Stuart Holliday.

 

"Past Forward: Contemporary Art from the Emirates" is organized and circulated by Meridian International Center with support from the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Washington, D.C. Additional support for "Past Forward" is provided by the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority, the Salama Bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation and Etihad Airways. The exhibition is co-curated by the Meridian Center for Cultural Diplomacy and contemporary Emirati art expert Noor Al Suwaidi. As part of its national tour, the exhibition has visited Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; Spokane, Washington; East Lansing, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois.

 

About the Bolivar Art Gallery

Housed in the University of Kentucky Art and Visual Studies Building, the Bolivar Art Gallery is the primary gallery space of the UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts. The gallery features exhibition programming showcasing work by visiting artists, as well as UK students and faculty in the School of Art and Visual Studies, an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design that offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies, and art education.

 

About Meridian International Center 

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., Meridian International Center is a premier international leadership organization that provides valuable insight and experiences across borders, cultures and sectors. Meridian works with U.S. Department of State partners in the government, private, NGO, and educational sectors globally to create lasting international partnerships through leadership programs and cultural exchanges. Meridian also connects U.S. and foreign governments with the private sector to respond to global challenges and sustain impact. Meridian’s mission is to create innovative exchange, educational, cultural, and policy programs that advance three goals: strengthen U.S. engagement with the world through the power of exchange, prepare public and private sector leaders for a complex global future, and provide a neutral forum for international collaboration across sectors.

 

About The United Arab Emirates

The UAE is a source of stability, tolerance, innovation, and growth in the Arabian Gulf and around the globe. The United States and the UAE are reliable allies, with historical and present-day shared security and economic interests. In fact, the UAE is the largest export market for U.S. goods in the Middle East and more U.S. naval vessels visit UAE ports than any other port outside the United States. The United States and the UAE also enjoy growing social and cultural ties, and many U.S. institutions in education, health care and the arts have formed collaborative partnerships with UAE entities. For more information: www.uae-embassy.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Quick Response by Co-Workers, Gill Heart Team Saves Lexington Man From "Widowmaker"

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Regardless of the outcome, the Southeastern Conference Tournament will be infinitely more memorable for Tim Hayden this year.

 

That's because he doesn't remember any of last year's tournament.

 

On March 13, 2015, just before the Kentucky-Florida tip-off, Tim had a heart attack during a meeting at work. Fewer than half of all patients survive the type of heart attack Tim had — ominously called a "widow-maker" — where the left anterior descending coronary artery becomes completely blocked. But the quick actions of his co-workers, emergency personnel, and physicians at the University of Kentucky Gill Heart Institute were factors in Tim's complete return to health.

 

 

Tim is famous among his co-workers at Southern Wine and Spirits (SWS) for hating meetings and loving UK basketball.

 

"I mean he loves it, he lives and breathes it," said Harold Nikirk, Southern Wine and Spirits' field sales manager and Tim's boss, But SWS Brand Director Greg Wilson was coming in from Louisville that day, and so Harold had no choice but to call the meeting and hope it would be finished by tipoff.

 

The small conference room was crowded with seven people, and two more sales people had called in from out of state. According to Harold, Tim "was his normal self, laughing and cutting up." But as Harold began to speak, Tim started snoring.

 

"At least I thought it was snoring," said Harold.  "I though he was trying to make a funny editorial comment about having a meeting."

 

But Tim didn't stop making the snoring noise. 

 

"Tim went rigid and turned a frightening shade of purple," said Erin White, a co-worker of Tim's. "It was chaos, everyone started shouting at once."

 

Susan Logan, an administrative assistant with nursing training, ran to the room where she locked eyes with Erin over Tim's prone body. Susan said, "We have to do this. Do you want breaths or compressions?" They immediately began CPR.

 

"That was probably the longest two minutes of my life, hovering over Tim and pushing," Erin said.  "We were pleading for Tim to stay with us and just could not press hard enough."

 

According to Harold, the office became choreography with everyone pitching in to help in some way. One person called 911, others ran to the street corner to wave the ambulance in, others moved cars from the parking spots closest to the door and furniture out of the way so that the paramedics had easy access.

 

Fortunately for Tim, his workplace had an AED, or automatic external defibrillator.  An AED is a portable device that checks heart rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm if needed. Anyone with basic training can use an AED, which makes it possible for more people to respond to a situation where sudden cardiac death is suspected. And Greg, a Boy Scout leader, had that training.

 

The AED administered one shock and advised to continue CPR until paramedics arrived.

 

"The paramedics had to peel us off of Tim because we didn't want to stop," said Susan.  "The whole time I was thinking that just two months previous I had run into Tim and his family at the movies, so I kept thinking 'please help me get him to his family, he's got two little boys, please.'"

 

As Harold climbed into the ambulance with Tim, Erin told paramedics to take him to UK. "Catherine (Tim's wife) works at UK and I knew they had a heart institute, so that seemed the best place to take him," she said.

 

"All the way to the hospital, Tim's making that snoring noise, all the way, even when they're taking him off the truck, even when they're wheeling him down, he never stopped," said Harold.  "I'll never, ever, get that noise out of my mind."

 

Waiting for him there was Dr. Adrian Messerli, director of the heart catheterization laboratory at the UK Gill Heart Institute.

 

"With a heart attack, especially one like Tim's, every minute literally counts," he said.  "We were the first hospital in Lexington to allow paramedics to bypass the emergency room and go directly to the cath lab, which buys us precious time and hugely increases the patient's chances for survival." 

 

Messerli restored blood flow by inserting two stents in the artery running down the front wall of Tim's heart, propping the blocked artery open.  He then put Tim in a type of medically induced coma called targeted therapeutic hypothermia, where a patient's core body temperature is cooled temporarily. 

 

"When the heart arrests, it's not just the heart that sustains damage, but all the vital organs, specifically the brain, because they all have inadequate blood flow during the arrest," Messerli said. "It's thought that this protocol protects the vital organs from damage and improves healing."

 

For Tim, it worked beautifully.

 

"What's so gratifying about Tim's case is that the healing has really been complete and absolute," he said.  "When I see him in the office, he's in wonderful spirits, minimal complaints, and he's doing really well."

 

Tim spent three weeks in the hospital, which were especially long and worrisome for Susan and Erin.

 

"I'll never forget the day we got the text from Tim's wife Catherine saying 'Tim is out of here tomorrow.' It was like the sky just opened up and the world was whole again," Susan said. She texted Erin with three words: "We Did It!"

 

Since then, about a dozen of SWS's 40 staffers have received CPR certification and AED training. The Lexington Fire Department honored the group at their annual banquet this year for their bravery, quick thinking, and knowledge of CPR. They also joined #TimsTeam at the American Heart Association's 2015 Heart Walk, raising more than $3,500, which included a large donation from SWS in Tim's honor.

 

"We are a family at SWS," said Erin.  "We came with our spouses and our children, and it was really cool just to show the importance in that day."

 

And, Susan adds with a laugh, "They don't know it, but we're about to ask again."

 

Messerli says that Tim's meeting on that day most likely saved his life.

 

"Dr. Messerli told us if Tim had been at home, or if the meeting had been scheduled later, or if he'd been in his car, this type of heart attack isn't something that people typically survive," Harold said.

 

"I think Tim was fortunate for many reasons," Messerli said. "He was surrounded by coworkers who knew how to perform CPR and knew how to use an AED. Those critical first steps sustained Tim until we could get him he treatment he needed."

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu

 

UK Chief Information Security Officer Warns Against Phishing Email Scams Aimed at Stealing Tax Returns

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 13:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Expect to receive fraudulent emails this tax season, University of Kentucky Chief Information Security Officer Michael Carr cautions. 

 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently warned consumers about email scams that are designed to steal identities and rob taxpayers of their tax refunds. The consumer alert was released after the IRS saw nearly a 400% increase in phishing and malware incidents so far this tax season and reports of scams targeting others in the tax community.

 

The emails are designed to trick taxpayers into thinking these are official communications from the IRS or others in the tax industry, including tax software companies. The phishing schemes may ask taxpayers about a wide range of topics. Emails can seek information related to refunds, filing status, confirming personal information, ordering transcripts and verifying PIN information.

 

What to do if you have replied to a phishing email that was sent to your UK email address:

  • Change your link blue password immediately via the UK Account Manager at http;//password.uky.edu.
  • Call UK Analytics and Technologies (UKAT) Customer Service at 859-218-HELP (4357) if you need additional assistance changing your password.

How to detect a potential scam:

  • An email that appears to be from the IRS (the IRS does NOT send emails).
  • Poor English syntax and/or grammar within the message.
  • An unspecified sender or links that ask you to click on any address (a uky.edu or a non-uky.edu address) or any website URL for "secure verification."
  • A fake reply address e.g., chancellor@uky.edu (UK does not have a chancellor).
  • An email that contains a threat or sense of urgency if action is not taken immediately

If you are in doubt about the validity of an email message, please contact UKAT Customer Service at 859-218-HELP (4357).

 

Steps you can take to protect yourself from identity thieves:

  • Always use security software with firewall and anti-virus protections. Make sure the security software is always turned on and can automatically update itself. Encrypt sensitive files such as tax records you store on your computer.  
  • Use strong passwords.
  • Learn to recognize and avoid phishing emails, threatening calls and texts from thieves posing as legitimate organizations such as your bank, credit card company and even the IRS. Do not click on links or download attachments from unknown or suspicious emails.
  • Protect your personal data. Don’t routinely carry your social security card and make sure your tax records are secure. Treat your personal information like you do your cash; don’t leave it lying around.

Visit www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p4524.pdf for additional steps.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Sounds of Support

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 11:24

 

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) — From an early age, Hannah Ellis loved to make a joyful noise.

 

"As far as my musical background, I guess you could say that I‘ve been singing before I was talking," Ellis said. "We have videos of me not really being able to put sentences together but I knew the words to 'Amazing Grace.' My parents were both singers and it came really natural to me and all my siblings to start singing as soon as we were able to make noise."

 

Another noise she liked to make growing up — cheering for the University of Kentucky Wildcats.

 

"I grew up in a small town, Campbellsville, Kentucky, and I have been a UK fan my entire life. My parents raised us as UK fans. We were those people that when we won the NÇAA men's basketball championship when I was seven we drove an hour and a half to meet the team coming off of the plane. It’s been true fandom the whole way through. I don’t even know that I applied to another college honestly. It was just kind of a non-option for me."

 

But Ellis did have another option — to go to Nashville to pursue her dream of becoming a recording artist.

 

"I was about to graduate high school when I had this epiphany that music was what I wanted to do with my life. At that time I had already received a full-ride scholarship to the University of Kentucky, so it was kind of this moment of ‘Do I go to college or do I just move to Nashville?’ With a little bit of coaxing from my parents because I was just 18, and knowing that going to UK was the plan all along, I went to UK and prayed that my degree and a full-time music career would go hand-in-hand in some way."

 

"It is funny to think about now, but when I first actually applied to go to UK I thought I was going to go in and take all these classes to become a sports therapist. That was my initial thinking when I applied for school and registered. Then about a semester into my freshman year, I was like ‘This does not contribute to a music career at all.'"

 

"So I decided to major in integrated strategic communication because it was something that was going to actually speak to the career path I had chosen as a musician. My major and attending UK really taught me how to market myself as a musician."

Singer-songwriter Hannah Ellis

 

After graduation in 2012, Ellis loaded up her car and left the Bluegrass State and moved to Music City — Nashville. While her heart never strayed far from her old Kentucky home, she never thought her Kentucky roots would play such a big role in her country music career.

 

"I was talking to a friend of mine about how much I love the state of Kentucky and he said ‘Oh that’s so funny my lawyer is actually a guy from Kentucky.’ I said ‘Wow, that’s crazy!’ and he’s like ‘Yeah, you actually ought to meet him because if you don’t have a lawyer that’s something you’re going to need in this career.’"

 

Ellis and Safford did meet. And just like that, the Big Blue Nation walked right back into Ellis' life in the form of UK alumnus Scott Safford.

 

"I wanted to be in the music industry since before I attended UK," Safford, a 1995 College of Arts and Sciences and 1997 College of Law graduate, said. "The fun part of my job is helping people like Hannah navigate the music industry, which can be complex and scary for people new to the business."

 

"When you find out that somebody else graduated from UK, you want to work with them," Ellis said. "From the very first time I met Scott, we sat around and talked about Keeneland and our hometowns and the University of Kentucky campus and different things that we had in common because we had kind of walked on that same path. It was really great for us to bond over that from the very beginning and we were like ‘Ok this relationship is special, it’s something going to have a huge bearing on our life.’ It’s just been a really awesome thing to go on this journey with somebody that knows where I came from and what I experienced."

 

"Here in Nashville, it's like UK south," Safford said. "There are so many UK alums in town and we support each other and a lot of us are honestly just friends. It's not because 'Hey you went to UK, therefore I'm going to support you.' It's we have known each other for a long time but still there's that sense of community amongst UK alums here. Anytime there is an event on television or an important game, at any number of places in town there will be a gathering of UK alums and that's kind of unique and special to us."

Scott Safford

 

"As a matter of fact, the very first person I met in the music business was a UK alum. She was instrumental in helping me grow relationships and meet people in the business, which ultimately led to the job I have today. It helps so much to have one person who can kind of bring you into a family, and it was great that I found somebody with whom I had a common connection to UK when I first started in this industry. It's been fun to pass that along to Hannah as part of our interaction and to bring her along as the next generation. UK, that pride and passion, transcends generations here. I think what makes us different at UK is the passion with which we support the university and each other. It's that passion and the relationships that go along with it that makes us special."

 

"Being able to be in another state in another city and to meet someone that shares your love of the University of Kentucky is very special," Ellis said. "It kind of feels like a little piece of home away from home, so to speak. You don’t have family in town with you, but you do have someone that gets it. They get why you get crazy in the month of March, and they get why your closet is over three-fourths blue. Having somebody that totally knows where you’re coming from, and just feeling like, there’s just a different level of even friendship there. Because there’s this kind of understanding that comes with it."

 

"A big part of what I do is being a champion for somebody who has come to Nashville with a dream," Safford said. "It's such a courageous step to come here and to declare 'I'm going to be a songwriter or an artist in Nashville' because the odds are astronomically stacked against you. People who fight through that and make it, I'm so proud to be a part of that process with them. But what they need are champions. It's fun for me to be a part of that story and that process."

 

"For me, being a musician is such a special job because I truly, truly believe that music moves people," Ellis said. "I honestly feel really blessed to be able to pursue something that I’m truly passionate about. And I’m finally at a point where I can say that this is my career and it’s something that is just such a blessing and such a gift to be able to pursue something that can positively impact other people. Not everyone gets to do their dream job and yet here I am. I just don’t know how I got that lucky."

 

"UK really sets you up to make your mark on the world. UK is a place that supports you as a person, you as an individual, you as whoever it is that you want to be, you as anything that you’re trying to accomplish."

 

###

 

Before the Wildcats take the court in this year's Southeastern Conference Tournament, Hannah Ellis will perform during the Greater Nashville UK Alumni Club SEC Tournament Pep Rally on Friday, March 11. The event, which takes place at the WIldhorse Saloon, runs from 2 – 5 p.m. (CDT). For more information, visit the UK Alumni Association website.

  

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

 

VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu; or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu 

 

UK's Stuckert Career Center to Host Kentucky Teachers Network Fair

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 10:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Education majors, recent graduates and teachers from Kentucky and surrounding states will have the opportunity to network with representatives and recruiters at the Kentucky Teachers Network (KTN) Career Fair, hosted by the University of Kentucky’s James W. Stuckert Career Center, March 22, at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office. 

 

This is the 35th year for the KTN Career Fair. Nearly 60 school districts from Kentucky and surrounding states have registered for this one-day event and seek to hire upcoming graduates and alumni.

 

"We highly encourage those students who are completing their education certifications as well as those who are already working in education to attend," said Reba Carroll, senior assistant director at the UK Stuckert Career Center..

 

UK's Career Center will host the event in collaboration with the Eastern Kentucky University, Morehead State University, Georgetown College and Kentucky State University from 3:30-6 p.m. Tuesday, March 22. The fair will be held at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office, located at 1140 Red Mile Place off of Red Mile Road, in Lexington.

 

The KTN Career Fair is free to all job seekers. Participants are encouraged to dress professionally and to bring at least 20 copies of their résumés. Parking is limited at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office. Car-pooling, if possible, is suggested. A complete list of those recruiters attending the career fair can be found at: www.uky.edu/careercenter/KTN_Fair

 

As part of the UK Division of Undergraduate Education, the James W. Stuckert Career Center mission is to prepare students to successfully connect with employers and post-graduate educational opportunities. The Stuckert Career Center is here to help students connect their passions with purpose by exploring their college major options and career goals, engage in the process of expanding their knowledge and experience of the work place, and to connect with those who can help students on their career path. For more information on the Stuckert Career Center and how the staff can provide assistance, visit www.uky.edu/careercenter.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Office of LGBTQ* Resources Offers First Annual Scholarship

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 09:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of LGBTQ* Resources is offering its first annual scholarships to currently enrolled full-time students. There are multiple $1,000 awards for the 2016-2017 school year. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Thursday, March 31, 2016.

 

This award was created to help ease the cost of tuition, room and board, books, education abroad, and other expenses related to the recipient’s academic journey at the university. The scholarship is available because of gifts to the UK LGBTQ* Endowment Scholarship Fund.

 

The fund was originally created by Keisa and Amanda Fallin-Bennett, two generous alumnae devoted to encouraging student success. The scholarship seeks to support UK students who are committed to earning a degree from the university. 

 

“This scholarship represents a significant new opportunity for our students that continues to raise the profile of some of the important diversity and inclusion work that is happening on campus,” said Lance Poston, director of UK LGBTQ* Resources. “These endowed scholarships also show the power of alumni engagement and generosity in promoting the success of new generations of Wildcats.”

 

To apply for this scholarship opportunity, students should complete and turn in the application to Blazer Hall room 302; electronic applications will not be accepted. Students should also supply two letters of recommendations, documentation of financial need in the form of FAFSA, and an essay explaining connections between a student’s identities and their goals at the university.

 

All full-time students are welcome to compete for this scholarship, including individuals who are a part of the LGBTQ* community and those who are not. Award decisions will be announced in late April.

 

For additional information on these scholarships and to access the application packet, click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

May Lecture Series Ends with Photographer of Nuclear Arsenals

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 17:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The work of Paul Shambroom, who is known for exploring nuclear weapons, political meetings and even lost pets in his photography, is the subject of the final presentation of the 2015-16 Robert C. May Photography Lecture Series, organized by the University of Kentucky Art Museum. The program begins 4 p.m. Friday, March 11, in the Singletary Center for the Arts. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the artist's exhibition "Lost," a series of photographs derived from missing pet posters placed by owners in public places, on display through May 22, at the museum. Both the lecture and exhibition are free and open to the public.

 

Shambroom has frequently focused on issues that are integral parts of our lives but are difficult to examine, such as the manifestation of power in American culture. He spent two years gaining permission to photograph the country’s nuclear arsenals and as many attending small-town municipal meetings photographing elected officials enacting democracy at a grassroots level.

 

Shambroom's photographs have been exhibited widely and are part of many prestigious collections, including those at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Minneapolis' Walker Art Center and Atlanta's High Museum of Art. His work has also been published in three monographs: "Paul Shambroom: Picturing Power," "Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality After the Cold War" and "Meetings." Shambroom has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Creative Capital Foundation, among others. He is currently on the faculty of the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

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