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UK College of Education Hosts Research Conference for Students

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 17:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) -- The University of Kentucky College of Education recently hosted the annual Spring Research Conference. The conference allows graduate and undergraduate students to present their research, whether it is completed, in progress or at the proposal stage. This event provides a welcoming context in which to receive feedback.

 

The day included presentations by students from the UK College of Education, University of Louisville College of Education and Human Development, and University of Cincinnati College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services, co-sponsors of the event.

 

“The purpose of the conference is to provide students an opportunity to present their research in a friendly environment and receive constructive comments on their work as well as their presentations,” said Rob Shapiro, associate dean for research, analytics and graduate student success at the UK College of Education. “It serves as a great learning experience for the students.”

 

Students gave presentations of their projects or used posters to present their findings. Sessions throughout the day focused on various aspects of research supported by the three colleges.

 

Sponsored annually by the three universities, the Spring Research Conference rotates among campuses each year.

 

For more information, visit https://education.uky.edu/adeanargs/spring-research-conference/ or contact Michelle Dye at michelle.traynor@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Wear Blue for the Welfare of Kentucky’s Children on April 8

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 17:29

 LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare employees seldom need convincing to wear blue in support of UK athletic teams.

 

But on Friday, April 8, wearing blue signifies support for a greater cause — the safety and welfare of children across the Commonwealth — as UK HealthCare and Kentucky Children’s Hospital observe Commit to Prevent Wear Blue Day, which brings attention to child abuse awareness. 

 

UK HealthCare and Kentucky Children’s Hospital employees can wear blue and join the official photo for UK Wear Blue for Child Abuse Awareness photo at 1 p.m. on April 8. The photo will take place in the Pavilion A Auditorium main lobby. Participants can use the hashtag #committoprevent in social media posts or make a pledge to safeguard children in their community by clicking here

 

According to Ginny Sprang, executive director of the UK Center on Trauma and Children, studies show adverse childhood experiences predict a host of short- and long-term health and behavioral consequences, including violence, smoking, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, risky sexual behaviors and more. In 2012, more than 15,000 children in Kentucky were victims of abuse and neglect. 

 

Commit to Prevent Kentucky recommends several actions to help prevent child abuse in Kentucky: 

  • Get to know the children in your neighborhood and make sure they are protected
  • Ask your faith-based organization to devote time to children's issues
  • Seek out information and resources on child abuse by calling 1-800-CHILDREN

If you suspect a child is a victim of maltreatment or abuse, call 1-800-CHILDREN. If you fear a child is in imminent danger, call 911. 

 

For more information on preventing child abuse, click here

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

VIDEO: Family Impacted by UK's Sanders-Brown Hopes to be Part of Alzheimer's Ultimate Cure

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 16:49

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2016) − Nearly 68,000 Kentuckians today are suffering from Alzheimer's disease, but the emotional and financial tolls are much higher. That's because, in the words of Linda Van Eldik, Alzheimer's is a "family disease."

 

"Alzheimer's affects the patient, of course, but as the disease progresses, it is also devastating for the people who love and care for that patient," said Van Eldik, director of the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

  

While a diagnosis of Alzheimer's or other age-related dementias brings an incredible amount of uncertainty to patients and their families, there is a valuable resource at the University of Kentucky providing information, support and hope. 

 

So say Tom Conley and daughters Terri and Susie, whose wife and mother Nancy was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2009.

 

"The care Nancy got while she was at Sanders-Brown and the clinical trials she participated in, I think slowed the disease down," said Tom.

 

Nancy passed away from breast cancer in November of 2014.  Looking back the Conley daughters feel grateful that their mother's last years were full of good memories.  

 

"I got my mother — my REAL mother — a few more years than I probably would have if she had gone untreated," added Terri.

 

The Conley family hails from Louisville, but they found care for Nancy in Lexington — at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

 

UK's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) was established in 1979 and is one of the original 10 National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers. SBCoA is internationally acclaimed for its work in the fight against age-related diseases.

 

Faculty and researchers work together within the framework of the Center's mission to explore the aging process and its implications for society. Research spans bench to bedside, from defining disease mechanisms in the brain and exploring cellular changes that lead to AD, to studies exploring healthy aging and ways to lower risk of dementia, to clinical trials testing potential new therapies that slow or stop the progression of age-related diseases of the brain.

 

"We are trying to cure Alzheimer’s and we know that here at the Sanders Brown Center on Aging we will be part of that cure," said Dr. Greg Jicha, professor of neurology at the UK College of Medicine and SBCoA.  "Whether it comes next year or comes five years from now or 20 years from now, we will be playing a central role in that ultimate goal."

 

Watch this video to learn how Sanders-Brown helped the Conley family extend Nancy's quality of life and why philanthropy is so integral to ensuring that UK researchers contribute to finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease while also helping other Kentucky families.   

 

As Tom Conley puts it, "You have a jewel right here in little old Lexington and we need to keep polishing it."

 

Media contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

Video ContactsAmy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Theatre to Conclude Season with 'Alice in Wonderland'

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 15:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Join the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance as it brings audiences a twist on the classic “Alice in Wonderland” in its final production of the season. “Alice in Wonderland” will run April 14-24, at Guignol Theatre.

 

Tumble down the rabbit hole with Alice into Wonderland, where nothing is as it seems. Alice’s whimsical adventure through Lewis Carroll’s mad world finds her in mind-bending debates with an enigmatic Cheshire Cat, a dubious caterpillar and tea party companion the March Hare. The cards are stacked against her when Alice finds herself face-to-face with the maleficent Queen of Hearts, a royal with a taste for beheading. Who are you? That’s the puzzle.

 

This production of "Alice in Wonderland" is a dark look through the rabbit hole, and may not be suitable for all audiences. It is recommended that children interested in attending

be at least 8 years of age.

 

“Alice in Wonderland” will take the Guignol stage at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, April 14-16 and April 21-23, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 17 and 24. Tickets are $15 for the general public and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. A processing fee will be added upon completion of transaction. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929. You can also visit their website at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Williams Named Robinson Center Director

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 15:04

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 7, 2016) — An agronomist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is the new director of UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability (RCARS). David Williams assumed the leadership position April 1.

 

Located in Breathitt County, the center uses a sustainable approach to enhance the goods, resources, services and economics of eastern Kentucky and its people. Center personnel engage in extension, instruction, research and development programs to help fulfill the center’s mission and help the region reach its full potential.

 

Williams will provide leadership on issues that will enhance long-term, value-added programs in eastern Kentucky. He will also manage personnel and resources at the experiment station, Robinson Forest and the Wood Utilization Center, which are all part of the college. In addition to the leadership position, Williams will continue his research on agronomic uses for industrial hemp.

 

“David Williams understands the center’s ability to empower the people of eastern Kentucky and is ready and willing to work with stakeholders to help the region and its people reach their full potential,” said Rick Bennett, associate dean for research and director of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.

 

A native of St. Albans, West Virginia, Williams received his bachelor’s degree from Eastern Kentucky University in technical horticulture. He earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from UK in crop science. He has been on the faculty at UK since 1997.

 

“I’m genuinely excited to become a part of the RCARS team and am looking forward to contributing to the mission,” Williams said.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

UK's Barnes Shares Marketing Expertise with Professionals, Students in Zambia

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 14:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Beth Barnes, professor in the UK College of Communication and Information, developed the outline of topics and gave three lectures during a two-day workshop in Zambia, Africa, titled "Planning Your Sales Promotion Campaign for Results."

 

“The workshop was to help marketers in Zambia use sales promotion more effectively through understanding some of the ways it can be used, the pros and cons of both price reduction and value-added techniques, and what we know about how consumers react to sales promotion offers in both the short- and long-terms,” Barnes said.

 

She delivered three talks on the first day of the workshop on sales promotion objectives, sales promotion techniques and consumer response to sales promotion. She also spoke on behalf of the U.S. Embassy at two events and held a Q&A session with topics including U.S. government and politics, U.S. higher education structure, opportunities for Zambian students and what the U.S. can learn from Zambia and vice versa.

 

Barnes prepared for this workshop by reflecting on the courses she’s taught at UK on the same topics and her knowledge of Zambia itself.

 

“I'm able to draw on my previous experience in Zambia to make [the talks] relevant for the current business situation there,” Barnes said.

 

Barnes plans to return to Zambia in the fall for her sabbatical semester.

 

“I plan to be working with the Zambia Institute of Marketing, so it's always useful for me to get to spend time with people working in marketing communication in the country,” Barnes said.

 

Her favorite part of the workshop was working with Zambian students.

 

“It was fascinating to hear what was on their minds and especially their perceptions of the U.S.,” Barnes said.

 

Barnes is currently teaching two UK courses, “Strategic Public Relations” and “Advertising to Multicultural Britain,” in London. She first made contact with ZAMCOM, a media-training institute in Zambia, through the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications in 2008 and has returned for various marketing and research projects since.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Legacy see blue. Day Taking Place April 16

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 14:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Alumni Association will host its annual Legacy see blue. Day on Saturday, April 16, at the Helen King Alumni House, located at 400 Rose St. The event, which is part of Alumni Weekend at UK, is for currently enrolled high school students who are UK legacies (a child whose mother, father or step-parent has earned a degree from UK).

 

Attendees will gain insight into the college admissions process and hear from current UK students about life as a Wildcat. Brunch is provided along with a guided walking tour of campus. Parking is available behind the Helen King Alumni House.

 

Registration and brunch begins at 9 a.m., April 16. The information session is at 9:30 a.m., followed by a student panel at 10:15 a.m., and a guided walking tour of campus at 10:45 a.m.

 

For information on Legacy see blue. Day, visit www.ukalumni.net/seeblueday16, email Kelly Hinkel at kelly.hinkel@uky.edu or call her at 859-257-7161. For more information about the Legacy Initiative Program, please visit www.ukalumni.net/legacy.

 

The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 7, 1912

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 13:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 195th diary entry from April 7, 1912, remembers McClure visiting the Colonial where she sees pictures of the beginning of the Great Flood of 1912 along the Mississippi River.

 

April 7th. Go to the Colonial, where we see pictures of the terribly high waters of the Mississippi.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

17th Annual BSU Talent Show Honors Lyman T Johnson April 16

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016)  The University of Kentucky’s Black Student Union will present its an annual talent show titled "The Apollo" hosted by Donnell Rawlings of "The Chappelle Show" and "Guy Code."

 

The legacy of Lyman T. Johnson is to be continued through the Black Student Union. Johnson inspired the organization’s annual event, which is in collaboration with the Student Government Association. "Volume 67: Continue the Legacy" is the show’s theme, symbolic in the representation of the years since Johnson was the first African-American admitted to UK.

 

Johnson was the trailblazer for diversity at the university. Even posthumously, Johnson is still making conquests for racial equality on campus by becoming the first African-American to have a residence hall named in his honor.

 

"The Apollo" follows the format of the original "Showtime at the Apollo" show at the historic Apollo Theater in New York City. This year’s show will feature 11 contestants from UK and Lexington community.

 

Tickets are available online and in-person at the Singletary Center ticket office (405 Rose St.) for $10. The show will begin with a comedy stand-up from the host at 7:30 p.m.

 

The Black Student Union was founded in 1968. The organization strives to provide a social, cultural and educational outlet for students on the campus of the University of Kentucky, with a focus on the minority community. The organization holds general body meetings 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

 

Like UK’s Black Student Union on Facebook and follow them on Twitter and Instagram, @uk_bsu. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

VIDEO: UK CAER 101 Inspires the Next Generation of Scientists

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 09:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2016) — Much has been reported about the lack of students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline across Kentucky and the nation.

 

Changing those statistics has been an on-going national challenge — a challenge in which the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has taken a leadership role.

 

The following video showcases how the UK CAER 101 program is helping to inspire the next generation of scientists at Yates, Cassidy and Russell Cave elementary schools here in Fayette County.

 

Video courtesy of UK CAER 

Helping to inspire those elementary students are current UK student participants in UK's Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE) program, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. UK's BPE program is a collaboration between UK CAER and UK's College of Engineering and seeks to inspire traditionally under-represented students to pursue leadership opportunities in STEM fields.

 

"Mentoring opportunities are available to incoming African-American, Hispanic or Native American engineering students at both the undergraduate and graduate level," said Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez, a research scientist at UK CAER and director of the BPE Mentoring program. "The BPE program has really allowed UK to engage in a unique mentoring opportunity for UK scientists. It also has allowed our students an opportunity to help build a pipeline of STEM learners in our community."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

 

Prepare Yourself for Tick Season

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 17:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — Excerpts from University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Sociology Mairead Moloney’s personal account of her horrifyingly prolonged battle with Lyme disease were printed in Tuesday’s Washington Post, in an article titled “I took all the right meds for Lyme, so why didn’t I get better?

 

“In full candor, writing about and publicly sharing this experience was very difficult for me,” Moloney said. “However, I am really grateful that it has received such widespread attention. It is my sincere hope that this piece moves the dialogue forward on what constitutes appropriate care for tick-borne illness. If even one person is helped by my story then I am happy.”

 

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection humans contract through the bite of an infected blacklegged or deer tick, which are exceedingly small and difficult to detect. According to an online article by the staff of the Mayo Clinic, “The bacteria enter your skin through the (tick) bite and eventually make their way into your bloodstream. In most cases, to transmit Lyme disease, a deer tick must be attached (to the skin) for 36 to 48 hours. If you find an attached tick looks swollen, it may have fed long enough to transmit bacteria.” 

 

According to the Mayo Clinic site, early signs and symptoms include:

· Rash. From three to 30 days after an infected tick bite, an expanding red area might appear that sometimes clears in the center, forming a bull’s-eye pattern. The rash expands slowly over days and can spread to 12 inches across. It is typically not itchy or painful. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.

· Flu-like symptoms. Fever, chills, fatigue, body aches and a headache may accompany the rash.

Later symptoms might appear weeks, even months after the bite. These include:

· Rash. The rash may appear in other areas of your body.

· Joint pain. Bouts of severe joint pain and swelling are especially likely to affect your knees, but the pain can shift from one joint to another.

· Neurological problems. Weeks, months or even years after infection, you might develop inflammation of the membranes surrounding your brain (meningitis), temporary paralysis of one side of your face (Bell's palsy), numbness or weakness in your limbs, and impaired muscle movement.

 

Less frequently reported symptoms may also occur. It is recommended that if you think you have been bitten and display some of the symptoms, to contact your doctor, even if the symptoms seem to disappear.  

 

According to the Center for Disease Control, Kentucky had 11 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in 2014. Incidence is particularly high in northeastern states, including Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. For a complete report of all states that you may visit during spring and summer vacation season, visit www.cdc.gov/lyme/stats/tables.html.

 

Moloney has her own advice for those living in or visiting areas known to have Lyme disease carrying ticks. While Kentucky has a comparatively low incidence rate of 0.2, she said, that is no guarantee you and your family are safe.

 

“While most ticks won’t make you sick,” Moloney said. “Lyme disease is rapidly on the rise. Between 1991 and 2015, the incidence of Lyme in the United States has doubled. (1) Worse, ticks carry many disease-causing organisms, some of which are difficult to detect and treat.”

 

Moloney offered the following tips:

· If you — or your pet — go outside, you are at risk. Lyme and related infections are present in all of the continental U.S. Ticks love grassy vegetation and patchy woods (2), and they don’t discriminate between rural and urban areas. In fact, Lyme has been found in ticks in New York City parks. (3)

· Wear tick repellent when you are outdoors. There are chemical and non-chemical varieties on the market. Moloney recommends the strongest formulation with which you feel comfortable.

· Perform daily tick checks, even if you’ve just been gardening or lounging in your yard. Ticks can be as small as poppy seeds, and they love to hide in hard to check areas like armpits, bellybuttons or in your body hair. Remove attached ticks immediately, and use proper technique. (4) www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

· If you develop a fever or a rash go to your doctor. (5) You should always err on the side of caution, as most people never see the tick or the rash. Early antibiotic treatment is effective for most people. (6)

 

References:

 

1. United States Environmental Protection Agency. “Climate Change Indicators in the United States.” www3.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators/health-society/lyme.html

 

2. National Science Foundation. “Ecology and Infectious Diseases: Lyme Disease on the Rise.” www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/ecoinf/lyme.jsp

 

3. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. “Healthy Environment: Ticks.” www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/environmental/ticks.shtml

 

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Prevent Lyme Disease." www.cdc.gov/features/lymedisease/

 

5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Symptoms of Tickborne Illness.”

www.cdc.gov/ticks/symptoms.html

 

6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Treatment.” www.cdc.gov/lyme/treatment/

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 6, 1912

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 194th diary entry from April 6, 1912, recalls McClure’s friends picking her up from the train station after her time at home in Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, with family.

 

April 6th. Have a fine time at home. Auntie gives me lots of narcissus and March flowers. Addie and Jessie Mit meet me at the station, but they are changed girls! They lead me and my two heavy suitcases up the most horrid looking alley! Marie and Adeline are hatless!

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Record-Breaking Number of UK Students to Attend National Conference on Undergraduate Research

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — A recording-breaking 88 University of Kentucky undergraduates have been selected to present their research projects at the 2016 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) this week.

 

Celebrating its 30th anniversary, this year’s conference will bring young researchers from around the world to the University of North Carolina Asheville April 7-9 where the students will share their research findings through poster and oral presentations. Each student will be given the opportunity to discuss their display and share their research results, illuminating how their work will have an impact on future research development.

 

“NCUR 2016 will be the second largest conference attended since its beginning in 1968,” said Bessie Guerrant, associate director of UK’s Office of Undergraduate Research and NCUR board member. “The University of Kentucky has been an active participant since the mid 90s.”

 

“Many students come to UK with a preconceived notion of what it means to do research, which often centers on laboratory work,” said Diane Snow, director of UK Undergraduate Research. “However, once they get involved, they find out research spans all disciplines and majors, and includes a wide variety of activities.”

 

Stephen Parsons, a UK computer science and international studies double major, is one of the many UK students heading to NCUR this week. Parsons will present his research in analyzing and understanding the structure of video games to determine how new digital tools used for studying literature may be applied to the study of video games. His research suggests that past scholars’ methods are too narrow, but the use of his new methods will help raise various questions reflecting on the understanding of the narratives.

 

“Attending NCUR to present the results of their research projects gives students an opportunity to talk with others from across the country who share their interests, and greatly expands their ideas about what’s possible,” Snow said. “The friends and colleagues they make at NCUR often become part of a professional network they can rely on throughout their careers.”

 

Julia Vandra, a UK biology major, is attending NCUR to present her discoveries in how certain active cells have an effect on the influence of obesity. The outcomes of this study will support future research to identify therapeutic targets to prevent and treat obesity-induced inflammation.

 

“Working with Dr. Smyth and Dr. Brandon in the UK Gill Heart Institute has provided me with incredible opportunities to pursue my creative and scientific ambitions, to present at local and national conferences, and to become a well-rounded undergraduate researcher,” Vandra said. “It has amplified my love for science and my appreciation for how new knowledge is discovered and how important these discoveries are.”

 

“NCUR is a time for our students to sharpen their presentation skills and meet new peers and faculty working in all disciplines,” said Evie Russell, assistant director of Undergraduate Research. “These students represent the best of our best. I’m so very proud of each one of them.”

 

The UK students attending NCUR 2016 include:

  • Orchid Abushanab
  • Shelby Albers          
  • Sara Assef
  • Grant Austin 
  • Cody Barnes
  • Thaiiesha Beard     
  • Mallory Bickett         
  • Keven Bloomfield   
  • Abigail Boone         
  • Alex Bugg
  • James Burke
  • Tyler Butsch 
  • Millicent Cahoon    
  • Ethan Cardwell       
  • Cameron Colvard   
  • Elizabeth Combs    
  • Alyssa Conley
  • Ambre Cooper
  • Kelly Corrigan         
  • Catherine Crawford
  • Miranda Cruse
  • Meredith Davis        
  • Alison DiGennaro   
  • Teagan Dolan         
  • Logan Douglas
  • Sabita Dumre          
  • Corrine Elliott          
  • Jonathan Elliott       
  • Elizabeth Fox          
  • Joelene Goh
  • Elaisy Gonzalez      
  • Vincent Gouge        
  • Richard Grewelle   
  • Emily Griggs
  • Brittany Guido
  • Stephanie Hacker  
  • Charles Harpole     
  • Maddisson Hatton  
  • Karl Hempel
  • Kayla Hicks  
  • Kaylee Hicks
  • J Jerry aromczyk     
  • Aqeel Jawahir         
  • Kennedy Karem      
  • Josephine Kim        
  • Sirah Kolstedt          
  • Amir Kucharski        
  • Hannah Latta          
  • James Lewis
  • Jamie Love  
  • Leigh Lytle   
  • Hannah Maddox     
  • Elise McConnell     
  • Trevor McNary
  • Patrick Montgomery           
  • Samantha Moore    
  • Aaron Mueller
  • Leona Nease          
  • Shannon Newberry
  • Richard Oden          
  • Fallon Olexa
  • Aya Omar     
  • Stephen Parsons
  • Hayden Pike
  • Ashley Pittman        
  • Rachel Potter          
  • Taylor Robinson     
  • Abby Schroering     
  • Landon Simpson    
  • Eashwar Somasundaram 
  • Amanda Spence     
  • Ashley  Stevens      
  • Emory Thomas        
  • Ethan Toney
  • Anna Townsend     
  • Henry Uradu
  • Olivia Utley
  • Julia Vandra
  • Alexandra Wade     
  • Sarah Wagner         
  • Natalie Watkins       
  • Callista Whorf
  • Mollie Williams        
  • Kalin Wilson
  • Evan Winrich           
  • Georgie Wolbert     
  • Alonna Wright         
  • Harrison Yates   

The UK Office of Undergraduate Research is part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education at UK.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu 

 

UK Alternative Service Breaks Leave Lasting Impressions on Students

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — University of Kentucky students did more than just flock to Florida for their spring break trips this year. For the past eight years, UK Alternative Service Breaks (ASB) has provided opportunities for students to make their breaks meaningful and extremely impactful.

 

UK ASB offers a variety of service immersions to UK students during spring, winter and summer breaks. The organization, housed in the Center for Community Outreach, strives to provide quality and fulfilling alternative breaks that mutually benefit community partners and student participants through the education of social issues, service work and student facilitated reflection.

 

During this past spring break, which took place the week of April 14-18, ASB hosted a variety of service excursions aiming to help spawn their organizational vision — a campus of socially aware student citizens seeking to make a positive impact in the global community.  ASB hosted programs in Nicaragua; the Dominican Republic; New Orleans; Silver Springs, Florida; Atlanta; David, Kentucky; Washington, D.C.; and California.

 

A total of 187 student participants were involved during the spring break service immersions, along with 24 site leaders and 26 faculty and staff site advisors that covered a range of 20 different sites across the state, country and the world. Over the 2015-16 school year, there will be a total of 15 trips during spring, summer and winter breaks combined.

 

For most participants, hard work and service quickly transformed into the realization that spending their free time outside of Lexington, in service, was the most fulfilling way to spend their breaks. Student Matthew Hunter was one of these participants impacted by a 2016 ASB spring break trip when he chose to travel and serve in Washington, D.C.

 

“I was a little skeptical before going on the Washington, D.C. trip because my initial thoughts about people affected by homelessness was that they were lazy, substance abusers or uneducated," Hunter said. "Before the trip I was prejudiced against people affected by homelessness."

 

However, after the trip Hunter’s views and outlook was changed because of his service to others.

 

“I learned that my presumptive thoughts were often wrong," Hunter said. "I realized that some of them just suffered from bad luck. They either lost their job or the housing market became too expensive. A handful of the people I met were college graduates. They did what they were supposed to do yet ran into some bad luck. I shouldn’t assume things before I meet people.”

 

Like Hunter, other student participants also confessed that their ASB service immersion pushed them out of their comfort zones. Megan Zugger, an incoming 2016-17 program director, had a daunting feeling prior to traveling to the Dominican Republic since she had never left the country.

 

"Last semester, a friend encouraged me to sign up for a spring break trip with Alternative Service Breaks and on a whim I decided to go," Zugger said. "At the time, I did not know much about ASB, but it sounded interesting and I was excited. I had always been involved in community service but never on the scale that my ASB trip would provide."

 

Zugger now claims that ASB educated her on how to be an active citizen. She learned about voluntourism, active citizenship and the Dominican culture.

 

"My time spent in the Dominican Republic was unlike anything I had ever experienced," Zugger said. "I was able to become a part of a new community that I served while simultaneously experiencing its rich and unique culture. The impact the trip had on my life, combined with the education provided by ASB has helped me develop as a more involved citizen and connect me to others who share my same passions."

 

Students across the university are learning and gaining new insight of what it truly means to be citizens who are making a positive impact on the global community. For some, one service immersion isn't enough!

 

"I have been on six ASB trips (and counting!) in my past three years at UK and each one has been equally impactful and life changing to me," Zuggar said.

 

Zuggar claims that each service immersion not only taught her about the importance of serving others, but she also found a little bit of herself as she selflessly gave to a community.

 

"In Nicaragua, I found my passion for service work and changed my major," Zuggar said. "In Scottsville, Kentucky, I found my voice in student leadership. In Ecuador, I found my strength in connecting with people. In West Virginia, I found my openness in learning about completely unfamiliar social issues. In California, I found that I still have so much to explore. In all of these places, I found never-ending laughter, great attitudes, hard work, humbling moments and unique bonds with the community and with my trip group. Each trip I have taken with UK ASB has brought me closer to finding myself."

 

ASB service immersions encourage students to reach beyond the boarders of Lexington. Each student returns after their week of selflessly giving of themselves with a fresh, new perspective of community service and a personal sense of growth. 

 

"You come home with new perspectives on everything in life, and you will always carry with you those small, but important, moments of enlightenment," Zuggar said.

 

Experiencing a culture through service-learning and immersion creates a spring, winter or summer break unlike anything else.

 

"UK ASB has been the most rewarding thing for me on a personal, professional and community level. I wouldn't trade my experiences these last three years for the world," reflected Zuggar.

 

UK ASB is a program housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach (CCO). The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote life-long community service. For more information about the CCO, visit www.ukcco.org. Connect with the CCO on Facebook here and on Twitter at http;//twitter.com/ukcco.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395

 

Supermassive Black Holes Do Not Form from Stellar Black Holes

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 15:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — Often containing more than a billion times the mass than our Sun, supermassive black holes have perplexed humans for decades. But new research by University of Kentucky astrophysicist Isaac Shlosman and collaborators will help to understand the physical processes at the edge of time and space, providing the details of how supermassive black holes formed 13 billion years ago.

 

Shlosman, as well as Jun-Hwan Choi at the University of Texas at Austin, Mitchell Begelman at the University of Colorado Boulder, and Kentaro Nagamine at Osaka University (Japan), ran simulations where supermassive black holes are seeded by clouds of gas falling into potential wells of dark matter — the invisible matter that astronomers believe makes up 85 percent of the mass in the universe.

 

The researchers found that while most seed particles in their simulations did not grow very much, one central seed grew rapidly to more than two million times the mass of our Sun in just two million years, demonstrating a feasible path toward a supermassive black hole. 

 

"Of course pointing for a feasible path does not mean yet that we went all the way and formed such a bizarre object," said Shlosman, who is a professor in the UK Department of Physics and Astronomy. "Much more work is required. In a way this is a collective effort."

 

Dark matter dominates gravity in the universe and forms structures; as the universe expands, the dark matter clumps together and cannot cool down, forming dark matter wells, he explained.

 

"Clouds of gas can fall into the potential wells of dark matter and collapse, forming supermassive black holes," he said. "There are many obstacles on this way."

 

It was previously assumed by many that supermassive black holes were simply normal, or stellar, black holes that grew over time, but newly discovered quasars — bright and distant objects which contain supermassive black holes, make this option less likely. Some of the distant quasars observed recently already existed 700 million years after the Big Bang. It would be very difficult to grow supermassive black holes from stellar size black holes in such a short time after the Big Bang.

 

An additional argument that supermassive black holes were seeded by the collapse of some of the first stars has also been debunked as "we have learned that those first stars were rather of normal size and collapsed into normal black holes," Shlosman said.

 

"Normal black holes and supermassive black holes are completely different beasts," he said.

 

Indeed, the simulations produced by supercomputers at UK and Osaka University plausibly show that supermassive black holes form by a completely different process than normal (stellar) black holes. The researchers expect their simulations to be validated when NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, due to be launched in 2018, observes distant sources where direct gas collapse is happening.

 

"We're at the forefront, but many questions remain," Shlosman said. "But the public and their curiosity deserve to have those answers; we cannot exclude anything if we want to keep advancing."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Music for Skins, Metals, Woods and Electronics

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 15:41
LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Percussion Ensemble (UKPE) will perform a free public concert featuring five extremely musical and physically demanding works for the performers that focus on the elemental families of percussion instruments; those made of skin, metal, wood and electronics. The concert will begin 3 p.m. Sunday, April 10, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall.

 

The UKPE concert program begins with Iannis Xenakis’ powerful work “Peaux” (skins), which finds the six percussionists linked by an inexorable network of rhythmic layers, structures and relationships. At times they pound out deliberate, even cruel unison passages. Another of Xenakis’ works, “Claviers” (keyboards) features the keyboard mallet percussion in colorful exchanges that often border on overload.

 

As a prelude to his residency the following week with the Lexington Philharmonic, the UKPE will feature Avner Dorman’s latest work for percussion alone, “Consumed.” The bulk of the melodic and harmonic material is centered on a quartet of marimbas, but also includes vibraphone, bells and tuned cowbells called “almglocken.”

 

Guest artist Dave Gerhart joins the UKPE as soloist on the Caribbean steel pan for "Passageways" by Baljinder Sekhon. In this new work, each section is a process-oriented progression of rhythm, pitch and timbre. These segments act as a string of transitions where each section serves as a passageway leading to the next.

 

The closing work, “Rocket Summer” for percussion ensemble was inspired by Ray Bradbury’s classic collection of short stories, “The Martian Chronicles.” First published in 1950, it tells the story of Earthmen fleeing a troubled and eventually devastated Earth and setting out to colonize the Martian planet. The work, composed by UK alumnus Dan Moore, features the theremin, a strange electronic instrument often found on old sci-fi radio and movie soundtracks.

 

The UK Percussion Ensemble, conducted by James Campbell, is internationally recognized for its excellence and innovative programming and has won the prestigious Percussive Arts Society Collegiate Percussion Ensemble Contest five times.

 

For more information on the UK Percussion Ensemble concert, contact James Campbell, director of Percussion Studies at UK School of Music, at 859-257-8187.

 

UKPE is one of several ensembles housed at the UK School of Music in the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK's Engineering and Science Libraries to Merge

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 15:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016)University of Kentucky Libraries announces that the Shaver Engineering Library will soon merge with the Science Library to become the Science and Engineering Library in the Margaret I. King Building. The current Engineering Library in Anderson Hall will be open to the public until 4:30 p.m. Friday, May 13, 2016. This should give Engineering Library users sufficient time to return borrowed materials and complete other library-related tasks.

 

During the summer, the Engineering Library faculty, staff and collections will relocate to the new Science and Engineering Library. The move should be completed well in advance of the beginning of the 2016 fall semester.

 

“The creation of a merged Science and Engineering Library will enhance UK Libraries’ ability to meet the needs of UK students, faculty and researchers by bringing together library faculty with science, engineering and research data expertise. This will enable the library to offer comprehensive research support services across scientific disciplines in one centralized location," said Christie Peters, head of the Science and Engineering Library and coordinator of eScience Initiatives.

 

Since opening in 1939, UK's Engineering Library has provided a research collection to support advanced graduate and doctoral level programs in all the traditional engineering disciplines.

 

Currently, the UK Science Library houses the physics, astronomy, chemistry, math, statistics and geology collections. It is also home to the largest map collection of its kind in the state of Kentucky with approximately 242,000 paper maps and aerial photographs. The Science Library faculty and staff offer reference support, information literacy instruction, research assistance, course reserves, circulation and library express (Interlibrary Loan, Book Express and Article Express).

 

The Science and Engineering Library will host an open house with associated events at the beginning of the 2016 fall semester to welcome everyone to the new facility.

 

If you have questions or need additional information, contact Engineering Librarian Sue Smith at susan.smith@uky.edu or the head of the new merged Science and Engineering Library, Christie Peters, at christie.peters@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Four UK Student Entrepreneur Teams Advance to Idea State U Finals

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 15:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — The University of Kentucky’s top four student entrepreneur teams placed in the money at the Idea State U (ISU) regional this past weekend, earning them spots at ISU state finals at the end of April.

 

The undergraduate and graduate students, who presented either a business concept or business plan to a panel of judges, set up a marketing display, produced a 60-second marketing video, and submitted a detailed written concept or plan, won a total $2,250 in cash prizes.

 

UK Venture Challenge winner Serandu Custom Riding Boots placed second in business plan. Serandu, comprised of UK merchandising graduate Allison Burke and Caitlin Halliwell, a senior in equine business management, will offer the first equestrian boot fit to ride in through 3-D scanning and printing. 

 

Race Assured, which includes Julia Fabiani, an undergraduate student in equine science and physiology; Ben Martin, a graduate student in finance and agricultural economics; and Stefanie Pagano, a graduate student in biomedical engineering, received third in plans. Race Assured will provide a blood test, which can potentially predict injuries in horses well before serious problems occur. The team also won the Georgia Bowl intercollegiate entrepreneurship competition hosted by Georgia Tech.

 

Ultimate Angler and Talkables placed second and fourth respectively in the business concept category. Pharmaceutical sciences doctoral candidate Jarrod Williams and MBA candidate Alan Sparkman with Ultimate Angler will provide a website to better connect professional fishing guides with their potential clients.

 

Andrew Dharamsey, a computer engineering sophomore, will offer the Talkables smart collar, a low-cost pet collar that enables your pet to communicate with you at strategic places throughout your home. Talkables placed second in UK Venture Challenge.    

 

“We are extremely proud of our students for their innovative ideas and commend them for all of their hard work,” said Warren Nash, acting executive director of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship, and Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network director.

 

Nash, in his role as director of the Lexington Innovation Office, also advises students at other Lexington area colleges and universities. Three teams from Asbury University qualified at an earlier ISU regional for finals: Digi-Books, first in business plan; Go Run For It, fourth in plans; and Impact Box, fourth in business concept. Also, Kumari Arts from Sullivan University's Lexington campus placed third in concepts at the regional this past weekend.

 

Finals for Idea State U will be Friday and Saturday, April 22 and 23, at the Marriott Griffin Gate Hotel, located on Newtown Pike in Lexington. ISU is a program of the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development’s Office of Entrepreneurship and administered by the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation.

 

In addition to Nash, advisors for the UK students include Deb Weis, UK Venture Challenge coordinator, and Von Allmen Center Commercialization Specialist and UK Venture Studio Director Mariam Gorjian. UK Venture Challenge is part of iNET in the UK College of Communication and Information. Venture Studio and bootcamp is part of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network, in the Gatton College of Business and Economics

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

PTS Expanding High Street Employee Lot This Summer

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 09:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2016) — University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) will be increasing the number of spaces in the employee parking lot located at the corner of E. High Street and S. Martin Luther King Boulevard. The expansion project is scheduled for summer 2016.

 

Currently, the High Street Lot has 81 parking spaces. PTS anticipates the addition of 77 new spaces — nearly doubling the parking capacity.

 

The expansion of the High Street Lot will provide proximate parking for North Campus employees, including those who work at UK HealthCare Good Samaritan Hospital and the Kentucky Utilities building.

 

Parking in the High Street Lot may be impacted during the expansion. However, construction will occur during the summer, when parking demand is decreased and permit holders experience more flexibility in student parking areas. Details regarding construction impacts will be communicated accordingly.

 

The project is slated to be complete before the start of the 2016 fall semester.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Singletary Center Lot Unavailable April 6

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 08:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2016) — The Singletary Center for the Arts E lot (located off Patterson Drive) will be unavailable for general parking Wednesday, April 6, due to facilitate set-up and staging for the Halestorm concert. The lot has 33 spaces.

 

Members of the University community with valid E permits who normally park their vehicles in this lot may park in other E lots on campus. E lots in the vicinity include the Linden Walk Lot, the King Alumni Lot, the Career Center Lot, the Coliseum Lot and the College View Lot. Go to www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_parking-maps to view a campus parking map.

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