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University Health Service Sponsors Love Your Body Week

Wed, 02/17/2016 - 08:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 18, 2016) – With Spring Break less than a month away, thoughts are turning to sun, sand and swim suits. Before fad diets and unhealthy exercise habits have the chance to make their way into the lives of students, University Health Service wants to encourage them to eat healthy, begin an exercise routine and "Love Your Body."

 

Love Your Body Week provides students with opportunities to participate in activities to focus on different aspects of health and their "unique selves." The National Eating Disorders Association reports, "35 percent of 'normal dieters' progress to pathological dieting. Of those, 20 to 25 percent progress to partial or full-syndrome eating disorders." Love Your Body events, like the Mindful Eating class, will teach students to have a better relationship with food and themselves to prevent issues, like eating disorders, from arising.

 

For the second year, the event will be held in partnership with the UK Panhellenic Association, falling during 2016 Panhellenic Pride Week. These events are open to all UK students. Shelby Stinson, a sophomore and member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, has participated in previous events, and is looking forward to being involved for a second year. "I want people to realize that they are beautiful individuals and need to learn to accept themselves for who they are,” she said

 

A similar sentiment was shared by Dietitian and Health Educator Emily Gimm who said the goal of the event is to "cultivate an environment in which (students) feel good about themselves." Participants are encouraged to share positive self-talk using the hashtag #loveyourbodyUK on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

 

Activities through Love Your Body Week include:

 

Monday

·         Let It Go, 11 a.m.to 2 p.m. in Whitehall North Lobby - students will learn about handling negative thoughts.

 

Tuesday

·         Know Your Numbers, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The 90 - students can have blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose screenings.

·         Mindful Eating, 5 p.m. at the Food Connection - during this one hour session, students will learn about foods role in the body.

 

Wednesday

·         Button Party, 4-6 p.m. at the Johnson Center Lobby - this crafting activity gives students the opportunity to create motivational buttons.

·         Ladies Night Out, 6-8 p.m. at the Johnson Center - personal trainers will assist students in navigating the intimidating muscle pit.

 

Thursday

·         Tranquility Jars 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the VIP Center - Students can make-and-take a tranquility jars that will help manage stress and negative thoughts.

·         Design Your Mirror, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the VIP Center - This mirror-creating exercise promotes positive self-images in students and supplies are provided.

 

Friday

·         Flatter Your Friends Friday - share kind words about your friends on social media using the hashtag #FlatterFriendsFriday

 

Saturday

·         Love Your Mind Love Your Body Yoga Class noon to 2 p.m. at the Johnson Center

 

Media contact: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076 

 

Community Collaboration Connects Lewis County High Schoolers with UK Scientists

Tue, 02/16/2016 - 16:57

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2016) – For most high school students, physics, health, communication and technology are the subjects of separate classes. In Lewis County, Ky., however, high school freshman are integrating these topics and skills through a collaborative, web-based project with scientists and students at the University of Kentucky.

 

The project is joint venture of Sara Poeppelman, a 16-year science teacher and department chair at Lewis County High School, and Robin Cooper, Ph.D., associate professor of biology at UK. The two educators met through their work with the Partnership Initiative for Math and Science Education Reform (PIMSER). Cooper, who also has a nursing degree and a passion for public health, is demonstrably committed to engaging young people in science, including establishing the Kentucky Science and Engineering Fair in association with Intel® International Science and Engineering Fair® (Intel ISEF). Peoppelman is similarly motivated to facilitate interactive and exciting science opportunities for her student.  

 

She and Cooper devised a web-based collaboration that gets students to use social media, smart phones and iPads — all while learning the physics and consequences of obesity and cardiovascular disease.  The project is supported by a community grant from the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, which aims to accelerate discoveries for human health and focuses specifically on health disparities in Appalachia.

 

“How can we reach kids in formats and ways that they’re comfortable with?” Poeppelman said.

 

The project involves two freshman physics classes at Lewis County High School. Led by Poeppelman and another teacher, Summer Hampton Behrendt, students are divided into groups and work through a “case study” about a fictional patient named Cindy, who is middle-aged, overweight and has high blood pressure.

 

Each group must build a visual model — using tubes, water and pumps — to demonstrate to Cindy the physics of what is happening within her blood vessels and why hypertension is dangerous for her health. The students then make videos to demonstrate their models and address with Cindy a holistic approach to her heath, including lifestyle changes, available medications, and possible outcomes cardiovascular disease. The videos are uploaded to a secure online platform called Acclaim, and UK science faculty and students then provide feedback and engage the Lewis Co. students in conversation about the case.

 

“I thought it was interesting in to do something hands-on like that in class,” said Caleb Voiers, a Lewis County freshman who’s interested in nursing. “It was fun – it was wet and messy and out of the ordinary and stuff that you wouldn’t normally do in a physics.” (Voier's video is included at the conclusion of the article).

 

The project aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards, which emphasize integration of scientific fields and the use of practical applications. The Cindy Case asks students to look at a common health problem through the lens of physics principles such as force and fluid flow, and then communicate their conclusions clearly. 

 

“It’s way more than just ‘hard science skills’. It’s communication and collaboration as much as anything else,” Poeppelman said. “And it’s strengthening our curriculum by getting kids to look at different ways that science can impact their lives, and different applications of science. Some of them thought it was hard, but that’s just the nature of science, and building some of that grit and getting kids to take on challenges is how I conduct my class. I want them to take on challenges, and I’ll help them.”

 

From Cooper’s perspective, the necessity of engaging young people in science is more urgent than just meeting the Next Generation Science Standards. 

 

“If we don’t get these younger kids interested in science, we’re going to end up with a public sector that doesn’t appreciate science. The only way to reverse that is to get kids to realize that we need to be science literate to advance our state as a whole,” he said.

 

As part of the Cindy Case, the Lewis County students also examined state and county-level public health data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Kentucky has some of the nation’s highest rates of heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes, especially in the Appalachian region.  The data included rates of these diseases but also statistics about income, graduation rates and education levels. The information sparked an unexpected conversation about the relationship between economic development, education, and health.

 

“We looked at big sets of health data, and some of the kids didn’t realize that we had so many health-related and other issues in our area. For example, one of the kids said, ‘This is awful! Do we really have that many drop-outs here?’” Poeppelman said. “We had some really good discussions about why having a good education and not moving out of Lewis County for good — but moving back to Lewis County and bringing some skills and industry — would be important to our community. The discussion was one of the unintended consequences of the project. I didn’t expect it to go there, but the kids said they saw real problems and I said, ‘Ok, well then what are you going to do about it?’”

 

The potential to encourage kids in their education is one of the main reasons that Sarah Martha, a doctoral student of nursing at UK, volunteers as one of the project mentors. Motivated by her own experiences a shy high student without much access to science resources or encouragement to go to college, she sees the project as a way to give all students an equal voice, get them thinking about their future educational plans, and break down barriers and fears about college. She thinks it’s especially important to engage young women in science through mentorship with women in science careers.

 

“I identify with the high school students who might be hesitant in sharing information in class and talking aloud. I’m a little shy myself, so I understand. But kids are on their phones and doing social media all the time, and this gives them the opportunity to have a voice.” She said. “And I identify with the students who don’t have access, and I want them to succeed. I want them to realize that the university is not a scary place and I want to break down the barriers to college. And this is just a neat opportunity for them to interact professors and university students. For me it goes back to the system and how we are placed within. Everyone should be granted the same opportunities, and some of us aren’t.”

 

Cooper and Poeppelman hope to expand the project to more classes in the future. They also plan to involve students in community health outreach through what they call “Healthy Flea” — setting up a health information booth and screenings (in collaboration with the local health department) at the popular local flea market.

 

 

UK & Lewis County High School's Online Collaboration from University of Kentucky on Vimeo.

 

A model video made by Lewis County freshman Caleb Voiers and classmates demonstrations the physics of high blood pressure. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, mallory.powell@uky.edu

 

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 17, 1912

Tue, 02/16/2016 - 15:56


LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 172nd diary entry from Feb. 17, 1912, recalls McClure waking up to find a suitcase that was left for her full of treats and an evening of “dancing.”

 

Feb. 17th. I am surprised at breakfast to hear that a suitcase was left to me, and I open it to find everything good to eat. John and Milton came down so I didn’t go to Lillian’s until afternoon. Addie tries to make the eleven o’clock car, but fails. I went to Paris as the boys went to Elmendorf. “Dancing” that night.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Student Wins Scholarship to Study Literature at Cambridge

Tue, 02/16/2016 - 10:51

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2017) – University of Kentucky's Abby Schroering, a theatre and English junior from Louisville, Kentucky, has been awarded an English-Speaking Union (ESU) Scholarship presented by the English-Speaking Union Kentucky Branch. The scholarship will cover Schroering's expenses for summer study at the University of Cambridge.

 

The Kentucky Branch of the English-Speaking Union awards a limited number of scholarships to qualified Kentucky college students for courses offered at institutions in the United Kingdom. Scholarship awards include tuition, lodging and two meals daily for three-week courses at the institutions chosen by the scholarship winners. Scholarships also include one week’s lodging in London and a cash allowance.

 

ESU scholarships are awarded for studies in English literature, history and social sciences at Oxford, Cambridge and Edinburgh University for the summer of 2016. Scholarship winners, selected through an essay and interview process for the program, are expected to become articulate lifelong ambassadors for British/American cultural exchanges. 

 

Schroering's scholarship will fund three-weeks of English literature studies at Cambridge.

 

The daughter of Becky and Steve Schroering, of Louisville, Schroering is a 2013 duPont Manual High School/Youth Performing Arts School graduate. A Gaines Fellow, Chellgren Fellow and Honors Program member at UK, Schroering pursued majors in theatre and English for the skills the programs instill in students. "Theatre, English and the humanities in general are fields in which we learn how to relate to each other and solve problems that are often overlooked in the pursuit of STEM and commerce."

 

As part of her theatre studies, Schroering has served as a stage manager for UK Department of Theatre and Dance's performances of "Much Ado About Nothing," "(Re)actions Dance Concert," "Hair!" and "The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee." She has also tested her directing and playwriting skills on such productions as "Extenuating Circumstances," "Episodes in Offices," "The Lady Next Door," "Paper Flowers," "Jefferson Hawthorne" and "Seek and Tell: a one woman show." Schroering's work and studies have also led to several undergraduate research projects, including "Stage Managers and Actors Can be Friends," "Gothic Art: Why the Catholics Need Theater," "Shakespearean Punctuation from the Folio to No Fear" and "T.S. Eliot's 'The Waste Land' as a Poetic Drama" that included a dramatic interpretation.

 

Schroering credits the world of theatre for giving her the strength to get involved. "As a child my shyness was crippling, and it was only through participation in theatre that I was able to get outside of myself and interact with other people in a meaningful way."

 

In the summers, the stage continues to call Schroering's name. The UK student has spent time working with both the Jenny Wiley Theatre and The Lexington Theatre Company.

 

"My summer making theater in Appalachia taught me more about the purpose of art — and life in general — than I can adequately express in words."

 

Upon completion of her undergraduate degrees, Schroering plans to pursue a doctoral degree in theater/performance studies.

 

The ESU of the United States is a nonprofit, nonpolitical, educational service organization whose mission is to promote scholarship and the advancement of knowledge through the effective use of English in an expanding global community. Headquartered in New York City, the organization implements programs through a network of 70 branches throughout the United States. The Kentucky branch of the ESU was chartered in 1923 by local business and civic leaders. Since 1960, more than 450 Kentucky teachers and college students have been awarded scholarships by the Kentucky branch of the ESU.

 

UK students interested in the ESU Scholarship may apply through the university’s Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the office assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Open and Operating on a Regular Schedule Feb. 16

Tue, 02/16/2016 - 05:39

University of Kentucky classes are in session on a regular schedule today, Tuesday, Feb. 16.  All offices are open and UK HealthCare clinics and hospitals are open and operating on a normal schedule.

 

The UK bus system and Lextran are operating on a normal schedule.

 

Good advice for pedestrians can be found here: http://www.uky.edu/hr/hr-home/uk-walk-safe-winter

A Movie Classic, Songwriting Phenoms, Opera and More at Singletary

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 18:16


 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — With the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra performing "Star Wars" as well as other major classical works, a concert featuring some of America’s finest songwriters, Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell, and a weekend of performances of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's well-known opera "Così fan tutte" by UK Opera Theatre, not to mention several recitals and community events, the next two weeks at Singletary Center for the Arts demonstrate the breadth of arts programming presented by the award-winning center.

 

Each year, the Singletary Center, part of UK College of Fine Arts, presents and/or hosts around 400 artistic, cultural and educational events on its recital and concert hall stages for not only the university community, but Lexington and the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In addition to the three major events above, the next two weeks will see the center hosting the Central Kentucky Youth Orchestra’s teen arts festival, three UK student and guest artist recitals, and the Day of Percussion presented by the Kentucky chapter of the Percussive Arts Society.

 

 

John Williams conducts the Boston Pops playing the main theme from "Star Wars".

 

First Stop: Space

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of John Nardolillo, will take its audience on a voyage through the universe with performances of "Star Wars" and "The Planets" at its February concert. The program, which will also feature this year's Concerto Competition winners from UK School of Music, will begin 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, at the Singletary Center. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

UK Symphony Orchestra's concert will feature popular pieces that connect listeners with space. Only months after the newest film from the "Star Wars" franchise hit theaters, the orchestra will perform the universally recognized main theme from the celebrated movies composed by John Williams. Continuing on the theme of space, the orchestra will also present one of Gustav Holst's most important works, "The Planets." For his magnum opus, Holst gave each planet a distinct astrological character, in a grandly orchestrated work that will also feature the UK Women's Choir, conducted by Lori Hetzel, associate director of UK School of Music.

 

In addition to performing the notable works by Williams and Holst, the orchestra will also celebrate the individual talents of two UK students who won the UK Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition. The competition presents a prestigious opportunity for UK music students to perform a solo concerto with the orchestra. Artistic excellence is the primary criterion, but students must also be fulltime music majors and prepare the entire concerto. A panel of judges composed of artists outside UK reviews excerpts performed by each contestant and selects the top four to return and play their entire concerto. From these finalists, one to three winners are chosen to perform with the orchestra in the Concerto Competition Concert.

 

This year two winners are Christine Sallas and Caden Holmes. Sallas, a doctoral student from Conyers, Georgia, will play an oboe concerto by Mozart. Holmes, a music performance junior from Madisonville, Kentucky, will play a trumpet concerto by Alexander Grigori Arutiunian.

 

For Sallas, whose maternal grandfather and mother also played the oboe, the concerto competition and possibility of playing with the orchestra was one the musician couldn't pass up. "I am honored to get the chance to perform as the winner. The chance to perform a concerto with a full orchestra doesn't come along very often, and I am thrilled that I can say I had this opportunity."

 

Sallas hopes the audience will take away the joy and excitement Mozart's music has to offer, while she experiences the magic of performing his work firsthand. "The Mozart Oboe Concerto is THE standard concerto in the oboe repertoire. It appears on nearly every major audition, and it is a piece I will be playing for the rest of my life. I wanted the chance to really experience this music as it was meant to be, not as an audition piece but as an incredible and moving piece of music."

 

Founded in 1918, the UK Symphony Orchestra is regarded as one of the nation’s best college orchestras. The 100-member all-student orchestra presents more than 50 concerts each year including classical, chamber and education concerts. The group is made up of undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States, Asia, South America and Europe.

 

UK's orchestra regularly performs with world-renowned concert artists including Itzhak Perlman, Sarah Chang, Gil Shaham, Mark O’Connor, Lynn Harrell, Denyce Graves, Lang Lang, Ronan Tynan, Natasha Paremski and Arlo Guthrie. Under Nardolillo's direction, the orchestra has performed not only in the concert hall at the Singletary Center but also around the U.S. and abroad, including concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York in 2007 and 2010, the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. in 2009, and a tour of China in 2013.

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra also collaborates yearly with UK Opera Theatre and in recent years they have also begun an active outreach program bringing classical music to all corners of the Commonwealth. In addition to live performances, UK's orchestra is one of the only collegiate orchestra programs to record for with Naxos, the world’s largest classical music label.

 

 

Three Celebrated Songwriters, One Night Only Concert

 

For one night only, Bluegrass audiences will enjoy three of America’s finest songwriters on one stage as Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell join together for a very special evening of music. Presented as a “songwriters-in-the-round” concert, all three of these celebrated performers will share songs and stories for an intimate and unforgettable evening beginning 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, at the Singletary Center.

 

This special concert will close out the center's own programming for the year. "We’re excited to have this fantastic show be the capstone on our 2015-16 Signature Series where we have taken a bit of a break from some of the classical and jazz fare of previous years and have focused this year’s season on more of the rock and folk sounds of the American musical landscape," Singletary Center Marketing and Ticketing Director Matthew Gibson said. "Patty Griffin spans the genres of folk, blues, rock and gospel so well — she is a perfect performer to end the season with, to say nothing of the incredible talents and accomplishments of Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell."

 

Patty Griffin performing "Servant of Love" from the "Servant of Love" album.

 

In a distinguished career spanning over 20 years, Grammy Award-winner Patty Griffin has established one of the strongest and most inimitable voices in contemporary folk music. In addition to standing out in a crowded field as an incredible vocalist, Griffin is also an accomplished songwriter, having written songs for artists including Mary Chapin Carpenter, Martina McBride, Emmylou Harris, Joan Osborne, Kelly Clarkson and Miranda Lambert, as well as most of the material on her own impressive catalogue of recordings. The artist’s recent collaborations include performances with Emmylou Harris, Mavis Staples and Dierks Bentley, as well as touring in Band of Joy with Robert Plant and Buddy Miller. Griffin received a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Gospel Album, a 2016 Grammy nomination for Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album and the American Music Association's 2007 Artist of the Year and Album of the Year awards.

 

Sara Watkins performs "You and Me" from the album "Sun Midnight Sun."

 

Singer and multi-instrumentalist Sara Watkins, first praised for her work as a founding member of Grammy Award-winning group Nickel Creek, has since established an extraordinary solo career including highly acclaimed studio albums and collaborations with artists such as John Mayer and The Decemberists. She has toured extensively as headliner, as well as performing and touring with such artists as Fiona Apple and Jackson Browne. Watkins is a frequent guest on NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and remains the only person invited to guest host on the program, which she did in 2010.

 

Anaïs Mitchell and the Young Man band perform "Dyin Day."

 

Widely known as the "Queen of Modern Folk Music," Anaïs Mitchell is first and foremost a storyteller. A Vermont-based singer-songwriter, Mitchell’s musical style, sound and performances have led her to be compared to Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Gillian Welch. She was first signed by Ani Difranco to Righteous Babe Records, where she recorded for several years before starting her own Wilderland label in 2012. Among Mitchell’s recorded works are five full-length albums, including 2010′s sensationally reviewed "Hadestown" and 2012′s "Young Man in America," which was described by critics as "genre-defining" and her "second consecutive masterpiece,” and for which she received a BBC Radio Two Folk Award nomination for Best Original Song. In addition to headlining worldwide, Mitchell has supported tours for Difranco, The Low Anthem, Richard Thompson, Josh Ritter and Punch Brothers, as well as two sold-out shows at Radio City Music Hall with the band Bon Iver.

 

Having such renowned artists come together on the Singletary stage is a thrill for the center's staff, who find it particularly exciting to have Griffin here on the heels of her Grammy nomination for Best Folk Album. "She has not just received accolades for her past work, but is proving that some of the best performances of her career are happening right now. We can’t wait," Gibson said.

 

Tickets for the concert featuring Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell range from $45 to $32 depending on location of seating. A ticket processing fee will be applied upon transaction. Tickets can be purchased from Singletary Center ticket office at www.scfatickets.com , phoning 859-257-4929 or at the venue.

 

 

'Così fan tutte' Marks Special UK Opera Appearance on Campus

 

In a rare treat for campus audiences, UK Opera Theatre brings its spring production to the Singletary Center for one weekend of performances of Mozart's "Così fan tutte." UK vocalists and the UK Symphony Orchestra will bring this opera to life Feb. 26-28, at Singletary Center.

 

This playful battle of the sexes finds two couples enjoying a romantic getaway when it is proposed that all women are cheaters — the bet is on.

 

Complete with sets and costumes, UK Opera Theatre presents Mozart’s masterpiece with a postmodern twist. Italian with English supertitles, the opera address the challenges of love, the pain of deceit, the power of temptation and the freedom of forgiveness in a lively comedic setting.

 

While UK Opera Theatre presents its annual musical revue, "It's a Grand Night for Singing!" at Singletary Center each summer, it is rarer for the opera program to present an opera production at the venue. So this will give audiences a special opportunity to see "Così fan tutte" staged on campus.

 

"We love presenting at the opera house and we look forward to our continued relationship with the Lexington Opera House, but when we can, we also want to bring our operas on campus," said Director of UK Opera Theatre Everett McCorvey. "Our audiences love Singletary Center because of the comfortable seating, the easy access and proximity to campus."

 

One of the challenges with Singletary Center is that it is not a theatre, it is a concert hall. Most opera productions require fly space (where a pulley system pulls the scenery up into the ceiling) or wing space (where a set can be moved off into the wings). For this production, UK Opera Theatre had to design a set that can either remain on stage or be altered and changed on stage in front of the audience.

 

To make "Così fan tutte," UK Opera Theatre was able to utilize technology they developed with UK Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments for a previous production.  

 

"We are incorporating our SCRIBE system of digital projection which we used in 'Porgy and Bess,' so we are happy to reacquaint our audiences with this technology," McCorvey said. "The system is basically 50 to 60 projectors positioned on a rack, projecting scenery against a screen. Because of this technology, scenery can be projected against a screen and can move to different places on stage between acts or between scenes." 

 

UK Opera Theatre's "Così fan tutte" will take the stage 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 26 and 27, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 27 and 28, at Singletary Center. Tickets for the opera range from $41.50 to $36.50 for general admission depending on location of seating. Student tickets with valid ID are only $9. A ticket processing fee will be applied upon transaction for all tickets. Tickets can be purchased from Singletary Center ticket office at www.scfatickets.com, phoning 859-257-4929 or in person at the venue.

 

With all these arts options at the community's fingertips, the Singletary Center hopes to see you in the audience soon. 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 16, 1912

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 16:59

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 171st diary entry from Feb. 16, 1912, recalls McClure having a friend stay over and how the friend could not remember a gentleman’s name.  

 

Feb. 16th. Mary spends the night, and we tease Addie, though Mary couldn’t catch on to Fred’s name.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UKAg's Davis Receives Distinguished Service Award

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 16:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — A longtime University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment employee recently received a distinguished service award from the Research Center Administrators Society (RCAS).

 

Donnie Davis is director of Central Kentucky Farms at UK and is the outgoing RCAS president.

 

“Donnie has been part of the lifeblood of this organization and one of its greatest advocates for its growth,” said Barry Sims, incoming society president. “Not only has he served in every executive position we have, but also on many of its committees. That kind of dedication is hard to find and we want to show our appreciation with this honor.”

 

A 1973 UK agriculture graduate, Davis has 40 years of experience managing research farm operations, resources and budgets, buildings and facilities, personnel, program interpretation and public relations.

 

Sims gave Davis a plaque during the society’s annual meeting in San Antonio.  

 

The Research Center Administrators Society is a national nonprofit organization whose membership is comprised of agricultural research station managers, directors, university, college and U.S. Department of Agriculture administrators.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Aimee Nielson, 859-257-7707

UK Ag Hosts Forum to Discuss Food Security and Justice

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 16:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2016) — A panel of community advocates will come together for the second P.R.E.P Talk at 6 p.m., Feb. 25, in the University of Kentucky’s Seay Auditorium. P.R.E.P. stands for Prevent, Reduce and Eliminate Poverty.

 

The Lexington Community Action Council, the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Department of Community and Leadership Development and its Community Innovation Lab are co-sponsoring the panel discussion. Local food activists and representatives from agricultural production and consumer organizations will share their ideas about food security and justice. Lexington’s local food coordinator, Ashton Potter Wright, will moderate. Community members, UK faculty and students are welcome to attend and join in the discussion at the free event.

 

With a panel composed of the key players and stakeholders in the battle for food justice, Bryan Hains, UK associate professor in community and agriculture education, anticipates that the discussion will lead to a “wonderful conversation” between agricultural producers, consumers, UK faculty and students.

 

“The primary audience is millennials, basically our students. We want them to start thinking about how they use what they’re learning at the university to make a change within their local communities,” he said. “It’s not only Lexington that has these problems, but nationwide, we see food justice issues too.”

 

Food justice is an overall term that encompasses the challenges people face in having access to healthy, reasonably priced food in some areas — known as food deserts — where grocery stores aren’t as prolific and transportation isn’t easily available.

 

“It’s a massive social issue,” Hains said. “It leads to all kinds of health issues, obesity, access issues.”

 

P.R.E.P. Talks are presented by Columbia Gas of Kentucky. Seay Auditorium is in the Agricultural Sciences Building, 1100 South Limestone.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324.

Apply Now for 2016 Phi Kappa Phi Fellowships, Scholarships

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 16:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2016) — The University of Kentucky chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi will celebrate its seventh birthday in April. Since receiving its official charter, the chapter has seen nine individuals from UK earn scholarship and fellowship awards from the national office, which each year distributes more than $500,000 to outstanding students, Phi Kappa Phi members and chapters.

 

"The UK Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi (PKP) is pleased to again announce a series of grants available through the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society," said Frank Ettensohn, professor of earth and environmental sciences and Jefferson Science Fellow, who is president of the UK chapter. "The previous UK recipients of these awards have put them to excellent use in furthering their educational pursuits, and in helping others through their service."

 

The following opportunities are available for students and faculty at UK who are active members of Phi Kappa Phi. Interested individuals should visit the PKP website at www.PhiKappaPhi.org and click on Grants & Awards.

 

Fellowship Program - Deadline to Apply is April 1

Each year, the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi awards 51 fellowships of $5,000 each and three at $15,000 each to members entering the first year of graduate or professional study. Each Phi Kappa Phi chapter may select one candidate from among its local applicants to compete for the society-wide awards. Applications are due no later than April 1, 2016, to the UK Chapter, 224 Funkhouser Bldg. Each chapter may send only one nominee forward.

 

Literacy Grant - Deadline to Apply is April 1

This program was initiated to mobilize members and resources of Phi Kappa Phi and the higher education community to champion literacy initiatives. Grants of up to $2,500 are available to Phi Kappa Phi chapters and individual members to fund ongoing literacy projects or to create new initiatives. The society's commitment to the cause of literacy grows out of and is consistent with its mission, which was expanded to include "…to engage the community of scholars in service to others." Deadline to apply is April 1, 2016.

 

Love of Learning Award - Deadline to Apply is April 1

These awards help fund post-baccalaureate studies and career development opportunities including graduate and professional studies, doctoral dissertations, continuing education, and travel related to teaching or studies. Students may apply directly to Phi Kappa Phi for these awards. One hundred forty awards of $500 each are awarded annually. Deadline to apply is April 1, 2016.

 

Eligibility

Applicants for the Fellowship ProgramLiteracy Grant and Love of Learning Award must be active Phi Kappa Phi members (with dues paid) or those who have accepted membership by June 30, 2016.

 

For additional information, contact:

C. Lynn Hiler, Program Coordinator

Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence

224 Funkhouser Building

University of Kentucky

Lexington KY 40506-0054

859-257-6894

clynnhiler@uky.edu

 

Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest, largest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Its chapters are on more than 300 campuses in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Philippines. Each year, approximately 30,000 members are initiated.

 

Since its founding, Phi Kappa Phi has initiated more than 1 million members into its ranks; all of these members have received emblems and certificates of membership. However, Phi Kappa Phi is much more than an emblem and a line on a résumé. It is a global network comprised of the best and brightest from all academic disciplines — a community of scholars and professionals building an enduring legacy for future generations.

 

The UK Chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education at UK.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200

"see blue." #selfie: Patrick Smith

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 15:57

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we're excited to introduce "see blue." #selfie - a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Today meet National Pan-Hellenic Council President Patrick Smith.

 

Patrick Smith, a junior finance and management major from East St. Louis, Illinois, serves as the 2015-16 University of Kentucky National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) President. We sat down with Smith to get to know the student leader behind the NPHC title. This dedicated, outgoing and zealous leader relays his passion for his involvement at UK in his "see blue." #selfie!

 

UKNow: What is your major and where are you from?

Patrick Smith: I'm a junior finance and management major from East St. Louis, Illinois.

 

UK: What position do you hold on the National Pan-Hellenic Council?

PS: I am president of NPHC, which is a job that oversees everything and relationships with other councils. It's the figure head for the council.

 

UK: When did you become involved with the National Pan-Hellenic Council?

PS: Well, I first initiated into Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. By being initiated, I was a member of NPHC, then I became president this year…so I'm going on two years!

 

UK: Why are you so passionate about this organization? 

PS: Going back to Kappa, I have always wanted to be a member of the fraternity since I was young. I grew up around a lot of Kappas, so that made an influence on me. I started going to meetings and learning about different organizations. That made me want to get into the position to be a leader. So, I would say, being involved in a minority organization, I wanted to voice opinions on issues around campus.

 

UK: What is your favorite part about your position? 

PS: I get to meet new people and be out on campus interacting with freshmen and others. Also, I like showcasing what we have to offer and reaching out to other people. One issue that I see when I interact with others is diversity on campus. We still have a long way to go. As a council, this is one thing we want to address. We can be pivotal in helping the campus get to where it needs to be.

 

UK: What made you decide to come to UK from out-of-state? 

PS: I was a big UK basketball fan. It was a culture shock, but I felt a sense of home and could see myself here for four years. Everyone is friendly, the scenery is great and the campus has great things to offer.

 

UK: What's your most frequently used emoji?

PS: Probably between the clapping hands one and the shrugging smiley face one.

 

UK: What are three things you consider essentials for any student on campus?

PS: A phone charger, of course, snacks and my laptop. No matter what, those will get you through the day. You'll be fine.

 

UK: What is your favorite class you have ever taken at UK? 

PS: Probably, "Accounting 301." It is a hard class but my teacher, Jane Wells, was a really good teacher and she helped me appreciate it, which led me to understand what I wanted to do and why. The class also taught me to work hard because nothing slides in that class!

 

UK: Are there any other organizations on campus that you're involved in? 

PS: I'm a member of Kappa, involved in Student Government Association and the National Association of Black Accounting.

 

UK: Growing up, what did you want to be?

PS: Lawyer. I've always wanted to be one; and I still want to be one.

 

UK: Who is your all-time favorite UK basketball player?

PS: John Wall.

 

UK: What is your favorite thing you like to do off campus in the Lexington community? 

PS: Keeneland. Coming from out-of-state, I thought it was the most awkward and bizarre thing ever. Now, it's something I look forward to!

 

UK: It's noon and you find yourself on campus. Where are you going to grab some lunch?

PS: Einstein Bagels.

 

UK: Where is your favorite place to study on campus?

PS: Probably the study room in Gatton. They transformed that into a brand new facility!

 

UK: What is one thing you know as a junior that you would tell an incoming freshman? 

PS: Get involved — like everyone says. That's the one way to meet new people and grow up. It helps you mature and gives you more responsibility, purpose and a great feeling. Get involved. Coming from out-of-state to UK from a place where only a handful of people come, coming alone, this helped me meet people and stay busy. 

 

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

Commerce Lexington and Gatton College Offer Executive MBA Scholarship

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 15:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — Through a partnership formed between Commerce Lexington Inc. and the University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics, a scholarship in the amount of $15,000 will be available to a Commerce Lexington member to help eliminate a portion of the cost of the UK/UofL Executive MBA program, beginning in August 2016. The goal is to provide an opportunity for an advancing corporate leader to demonstrate their desire to improve the economic environment of Central Kentucky, while furthering their own personal development.

 

For many years, Commerce Lexington has recognized the importance of nurturing leaders by providing leadership and professional development opportunities to individuals in our community and region through its Leadership Lexington and Leadership Central Kentucky programs. The opportunity for a Commerce Lexington member to receive a scholarship for the executive MBA program is an extension of the chamber’s commitment to developing strong corporate leadership in our region.

 

UK and the University of Louisville recently partnered to create a first-rate Executive MBA program that helps participants gain hands-on skills and real-world knowledge applicable to a variety of challenging work situations, while supporting personal and career growth, as well as leadership development. The goal is to help up-and-coming business professionals within a company develop the confidence and knowledge they need to take the next step in advancing as a leader in their field.

 

The scholarship application deadline is March 15. To qualify for the scholarship, those Commerce Lexington members must complete an application that includes an essay outlining how their participation in the program would benefit both themselves and Central Kentucky as a whole. The scholarship application is available online, with a submission deadline of March 15, 2016. Additionally, the scholarship candidate must meet all the admission criteria for the UK/UofL Executive MBA program detailed on their website.

 

Scholarship applications will be reviewed by both representatives of Commerce Lexington and the Gatton College, and a recipient will be recommended to the EMBA Admissions Committee, who will then make the final determination. For more information about the Commerce Lexington EMBA Scholarship opportunity, call 859-226-1611.  For questions about the UK/UofL Executive MBA program, call 859-257-3741.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Terrance Wade, terrance.wade@uky.edu, 859-257-8716; Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750; annmary.q@uky.edu.

College of Social Work to Host Diversity Workshop

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 11:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Social Work will be hosting Roger Cleveland on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, for a Diversity Training and Workshop.

 

Cleveland is an associate professor in the College of Education and director of the Center for Education Equity and Excellence at Eastern Kentucky University. He was recently on a panel at the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Intercultural Awareness Day at UK. Cleveland has conducted cultural competency workshops for other units on campus, including one last spring for faculty in the College of Health Sciences.

 

The training and workshop, “Culturally Competent Organizational Culture,” will take place from 2–4 p.m., at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall, and is open to all students, faculty, staff and community members.

Learning Objectives:

  • Present the concept of cultural competency and its guiding principles for implementation.
  • Establish the importance for continuously building our skills towards cultural competence and recognize the value-added outcomes for the organization.
  • Present a framework in which to understand the impacts of institutional power and privilege.

Two free continuing education units (CEU's) will be offered for attending the event. If you would like the CEUs, pre-register with Leigh Oakley (leigh.oakley@uky.edu). If you are teaching this semester, encourage your students to attend — the workshop also might serve as a related learning event for students in field.  

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

 

Being Heart Healthy is Easier Than You Think

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 10:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) – It's the halfway mark of National Heart Month and by now more than one in three people have abandoned their New Year's resolutions.

 

Even people with the best of intentions to get heart-healthy in the new year become discouraged after just a handful of long runs or drop their gym memberships after a couple of sessions. Dr. Gretchen Wells, director of women's heart health at the University of Kentucky's Gill Heart Institute, emphasizes that we don't have to exercise strenuously to achieve results.

 

"You reduce your risk of heart attack by 50 percent if you get 150 minutes of activity a week — or 30 minutes for five out of seven days," Wells said. "That doesn't have to come with a gym membership or fancy, expensive equipment. A brisk walk can be just as effective in reducing heart attack risk."

 

In fact, said Wells, even completing household chores like vacuuming or mowing the lawn can take up a significant chunk of that goal.

 

Allison Perry, a Lexington, Ky.-based fitness instructor, saw firsthand how being active throughout the day can be as beneficial as a strenuous workout.

 

"One day I had a mostly sedentary day at my desk, but taught a high-intensity kickboxing class at the end of the day. The next day I walked around a lot at work and taught a spin class, but off the bike. I actually walked more steps and burned more calories on the second day, even though the first day was the day I went to the gym," said Perry. "There's clearly a tremendous benefit to moving around all day."

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

 

 

 

Confucius Institute Taking Applications for Faculty Grants

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 10:40

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) is currently taking applications for faculty grants that help fund China-focused academic endeavors. Applications for 2016 spring and summer grant proposals are due Monday, Feb. 22.

 

"This is UK Confucius Institute's effort to support faculty in their China-related research and travel. We are offering a wide range of grants for travel and course development. I hope faculty will take advantage of these funds to advance their research and course development on China-related topics," said Huajing Maske, director of UKCI and executive director of the Office of China Initiatives.

 

Funded through the institute, the UKCI faculty grant provides UK faculty members with financial support toward international and domestic travel for China-related conferences, research, course field trips or curriculum development. The type, number and amount of grants to be awarded are as follows:

· International Travel Grant - Six $2,500 grants supporting UK faculty travel internationally for China-related conferences (must be speakers) and research.

· Domestic Travel Grant - 10 $1,500 grants supporting UK faculty travel within the continental U.S. for China-related conferences (must be speakers), to conduct China-related research or field trips with students (ex. museum visit, etc.).

· Curriculum Development Grant - 10 $1,000 grants to integrate perspectives from China into courses and programs that do not already include this aspect.

Faculty can only be awarded one category of these faculty grants each academic year. Funds must be used in accordance with standard UK funding policies. To be eligible to apply for a UKCI faculty grant, applicants must be full-time faculty who teach at least one course at UK.

 

Faculty wishing to apply for a UKCI grant should complete the application form here. Applicants must include the following:

· curriculum vitae;

· proposal narrative;

· information on improvement or knowledge to be gained from grant;

· official conference/program invitation (if applicable);

· an administrative recommendation;

· all additional information relevant to the proposed research/conference/field-trip/curricular development; and

· a proposed budget.

 

The UKCI Steering Committee’s grant subcommittee will evaluate all proposals and make the final decisions regarding the awards. Awards will be announced March 15.

 

A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, the UK Confucius Institute provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth.

 

For more information on the UK Confucius Institute's faculty grants, contact Huajing Maske, director of UKCI and executive director of the Office of China Initiatives, at huajing.maske@uky.edu.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK on Two Hour Delay

Mon, 02/15/2016 - 05:28

The University of Kentucky is operating on a two-hour delay today, Monday, Feb. 15. Classes beginning at 10 a.m. and later will be in session.  Earlier classes are canceled. Employees except those on Plan B report to work on a two-hour delay. All UK HealthCare hospitals and clinics are open and operating on a regular schedule.

Motivated by Personal Experience, Scientist Seeks Answers About Spinal Cord Injury

Fri, 02/12/2016 - 15:43

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2016) — At the age of 19, Sasha Rabchevsky was a strong safety on the Hampden-Sydney College football team when a motorcycle accident left him paralyzed from the chest down.

 

Rabchevsky has transformed that dreadful turn of events into a meaningful career searching for ways to repair spinal cord damage and improve the lives of those living with spinal cord injury (SCI).

 

"After my accident, I knew I wanted to pursue research to understand what my condition was and if not cure it, figure out and understand why there was no cure," he said.

 

After graduating with a bachelor of science in biology only a semester behind his original class, and then working as a technician at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, Rabchevsky joined the University of Florida Neuroscience graduate program and earned his PhD in 1995. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Paris, XII, he came to Lexington in 1997 for a second postdoctoral fellowship and launched his career as an independent investigator in 2002.

 

Rabchevsky's research career has focused on two primary problems related to SCI: finding ways to either promote tissue sparing post-injury to improve functional recovery,  or to prevent aberrant neuronal regeneration that can lead to dangerous hypertension.

 

"A key element underlying both problems is the dysfunction of mitochondria, which are the principle energy-producing organelles in a cell responsible for their life, but also responsible for cell death when damaged," Rabchevsky explained. "We've been testing some unique pharmacological agents which are showing promise as mitochondria stabilizers of sorts, preventing their short circuiting and thus promoting neuroprotection after SCI."

 

Part two involves a little-known syndrome following SCI that stems from a sort of rogue regeneration that is associated with a condition called autonomic dysreflexia.

 

"There is actually regeneration that does occur after SCI, and a lot of it," said Rabchevsky. "However, most axons do not form proper connections and instead many can activate autonomic (unconscious) reflexes that aren't necessarily pleasant or good even for the human condition."

 

During autonomic dysreflexia, a painful stimulus below the level of the SCI (which the person cannot feel) can cause sudden and often sustained hypertension until the stimulus is removed.

 

"So the person with SCI can have a huge spike in blood pressure, often accompanied by headaches and sweating, but not really know why it's occurring, and there's no shut-off mechanism, so to speak," Rabchevsky explained. "Clearly, that kind of change in blood pressure wreaks havoc on the body and daily livelihood because the most common trigger is a full bladder or bowels, which is frequent but imperceptible."

 

Rabchevsky has recently received a grant that will allow his lab to be the first to transplant healthy mitochondria into animals with SCI.

 

"We hope this procedure will replace dysfunctional mitochondria in the injured host cells to foster tissue sparing and, thus, promote functional recovery and reduce the incidence of autonomic dysreflexia," he said.  "Down the road, we might even be able to merge the two branches of my research into one, combining mitochondrial transplantation with pharmacologic agents that mitigate cell damage to improve both grafted and host mitochondria survival for maximizing functional neuroprotection."

 

Watch the video above to learn more about what drives Rabchevsky as a researcher and why he thinks UK has a uniquely nurturing environment for research.

 

This video feature is part of a new monthly series called ‘“see discovery:” The People Behind Our Research.’  The videos, produced by UKNow and REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers.  The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

 

Since this is a monthly feature on UKNow, we invite you to submit future ideas.  If you know of a researcher who you think should be featured, please email us

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Laura Dawahare, 859-257-5307, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu

or Alicia Gregory, 859-257-2980, alicia@uky.edu

 

Join UK Symphony Orchestra on a Voyage through the Stars

Fri, 02/12/2016 - 15:02

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 12, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra will take its audience on a voyage through space with performances of "Star Wars" and "The Planets" at their February concert. The program, which will also feature this year's Concerto Competition winners from UK School of Music, will begin 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, at the Singletary Center for the Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Each year, the orchestra celebrates the individual talents of two UK students who win the UK Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition. This year's winners, Christine Sallas and Caden Holmes, will each perform a solo concerto with the orchestra. Sallas, a doctoral student from Orlando, Florida, will play an oboe concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Holmes, a music performance junior from Madisonville, Kentucky, will play a trumpet concerto by Alexander Grigori Arutiunian.

 

The rest of the concert will feature popular pieces that connect with the universe. Only months after the newest film from the "Star Wars" franchise hit theaters, the orchestra will perform the universally recognized main theme from the celebrated movies composed by John Williams. Continuing on the theme of space, the orchestra will also present one of Gustav Holst's most important works, "The Planets." For his magnum opus, Holst gave each planet a distinct astrological character, in a grandly orchestrated work that features the UK Women's Choir.

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra, conducted by John Nardolillo, and UK Women's Choir, conducted by Lori Hetzel, are housed in the UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Libraries Reconfigures Access to Licensed Library Electronic Resources

Fri, 02/12/2016 - 14:39

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2016) — To better ensure continued access to academic and scholarly electronic resources, the University of Kentucky Libraries will reconfigure licensed electronic books, journals and databases to require channeling through the EZproxy server. EZproxy is a service which allows access to restricted electronic information purchased or licensed by the UK Libraries for current UK students, staff and faculty.

 

In the past EZproxy has been used for off-campus access only, but this reconfiguration will mean that the EZproxy service will be required for both on-campus and off-campus access to most licensed resources. It also means that a user’s initial access to licensed resources will have to be made through a UK Libraries service — the Libraries web site, InfoKat Discovery, Research Guides or “View Now @ UK” button. 

 

Most users of UK Libraries resources should see no difference.

 

If an instructor has set up direct access to licensed resources from Canvas or BlackBoard and properly configured links for off-campus access as described on the EZproxy FAQ, there should be no difference. 

 

If an instructor has not followed the instructions on the EZproxy FAQ, then the links will need to be altered after this change is implemented.

 

Personal bookmarks, favorites or shortcuts directly to licensed journals, books and databases may need to be recreated after this change is implemented. To recreate personal bookmarks, favorites or shortcuts:

  1. Start from one of the UK Libraries resources listed above: the Libraries web site, InfoKat Discovery, Research Guides or “View Now @ UK” button
  2. Find the resource
  3. Save it to bookmarks, favorites or shortcuts

Alternately the favorite could be edited directly by adding the URL prefix as indicated on the EZProxy FAQ.

 

UK Libraries does not make this change lightly, but we must to live up to our licensing obligations, avoid disruption of service, and ensure continued access to academic and scholarly electronic information.  

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Theatre to Present 'In the Red and Brown Water'

Fri, 02/12/2016 - 14:33

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance will present Tarell Alvin McCraney's "In the Red and Brown Water" Feb.18-28, at the Guignol Theatre.

 

In this powerful play about choice, fleet-footed young athlete Oya is on the verge of womanhood, forced to make life-altering decisions. Does she escape fate by accepting a track scholarship at a state university or does she stay caught in the Louisiana projects to take care of her dying mother? And who will her heart choose, Shango, a military man, or Ogun, a down-to-earth businessman? Oya must come to terms with her identity, her sacrifice and her loss.

 

"In the Red and Brown Water" is the first play in a trilogy of plays called "The Brother/Sister Plays." The second play, "The Brothers Size," premiered at Actors Theatre of Louisville a few years ago. "In the Red and Brown Water" premiered at the Alliance Theatre in Atlanta and was later produced at the Young Vic in London. The entire trilogy had its world-premiere at The Public Theatre in New York in 2009.

 

Playwright Tarell McCraney is a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation genius grant. He's a resident member of Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago and an alumnus of New Dramatists in New York.

 

"In the Red and Brown Water" will take the Guignol stage 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Feb. 18-20 and Feb. 25-27, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21 and 28. Tickets for the production are $15 for general admission and $10 for students with a valid school ID through the Singletary Center box office. Fees will be added to purchase upon completion of transaction. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

Strong language and sexual content are used in the production of "In the Red and Brown Water." Viewer discretion is advised.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

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