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UK Helps St. Catharine Students With Transfer Requests

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky is helping St. Catharine College students continue their education in the aftermath of last week's announcement that the college in Springfield, Kentucky, would close at the end of July.

 

The UK Office of Undergraduate Admission and the Transfer Center are assisting students who are interested in transferring to UK. The $50 application fee is being waived for all students applying to transfer to UK on or before June 30, 2016, including St. Catharine students.

 

"The University of Kentucky recognizes the unique needs of transfer students, particularly those from St. Catharine College," said Mike Shanks, director of the UK Transfer Center. "We encourage each student interested in transferring to contact the Transfer Center to aid in transcript evaluation and admission information.

 

"Our Transfer Center provides resources to help students transition to UK.  Our staff collaborates with other on-campus units to provide the necessary resources for successful progress toward graduation."

 

At the Transfer Center, students can:

 

·         Discuss transfer course equivalencies prior to admission

·         Resolve specific transfer related issues by connecting with a UK staff member

·         Discuss transfer planning strategies prior to enrolling at UK

 

For more information on how to contact a staff member or to learn more about transferring to UK, call the UK Transfer Center at 859-218-1724; email to UKTransfer@uky.ed; or visit the center at 11 W.D. Funkhouser Building on the UK campus. 

 

The website is www.uky.edu/Transfer. Application information is also available at: www.applyuk.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Rebecca Stratton, 859-323-2395, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

KNI Stroke Center Receives High Designation from American Heart Association

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2015) - UK HealthCare's Kentucky Neuroscience Institute (KNI) has received the "Get With The Guidelines - "Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award" by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for maintaining nationally recognized standards for the treatment of stroke patients.
 

KNI also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. Over 12 months, at least 75 percent of the hospital’s ischemic stroke patients received tPA within 60 minutes of arriving at the hospital (known as door-to-needle time). Stroke patients who receive tPA within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover more quickly and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

 

This year marks the sixth year that KNI has received Gold Plus designation. KNI has been named to the Target: Stroke Honor Roll the past three years and repeats for the 'elite' level that was introduced last year.

 

Kentucky patients aren't the only ones benefiting from this achievement.

 

"By participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program, we are able to share our expertise with other member hospitals around the country, including access to the most up-to-date research, clinical tools and resources, and patient education resources," said Dr. Jessica Lee, medical director of the KNI Comprehensive Stroke Center.

 

Dr. Larry Goldstein, chair of the UK Department of Neurology and co-director of KNI, said that “Comprehensive Stroke Center status reflects our capability to provide the most advanced care for patients with stroke. These awards further underscore the hard work of our multidisciplinary team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, emergency physicians, nurses, therapists and others to optimize care delivery for stroke patients right here in Lexington.”

 

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. In Kentucky, cardiovascular disease (which includes stroke) is the leading cause of death.  On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 785,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

 

The KNI Stroke Center is also also certified as a “Comprehensive Stroke Center” by The Joint Commission – its highest honor.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

World's Largest Math Proof Produced at 200 Terabytes

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:19
LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016)  The world's largest mathematical proof — at a massive 200 terabytes — has been produced and a longstanding math mystery has been solved by University of Kentucky Professor Victor Marek and collaborators.

 

How big is 200 terabytes? The journal Nature reported that the proof is "roughly equivalent to all the digitized text held by the US Library of Congress."

 

“It is, indeed quite big," said Marek, a professor in the UK Department of Computer Science.

 

The team, including Marek, Marijn J. H. Heule of The University of Texas at Austin, and Oliver Kullmann of Swansea University in Wales, was working to solve the boolean Pythagorean Triples problem. (Remember the Pythagorean theorem? a2 + b2 = c2.)

 

The problem asks if it is possible to color each positive integer either blue or red so that no Pythagorean triple a, b and c are all of the same color.

 

The supercomputer-assisted proof revealed that it was possible to color the integers in multiple ways up to 7,824 integers. But at 7,825 and beyond, it is impossible for every Pythagorean triple to be multicolored.

 

The team's findings are featured pre-print at http://arxiv.org/abs/1605.00723. Marek, Heule and Kullmann have already been rewarded for their work. Ronald Graham, the mathematician who proposed the problem in the 1980s, pledged back then to give $100 to whoever solved the problem. He followed through on his promise last month, presenting a check to Heule at a scientific conference.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Honorary Degree Nomination Deadline is July 15

Wed, 06/08/2016 - 15:22

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016) — The University Joint Committee on Honorary Degrees is inviting nomination packages for honorary doctorates to be awarded at the university Commencement exercises in December 2016.

 

An honorary doctoral degree pays tribute to those whose lives and work exemplify professional, intellectual, or artistic achievement and who have made significant contributions to society, the state and the University of Kentucky.

 

Nominations may be made by faculty, students, staff and friends of the University of Kentucky. The committee will follow the criteria, principles and guidelines approved by the University Senate and Board of Trustees. 

 

For information on criteria and the nomination process, as well as the list of previous recipients, visit the Graduate School’s Honorary Doctoral Degrees website.

 

Lead nominators who are assembling a nomination package should upload the completed document at the link on the above website by July 15, 2016.

 

Please direct any questions to Morris Grubbs at morris.grubbs@uky.edu in the Graduate School.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Behind the Blue: UK's Dr. Derek Forster on Dealing with Zika Virus

Wed, 06/08/2016 - 11:36
LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016) — Amid growing concerns about the Zika virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued a travel advisory for the countries hit hardest by the virus, as well as new guidelines for clinicians who may be treating women who have contracted the virus.  As Zika continues to spread through South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean, many Americans and growing concerned about the potential impact in the U.S.  In this week’s edition of the “Behind the Blue” podcast, UK HealthCare's Medical Director for Infection Prevention and Control Dr. Derek Forster discusses the background of the Zika virus, its implications, and what Kentuckians can do to help prevent the spread of the virus. You can download this edition and others of "Behind the Blue" at:http://behindtheblue.libsyn.com/podcast UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Mining Engineering Professors' Innovation Combats the Dangers of Dust

Wed, 06/08/2016 - 11:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016)  According to Thomas Novak, professor and Alliance Coal Chair in the Department of Mining Engineering at the University of Kentucky, approximately 50 percent of all coal produced in underground mines in the U.S. comes from a particular kind of underground mine called a longwall mine. While such mines are quite productive, they are not effective at reducing the amount of dust generated by longwall shearers, which extract the coal. Whether respirable dust, which is harmful if breathed over a miner’s career, or float dust, which carries the potential for an explosive dust cloud if the mine is subjected to an ignition of methane, dust is hazardous to safe and sustainable mining. 

 

In an attempt to combat dust emissions, Novak and Assistant Professor Chad Wedding have created a full-scale model of a longwall shearer that features a fully functional scrubber system.

 

“Scrubbers aren’t new to underground mining,” explained Novak. “Continuous mining operations — which are different from longwall mining operations — have used what are called flooded bed scrubbers successfully for quite some time. Basically, we are trying to bring what we know works for one method of mining to another method that suffers from more difficult dust control.”

 

While both Novak and Wedding are mining engineering professors at UK, they bring expertise in other fields to this project. Novak received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering; Wedding earned his in mechanical engineering. Novak designed the electrical and computer-control system for the scrubber and Wedding fabricated all of the components with the help of the college’s machine shop and used a 3-D printer to create a mold for the scrubber’s 32 cutting picks.

 

Because longwall shearers face vertical height restrictions, it is not possible to simply attach a scrubber onto an existing machine; therefore, Novak and Wedding have incorporated their scrubber into a new shearer design. Further, the placement of the scrubber is crucial. Because the dust must be captured before it is dispersed into the air and diluted, the scrubber inlet needs to be near the cutting drum, which cuts into the longwall face; however, if it is too close, large coal particles may clog the scrubber bed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling played a critical role in helping the team place the scrubber’s large centrifugal fan and ductwork.

 

Based on CFD modeling, Novak and Wedding 3-D printed a small-scale version of the new shearer design. Then they went to work on producing the full-scale model, which is approximately 65 feet in length when assembled. This week, the team will transport the shearer to the Pittsburgh Research Lab of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). There, they can test the scrubber’s capabilities in NIOSH’s longwall dust gallery.

 

“There wouldn’t be any way to test this prototype due to its size and the disruption it would cause to a mining operation,” Wedding said. “That is why it is important that we are able to use the longwall gallery at NIOSH, which closely simulates a longwall face. Currently, we are working on building a similar gallery for continuous mining in Georgetown, Kentucky.”

 

Funding for the project came from the Alpha Foundation for the Improvement of Mine Safety and Health Inc. with an in-kind donation of equipment from Joy Global and in-mine visits from Alliance Coal LLC.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Federal Grant Helps Bridge Rural Gap in Availability of Speech Therapy Services

Wed, 06/08/2016 - 10:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016) — Access to health care and health-related services is a chronic problem in rural America, and Kentucky with its swaths of undeveloped land in Appalachia and points west is particularly vulnerable. A number of initiatives are working to address the issue, and one in particular – using videoconferencing technology to connect experts in larger cities with patients in rural areas – has shown promise.

 

Via “telemedicine,” UK HealthCare physicians have been able to help women with high-risk pregnancies, Alzheimer’s patients, and many other sick people who cannot feasibly travel long distances to get their care.   

 

Faculty from the University of Kentucky’s College of Health Sciences have been exploring ways to train a new generation of speech-language pathologists in "telepractice," a similar concept of using technology to connect practitioners and patients, to deliver therapy to underserved populations. Their efforts have been rewarded with a $1.2 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education to develop the LinKS (Linking Kids to Speech-Language Pathologists) project. 

 

Funding will be used to prepare eight master-level speech-language pathologists annually (40 total) in the effective utilization of telepractice, thereby increasing children’s access to speech-language services in rural Kentucky schools. Assistant Professor Joneen Lowman, Ph.D., will serve as LinKS project director and Associate Professor Jane Kleinert, Ph.D., as co-director.

 

“Resources in rural school districts can be slim and schools are frequently unable to meet federal mandates to provide support services for children with disabilities,” Kleinert said.  “Telepractice is an innovative way to help solve that problem.”

 

Lowman said the program will give students the skills to address the nuances in delivering therapy remotely.

 

“A race car driver must know more than just how to drive the car,” she said.  “He must know how the car’s technology functions, how to manage gas usage…. all sorts of things that are tangentially related to race car driving, but are directly critical to success.  Using technology to deliver healthcare services is very similar.”

 

To that end, the program will help students understand the complexities of licensure and reimbursement, HIPAA/FERPA and other privacy concerns, and even some of the more technical aspects of care delivery.  “They must know how to operate high-tech equipment and understand terminology like ‘bandwidth,’ to be effective,” said Lowman. “If they can’t fix technical issues on the spot, they can’t provide the services these children need.”

 

Perhaps one of the most intriguing elements of the LinKS program is the curriculum on rural culture. Students will be assigned readings and attend lectures about the unique character of Appalachia and other rural areas that will inform each student’s ability to collaborate with “cultural brokers” in the communities they ultimately serve.

 

Hazard resident Taylor Marshall, now nine years old, participated in a trial run for speech language telepractice at UK. Taylor had hearing issues that contributed to a speech delay with certain letters and sounds, said his father, Charles Marshall.

 

“We looked into speech therapy for Taylor and were astonished to discover that the only place in Hazard that could help Taylor didn’t take our insurance,” said Charles Marshall. “Our only other options were to pay $50 per session to stay in Hazard for speech therapy or drive to Lexington in order to use our insurance.”

 

Then, Charles got in touch with Lowman, who agreed to treat Taylor using telepractice.  At first, Lowman teleconnected with Taylor twice a week at the Center for Excellence in Rural Health in Hazard.  Eventually, however, Taylor’s school allowed Lowman to meet with Taylor once a week via FaceTime.

 

“Being able to receive speech therapy services in school was a huge plus, since it reduced the amount of time Taylor spent out of the classroom,” Charles said.

 

Lowman used her experience with Taylor to begin crafting a systematic approach to training students in telepractice.  “We scaffold (the LinKS students) through this process thoughtfully, allowing them first to practice with one another, and then with a child client in pairs, and ultimately when they're out doing a 15-week rotation in a rural school.”

 

Emma Davis of Louisville is one of the first students admitted to the LinKS program.  She always knew she wanted to be a speech therapist, but the telepractice concept made it a more intriguing career prospect.

 

“I think that there are a lot of people around the world that are underserved in various aspects of health,” said Davis. “You always think of Third World countries but you really don’t even have to cross the state line to find those kids, and so I was really excited about the idea of using technology to reach those kids and to provide services to them.”

 

Kleinert is particularly enthusiastic about the cycle of learning, feedback and adjusting that the LinKS program – which is just one of a handful in the U.S. – will afford. 

 

“As a land grant research university, it’s our mission to develop evidence-based practice to help our citizens lead better lives,” Kleinert said. “We know what strategies work with children in a face to face setting. What we have to find out, and give evidence to support, is whether these same strategies can also be used in telepractice, or should they be adapted or changed? So the program will not only train our students, but it should produce some very good evidence and research that can be used elsewhere in the country.”

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Linguistics Department Explores Answers to What is Human Language

Tue, 06/07/2016 - 16:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 8, 2016)  Two touchstones in every child’s life are celebrated by parents and loved ones around the world with equal awe, expectation and enthusiasm – a baby’s first steps and a baby’s first words. Walking signifies a child’s growing strength and independence. But talking signifies a budding ability to share emotion and intellect, to understand others and to be understood in turn.

 

Communication in all its myriad manifestations — from singing a child’s lullaby to reading a literary masterpiece to sharing a joke — expands a person’s concept of self and is essential to the well-being of the individual and ultimately the survival of the species.  

 

A group of linguistics scholars at the University of Kentucky excel in the study and teaching of this survival skill — as evidenced by global accolades, innovative research, practical applications, and other contributions to the study of the spoken and written word. Their combined commitment and innovation made it easy for the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees to recently elevate the College of Arts and Sciences’ Linguistics Program to full department status.

 

Linguistics professor Andrew Hippisley has been named the first chair of the university’s newest department.

 

Educated in England with a master’s degree in Russian language and literature from the University of London and a doctoral degree in linguistics from the University of Surrey, Hippisley moved from the U.K. to UK in 2007 and became a full professor in the university’s Department of English five years later. With linguistic research interests in morphology, including its interface with syntax and phonology, Hippisley has co-authored three books, his most recent being "The Cambridge Handbook of Morphology" (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He has served as chair of the UK Senate Council for the past two years

 

In April 2016, Hippisley was one of 33 collegiate leaders selected to attend the American Council on Education's (ACE) ACE Fellows Program, the longest running leadership development program in the United States.

 

“We’re very proud of Andrew Hippisley’s achievement,” said UK Provost Tim Tracy, who nominated Hippisley for the ACE program. “This fellowship will help him further hone his skills as a leader, collaborator, and one who empowers his colleagues to make progress on behalf of our most important mission: student success.”

 

“I am tremendously excited and honored,” said Hippisley, “to be participating in such a program that will help me learn about the multi-layered roles and functions of a diverse range of higher education institutions, and apply these outside experiences to a student success based project here at UK. I am extremely grateful to UK's leadership for their commitment to support and mentor me throughout the program.”

 

From creating a fanciful pre-proto-Indo-European language for a video game … to researching what speech says about our personal identities … to publishing a book with new insights into a dozen linguistics conflicts in content and form … to securing prestigious fellowships and scholarships, members of the new UK Linguistics Department have excelled in recent years under Hippisley’s leadership as program director, constantly expanding what most of us consider to be the study of linguistics.

 

Beyond an impressive undergraduate degree program, a growing program in linguistic theory, and typology at the graduate level, there are other innovations like the UK "2017 Linguistics Institute: Language Across Space and Time." The event, slated July 5 through Aug. 1, will include expert speakers, teachers and researchers from across America and around the world with a record-breaking 64 course proposals submitted.

 

Of a previous UK Linguistics Institute, Maria Polinsky, associate professor of linguistics at Harvard University, wrote in a review, “I was impressed how varied the interests among language and linguistic faculty are, from theoretical linguistics to work on language documentation to linguistic experimentation to applied topics.”

 

Students of linguistics are interested in the general question "what is human language?" In order to answer this question, they look at language from a variety of viewpoints:

· how languages differ from one another

· the ways in which they are alike

· how languages are learned

· how they change over time

· what historical relationships exist between and among different languages

 

The field of linguistics also maintains important links with research in speech technology, education, communication disorders, language pedagogy and communication.

 

Linguistics fits comfortably into our modern, ever-shrinking world. It can take a young person virtually anywhere, performing an ever-widening circle of tasks. Where can studying linguistics take you? Just about anywhere a student may want to go, from artificial intelligence to translation, from researching ancient languages to speech pathology, from teaching languages to advocating minority languages. Studying linguistics can help one think logically, develop an awareness of socio-cultural differences, communicate effectively to a global audience, work collaboratively in just about any environment, and help us interpret complex socio-cultural information.

 

For more information about careers in linguistics, visit www.aaal.org/. For an expanded list of reprinted news and feature stories about the program, visit https://linguistics.as.uky.edu/features. To review the linguistics faculty and their areas of expertise, visit https://linguistics.as.uky.edu/users. For a review of the department’s projects, research, resources and publications, visit https://linguistics.as.uky.edu/linguistics-faculty-research.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

Recent Grad's New Album 'Made Of' Several UK Talents

Tue, 06/07/2016 - 15:21
<a href="http://maerz.bandcamp.com/album/made-of" _cke_saved_href="http://maerz.bandcamp.com/album/made-of">Made Of by Maerz</a>"Your Question" from the album "Made Of" by Maerz. LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 8, 2016) — Recent University of Kentucky graduate Connor Shafran has been hard at work putting together his latest project. Released April 22, the album "Made Of" is part of his project Maerz, which combines digitally produced music with classical organic textures of live instrumentation.

 

"I come from a background in traditional/classical composition," Shafran said. "During my first few years at UK, I spent a lot of time composing for various chamber groups and soloists; however, about two years ago, I discovered Ableton Live, a computer program that lets users create electronic music entirely from scratch. It allows for total artistic creativity and makes it possible to combine the worlds of electronic drums and synthesizers with live recordings of real instruments."

 

Shafran has been working on the album since last summer. "The album began last July when I was playing around with recorded samples of my voice — layering them to create harmonies and synth-like textures. I kept jotting down new ideas, and before I knew it, I had six or seven songs sketched out. I got my friend Jonathan Barrett involved, and together, we recorded all sorts of layers and melodies — taking advantage of his multi-instrumental talents on guitar and saxophone. Shortly after, UK student and Lexington Philharmonic member Jessie Zhu became a big part of the project, recording violin on six of the 10 tracks."

 

Other musicians joining Shafran and music performance seniors Barrett, of Georgetown, Kentucky, and Zhu, of Lexington, on the project were:

· doctoral student Jeremy Bass, of Berryville, Virginia, on classical guitar;

· doctoral student Danny Hoppe, of Chicago, Illinois, on cello;

· music performance senior Aryana Misaghi, of Charleston, West Virginia, on flute;

· music performance senior Joel Murtaugh, of Whitesburg, Kentucky, on upright bass;

· mathematics senior Conner Novicki, of Louisville, Kentucky, on electric bass; and

· music education senior Coty Taylor, of Frankfort, Kentucky, on piano.

Doctoral student Elizabeth Varnado, of Louisville, and theatre senior Madison Ward, of Maysville, Kentucky, provided vocals.

 

"Made Of" is available for streaming and purchasing at www.Maerz.Bandcamp.com and on Soundcloud. More info on Maerz can be found on Facebook.

 

Shafran, a native of Richmond, Kentucky, is a 2016 music and German graduate and former member of the Honors Program at UK. He previously served as the principal percussionist in the Central Kentucky Youth Orchestra and took first place in the Winter Guard International's Independent World Percussion Championships with the indoor percussion group RHYTHM X.

 

During his senior year of high school, Shafran received the Emerson Scholarship for the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp and attended under the instruction of Keith Aleo and Jung-Ho Pak.

  

At UK, Shafran also presented on his work and experience building melodic percussion instruments out of propane tanks at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research, hosted by the university in 2014. The presentation included a history of the instrument and its family, and a playing demonstration with fellow UK percussionist Aaron Marsala. 

 

For more information on Shafran and his music projects, visit his website www.connorshafran.com.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK's Kidwell Receives Scholarship from Kentucky CPAs

Tue, 06/07/2016 - 10:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 8, 2016) — The Educational Foundation of the Kentucky Society of Certified Public Accountants (KyCPA) recently awarded scholarships to college students across the Commonwealth who are studying accounting.

 

Included among those receiving scholarship awards is Jessica Kidwell of Lexington, a May graduate of the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics Von Allmen School of Accountancy with a bachelor's degree in accounting. Kidwell received the PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Scholarship. She will utilize the scholarship to help pay for her continued studies as she pursues a master's degree in accounting at UK beginning this fall.  

 

The KyCPA scholarships, which were announced at a banquet in Louisville, were awarded to students who met academic as well as financial need criteria set forth by the foundation on behalf of the nonprofit organization.

 

The Kentucky Society of Certified Public Accountants (KyCPA) is a statewide, nonprofit professional organization serving CPAs in public accounting firms, business, industry, government and education. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu.

Major Newspapers Mark Death of UK Alum, Former Va. Tech President T. Marshall Hahn

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 19:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) — T. Marshall Hahn Jr., a University of Kentucky alumnus and former president of Virginia Tech, died last week at the age of 89. A story in the New York Times and one in the Washington Post outlined his prestigious career and the major educational strides he made while at the helm of Virginia Tech for more than 12 years during the 1960s and '70s.

 

Hahn, a native of Lexington, earned his bachelor's degree in physics from UK in 1945 when he was 18 years old, and following two years of duty in the Navy, he earned a doctorate in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at the age of 23. He  was named to the UK Alumni Association's Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 1965, and he was presented with an honorary doctorate at UK's 1990 May Commencement.

 

Following the Virginia Tech presidency, Hahn served as executive vice president and ultimately CEO of  the paper company Georgia-Pacific.

UK Researchers' Study Links Tobacco Microbials, Carcinogens

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 7, 2016) — University of Kentucky researchers have found a link between changes in microbial communities on tobacco leaves and the development of carcinogens during the curing process.

 

A team of researchers led by Luke Moe, UK associate professor, found that the microbial community on the tobacco leaf changes during the air-curing process, especially during high heat and high humidity. Under these conditions, microbes that convert nitrate to nitrite appear to increase. Nitrate to nitrite conversion is key in forming carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines, referred to as TSNAs.

 

In the field, tobacco contains really low TSNA levels. For many years, University of Kentucky tobacco researchers and tobacco farmers in the state have noticed that hot, humid conditions increase the amount of TSNAs that develop during curing. To attempt to minimize the amount of TSNAs formed during curing, farmers open barn doors to increase airflow and lower humidity levels in the barn.

 

“If we can understand or manipulate the microbial community so that those microbes responsible for TSNA formation are absent from the leaf when it goes into the barn, we could potentially minimize TSNA formation regardless of curing condition,” said Moe, a microbial ecologist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

 

For this study, Moe worked with Audrey Law and Colin Fisher from the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, and Anne Jack with the Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center. Fisher has designed a curing structure in which he can control humidity and temperature. For this study, researchers cured tobacco in the structure at temperatures ranging between 60 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit with humidity levels between 60 and 90 percent.

 

They reported their findings in the academic journal Microbial Ecology.

 

The researchers are conducting a follow-up study to examine the microbial communities present on tobacco leaves in the field and then characterize population shifts every two weeks during curing. This will allow them to better understand when microbial community changes are occurring and to pinpoint when these detrimental bacteria begin to increase on the leaf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774

PNC Bank Named Official Bank of University of Kentucky

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 15:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) PNC Bank N.A., a member of The PNC Financial Services Group (NYSE: PNC), and JMI Sports announced today that PNC will become the official bank of the University of Kentucky. Expanding its longstanding relationship with the University of Kentucky, under the new 15-year agreement PNC will provide student and workplace banking, as well as financial literacy programs, for more than 50,000 UK students, faculty and staff. JMI Sports is the campus multimedia rights partner for the University of Kentucky.

 

Highlights of the agreement include:

 

·  A University of Kentucky Student Center (scheduled to open in January 2018) electronic financial services office, staffed by PNC personnel to assist PNC customers with completing transactions and equipped with technology to educate them about various PNC products and services.

· Seven ATMs throughout the University of Kentucky’s main campus. Up to three ATMs will be DepositEasySM, which allow students, faculty and staff to withdraw cash, including $1 bills, cash checks and deposit checks or cash directly into their accounts.

· Access to PNC deposit products and services, including Virtual Wallet® Student accounts for University of Kentucky students. These features include tools to help students monitor spending, view account balances and avoid account-management mistakes.

· A co-branded PNC debit card available to all PNC deposit account holders.

· The capability for PNC account holders to link their account to their WildCard ID, which can be used to conveniently access cash at all PNC ATMs.

· A co-branded website, hosted by PNC Bank, where students can complete account applications, manage their finances and find financial and educational information.

· Financial and consulting support for the UK MoneyCATS Peer Education and Coaching Program and on-site workshops on personal financial management and financial literacy. Topics include basic banking, credit management, savings and investing, identity protection and home buying.

 

“We have partnered with PNC Bank on a number of initiatives over many years at the University of Kentucky and are excited about this partnership with them,” said Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “This new and expanded relationship — coordinated through our multimedia partner JMI — will produce substantive benefits for our campus community as well as an exciting financial literacy educational component for our students. We believe it’s a relationship that will benefit everyone involved.”

 

“Financial education is crucial to a student’s future, and PNC is committed to helping create educated consumers,” said John L. Gohmann, PNC Bank regional president for Lexington. “This new relationship will allow students to make smart and responsible banking decisions, with PNC tools and knowledge to achieve long-term fiscal success.”

 

PNC has relationships with more than 400 schools across 19 states and the District of Columbia.

 

The PNC Financial Services Group Inc. is one of the largest diversified financial services institutions in the United States, organized around its customers and communities for strong relationships and local delivery of retail and business banking; residential mortgage banking; specialized services for corporations and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; and wealth management and asset management. For more information about PNC, visit www.pnc.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Terri Wilson, 502-581-4073, terri.wilson@pnc.com

Bachstetter Lab Featured on LabTV

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 13:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) — In the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center (SCOBIRC) at the University of Kentucky, Adam Bachstetter’s lab studies how glial cells in the brain interact with neurons to support brain health. Bachstetter and Danielle Lyons, a postdoctoral scholar in his lab, recently shared their stories with LabTV.

 

Bachstetter, who was a pre-law psychology undergraduate at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio, said he ended up in science because of a neuroscience internship. He went on to graduate work at University of South Florida, started postdoctoral research at Northwestern University and then moved to the University of Kentucky to finish his postdoctoral work.

 

To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

Bachstetter said his favorite part of being a principal investigator is mentoring students: “It’s really great working and interacting with the team, teaching them new techniques and allowing them to explore and grow as scientists, which is really what I’m here for—to help them grow.”

 

Postdoc Danielle Lyons grew up in Simpsonville, Kentucky, an hour from Lexington. She earned both her undergrad and graduate degrees at UK. “I wanted to be everything, which is still kind of my problem. Anything that was trying to change the world, and I know that’s very corny, but it’s true,” Lyons said. 

 

To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

She ultimately chose to study neuroscience because of her mom, who has trigeminal neuralgia. This chronic pain condition affects the trigeminal nerve, which carries sensation from the face to the brain. For people with this condition, even mild stimulation of their face—like brushing their teeth or putting on makeup—can trigger a jolt of excruciating pain.

 

“There’s not very good treatment for it. I wanted to try to do something for it,” Lyons said. “When you go into science, you realize you can’t do everything but you can do a small part. And that small part can help someone else do a small part, and someone else do a small part, and it just builds on each other and that’s the magic of science.”

 

Bachstetter and Lyons are partnering on a three-year study, funded by the National Institute on Aging, which focuses on how glial cells are altered with aging. Bachstetter explains, “We’re at the very early stages of understanding how glial cells become dysfunctional, what makes them not healthy. If we can figure out what are the processes, what are the signals, what’s the biochemistry of this, then we can start to develop ways to target those processes to develop drugs that could potentially treat people who have had a traumatic brain injury or people who are at risk for developing a neurodegenerative disease like Alzheimer’s.”

 

LabTV.com features videos with medical researchers, including 32 from UK, who tell where they came from, how they chose their career, what they do each day in the lab, and why they love it. LabTV’s founder, Jay Walker of TEDMED, said he started the site because if high school students can personally identify with a young medical researcher, they are far more likely to consider becoming one. LabTV’s network features researchers working at leading universities, corporations and the National Institutes of Health.

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, laura.dawahare@uky.edu

 

UK Hospitalists Help Enhance Quality of Care for Patients

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 13:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) – Managing and providing a continuum of care for patients with complex health care needs at a large academic medical center like UK HealthCare can be very complex when providers from multiple specialties and subspecialties are needed for tests, treatment and patient education.  

 

UK HealthCare is at the forefront of a growing trend among U.S. hospitals to employ hospitalists, with more than 50,000 hospitalists now working in the U.S.  Hospital medicine is the fastest growing specialty in the history of American medicine. At UK, hospitalists ensure coordination of quality care for acutely ill patients at the highest level from time of admission through discharge.

 

'Hospitalist' refers to an in-patient physician who dedicates his or her practice exclusively to the care of hospitalized patients. The hospitalist works with the patient's primary care outpatient physician and specialists to coordinate and manage round-the-clock care, like what Dr. Paula Bailey does at UK Chandler Hospital and the Kentucky Children's Hospital.

 

Bailey said hospital medicine appealed to her because she enjoys seeing acutely ill patients all the way through their hospital stay until they are well enough to go home. She also enjoys the variety of patients and problems she encounters on a day-to-day basis, and interacting with all the subspecialists who keep her current on the huge amount of new medical information that is continually evolving.

 

"We are the quarterbacks of the care team and we make sure we all work together to provide the most effective and efficient care," Bailey said. "Hospitalists must be current on the treatment of acute illness of all the systems of the body. We are experts in quality improvement and patient safety in the hospital. We are constantly looking to improve the complex systems in which we work."

 

Hospitalists typically spend their entire work day in the hospital and can be more readily available to a patient than a doctor who spends much of the day in an office or other outpatient clinical setting. Because the hospitalist is based at the hospital, they can gain a great deal of experience in the unique aspects of a patient's needs during the hospital stay.

 

Dr. Charles (Randy) Jones, associate chief for clinical services in the Division of Hospital Medicine at UK HealthCare's Good Samaritan Hospital, and director of the Hospitalist Advanced Practice Providers (APP) program, left private practice in rural Kentucky to become a hospitalist because he felt he would have the greatest impact on the most vulnerable of patients in need of hospitalization. He knew he would have the opportunity at UK to care for the most medically complex patients from all over Kentucky that would push him to be the best physician he can be. He would also be able to do more teaching and mentoring of medical residents interested in hospital medicine.

 

"We must be advocates for our patients in the milieu of insurance regulations, varying degrees of access to care, and the inherent challenges that come with taking care of patients with complex illnesses," Jones said. "Hospitalists must be adept at processing a large amount of information accurately and in a timely fashion in order to provide excellent delivery of care."

 

Dr. Mark V. Williams, chief in the Division of Hospital Medicine at UK, established the first hospitalist program for a public hospital in 1998, and built two of the largest academic hospitalist programs in the U.S. at Emory University (1998-2007) and Northwestern University (2007-2013). Williams is a past president of the Society of Hospital Medicine, one of the first 10 Masters in Hospital Medicine and the Founding Editor of the Journal of Hospital Medicine and continues to actively promote the role of hospitalists as leaders in delivery of health care to hospitalized patients. 

 

On his arrival at UK in January 2014, the Department of Internal Medicine established a new Division of Hospital Medicine which rapidly grew from 24 hospitalists and two advanced practice providers (APP) to 60 clinicians now caring for more than 200 patients per day, seven days per week, 24 hours per day.

 

UK's Bailey and Jones are a good representation of the hospitalists dedicated exclusively to improving the overall hospital experience and quality of care for patients and their families.

 

"The thing I like most about my job is the sense that I am making a difference in the lives of my patients. Seeing patients flown in to the University of Kentucky and then be able to walk out under their own power is a reward in itself," Jones said. "Of course, the story does not always end that way. Another rewarding aspect of my job is the opportunity to care for patients who have chronic life threatening illnesses.

 

"I am honored to be involved in end-of-life care for patients who have no further treatment options for their disease. I strive to be a source of comfort to these patients and families both by means of my medical treatment and the relationships that are formed between provider and patient. Ultimately, medicine is still all about the patient-physician relationship and the patient's trust and physician's compassion that is at the heart of it."

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

###

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

PTS Now Accepting Commuter Renewal and Returning Residential Student Permit Applications

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 10:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) — University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) will be accepting student parking permit applications throughout the summer.

 

Student permit application dates are as follows:

 

June 1-June 15: Accepting commuter permit renewal applications

 

June 6-June 17: Accepting residential permit applications from returning students

 

June 16-until supply exhausted: Accepting commuter permit applications from all eligible students.

 

June 20-until supply exhausted: Accepting residential permit applications from all eligible students.

 

July 1-until supply exhausted: Accepting applications from all eligible students K permits and off-peak (formerly evening) permits.

 

UK students are encouraged to apply for their permits at www.uky.edu/pts. Students may also apply for parking permits via mail by using printable forms found at www.uky.edu/pts or in person at Parking and Transportation Services in the Press Avenue Garage (Parking Structure #6). Office hours for permit sales are 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

Student C and R permits are $296 for the 2016-2017 academic year, while K permits are $272 and evening permits are $148. Students who require a motorcycle permit in addition to their vehicle permit should contact PTS directly after purchasing their permit.

 

All outstanding parking citations must be paid before an application is accepted. Citations may be paid online at www.uky.edu/pts.

 

If the initial permit type requested is no longer available, eligible students may submit a lottery request online for C and R permits. Eligibility criteria must be met to purchase the desired permit. Lottery drawings are typically held two to three weeks after the beginning of the semester, based on the availability of R or C spaces, and notification is sent via electronic mail.

 

Eligible students are encouraged to purchase permits online at www.uky.edu/pts. Students may also purchase permits in person at Parking and Transportation Services, located at 721 Press Avenue, or by mailing printable application forms.

 

For more information, visit the UK Parking and Transportation services website.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

FUSION Accepting Applications for 2016 Site Advisors

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 09:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 07, 2016)  University of Kentucky FUSION is currently accepting applications for site advisors. This position plays an essential part in the execution of this fall event in addition to giving students an opportunity to connect with members of UK alumni, faculty and staff. Some of the expected responsibilities as a site advisor are as follows: help provide risk management, assist with group dynamics, and serve as a positive role model for participants.

 

FUSION (For Unity and Service in Our Neighborhoods) is a day of service hosted by the Center for Community Outreach (CCO) during K Week. This year the program is expecting approximately 1,000 students to join in serving at nearly 70 community and neighborhood organizations. Each small group is led by one to two site leaders and one site advisor (a faculty member, staff member or graduate student). It is a great way to interact with incoming and returning students in a different and meaningful way.

 

FUSION is an all-day commitment that will take place from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23. Note that FUSION will occur on Tuesday, Aug. 23, this year and not on Monday as it has in previous years. Participants' end time for the day may vary depending on the specific project assigned at the service location. Lunch and a T-shirt will be provided.

 

Staff, faculty and graduate students are able to sign up for FUSION on OrgSync, not on VolunteerMatch as it has been for previous years. To sign up, follow this link: https://orgsync.com/82576/forms/195787. Please note that if participants would like to indicate a site preference he or she must sign up before June 30.

 

For questions, please contact FUSION 2016 Leadership Development Chair Kelly Sudbrack at fusion.leadershipdevelopment@gmail.com or Staff Advisor Jessica Proskin at jessica.proskin@uky.edu

 

UK FUSION is a program housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote lifelong community service.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

CCO CONTACT: Erica Daly, publicrelations@ukcco.org, 859-257-9385

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395

 

University Drive Garage Closure Set for June 11-12, 18-19

Mon, 06/06/2016 - 09:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 7, 2016) — As part of the annual routine maintenance work on the University of Kentucky's parking structures, the University Drive Garage (PS #1) entry will be closed starting at 5 p.m. Friday, June 10. All vehicles must be removed from the garage by 8 a.m. Saturday, June 11. The garage will remain closed until 11 p.m. Sunday, June 12. The project is weather-dependent and the dates are subject to change.

 

This closure is necessary to apply a protective coating to the facility. Parking and Transportation Services is undertaking this process to help extend the useful life of the facility. This work has been scheduled to take place on a weekend to minimize the impact to the university community.

 

Details for the June 18 and 19 impact will be communicated closer to that date.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

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