MenuMenu

Campus News

UK Spring Art Courses Help Community Harness Creativity

Mon, 02/08/2016 - 14:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2015) — The University of Kentucky's Fine Arts Institute will offer a variety of classes this spring that explore different aspects of art and creativity. The classes are all offered as noncredit art courses and are perfect for adults with busy work schedules. Courses range anywhere from metalworking to digital photography and are offered from the beginners' level to the more advanced.

 

Three times a year, UK Fine Arts Institute offers weekly classes as well as some weekend workshop options to suit various types of schedules. Most classes meet once a week during the evening. This spring there are a total of 12 courses being offered, nine weekly classes and three one-time workshops as well as open drawing sessions every Thursday and Saturday. The classes and workshops will be held in the new UK School of Art and Visual Studies Building and in the Metal Arts Building.

 

Most of the weekly classes start the week of Feb. 15 and run through April with no classes during UK's spring break, the week of March 14.

 

The classes being offered include:

· "Explorations in Drawing" with Christine Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Mondays, beginning Feb. 15;

· "Taking Ceramics to the Next Level" with Jill Coldiron, 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning Feb. 16;

· "Learn to Paint, Yes You Can!" with Kuhn, 6:30- 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning Feb. 16;

· "Layering it On: Mixed Media Painting Techniques" with Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays, beginning Feb. 17;

· "Beginning Ceramics" with Coldiron, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Feb. 18;

· "A Fresh Approach to Improving Your Painting Skills" with Kuhn, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Feb. 18;

· "Metalworking" with Jeremy Colbert assisted by Nick Guarliardo, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Feb. 18; and

· "Photoshop Class" with Lennon Michalski, 6-8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, session one beginning March 21, session two beginning April 11; and

· "Felting on the FeltLOOM Felting Machine" with Laverne Zabielski, 1-3 p.m. Saturdays, session one beginning Feb. 20, session two beginning March 26, and session three beginning April 23.

 

This semester's one-day workshops are:

· "One Day Digital Photography Workshop for Beginners" presented by Michalski, March 26 or April 23;

· "One Day Advanced Digital; Photography and Studio Portrait Lighting Workshop" presented by Michalski and Shelly Petty of Rochambeau Photography, March 20 or April 10;

· "One Day Natural Lighting Portrait Photography and Photoshop Editing Workshop" presented by Michalski and Petty, April 17.

 

For more information on any of these classes or workshops or their instructors, including cost and specific class times, visit the institute online at http://finearts.uky.edu/art/FAI/classes or visit the institute's Facebook page: www. facebook.com/Fine-Arts-Institute-at-the-University-of-Kentucky-101758123207317.

 

The Fine Arts Institute, an outreach program of the School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts, offers all the resources and classrooms that the department has to offer through these noncredit art classes. All courses and workshops are open to the public.

 

Registration for UK Fine Arts Institute courses is available online at http://finearts.uky.edu/art/FAI/registration, by calling the institute at 859-257-8151, or by emailing Jane Andrus at jane.andrus@uky.edu.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 9, 1912

Mon, 02/08/2016 - 14:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 169th diary entry from Feb. 9, 1912, recalls getting breakfast at the university lunch stand and not getting to see “Billy Burke.”

 

Feb. 9th. Go down at second hour and try for another picture. Get breakfast at the University lunch stand. Write up good times book. Don't get to see "Billy Burke."

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Early Action Track Deadline for UK Housing Approaching

Mon, 02/08/2016 - 12:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2016) — Students who apply to the University of Kentucky on the Early Action Track and plan to live on campus must apply for housing by Monday, Feb. 15.

 

To start the application process, visit http://www.uky.edu/housing/undergraduate/how-to-apply.

 

All parts of the application, including the $50 application fee, must be submitted in order for the application to be considered complete. Students who meet the Feb. 15 deadline will know which residence hall they are living in by April 15. For students who applied to the university on the Regular Decision Track, the housing application is due May 1. Housing requests are processed on a first come, first served basis.

 

Benefits to living on campus include close proximity to classes and campus resources, higher retention rates and higher GPAs — hear what Erin Harville, a current student who lives on campus at UK, has to say. Students interested in the living learning programs (LLP) can also apply through the same housing application.

 

For a step-by-step guide to completing the application, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gktRi6f1Rss. UK Housing, Residence Life, and UK Dining staff will be available to answer questions regarding housing, dining and LLP applications during a Google+ Hangout session today, Tuesday, Feb. 9, from 4 to 5 p.m. EST.

 

Other questions and concerns can be directed to the housing and residence life Twitter account or the housing assignments office at 859-257-1866 or ukhousing@uky.edu.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Woman's Club Offering Tuition Scholarship to Students

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 17:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016) —The University of Kentucky Woman's Club (UKWC) is currently accepting applications for its 2016-2017 tuition scholarship, awarded to undergraduate full- or part-time students. The deadline to apply for the scholarship is Tuesday, March 15, 2016.

 

Each year, the UKWC awards scholarships covering up to full tuition for residents of Kentucky as defined for tuition and fee purposes. Applicants must have completed at least 12-credit hours at UK with a minimum 3.0 grade-point average. Consideration will be given to nontraditional women students with outstanding academic records who have unmet financial needs.

 

Scholarship applications for the 2016-2017 academic year can be found here on the Woman's Club website. Applications are due in the UK Office of Academic Scholarships in the Funkhouser Building before 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Applicants must also complete the 2016-2017 Federal Application for Student Financial Aid (FAFSA) by March 15.

 

The pool of applicants that will be chosen to participate in an interview with the UKWC Scholarship Committee must be enrolled in at least six credit hours per semester and must be residents of Kentucky. Current members of the UKWC and UK employees whose tuition is covered by the Employee Education Program are ineligible.

 

Since its inception in 1973, the UKWC Aid Fund has provided 196 undergraduate scholarships totaling more than $400,000.

 

"In an era where higher education is so costly, for students who might have families, are working second jobs, and have high financial aid need, the UKWC undergraduate scholarships often provide the lifeline to degree completion," said Lisa Collins, chair of the UKWC Scholarship and Fellowship Committee.

 

With a rich tradition of more than 100 years of service, the UKWC provides a welcoming and enriching environment for all women to be part of a group committed to supporting the campus and its students. UKWC scholarship and fellowship programs provide nearly $40,000 annually to students pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees. In addition, UKWC partners with other UK organizations and programs to provide needed services to the student body.

 

For more information about the UKWC scholarship, visit www.ukwc.org or contact the Office of Academic Scholarships at 859-257-4198.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jacob Smith, jacob.smith@uky.edu, 859-361-2318

 

 

February Drawing Date Set for Lexus for the Little Ones Raffle

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 16:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016) — Lexus of Lexington will raffle away a brand new Lexus ES 350 to support Kentucky Children’s Hospital (KCH) at 1 p.m. on Feb. 18 at the Lexus Store located at 1264 East New Circle Road. Tickets can still be purchased to enter the drawing.

 

Funds raised through raffle tickets will improve facilities for children receiving treatment at KCH. Lexus of Lexington has set a fundraising goal of $100,000 for the 2015-2016 raffle and supports Ocean Pod renovations at KCH. 

 

“Giving back to the community has always been an important part of our business, and who better to support than KCH, the pediatric care center that takes care of Kentucky’s kids,” said Lexington businessman Rick Avare, co-owner of The Lexus Store of Lexington.

 

Raffle tickets are $100 each and can be purchased online at www.givetokch.org/lexus, in person by visiting the Lexus dealership on 1264 E. New Circle Road, or by contacting the KCH Development office at (859) 257-1179. There is no limit on the number of tickets purchased, and ticket holders do not have to be present to win.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Your Major Just Got Easier To Find With Launch of AET

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 15:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016)  Since 2012, the University of Kentucky Office of Enrollment Management has envisioned an innovative tool to streamline and centralize information about academic degree offerings. This tool would improve and transform the way prospective and current students blueprint their academic experience.  As of Wednesday, Feb. 3, this vision became a reality when the university launched the new Academic Exploration Tool (AET). 

 

The project has two phases.  The first phase was made available Feb. 3 and includes bachelor's, minors and pre-professional programs.  The second phase will bring in a live-feed of curriculum data based on the four-year degree plans developed in the new myUK: GPS (Graduation Planning System) project and expand into graduate and professional programs.

This was a campuswide project, partnering with individuals from all 16 colleges, Undergraduate Studies, the Stuckert Career Center, UK PR and Marketing, UK Analytics and Technologies and several others.

 

In an effort to create a better search and exploration process for prospective and current students, academic major sheet PDFs have been transformed into an adaptive and responsive website.  The outdated website that hosted the major PDFs is replaced by the university's AET, which offers a revamped, structured and user-friendly webpage that is easily accessible. The website functionality allows students to discover degree programs at a personal level.

 

Users begin searching for degree paths by first selecting from categories within "I like to…," "I want to be a…," "I'm searching for….," or "Browse all programs" options. After selecting personal preferences, they are then given a list of degree programs offered that correlate with selections they made under the different categories.  From here, users then can click on different degrees to learn about careers in the field, courses offered at UK, work environment as well as featured careers, which include salary, number of jobs in the U.S. and a 10-year job outlook all streamed into the site by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

"We're really proud of the technology that's taking place behind the scenes," said Tyler Gayheart, communications and technology director for Enrollment Management. "For the users, it's a seamless process, but we made a point to listen and partner with the right people to strike a good balance between academic, curricular, career and program level information to make the exploration process seem uninterrupted and data rich.  We've collectively created a platform that has a lot of possibilities for expansion into other areas such as online programs, certificates and advanced filtering and search."

 

Beginning in the fall, Enrollment Management will be utilizing data from myUK: GPS to utilize a Web service to dynamically feed curriculum and course information into the Academic Exploration Tool. The myUK: GPS will reshape the student planning, auditing, advising and course registration experience, delivering real-time, critical information via self-service features to promote proactive planning for students and advisors.

 

This tool includes features that have brought together the feedback from our staff, faculty, prospective and current students as well as institutional surveys and research. Enrollment Management has been committed to listening to what parents and students most want in the recruitment and information gathering process. Research conducted by Ruffalo Noel Levitz indicates that academic degree and career outlook information continues to be the primary need for parents and students seeking additional information about universities.

 

AET is also designed to be accessible and editable by each college and program.This puts the control in the hands of the individuals most familiar with the program itself.

 

"As an academic advisor in Undergraduate Studies, my main role is to assist students in exploring interests and majors that may be connected in those interests," said Jesse Farley. "I'm excited about the release of the Academic Exploration Tool as it will be a great conversation starter.  In a typical meeting with students, we discuss the major, the classes associated, related majors and some potential careers. Therefore, it is great to see this information streamlined into one online tool!"

 

"We're very excited for this cross campus collaboration to bring a tool online that can be used by prospective and current students, as well as advisors," said Associate Provost for Enrollment Management Don Witt.

 

Research shows that content regarding academic majors and minors is the most searched feature on the university's main website. However, there can be slight differences between information that live on the colleges' websites versus the university's website. The AET effectively creates a uniform voice flowing from the information projected by individual colleges to the information housed on www.myuk.edu.  This causes less confusion when prospective and current students search for information about majors on different websites within the university. 

 

The AET revamps the way students prepare for college classes and their futures, making the process more user friendly and allowing for more creativity when searching and considering forthcoming career possibilities.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

"Go Red for Women" Celebrates Women's Heart Health at Gill Heart Institute

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 14:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016)  The unspoken pact among Wildcat fans to always "Bleed Blue" was suspended last week in the Pavilion A atrium of UK Chandler Hospital long enough for supporters to "Go Red."

 

The American Heart Association's "Go Red for Women" day was Friday, Feb. 5 and dozens of supporters showed up dressed in red to promote awareness of women's heart health.

 

"Sadly, we are seeing more women with heart disease at a younger age," said Dr. Gretchen Wells, Gill Heart Institute's director of Women's Heart Health and the event's featured speaker.  "It's critical we help women understand that heart disease affects them differently, that their heart attack symptoms can be different than men's, and that they shouldn't put off seeing a doctor if they have symptoms."

 

Wells explained that mortality rates for heart attack are actually higher in women than in men primarily because many women downplay their symptoms and/or don't recognize them as symptoms of heart attack until it's too late. She offered her own "Top 10" to encourage women to think about their heart health, including:

 

Know your symptoms. "Half of all women having a heart attack will experience chest pains, but the other half won't have that 'Hollywood Heart Attack,'" she said. Women are more likely to experience chest pressure, chest discomfort, back pain, jaw pain, or even tooth pain.  Other symptoms include shortness of breath, cold sweats, nausea or lightheadedness. "Sadly, all of these symptoms mimic common illnesses like flu, and so women tend to dismiss them," Wells said.

 

Know your numbers.  "Blood pressure, cholesterol, body weight and blood sugar are all factors that contribute to heart disease," said Wells.  "It's critically important that you find out what your numbers are and take measures to correct anything that's out of line."  Wells added an interesting note: while weight is important, waist size is perhaps a more relevant predictor of heart disease. "Women don't like to have their waists measured, but it is a really good way for us to predict heart disease."

 

Pay attention to lifestyle factors. Quitting smoking, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, get 150 minutes of exercise a week and find ways to reduce stress all can help reduce heart attack risk. "You don't necessarily have to join a gym or invest in a lot of expensive equipment to get heart-healthy," Wells explained. "Simply find ways to incorporate more energy into your day — park your car a little bit farther away in the lot, walk to lunch — even some household chores can burn a decent number of calories."

 

Call your mother. "This suggestion came from my mother," Wells explained with a smile. "Your family history can tell a lot about your risk for heart disease, and you should talk to your mother or other family member to learn whether heart disease runs in your family and, if so, which types."

 

The event ended with fruity treats, free chair massages and aromatherapy hand massages, and a group photo of participants dressed in red to honor the day.

 

"I didn't realize until today how women are different than men when it comes to heart disease," said Elizabeth Carman as she surveyed a table full of heart health information and giveaways. "I'm glad I came, and I will definitely be paying more attention to what I eat in the future to stay heart healthy."

 

Wells is already planning for Go Red 2017. She hopes UK HealthCare staff will contribute their heart-healthy recipes to a cookbook or even a bake-off to see who can make the tastiest healthy treats.

 

"Nothing would make me happier than to see our women commit to healthier living," Wells said. "We are role models for our spouses, our children, and our peers, and we must learn to put our health first for our own sake and as a model for those who love us, admire us, and/or work with us."

 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Laura Dawahare, laura.dawahare@uky.edu

UK Partnership Will Prepare STEAM Students for Geosciences Careers

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 11:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016) — A new partnership between the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) in the College of Arts and Sciences, UK College of Education and STEAM Academy will prepare a diverse population of high school students for careers in geosciences. The program is being funded by a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and is expected to begin fall 2016.

 

"Many high school students don't realize they can make a living studying rocks, and that it's not just rocks — we study water resources, energy, natural hazards, environmental issues and even focus on community planning," said Rebecca Freeman, principal investigator (PI) on the NSF proposal and EES assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies.

 

Through field work, hands-on activities and new curriculum, the "Full STEAM Ahead" program will expose all STEAM students to four career options in the geosciences during their first two years of high school. Interested students can continue the program with a semester-long internship in EES laboratories during their sophomore year. Students can then transition into a "geoscience career pathway" through dual-credit EES courses on the UK campus during their junior and senior years, while continuing a customized curriculum at the STEAM Academy.

 

"It's a great opportunity to partner together, to package our STEM curriculum with UK's deep content expertise in geosciences, which we would never have access to on our own," said Justin Bathon, a UK College of Education associate professor who provides leadership to the STEAM Academy as the college’s director of innovative school models.

 

Bathon along with EES Associate Professor Alan Fryar and Pioneer Natural Resources Professor Michael McGlue are co-PIs on the NSF grant and will help lead the program.

 

"Because there are not a lot of geoscience courses in high school, it doesn't get reinforced systematically; students often don't know how to make a career track out of it," Fryar said.

 

At the same time, the need for geoscientists is growing and a workforce shortage is approaching. To address this, the "Full STEAM Ahead" program will not only aim to attract more students into the field, but also more diverse students, a challenge geosciences has dealt with for years.

 

The program will particularly focus on recruiting underrepresented groups, including women, minorities, persons with disabilities, and others, and easing their transition from high school to college. Of approximately 340 students, minority students represent 42 percent and students with free/reduced lunch represent 40 percent of STEAM's student population.

 

"We’re hoping to make life easier for other groups who may have obstacles in pursuing a STEM education or career path," said Freeman, who noted her own obstacles as a woman in geosciences. 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 8, 1912

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 19:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 168th diary entry from Feb. 8, 1912, recalls a fun women’s basketball game held against Lexington High School (now Henry Clay High School) and beginning Latin lessons with her close friend Pauline.

 

Feb. 8th. Go to the Girl's Game with High School. H.S. decides not to put in any scrubs — then we ought to win since all our players are old women! Oh you jumping-jack! Addie says, "It ain't no fair to have four things to guard with!" Pauline and Addie have designs on Mr. Harrison. The "Mountain Club" is practicing when we get back. Pauline and I read our first lesson in our new Latin book.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Singletary Center Signature Series Presents Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 18:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Singletary Center for the Arts will present three celebrated songwriters on stage together for one night only. Patty Griffin, Sara Watkins and Anaïs Mitchell will perform in concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20.

 

In a critically acclaimed career spanning over 20 years, Grammy Award-winner Patty Griffin has established one of the strongest and most inimitable voices in contemporary folk music. In addition to being an incredible vocalist, Griffin is also an accomplished songwriter, having written songs for artists including Mary Chapin Carpenter, Martina McBride, Emmylou Harris, Joan Osborne, Kelly Clarkson and Miranda Lambert. Singer and multi-instrumentalist Sara Watkins, first praised for her work as a founding member of Grammy Award-winning Nickel Creek, has since established a solo career including highly acclaimed studio albums and collaborations with artists such as John Mayer and The Decemberists. Widely known as “the Queen of Modern Folk Music,” Anaïs Mitchell is first and foremost a storyteller. A Vermont-based singer-songwriter, Mitchell’s musical style, sound, and performance have led her to be compared to Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, and Gillian Welch. 

 

For one night only, enjoy three of America’s finest songwriters on stage as Griffin, Watkins and Mitchell join together for a very special evening of music. Presented as a “songwriters-in-the-round” concert, all three of these noted performers will share songs and stories for an intimate and unforgettable evening.

 

Tickets for this concert are $45-32 depending on location of seating. A ticket processing fee will be applied upon transaction. Tickets can be purchased from Singletary Center ticket office at www.scfatickets.com, phoning 859-257-4929 or at the venue.

 

A part of the UK College of Fine Arts, the Singletary Center for the Arts presents and hosts around 400 artistic, cultural and educational events annually for the university community, Lexington community and the Commonwealth of Kentucky. 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

NICU Nurses Receive Training to Facilitate Important Family Bonding

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 17:45

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2015) — With her tiny body too vulnerable to withstand the world outside her mother’s womb, infant Emma Lewis continued to grow and develop inside an incubator during the first four days of her life.

 

But the life-preserving incubator at Kentucky Children’s Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) also separated Emma from her mother’s nurturing touch, which plays an important role in comforting and strengthening newborns. Those days were emotionally grueling for parents Katie and D.J. Lewis, who feared they were missing out on a critical time of bonding with their baby.

 

“I just always thought I’d have a picture-perfect delivery,” Katie Lewis said. “That I will get to hold her, and all the family will come and see her and hold her.”

 

Halfway through Katie’s pregnancy, a serious and rare complication expedited Emma’s delivery, making Katie’s vision of a perfect birth impossible. Obstetricians at St. Joseph East diagnosed Lewis with HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening variation of preeclampsia that causes a depletion of red blood cells and liver failure in the mother. As symptoms worsened, Katie’s brain swelled and liver started to fail. Because the only way to stop the progression of HELLP syndrome is through delivery, doctors sent Lewis to UK HealthCare where an obstetrics teams delivered baby Emma via emergency cesarean section at 26 weeks gestational age.

 

One-pound, 15-ounce Emma arrived on July 13, 2015, attached to intravenous lines, beeping monitors and a breathing ventilator to support her underdeveloped lungs. The neonatal care team watched Emma closely because of the risk of brain bleed, and monitored her red blood cell count and bacterial infections. While the team focused on giving Emma the best chance for survival and recovery, they did not neglect the essential function of maternal and paternal bonding during her stay in the NICU. Even in cases involving the earliest born and weakest babies, the NICU nursing staff attempts to accommodate maternal-paternal bonding with families through postponed Kangaroo Care.

 

In 2015, three Kentucky Children’s Hospital nurses, LaQuinta Bailey, Tara Hunt and Lisa McGee, received special training to facilitate Kangaroo Care for parents whose baby required treatment in the NICU. A standard method for initiating the maternal-infant bonding process of skin-to-skin contact, Kangaroo Care is typically conducted immediately after birth by placing the baby on the mother’s chest. Skin-to-skin contact soothes infants under stress, stimulates the nervous system, regulates an infant’s heart rate, and improves weight gain, among other benefits for mothers and babies. In the busy NICU environment, where intravenous lines, incubator isolation, heart monitors, and feeding tubes complicate the process, nurses must work within their environment and parameters to engage families in bonding practices.

 

Lisa McGee, a NICU clinical nurse specialist, said the additional expertise has prepared KCH nurses to help families navigate the challenges of implementing Kangaroo Care hours, days or even weeks after birth.

 

“There is a lot of science behind Kangaroo Care,” McGee said. “Actually, the biggest thing it does is to decrease stress in the baby, and it helps parasympathetic nervous system to come into play, so that the baby calms down.”

 

Katie Lewis recalls nurses in the operating room encouraging her to look at Emma immediately after the cesarean delivery. Because Emma required immediate placement in an incubator, the medical team couldn’t spare any time for maternal bonding. Instead, the nurses initiated paternal bonding with D.J. Lewis after birth by allowing the new dad to touch Emma as she was relocated to an incubator.

 

A day later, Katie recovered from surgery and reunited with Emma, who was still inside the incubator. After four days passed, the eager parents were able to hold Emma outside the incubator for the first time. During this interaction, nurses helped initiate skin-to-skin contact by setting Emma on the chests of her parents.

 

At first, the couple held Emma for increments of an hour and a half because getting the baby in and out of the incubator frequently was a risk. Emma relied on the warmth of her parents’ bodies to retain heat, calories and body temperature. As Emma gained strength, the nursing staff gradually introduced the parents to new bonding opportunities, such as giving Emma a bath, pushing her food through a feeding tube, giving her a bottle of Katie’s breast milk and reading her books.

 

Bonding was especially important for D.J. Lewis, a sergeant in the U.S. Army. At the time of Emma’s birth, Lewis was preparing for a yearlong deployment to Kuwait in September. He couldn’t wait for IV lines and monitors to disappear to begin the bonding process with their daughter.

 

“He loved it,” Katie Lewis said of D.J.’s role in paternal bonding. “He would just fall asleep with her and rub her head and read books.”

 

Katie Lewis said the NICU nurses encouraged and affirmed the parents in interacting with their fragile child. The nurses shifted equipment and rearranged areas in the NICU pods to accommodate peaceful Kangaroo Care time for the family, even in the middle of the night. As Emma’s chances of survival increased with each day, the nurses transitioned the responsibility of care to the parents. The parents learned the baby’s signals indicating breathing problems or a loss of body heat.

 

“None of them made me feel like I didn’t know what I was doing,” Katie Lewis said of the nursing staff. “They would help reposition us, they would move the incubator — to make us feel as at home as possible.”

 

By the time Emma was ready to leave the hospital in September, Katie Lewis felt terrified but also excited.

 

“When we got home, I sat on my couch and I held her and I cried because it’s such an exciting feeling,” Katie Lewis said. “To be able to reach that milestone and go home for good was a very exciting feeling.”

 

More NICU nurses will receive formal training to become certified Kangaroo Care Caregivers. McGee said low birth weight infants received Kangaroo Care in about 45 percent of cases, with efforts underway to increase the number of families benefiting from Kangaroo Care.

 

And paternal bonding was worth the extra effort for D.J. Lewis, who came home to visit his family in November. Emma had no trouble snuggling and sleeping on her dad’s chest after his time away.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

 

 

 

Confucius Institute Director is Guest on WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 16:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today, guest host Chase Cavanaugh speaks with Huajing Maske, director of the University of Kentucky's Confucius Institute, which offers programs on Chinese language and culture. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-look-confucius-institute.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

UK Studio Season Shines Spotlight on Directing, Playwriting Talents

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 16:12

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — Performances of "Dead Poets Society" will kick off this semester of productions in the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance Studio Season. The spring portion of the season, which gives UK students the chance to stage their own work or interpretations of work, opens with two showings of "Dead Poets Society" at 5 p.m. today (Friday, Feb. 5) and noon Saturday, Feb. 6, at the Lucille C. Little Black Box Theatre, located in room 102 of the Fine Arts Building.

 

The UK Theatre and Dance Studio Season provides an opportunity for students to generate their own work in the department's facilities with the department's available resources and benefiting from the advice and supervision of the department's faculty and staff. Theatre faculty encourage students to use the Studio Season as a laboratory for experimentation in a variety of theatrical forms. Students are challenged to think creatively.

 

This spring's productions and the students presenting them are:

· "Dead Poets Society," play by Gina Cerimele-Mechley and Cincinnati Actor’s Studio and Academy, directed by theatre senior Faith Gingrich-Goetz, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 5-6;

· "Nevada, Nevada," play by English and theatre senior Jenny Winstead, of Louisville, Kentucky, directed by theatre junior Maddy Williamson, of Norfolk, Virginia, Feb. 26-27;

· "Revenge on Reality," play written and directed by theatre senior Rob Miller, of Hilliard, Ohio, March 25-26;

· "Our Town," play by Thornton Wilder, directed by senior Daylin Tone, of Burbank, California, April 1-2;

· "Women and Wallace," play by Jonathan Marc Sherman, directed by theatre senior Katy Vest, of Frankfort, Kentucky, April 8-9;

· "Eat (It’s Not About Food)," play by Linda Daugherty, directed by elementary education and theatre junior Myranda Thomas, of Corbin, Kentucky, April 18-19;

· "Five Drinks," play by Jake Willams and Anna Dye, directed by Tone, April 22-23; and

· "Jefferson Hawthorne," play by English and theatre senior Abby Schroering, of Louisville, directed by theatre junior Curtis Lipsey, of Louisville, April 29-30.

For specific times for each production, visit http://finearts.uky.edu/theatre/studio-season. All performances will be staged in the Little Black Box Theatre, except "Our Town," which will be held in the Wallace N. Briggs Theatre. All shows are free and open to the public.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 5-7, 1912

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 15:24

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 165th, 166th and 167th diary entries from Feb. 5-7, 1912, recall her missing a yearbook meeting due to a bad cold, and after a day of rest, getting back on her feet to attend her Y.W.C.A. cabinet picture, another yearbook meeting where she turned in a piece to be published on the "disappearance" of a fellow student, and the UK women’s basketball game against University of Tennessee

 

Feb. 5th. Stay in and can't speak a word. Everybody lovely to me. Have to miss Annual Meeting.

 

Feb. 6th. Go to have Y.W.C.A. cabinet picture at Spengler's.

 

Feb. 7th. Annual meeting when I hand in first contribution, Mr. Nagel says, "Much Ado" is "rich." Very few present. Go with Jessie Mit to Tennessee game, which was fine. We beat them 27-15.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UKSGA Child Care Grant Applications Now Open

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 13:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Student Government Association (SGA) is once again offering child care grants to part-time and full-time UK students, both at the undergraduate and graduate level. 

 

"The goal of these grants is to help any University of Kentucky student who is having to pay for child care while attending the university," SGA Senate President Ben Childress said. "SGA strives to enhance the overall student experience, assisting the student body in any way possible by providing necessary student services — child care grants are one of these services."

 

By helping students pay for child care services, Student Government hopes that UK students can further their education with less financial stress. The grant will be credited to the student’s myUK account.

 

In order to qualify for a child care grant, a student must be enrolled at UK in the semester that they are applying for the grant. The student’s child must be enrolled in a day care or after-school program that requires a weekly or monthly payment. This is a one-time grant with applications available each semester. 

 

To apply, click here. The deadline to apply is noon Thursday, March 1. No late applications will be accepted.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, 859-257-1909; katy.bennett@uky.edu; Rebecca Stratton, 859-323-2395; rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

 

Heart-Healthy Tips, Treats and Prizes in Chandler Hospital Pavilion A Tomorrow

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 11:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 4, 2016) — Want a free chair massage? An aromatherapy hand massage?  A chocolaty fruit treat? If you "Go Red" tomorrow, you can get all of this and more.

 

February is Heart Month and Feb. 5 is the American Heart Association's "Go Red Day" celebrating women's heart health. Beginning at 11 a.m. tomorrow in the atrium of Chandler Hospital's Pavilion A, the Gill Heart Institute will celebrate Go Red Day with heart-healthy tips, treats and prizes.

 

According to Dr. Gretchen Wells, director of the Women's Heart Health Program at the Gill Heart Institute, women's hearts are different from men's in certain ways, which can affect the way women develop heart disease and experience heart attack symptoms.

"People assume all heart attacks feel like a crushing in the chest, but often, and for women in particular, the symptoms of a heart attack can be quite different," Wells said.  "Events like Go Red Day give us another opportunity to teach women what to look for and how to take the best care of your heart."

 

There will be free chair massages and aromatherapy hand massages beginning at 11 a.m. in the Pavilion A atrium of Chandler Hospital. At noon, Wells will offer tips for women's heart health. Afterward, there will be delicious treats, gifts and take-home information. Anyone wearing red is encouraged to participate in a group photo session at 12:30 p.m.

 

To be eligible for a prize, take a selfie wearing red and post it to the Gill Heart Association's Facebook page with the hashtag "#GillGoesRed."  You can also visit http://twibbon.com/Support/gill-goes-red-2016-2 for instructions on how to customize your photo.

 

 

 

UK Faculty Win Big at Lexington Music Awards

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 10:36

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — Two University of Kentucky School of Music faculty and a former faculty member took home awards at the second annual Lexington Music Awards held Jan. 31, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.

 

Raleigh Dailey, associate professor of UK Jazz Studies, took home the award for Best Keyboardist. Dailey, who earned his doctoral degree from UK, is an internationally recognized jazz pianist, composer, scholar and educator. Under his direction, UK's Lab Band and Jazz Combos have performed nationally at various jazz festivals, including the International Jazz Education Network Conference. Dailey regularly performs worldwide, and his recordings were the subject of a recent feature article in DownBeat magazine.

 

Kevin Holm-Hudson, an associate professor of music theory, took home the Jay Flippin Music Education Award. Holm-Hudson has taught at UK since 2000. He holds a doctoral degree in composition (with an ethnomusicology emphasis) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of "Genesis and the Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" (Ashgate, 2008) and the editor of "Progressive Rock Reconsidered" (Routledge, 2002). He is currently preparing a music theory textbook for Oxford University Press.

 

This is Holm-Hudson’s second Lexington Music Award. In addition to being one of the evening's winners, Holm-Hudson and his group, The Twiggenburys, served as the house band for the awards ceremony.

 

Vince DiMartino, a former UK faculty member, received the Lexington Music Award’s Lifetime Achievement Award for his dedication to Kentucky music. Described as one of the most sought after trumpet performers and educators, DiMartino has also received the CASE Professor of the Year award in Kentucky in 2004 and the Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. DiMartino retired in 2012 from Centre College.

 

The idea for the Lexington Music Awards came about from Lexington musician and music teacher, David McLean. McLean intended for the event to be a small gathering, but soon realized that there was much more interest in the event than he originally predicted. In order to determine the winners of each category, McLean has the public make nominations online. He then narrows down the votes to the top four candidates per category and had individual nominees vote on each category to determine the winners.

 

The UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK's Math and Science Outreach Recognized with Robinson Award

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 10:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016) — At its February meeting, the Kentucky Board of Education presented the annual Dr. Samuel Robinson Award to co-winners — the Partnership Institute for Math and Science Education Reform (PIMSER) at the University of Kentucky and the Playhouse in the Park/Murray Calloway County Community Theater.

 

Since 2004, the Dr. Samuel Robinson Award has been conferred on an individual or group in Kentucky for outstanding leadership, commitment and service in promoting equity and opportunity to learn at high levels for all Kentucky students.

 

PIMSER was nominated for the Robinson Award by Tim Schneider, an interim secondary teaching and learning lead teacher in the Campbell County public schools. Schneider described PIMSER as his “educational leadership Think Tank” that he uses frequently.

 

“PIMSER is ‘that’ place where I can go to see and experience the current research put into practice," he said. "The research-based initiatives shared by experienced, well qualified staff at the institute are phenomenal!”

 

Sara M. Poeppelman, chair of the Lewis County High School Science Department, agreed with Schneider’s assessment of PIMSER.

 

“Through their outreach programs and offerings for teachers who take these experiences back to enhance their student learning experiences, PIMSER has undoubtedly positively impacted thousands of young Kentuckians’ learning and understanding of mathematics and science and engineering concepts,” she said.

 

Samuel Robinson, for whom the award is named, is a former educator, who served on the Kentucky Board of Education from 1991 to 2004, and is known for being a racial and social justice advocate and for promoting the difference education can make in the lives of all students.

 

Past Recipients of the Dr. Samuel Robinson Award

 

2004 (joint recipients) Sen. Gerald A. Neal of Louisville and the One Community, One Voice Achievement and Closing the Gap Community Committee of Fayette County

 

2005 Robert Smotherman, superintendent of the Bardstown Independent school district

 

2006 (joint recipients) Marlene Helm, Ed.D., former interim dean of the Eastern Kentucky University College of Education and Rep. Frank Rasche of Paducah

 

2007 Kathy Reed, member of the Bardstown Independent school board

 

2008 Laura McGrail, lead school psychologist for the Henderson County school district

 

2009 (joint recipients) Arriba Ninos (Upward Children) program in Shelbyville and the First Baptist Church Bracktown in Fayette County

 

2010 Helen Mountjoy, former secretary of the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet

 

2011 Robert Sexton, former executive director of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence (posthumous)

 

2012 (joint recipients) Gregory Ross, Ed.D., former principal of McNabb Elementary, Paducah Independent school district, and Kern Alexander, Ed.D., former president of Murray State University and Western Kentucky University

 

2013 (joint recipients) The Fayette Co. Equity Council and Ronnie Nolan, director of the Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children (KECSAC)

 

2014 (joint recipients) Cindy Heine, retired associate executive director of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence, and Henry Webb, superintendent of Floyd County Schools

 

The Kentucky Department of Education contributed to this report.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Dining Encourages Commuters to Sign Up for Commuter Meal Plan

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 10:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016)  With 26 campus dining locations, living off-campus shouldn't stop students from enjoying all that UK Dining has to offer. With specially designed meal plans, students have access to delicious food from Blazer’s made-to-order pasta bar to the gluten free zone at the Fresh Food Company.

 

UK Dining is now offering a chance to win a $100 gas card when non-residential or commuter students sign up for a spring Meal Plan or Flex Plan.

 

To review meal plan options or to sign up, visit the Dining Center or go to www.uky.campusdish.com

 

Commuter students on annual contracts, as well as new spring contracts, will be added to the drawing. The drawing will take place if at least 50 commuters sign up for a new spring Flex or Meal Plan. Promotion excludes Custom Flex Plan. This promotion ends Feb. 12, 2016.
 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

School of Journalism and Telecommunications Welcomes New Director

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 09:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2016)  The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information welcomes Lars Willnat as the new director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications.

 

A committee appointed by Dean Dan O’Hair and led by Mike Farrell chose Willnat for this position during the spring 2015 semester. Willnat arrived on UK’s campus in January to begin his new role.

 

“I was thrilled,” Willnat said. “It’s a nice change for me. I’ve been a professor for 20 years. I want to do something different, create something, work with a program that already exists and build on that.”

 

Willnat will take a break from teaching for one semester to allow time for him to settle into his new role. He is looking forward to teaching in the fall semester and plans to instruct a course on media and the upcoming presidential election.

 

His vision for the school includes incorporating additional emerging media courses to the curriculum, updating technology resources for students and creating a professional master’s program within the school.

 

“The big thing that I would really like to accomplish within the next one or two years would be to start a professional master’s program here, and I think there’s big potential for that, focusing on new and emerging media,” Willnat said.

 

Willnat also hopes these changes will bring national recognition to the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at UK.

 

“I would like to make it one of the leading schools in the country,” Willnat said. “I would like to see it as one of the top schools, really.”

 

Preceding Willnat was Beth Barnes, the former director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications. Barnes served the school's limit of three four-year terms and went on to teach a UK education abroad course in London, England, this semester, followed by a sabbatical doing research in Zambia during the fall 2016 semester.

 

Willnat, too, has seen much of the world. Before coming to UK, he was a professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong; George Washington University in Washington, D.C.; and most recently at Indiana University.

 

Willnat then spent a sabbatical semester last fall conducting research in Hong Kong, focusing on journalism, politics and social media.

 

Willnat is settling in and enjoying his time on campus.

 

“The campus here is beautiful,” Willnat said. “I was really excited because I like campus life, and Kentucky has a nice one. To me that was one big draw when I came here.”

 

Willnat’s wife, Annette, is now also a part of the Wildcat family. She is teaching "Strategic Public Relations, ISC 341," and "Global Strategies, ISC 497," this semester.

 

Along with David H. Weaver, Willnat has conducted research in digital journalism. Together they will publish a book this year titled "The American Journalist in the Digital Age." The book is based on a representative survey of more than 1,000 U.S. journalists that focuses on how journalists think about their roles in society and their profession overall. 

 

Willnat is the author of more than 50 journal articles and book chapters and the co-editor of four books. He has written more than 80 conference papers and worked as a consultant for American industries and government agencies. Willnat is on the editorial boards of four academic journals, has lectured and conducted research in more than 30 countries, has been a Fulbright scholar and guest professor at leading universities across the world.

 

“We are very pleased to have Dr. Willnat join our journalism and media school,” Dean O’Hair said. “Lars is a recognized scholar in the field of journalism and brings a great deal of international experience to the role. Additionally, we are excited to welcome Annette Willnat to the Integrated Strategic Communication faculty. Both Willnats come to UK with a wealth of teaching experience.”

 

Willnat earned his bachelor's degree in media research and political science from the Free University of Berlin and his master's and doctoral degrees in mass communication from Indiana University.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Pages