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UK College of Social Work Students Serving Kentucky Today; Cultivating Leadership for Tomorrow

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 15:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016)  Students at the University of Kentucky College of Social Work are working for Kentucky by working with the Commonwealth's most vulnerable citizens in child protection, hospitals, senior centers, veteran’s programs, mental health centers, foster care, medical clinics, schools, juvenile and adult court programs, domestic violence programs, assisted living and developmental disability programs, and a wide variety of nonprofit and government programs.

 

In turn, students are provided with learning environments that cultivate leadership, and connect the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom to the realities of practice. Through field education internships they are able to increase knowledge, refine skills, and strengthen professional ethics and values in preparation for professional practice.

 

"Social work students provided over 131,000 service hours last year to the citizens of Kentucky through undergraduate and graduate internships," said Pamela Weeks, director of Field Education and clinical associate professor at the College of Social Work. "Field education is an integral part of the social work curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and all students are required to complete a minimum of two internships under the supervision of practicing social workers."

 

Jennifer Garland, a social worker and agency field instructor at the Lexington Senior Center, works with and supervises UK social work students.

 

"These students are an asset to my work with the senior population. Not only do they keep me on my toes with their questions of how theory applies to our services and best service practices, but they work hand in hand with the seniors of our community. They are kind, caring and generous with their time when it comes to keeping our clients satisfied. In the months that they work with our clients, the social work students that pass through the Lexington Senior Center are able to really touch the hearts of our senior population and help them in whatever way they can. I can only hope that the students get as much learning and life enrichment out of this experience as our seniors get from their interactions with our up-and-coming social workers," Garland said.

 

Megan Moore, director of Training, Development and Compliance at KVC Kentucky, a behavioral health care organization, said that KVC Kentucky has a long-standing tradition of providing a robust practicum experience for both bachelor's and master's degree level social work students. 

 

"KVC Kentucky values the role that students play in the agency and offers a wide array of learning experiences in the areas of child welfare, foster care, behavioral health, substance abuse and co-occurring disorder treatment. KVC's partnership with University of Kentucky College of Social Work has allowed for unique opportunities for students to learn in a stimulating and supportive environment with their peers. Many of KVC Kentucky's leaders and employees began their professional careers as bachelor and masters level social work practicum students."

 

When Jacqueline Dallaire first decided to come to UK, she already knew that she wanted to become a physician and wanted an undergraduate major that would teach her about people, and then she came across social work.

 

"Being a social work student at UK has broadened and deepened both my understanding of and respect for the diversity of the human experience. I learned what it meant to truly value human dignity and autonomy, and I came to appreciate the critical importance of social context. While a lot of the groundwork for those lessons was laid in the classroom, social work truly came to life for me during my practicums."

 

Graduate student Rebecca Stinsky pursued her bachelor's degree at UK while actively serving in the U.S. Marine Corps. The thing she loved the most about her time in the military was the people with whom she served. That experience gave her a greater sense of purpose — service to others.

 

"After I discharged from active duty, I knew I wanted to put my G.I. Bill to work and to pursue a career that was versatile and that would continue to fuel my purpose. Through UK's College of Social Work's supportive and genuine faculty, I was able to develop my interest further and tailor my education around what matters most to me: our nation's military and veteran populations," Stinsky said.

 

"As an undergrad, I completed a placement at the Volunteers of America's Homeless Veterans Transitional Treatment Program, a two-year residential substance abuse program specifically for homeless veterans. Throughout graduate school, I have been placed at the Lexington VA Medical Center. I have worked with the acute care medicine teams and have recently transferred onto the acute psychiatric unit. This has proven to be one of the most valuable experiences in my journey through higher education. I feel as though my coursework coupled with real-life, hands-on, tangible experience is setting me up for success in the future."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

"Houston, We Have a Problem..." Apollo 13 Commander to Headline Sanders-Brown Annual Dinner

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 15:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Foundation will feature remarks from Apollo 13 commander and NASA legend Capt. Jim Lovell at its annual dinner on Thursday, April 7, 2016.

 

Lovell is famous for his calm, careful command of Apollo 13. Through teamwork and decisive leadership, Lovell and his crew modified the lunar module into an effective lifeboat to safely return to Earth in 1970. This inspiring national hero turned, “Houston, we have a problem” into an enduring part of the American lexicon.

 

The dinner will fund internationally recognized ongoing research at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, where researchers are engaged in the battle against Alzheimer's disease and other age-related illnesses.

 

A cocktail reception begins at 6:30 pm in Lexington Center Blue Grass Ballroom, Lexington, Ky. The dinner and remarks follow at 7:30 pm. Individual tickets are $175; table sponsorships start at $1,500. For more information contact the Foundation Office at 859-323-5374.

 

The UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) has been conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and other age-related disease for more than 35 years. In 1985, the Center was one of the first 10 National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers. Today, SBCoA is an internationally prestigious research center, identifying mechanisms for healthy brain aging and age-related diseases and exploring treatments that may slow down, cure, and/or prevent these diseases entirely.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

With Donations for Citations, PTS Offers an Alternative Way to Pay Parking Tickets

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 14:58

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016) — University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) will accept donations of non-perishable food goods — including food and personal care items — from Monday, Feb. 29, to Friday, March 11, in exchange of waiving one regular parking citation of $25 or less. All donations will go to UK’s Big Blue Pantry which assists UK students who are experiencing food insecurity or hunger.

 

This pilot program — dubbed Donations for Citations — will not only benefit the students, faculty and staff who depend on the Big Blue Pantry, but will also offer an alternative way for members of the campus community to pay one of their citations.

 

“Part of the idea behind Donations for Citations is not just to offer an alternative way for students to pay, but to inspire a culture of generosity,” said Chrissie Tune, UK Parking and Transportation Services marketing director.

 

“Partnering with PTS is going to give us the chance to stock up for the summer, make students a little more service-minded, and get the word out about Big Blue Pantry. I feel as though Donations for Citations will be incredibly successful, so much so that we can continue this program for years to come,” said Manning Kulis, Big Blue Pantry student director.

 

“Contrary to the common perception, parking enforcement is not about revenue generation. The fines primarily exist as a disincentive to violating the university’s regulations,” said UK Director of Parking and Transportation Services Lance Broeking.

 

Big Blue Pantry served over 100 students in its first year of operation from August 2014-August 2015. Donations for Citations will help Big Blue Pantry customers during a time in the semester when donations to the pantry are historically low.

 

“Overall, the Donations for Citations program is going to be a tremendous help for the Big Blue Pantry,” Kulis said. “This is the time in the semester where we don't have as many donors, drives or people interested in helping out. Though the pantry isn't under-stocked currently, it's always good to have a variety of foods.”

 

There are some specific guidelines in terms of donation items.

 

Customers may choose to donate 10 non-perishable food items or five personal care items to the Donations for Citations drive in order to have one regular citation of $25 or less waived.

 

Donations will not be accepted if: 

  • Items are expired, damaged or opened.
  • Items require refrigeration.
  • Items are in a glass container.
  • Items are trial size.

The following non-perishable food items will be accepted: canned fruit, soups, cereal, instant oatmeal, pasta, beans, canned tuna or canned chicken, and nut butter. The following personal care items will be accepted: shampoo, hand soap, hand sanitizer, toilet paper (minimum size of 4 pack), toothpaste, shaving cream, razors and tampons.

 

For a complete list of acceptable donation items, visit the Donations for Citations website.

 

Donations for Citations waivers are only valid for one regular fine of $25 or less. This does not include immobilizations, impoundments, parking in fire lanes, disabled accessible parking violations or improper application or use of parking permits.

 

Customers may only have one eligible citation waived as part of the Donations for Citations drive. Customers with multiple unpaid citations must pay all other outstanding citations in order to have one waived under the program. Citations waived through the Donations for Citations program are not eligible for appeal.

 

If you have any questions regarding the Donations for Citations program, visit www.uky.edu/pts/donationsforcitations or email ukparking@lsv.uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Design Announces New Administrative Officers

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 12:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Design (CoD) has announced the appointment of two new administrative officers for the college: Susan Eriksson is the new associate dean for research (ADR) and Gregory A. Luhan takes on the role of associate dean for administration (ADA).

 

Joining the college in November 2015, Eriksson’s role as ADR includes serving as liaison to the university's vice president for research and will represent the college at regular meetings with the Office of the Vice President for Research. She will also work with faculty to develop a research portfolio that aligns with the strategic plan of the college. Eriksson will be assisting the dean in establishing a college-wide “design research” trajectory and advancing existing research and collaborative projects.

 

In addition to her new position at UK, Eriksson is a research fellow in the ArtSci program at the University of Texas at Dallas. The program promotes collaborations between the art/design community and geoscience to improve both data visualization/exploration and science communication. Eriksson is a native of Lincoln County, Kentucky, and a graduate of UK.

 

As CoD’s new ADA, Professor Luhan will be responsible for coordinating the college's long-term planning activities, including the strategic planning process. He will also provide coordination in the development of curricula by the faculty of all three programs — architecture, historic preservation and interior design — and their review at the college level by dean, directors, chairs, faculty and other university officials.

 

On the CoD faculty since 1998, Luhan is the John Russell Groves Endowed Professor in the School of Architecture where he teaches digital design studios and seminars on design theory, systems thinking and design computing. Prior to teaching in Kentucky, he worked for the New York City architecture firms Edward Larrabee Barnes, Peter Eisenman, Charles Gwathmey, and Agrest and Gandelsonas after graduating from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Princeton University.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

"see blue." #selfie: Olivia Senter

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 12:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we're excited to introduce "see blue." #selfie  a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. This week, learn about the 2015-16 president of Student Activities Board, Olivia Senter.

 

Olivia Senter, an integrated strategic communication major from Madisonville, Kentucky, serves as the 2015-16 president of Student Activities Board (SAB). Senter was so confident she wanted to attend the University of Kentucky that she refused to apply anywhere else. She showed this same confidence when she became involved in SAB her very first semester on campus. This leader has a passion for helping others realize and achieve their goals and she uses her position in SAB to live out this passion, as explained in her "see blue." #selfie!

 

UKNow: Tell me about your position in Student Activities Board (SAB).

Olivia Senter: So, I'm the president. A lot of what I do is managing the organization and making sure everything we do aligns with our core values and making sure we are achieving the organizational goals we have set not only for right now, but for the next five or 10 years. There are things we want SAB to achieve that I won't be here for, but I can help lay the groundwork for! The other part of what I do is external relations. I meet with administrators to get them connected with what we are doing, other student orgs for collaboration on events as well as community members to gain insight on what other people think about SAB and what we can improve. I also share SAB stories with others so they can better understand what our role is on campus — to enrich the lives on students. Internally, I meet with directors, run weekly meetings and meet with our advisors.

 

UK: What is your major?

OS: ISC with an English minor. I plan on graduating in August!

 

UK: What made you choose the University of Kentucky?

OS: It's so cliché, but I've been to every home football game since I was three years old.  When I got here, I realized the university had so much more to offer than going to football games, like the classes, the education abroad experiences and opportunities made available to students — it's awesome! Growing up as a Wildcat, I knew UK was where I wanted to go, but I wanted to make it my home and my place where I was going to be able to figure out who I am, where I want to go and what I want to accomplish.

 

UK: When did you become involved with SAB? 

OS: Actually, it was my first semester. I was Traditions Committee chair. I worked on homecoming and senior send-off events in the spring. Sophomore year, I was director of public relations and I connected with UK PR, wrote press releases and handled media. Suring that term is when I applied for president.

 

UK: So you jumped into SAB as soon as you got onto campus! Why were you so drawn to it?

OS: I used to be pretty shy. I wanted to push myself. I thought SAB had interesting people that come from so many different places. This organization has made me more open minded and helped me to realize that this campus has more to offer than what I grew up thinking. I wanted to take advantage of those things.

 

UK: What is your favorite part of being president? 

OS: That's an easy one! I would say it's helping students realize and achieve their full potential. I like helping others figure out what their goals are. Being president helps me do that on a daily basis. I like pushing them to think bigger, which is actually harder because sometimes it takes a second for them to believe in themselves. I love helping people achieve more than they think they can achieve.

 

UK: During your time in SAB, what has been the most memorable event?

OS: I would say when Judy Smith came for Women of the World. The TV story "Scandal" is about her life. One unique thing was seeing the actual person versus the person portrayed on television. She has a family of her own, she's raising a family … but she's a superwoman! She takes on difficult cases and goes above and beyond her job description — she's intelligent, she talked about working hard and networking — I appreciated her being so open and honest! Even though she's so amazing, she was so down to earth with the students and she wanted to know our stories and help us figure out our goals. She travels the world, but here she was in Kentucky wanting to connect with our students!

 

UK: Are there other organizations on campus that you’re involved in?

OS: Chi Omega. I am part of the Commencement Committee. I'm a Mountain Cats pen pal in David, Kentucky. Mountain Cats is a really neat experience!

 

UK: When you’re studying late at Willy T., what Starbucks drink keeps you going? 

OS: A grande vanilla latte — so good! With two sugars.

 

UK: What’s one phrase you’re guilty of using too often? 

OS: I'll take care of it.

 

UK: What is your favorite thing you like to do off campus in the Lexington community? 

OS: I would say CycleYOU! I like to go exercise super early!

 

UK: What are three things you have with you at all times on campus?

OS: My planner, for sure! My ChapStick. My Fitbit — I wear it everyday. In our office we challenge each other. You know how meeting is going to go based on who won the Fitbit challenge for the week.

 

UK: Where is your favorite place to study on campus? 

OS: The area in Grehan called the Student Services Center. I used to tutor in the MC3 lab, which is in the Student Services Center. It's so quiet and there's usually at least one other ISC student.

 

UK: What made you decide to be an ISC major? 

OS: ISC allowed me to be my own kind of creative. I really like to write, so that was an upside! I like how you can put your own creativity and spin into what you create. I like how you can do anything with this major. It's helped me prepare for law school, as it has taught me to think critically and work in groups. The professors are so knowledgeable and have had direct experience with what they are teaching! That's what is super helpful!

 

UK: Do you remember your campus tour at UK as a prospective student? 

OS: No, I didn't take one! I toured zero campuses and applied to only one — UK.

 

UK: What advice would you tell an incoming freshman? 

OS: Find a mentor. Whether it's a professor, an advisor or even just a fellow peer or student — it's good to have someone there that will support what you want to do and that will help push you towards your goals. Definitely look into education abroad no matter your major, too. I learned so much in just a two week period abroad. That experience is invaluable that you can't replace. Also, invest in a good coat, gloves and rain boots!

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

UKSGA Scholarship and Award Applications Now Available

Mon, 02/29/2016 - 12:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016)  Each year, the University of Kentucky Student Government Association (UKSGA) awards several scholarships to UK students and faculty. Applications are now available.

 

The Lyman T. Johnson Odyssey Award will be given to one student who has demonstrated a sincere commitment to working for the betterment of the campus and/or community. This award is in honor of Lyman T. Johnson, the first African-American student to enroll at UK. UKSGA will award the scholarship to a student that the committee finds to have most closely demonstrated the spirit and dedication of Lyman T. Johnson.

 

The Constitutional Scholarship will be awarded to one undergraduate student who has excelled academically and contributed to the university as well.

 

The Academic Excellence Scholarship will be awarded to one undergraduate student and one graduate student who has excelled academically and contributed to the university as well.

 

The Robert G. Zumwinkle Student Rights Award will be bestowed upon one student and one faculty or staff member that has done the most to promote and protect student rights on campus during the current academic year. The Zumwinkle Award was named in recognition of Robert G. Zumwinkle, former vice chancellor at UK. Zumwinkle also served as the vice chancellor for Student Affairs, chairman of the UK Student Code Committee and was a long standing member of the American Civil Liberties Union, a national organization known for promoting individual rights.

 

For additional scholarship requirements, visit http://uksga.org/applications/scholarships-awards. Applications are to be turned in to the UKSGA office located in 351 Blazer Hall by 2 p.m. Monday, March 21. No late applications will be accepted. For questions or additional information, email Noel Ekman at ndek222@g.uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

DanceBlue Raises $1,631,067.49

Sun, 02/28/2016 - 16:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2016) – After 24 hours of dancing in anticipation, DanceBlue chairs and committee members revealed the 2016 grand fundraising total of $1,631,067.49 to the nearly 800 student participants and crowd of supporters.

 

Whether participating as a dancer, volunteer, committee member or a supporter, DanceBlue is something no one ever forgets, especially the last few hours. With a family talent show featuring children from the clinic and an emotional memorial hour to remember those who have lost their battle with cancer, the reveal this afternoon was a much anticipated moment for so many people at UK.

 

It all began in 2006 by raising $123,323.16 and has increased every year. With this year's total, DanceBlue has contributed $9.8 million to the Golden Matrix Fund and the DanceBlue Kentucky Children's Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic.

 

Nearly 800 dancers completed the 11th annual DanceBlue. All of the money raised at this annual 24-hour no-sitting, no-sleeping dance marathon benefits children with cancer and their families and cancer research.

 

"DanceBlue has opened my eyes to a whole new way of serving my community," Erica Shipley, 2016 overall chair, said. "It’s an amazing organization because it’s mutually beneficial. DanceBlue allows students to be involved in something bigger than themselves. Dancers get to partake in the celebration of life and watch the kids at the marathon forget about the worries of cancer. All parties involved are impacted. Over the past 24 hours, we have been one campus united for one cause and it has been awesome."

 

Everyone at DanceBlue was there for a reason this weekend. They were there for a cure, for hope and most importantly, for the kids.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909, or Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

 

 

UK Unveils Website, Effort to Underscore How University Serves Commonwealth

Sun, 02/28/2016 - 15:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky has unveiled a website — www.uky.edu/uk4ky — that is designed to tell UK's story of service to the Commonwealth and ask supporters to let policymakers know of the importance of continued funding.

 

"We are the university for Kentucky," said UK President Eli Capilouto. "This site tells the story of our momentum and of how we are serving more people and educating more students than at any time in our 150-year history. It also provides a clear avenue for how people can become involved in helping tell that story to legislators and policymakers."

 

The site, which debuted last week, describes the details and some of the impacts of proposed state budget cuts, currently being considered by the state legislature. 

 

 

The proposed state budget being considered by legislators would reduce UK's funding by nearly $13 million this year, another $25 million next fiscal year and would put at risk about a third of the university's state appropriations the following year through an as-yet-defined performance funding plan.

 

The site describes how UK's budget works as a way of demonstrating the importance of state investment. Learn more here: www.uky.edu/see/UK4KY/fact-fiction. It also provides information for how those interested can contact legislators by phone or email with a message of support. Visit www.uky.edu/see/UK4KY/show-your-support.

 

"Our state faces many significant challenges and we support our policymakers in finding solutions," Capilouto said. "But we can't create a stronger future for our state tomorrow by cutting investments in education today. This site, we hope, provides a brief look in a compelling way at the importance of state investment in our continued work for Kentucky and how proposed reductions in funding would inarguably impact that service."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

 

UK Students Send Books Abroad

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 17:12

LEXINGTON, KY. (March 2, 2016)  University of Kentucky Education Abroad (UK EA) and International Studies Abroad (ISA) hosted the first “Night of Service” recently at the International Book Project. Students were offered the opportunity to participate in a local service project while learning about international service learning.

 

“UK Education Abroad is hosting 'Nights of Service' in an effort to involve students in Lexington-based community projects,” said Susan Meredith, UK EA adviser. “We hope that by serving locally, students are inspired to serve internationally as well.”

 

This semester’s "Night of Service" took place at the International Book Project, a nonprofit organization that promotes literacy, education and global friendships by sending over 200,000 books annually to developing nations and impoverished areas in the United States. Boxes from this particular day of service were sent to Papua, New Guinea, and Kosovo.  

 

For more, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=9o4fREsQpI0.

 

“Working with an organization like the International Book Project inspired me to continue giving back to my community, both locally and internationally,” said freshman psychology and Spanish double major, Sarah Smoak. “It kindled the spark for service learning in me, and has made me want to seek out more opportunities to serve people.”

 

UK Education Abroad offers international service learning programs through ISA. Students can spend a summer in India, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic among other places participating in service projects with nonprofit organizations, municipal offices, schools or clinics. There is also a semester-length option in Cuzco, Peru.

 

For more information about international service learning, visit the digital catalog or contact Susan McVey Meredith, UK EA adviser, at susan.mcvey@uky.edu or call 859-313-2143.

 

Education Abroad is a unit of the UK International Center. Its primary responsibility is to facilitate high quality, academically sound and experientially rich study abroad, research abroad and intern abroad programs for UK students. More information about the International Center can be found at www.uky.edu/international/.

 

Connect with Education Abroad on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest, the blog enKompassYoutube and Snapchat (@ukyabroad). Visit 315 Bradley Hall to talk with an Education Abroad Peer Ambassador, email educationabroad@uky.edu, call 859-257-4067 or go online to www.uky.edu/educationabroad for more information.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

UK MBA Program Still Accepting Applications

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 16:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics is still accepting applications for the One Year Accelerated MBA and Professional Evening MBA programs.

 

The One Year Accelerated MBA is an 11-month program that runs from June to May each year. Both business and non-business majors can apply. Students can also take advantage of a yearlong internship program called Project Connect, which provides valuable real-world experience. This program’s coursework is enhanced by a number of workshops, certificate programs, team competitions, outside speakers and panel discussions.

The Professional Evening MBA can be completed in two or three years with convenient evening-only classes, allowing students to work fulltime during the day. This program begins in August or January of each year, and provides a deeper knowledge of advanced business processes which helps students increase their value to their present company or organization.

 

Harvie Wilkinson, director of the Gatton MBA programs, said, "If you want to make yourself more marketable in today's competitive job market, or if you want to expand your skill set so that you can be successful in your career, then acquiring an MBA may be an attractive option for you."

 

The application deadlines for the One Year Accelerated MBA program is May 11 and the Professional Evening MBA is July 1. For interested candidates, we encourage you to visit the UK’s MBA programs at http://gatton.uky.edu/mba for more information on the programs and how to apply.

You can also contact Christopher Carney, director of MBA Recruitment at christopher.carney@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200/carl.nathe@uky.edu; Chris Carney, 859-257-7645/christopher.carney@uky.edu

 

Deadlines Approach for Education Abroad Summer Programs

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 16:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2016)  University of Kentucky Education Abroad (UK EA) summer program application deadlines are approaching, with the majority of the applications closing March 1. Students can make the most of their summer break by earning credit abroad through UK-sponsored programs led by UK faculty members.

 

UK EA is offering many sponsored — or faculty-directed — programs in summer 2016. Faculty-led programs are unique because students will study alongside their peers from the university and earn UK credit directly without the need to fill out an academic approval form. These programs typically run for about four weeks and are a good option if students are lacking any UK core or major requirements.

 

There are few programs highlighted below, but students can find all of the faculty-led programs running this summer here.

For more information about any of these programs, contact Education Abroad by visiting our Resource Center in 315 Bradley Hall, emailing eapa@uky.edu, or calling 859-257-4067.

 

Education Abroad at the University of Kentucky is a unit of the UK International Center. Its primary responsibility is to facilitate high quality, academically sound and experientially rich study abroad, research abroad and intern abroad programs for UK students. More information about the International Center can be found at www.uky.edu/international/.

 

Connect with Education Abroad on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, our blog enKompass, Youtube and Snapchat (@ukyabroad). Visit 315 Bradley Hall to talk with an Education Abroad Peer Ambassador, email educationabroad@uky.edu, call 859-257-4067 or go online to www.uky.edu/educationabroad for more information.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Kyprianou Named 2016 Urology Care Foundation Distinguished Research Scholar Alumna

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 15:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) – Dr. Natasha Kyrpianou has been chosen as the 2016 Urology Care Foundation Distinguished Research Scholar Alumna. The award recognizes those in the urologic community who have compiled significant and substantial research and demonstrated academic leadership as well as a commitment to scholarship to advance urology care. Dr. Kyprianou will be honored at the Urology Care Foundation Research Honors Program on May 7.

 

Currently serving as a professor of Urology, Biochemistry, Pathology and Toxicology and Cancer Biology in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Kyprianou has done extensive research in the field of urology; in 2002, Kyprianou joined the Markey Cancer Center as the James F. Hardymon Chair in Urologic Research.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

'Mommy Goose' and Other UPK Books in Spotlight at Kentucky Crafted

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 14:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) — The University Press of Kentucky (UPK) returns this weekend to one of Kentucky's premier arts events, Kentucky Crafted: The Market, with a varied selection of new publications including one particularly fitting for the event celebrating the state's artists. “Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains,” is a one-of-kind nursery rhyme book featuring the art of two of the state's most popular folk artists.

 

The signature event of the Kentucky Arts Council, Kentucky Crafted is produced each year to showcase the highest quality art, craft, literature, music, film and food found in the state. More than 200 Kentucky Crafted and select out-of-state artists, musicians and artisanal food producers make their finest work available to wholesale buyers and the general public during the three-day event.

 

Buyers have the rare opportunity at the market to place orders directly with producers of Kentucky traditional and contemporary fine art and craft, as well as publishers of Kentucky-related books, such as Mike Norris’ “Mommy Goose,” illustrated by Minnie Adkins.

 

“Mommy Goose” is a piece of American heritage with a collection of 50 original nursery rhymes celebrating Appalachian tradition and speech and is designed to engage young children with a series of simple and often humorous verses that gradually become more challenging as the book progresses. Readers can advance to longer, more complex rhymes as their skills develop — at home or with the guidance of teachers. Featuring sheet music for the original song “Tell me, Mommy Goose,” this multidimensional book is certain to entertain while introducing a new generation to hallowed folk traditions.

 

Mike Norris is a native of eastern Kentucky who has been writing stories, poems and songs for more than 40 years. He worked as the director of communications for Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, for many years, where he also performed as a folk musician. He has written two other children’s books, “Sonny the Monkey” and “Bright Blue Rooster,” both of which were illustrated by Adkins.

 

Minnie Adkins is a folk artist with permanent collections at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Gallery of Art, the American Folk Art Museum, the Huntington Museum of Art and the Kentucky Folk Art Center. Adkins, who has been called "the most important female wood carver in the history of American folk art” by Matt Collinsworth, director of the Kentucky Folk Art Center, has won the Kentucky Arts Council's Artist Award honoring lifetime achievement in the arts. She has contributed essays to numerous collections on folk art and crafts.

 

Kentucky is one of a few states in the nation to sponsor a show of this kind for its art and craft businesses. Its 34-year tradition of excellence has not gone unnoticed. Kentucky Crafted was named the number one fair and festival in the country four times by readers of AmericanStyle magazine. The Southeast Tourism Society has named it a top 20 event for 15 years.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that now includes all of the state universities, five private colleges and two historical societies. The editorial program of the press focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation.

 

Kentucky Crafted will take place 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, March 5, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 6, at the Lexington Convention Center. One-day tickets are $10 and two-day tickets are $15. Children 15 and under are admitted for free. For more information on Kentucky Crafted, visit http://artscouncil.ky.gov/KentuckyArt/Event_Market.htm

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Making Breastfeeding Best for Women Working Outside the Home

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 13:35

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) — The health advantages of exclusive breastfeeding have been documented and reported for both mothers and children. According to a 2014 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nationally 79 percent of infants had ever been breastfed and 49 percent were breastfeeding at six months. The same report showed, in Kentucky, 61 percent of infants were ever breastfed and only 32 percent were breastfeeding at six months. The goal standard is to increase the proportion of infants that are breastfeeding at six months; with planning and support from the community those rates can improve.

 

Many mothers are aware of the benefits of breastfeeding however, they encounter significant barriers that decrease their chances of initiating breastfeeding or continuing until the recommended six months. Working outside the home can be one of those barriers and is related to a shorter duration of breastfeeding. Low-income women are more likely than their higher-income counterparts to return to work earlier and to be engaged in jobs that make it challenging for them to continue breastfeeding.  

 

"Baby-Friendly" facilities work to teach new moms to initiate breastfeeding and Mommy and Me Workshops focus on educating women during the two weeks following delivery. There are some steps women can take to maintain breastfeeding while working outside the home.

 

Recognizing additional challenges that women working outside the home may have, makes it increasingly important to support their breastfeeding goals. Some women know early in their pregnancy they will work outside the home after delivery; this knowledge allows new moms to plan their return to the workplace. Storing breastmilk is a key step to continuing breastfeeding.

 

A few weeks before returning to the workplace mothers can begin freezing breastmilk, labeling bottles with the date so older bottles can be used first. In a standard freezer, milk is usable for three months after bottling. A breast pump is the most important tool in the process of creating your own "milk bank," most health insurances cover the cost of pumps; Medicaid recipients also receive this benefit through the local health department. Teaching the baby to drink breastmilk from a bottle is a process that should begin a few weeks before returning to work and family members can help in this. Additionally, the goal to pump breastmilk should be discussed with employers to accommodate the best times and place to pump. Finally, the goal of continuing breastfeeding should be discussed with child care providers.

 

Commitment to providing women with the support that they need to achieve their infant feeding intention is a collective effort. When we come together to protect every mother’s right to breastfeed, as long as she and her baby desired, we'll begin to see a positive change in the health of our nation.

 

Media Contact: Olivia McCoy at 859-257-1076 or Olivia McCoy at olivia.mccoy@uky.edu 

University of Kentucky Physicist Discovers New 2D Material that could Upstage Graphene

Fri, 02/26/2016 - 13:24

 

View the video above to hear more about the new material discovered by Menon that could upstage graphene. Video by REVEAL Research Media.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 29, 2016) — A new one atom-thick flat material that could upstage the wonder material graphene and advance digital technology has been discovered by a physicist at the University of Kentucky working in collaboration with scientists from Daimler in Germany and the Institute for Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL) in Greece.

 

Reported in Physical Review B, Rapid Communications, the new material is made up of silicon, boron and nitrogen — all light, inexpensive and earth abundant elements — and is extremely stable, a property many other graphene alternatives lack.

 

"We used simulations to see if the bonds would break or disintegrate — it didn't happen," said Madhu Menon, a physicist in the UK Center for Computational Sciences. "We heated the material up to 1,000-degree Celsius and it still didn't break."

 

Using state-of-the-art theoretical computations, Menon and his collaborators Ernst Richter from Daimler and a former UK Department of Physics and Astronomy post-doctoral research associate, and Antonis Andriotis from IESL, have demonstrated that by combining the three elements, it is possible to obtain a one atom-thick, truly 2D material with properties that can be fine-tuned to suit various applications beyond what is possible with graphene.

 

While graphene is touted as being the world's strongest material with many unique properties, it has one downside: it isn't a semiconductor and therefore disappoints in the digital technology industry. Subsequent search for new 2D semiconducting materials led researchers to a new class of three-layer materials called transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). TMDCs are mostly semiconductors and can be made into digital processors with greater efficiency than anything possible with silicon. However, these are much bulkier than graphene and made of materials that are not necessarily earth abundant and inexpensive.

 

Searching for a better option that is light, earth abundant, inexpensive and a semiconductor, the team led by Menon studied different combinations of elements from the first and second row of the periodic table.

 

Although there are many ways to combine silicon, boron and nitrogen to form planar structures, only one specific arrangement of these elements resulted in a stable structure. The atoms in the new structure are arranged in a hexagonal pattern as in graphene, but that is where the similarity ends.

 

The three elements forming the new material all have different sizes; the bonds connecting the atoms are also different. As a result, the sides of the hexagons formed by these atoms are unequal, unlike in graphene. The new material is metallic, but can be made semiconducting easily by attaching other elements on top of the silicon atoms.

 

The presence of silicon also offers the exciting possibility of seamless integration with the current silicon-based technology, allowing the industry to slowly move away from silicon instead of eliminating it completely, all at once.

 

"We know that silicon-based technology is reaching its limit because we are putting more and more components together and making electronic processors more and more compact," Menon said. "But we know that this cannot go on indefinitely; we need smarter materials."

 

Furthermore, in addition to creating an electronic band gap, attachment of other elements can also be used to selectively change the band gap values — a key advantage over graphene for solar energy conversion and electronics applications.

 

Other graphene-like materials have been proposed but lack the strengths of the material discovered by Menon and his team. Silicene, for example, does not have a flat surface and eventually forms a 3D surface. Other materials are highly unstable, some only for a few hours at most.

 

The bulk of the theoretical calculations required were performed on the computers at the UK Center for Computational Sciences with collaborators Richter and Andriotis directly accessing them through fast networks. Now the team is working in close collaboration with a team led by Mahendra Sunkara of the Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research at University of Louisville to create the material in the lab. The Conn Center team has had close collaborations with Menon on a number of new materials systems where they were able to test his theory with experiments for a number of several new solar materials.

 

"We are very anxious for this to be made in the lab," Menon said. "The ultimate test of any theory is experimental verification, so the sooner the better!"

 

Some of the properties, such as the ability to form various types of nanotubes, are discussed in the paper but Menon expects more to emerge with further study.

 

"This discovery opens a new chapter in material science by offering new opportunities for researchers to explore functional flexibility and new properties for new applications," he said. "We can expect some surprises."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Research is the Topic of WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Today

Thu, 02/25/2016 - 16:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today's program explores the role of research in the University of Kentucky's Strategic Plan. Godell talks with UK Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/plotting-uks-research-future.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

UK Historian Contributes to Discussion of Historic Basketball Championship

Thu, 02/25/2016 - 16:41

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2016) – University of Kentucky history Professor Gerald Smith will take part in panel discussions associated with a CBS Sports Network’s special about the 1966 Texas Western University versus University of Kentucky national basketball championship game. The television special, “Championship of Change,” will explore the impact the game had on the sports and cultural landscape of America. The one-hour special airs at noon Sunday, Feb. 28, on CBS.

 

Against the backdrop of the civil rights movement in 1966, and for the first time in NCAA Championship history, an all-black starting lineup took the floor for Texas Western and defeated top-ranked and all-white Kentucky on March 19, 1966.

 

In a unique panel discussion, moderated by journalist Jack Ford, members of the 1966 team, journalists, historians (including Smith) and other special guests, provide accounts of basketball life in the segregated south, the challenges and triumphs of the 1966 Miners team and the way the game has resonated with fans throughout the years. The program also includes interviews with former Kentucky players Pat Riley and Larry Conley.

 

"As a historian,” said Smith, “I found it extremely rewarding to serve on a panel with the Texas Western players and listen as they shared their side of the story." While in El Paso, Smith interviewed six of the Texas Western players, along with former Arkansas head coach, Nolan Richardson. He has donated those taped interviews to the UK Nunn Oral History Center.

 

The 1966 national championship game remains one of the most famous in sports history.

 

To view a clip from the documentary, visit http://cbsprt.co/1KIfsvB. To view a clip from the 1966 game, visit https://youtu.be/V6-QpNV_lww

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

Nominate a Student Employee for Student Employee of the Year

Thu, 02/25/2016 - 16:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Human Resources Student Employment Office needs your help in recognizing UK students making outstanding contributions beyond the classroom.

 

If you supervise or work with a student worker, consider nominating them for the ninth annual Student Employee of the Year Award. Nominations are open now through March 18. The award recognizes undergraduate students who have shown exemplary commitment and initiative in their work.

 

“Student employees are a valuable part of campus life,” said Chuck Embs, student employment program coordinator. “It is very rewarding to be a part of an event that recognizes them in this way. If you have a student worker that has been dedicated and a valuable addition to your team, we encourage you to be a part of this too and nominate them.”

 

To be eligible, students must:

  • Currently be work-study or hourly student employees at UK.
  • Have completed or expect to complete at least six months of part-time or three months of full-time employment before April 2016.
  • Be in a UK undergraduate degree program and enrolled at least half-time for both the fall 2015 and spring 2016 semesters.
  • Not be employees of the UK HR Student Employment Office.

Please use this online form to submit a nomination.

 

Nominations are due by March 18. The Student Employment Office will select 10-15 finalists to compete for Student Employee of the Year. Each finalist and their nominating supervisor will be recognized at an award ceremony April 13.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

2016 Global Health Case Competition to be Held Saturday

Thu, 02/25/2016 - 16:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Global Health Initiative is welcoming its second annual Global Health Case Competition (GHCC), which will take place 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 27, at the College of Pharmacy. The competition will involve participants addressing ways to combat childhood obesity in Mexico.

 

Twelve interdisciplinary student teams representing 15 different colleges will develop strategies to address a critical global health scenario during the Global Health Case Competition.
 
For this year’s scenario, each student team will serve as a multidisciplinary consultant team to the Division of Child Health in Mexico’s Ministry of Health. The teams will create a strategy for reducing the health and socio-economic burdens of childhood obesity in Mexico and determine the costs and trade-offs involved.
 
The student teams will have 15 minutes to present their strategies to a panel of judges, followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer portion.
 
One team will be chosen to advance to the 2016 International Emory Global Health Case Competition, which will take place on April 8-9, 2016 at Emory University. There, the UK winning team will face teams from 24 other universities who will collaborate to learn about, develop and recommend innovative solutions for the 21st century global health posed problem. The first-place team at the Emory competition will win $6,000.
 
The UK Global Health Case Competition is organized by the Global Health Initiative, whose mission is to advance research and educational programs for students to improve the health of people throughout the world.
 
For more information about UK’s 2016 Global Health Case Competition please visit the GHCC website.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

VIDEO: Former DanceBlue Clinic Patient Gives Back, DanceBlue 2016

Thu, 02/25/2016 - 16:25

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.  

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2016)  DanceBlue has a profound impact on the children treated in the DanceBlue Kentucky Children’s Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic. Not only does money raised through DanceBlue benefit the Golden Matrix Fund and in turn the clinic, but student participants actively shape the treatment experience of the patients.

 

R.J. Hijalda, University of Kentucky freshman, will be dancing in DanceBlue 2016 on the Morale Committee; but he is no stranger to the organization or its impact. In 2011, Hijalda was diagnosed with Stage IV A Hodgkin lymphoma as a freshman in high school.

 

“I heard stories from high school students when I was in eighth grade that high school would be some of the hardest years of your life," Hijalda. said. "It was definitely a big change for me and then being told I had cancer was just like a double whammy."

 

On the day of Hijalda’s diagnosis he was rushed into surgery to remove tumors on his back that were pressing against his spine. Soon after, doctors told him that he would have to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments in the DanceBlue Clinic. Hijalda went through four cycles of chemotherapy that lasted three weeks each. After the chemo, he went into 10 days of radiation treatments.

 

Hijalda spent a lot of time in the clinic. He filled most of his time spent there playing video games, but admits that there were some scary and surreal moments during his treatment. The nurses, social workers and DanceBlue student volunteers in the clinic went out of their way to make Hijalda and his family feel comforted during this trying time.

 

In April of Hijalda’s freshman year of high school, doctors told him that all of the tumors in his body where dormant and he was essentially cancer free!

 

Around the time of Hijalda’s diagnosis he had to be completely focused on beating his cancer and becoming healthy again. But now, only a few years since his battle, he’s excited to be on the other side as a DanceBlue participant, dancing "For The Kids"  — healthy and ready to lend a hand and encourage children who were in his shoes not long ago.

 

“I'm definitely excited to be on the other side of DanceBlue," Hijalda said. "I’m excited to get the full picture and see what they do behind-the-scenes and see how much work goes into it all. It takes a lot of time and commitment to make the actual event happen and raise all the money that they do for the clinic."

 

Since it’s inception in 2006, DanceBlue has raised more than $8.2 million to support pediatric cancer patients and fund research. Hijalda hopes that one day DanceBlue will be an event that celebrates a eternal cure for cancer.

 

Hijalda has a special message that he wants to make sure all children fighting their battle with cancer know: “Pediatric cancer patients are definitely not fighting the battle alone. Even if they think they are, there are hundreds even thousands of other kids, or other people in the world supporting them in their battle. I know what they're going through, what they have to battle everyday. The students at DanceBlue, stand up for 24 hours to simulate the pain and the hardships that the kids have to go through so that they have a little sense of what they have to go through every day, so they're definitely not alone in their fight with cancer.”

 

The DanceBlue 2016 Marathon will take place this weekend, Feb. 27-28, from 2 p.m. Saturday through 2 p.m. Sunday, in Memorial Coliseum. The marathon is open to the public from start to finish.

 

DanceBlue is the University of Kentucky's 24-hour no-sitting, no-sleeping dance marathon that benefits the Golden Matrix Fund and the DanceBlue Kentucky Children’s Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic. For more information about DanceBlue, registration information or to support its efforts, visit www.danceblue.org

 

DanceBlue is a program housed in the Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite UK with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote lifelong community service. For more information about the CCO, visit www.ukcco.org. Connect with the CCO on Facebook here and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ukcco.

 

Give to DanceBlue here and connect with DanceBlue on Facebook at www.facebook.com/danceblue and on Twitter at https://witter.com/UKDanceBlue and on Tumblr at danceblue.tumblr.com. You can also follow DanceBlue on Instagram. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

DANCEBLUE CONTACT: Allee Williams, pr@danceblue.org

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

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