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Commit to Recycling at UK on America Recycles Day

Thu, 11/10/2016 - 10:24
Campus NewsBy Esther Moberly Monday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 14, 2016) — In celebration of America Recycles Day on Tuesday, Nov. 15, the University of Kentucky Recycling Program is challenging the university community to take the recycling pledge. 

The goal is to increase recycling participation on campus, and to continue encouraging the UK community to be engaged and informed about recycling. Everyone that takes the pledge will receive a UK Recycling T-shirt and will be entered in a drawing for prizes. Winners will be announced on Dec. 6.

The pledge is simple:

Recycling Pledge

_____ I pledge to LEARN more about what is recyclable on my campus, by visiting UK Recycling.

_____ I pledge to LEARN more about what is happening on the UK campus related to UK Recycling, by following them on a social media outlet (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat or Pinterest).

_____ I pledge to RECYCLE more, by placing all my plastic bottles and aluminum cans in a recycling bins.

_____ I pledge to SHARE information about the recycling pledge with one of my friends.

Take the pledge online at www.recycleblue.uky.edu, or in person this week. From 8:30 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Nov. 15, a pop-up event will take place on the Rose Street sidewalk. Everyone is invited to stop by, take the pledge, and learn more about the UK Office of Sustainability's work, recycling on campus and in Lexington. The rain location will be the first floor inside White Hall Classroom Building.

The recycling program will also be tabling at White Hall from 8:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 16, and from 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, in front of Bowman’s Den.

For more information, visit www.recycleblue.uky.edu or email recycle@uky.edu. And follow UK Recycling on social media:

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Whitney Harder

Summary: In celebration of America Recycles Day on Tuesday, Nov. 15, the UK Recycling Program is challenging the university community to take the recycling pledge. Section Feature: Section Feature

Public Health Study Documents the Power of Strong Community Networks in Improving Health

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 17:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 10, 2016) — A national study published by researchers in the University of Kentucky College of Public Health provides strong evidence that community networks can lead to long-term population health improvements. 

 

Since the turn of the century, the American population has declined in health status, longevity and, in some groups, life expectancy. Health policy officials across the country are testing strategies for reversing these trends. The study, conducted by UK College of Public Health researchers and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), indicates that communities can reduce deaths from multiple preventable causes by building multi-organizational networks that support a set of population health improvement activities. 

 

The researchers followed a national cohort of more than 300 communities over a 16-year time period to examine the extent to which community organizations work together in implementing a set of activities designed to improve health status in the community at large.

 

These activities recommended by the National Academy of Medicine and other scientific and professional advisory groups included conducting assessments of health status and needs in the local area, developing shared priorities and plans for health improvement, educating community residents and leaders about health priorities, investing resources in shared health priorities, and evaluating the results of these investments. By analyzing data spanning 16 years, the study found that deaths from preventable causes such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, influenza and infant mortality declined significantly among communities that implemented a broad spectrum of population health activities through dense networks of collaborating organizations.  

 

Preventable deaths were more than 20 percent lower in the communities with the strongest networks supporting population health activities, compared to communities with less comprehensive networks.  These differences in mortality persisted after controlling for a wide range of demographic, socioeconomic, and health resource characteristics in the communities, including using methods to control for unmeasured community differences.  

 

“These results give us the clearest picture yet of the health benefits that accrue to communities when they build broad, multi-sector networks to improve population health,” said Glen Mays, the Scutchfield Endowed Professor of Health Services and Systems Research and lead author of the study. “It’s not simply a matter of implementing widely-recommended activities involving assessment, planning, and improvement – it’s about engaging a full range of partners in these activities.”

 

Mays suggested that strong networks of collaborating organizations may help communities arrive at the best decisions about how to invest limited resources in high-impact health solutions. 

 

The population health activities examined in the study include those now incentivized through the federal Affordable Care Act and related health reform initiatives. Tax-exempt hospitals are required to conduct community health needs assessments in their local service areas, develop community health improvement plans, and report annually on their expenditures related to community benefit activities. And state and local public health agencies are required to undertake similar activities in order to meet voluntary national accreditation standards. The communities that achieved significant reductions in mortality in this study, however, progressed beyond health assessment and planning activities to include shared investment of resources along with monitoring and evaluation activities.

 

Perhaps most importantly, the communities that achieved sizable reductions in mortality appeared to do so by engaging broad networks of organizations in implementing population health activities rather than relying on independent and uncoordinated efforts.  

 

“The network effects appear to be major drivers of these results,” said Cezar Mamaril, a co-author on the study and a University of Kentucky assistant professor.  “Our results are consistent with a growing body of research indicating that community networks can be force multipliers.”

 

This study is part of the new Systems for Action research program created by RWJF as part of its national action framework for building a Culture of Health. Based at the UK College of Public Health, Systems for Action supports research that evaluate mechanisms for aligning medical care, public health, and social services in ways that improve health and wellbeing. The study appears in a special theme issue of the journal Health Affairs featuring new research on strategies for building a culture of health. 

 

Mays will be participating in a briefing session held by Health Affairs for policymakers and federal health officials on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 in Washington, D.C. Both @Systems4Action and @Health_Affairs will be live tweeting during the event and others should use tag #CultureOfHealth when posting on social media.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

 

UK Air Force ROTC Cadets to Run 29 Miles for POWs, MIAs

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 16:14

LEXINGTON, KY (Nov. 10, 2016) —  Air Force ROTC cadets of the 290th Cadet Wing at the University of Kentucky will run from Lexington to Frankfort — 29 miles — this Saturday, Nov. 12, for the annual POW/MIA Run to honor the sacrifices of the nation's prisoners of war and those still missing in action.

 

The group of runners also includes Air Force ROTC faculty and cadets of the University of Louisville and Team Red White and Blue. Runners will depart from Barker Hall on the UK campus at 6 a.m. and finish at the Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Frankfort.  The route will take runners on Old Frankfort Pike, where community volunteer organizations, such as JROTC, Civil Air Patrol, Boy Scouts of America and more will provide water stations along the way.

 

"The POW/MIA Run is not just a run to remember, it's a run so that we never forget the torture, the pain, the uncertainty, and the solitary confinement that they endured in lands far away from home," said event organizer Bradley Shimfessel, C/1st LT, AFROTC, Arnold Air Society commander and special projects officer. "The POW/MIA Run allows us to bear the physical weight of hardship and the opportunity to bond with brothers and sisters in arms and anyone who truly honors that sacrifice while we reflect."

 

Following the run, the 290th Cadet Wing’s Honor Guard will perform a brief wreath laying ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial site at noon, followed by a presentation by the Quilts of Valor.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK Air Force ROTC Cadets to Run 29 Miles for POWs, MIAs

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 16:09
Campus NewsBy Samantha Ponder Thursday

LEXINGTON, KY (Nov. 10, 2016) —  Air Force ROTC cadets of the 290th Cadet Wing at the University of Kentucky will run from Lexington to Frankfort — 29 miles — this Saturday, Nov. 12, for the annual POW/MIA Run to honor the sacrifices of the nation's prisoners of war and those still missing in action.

The group of runners also includes Air Force ROTC faculty and cadets of the University of Louisville and Team Red White and Blue. Runners will depart from Barker Hall on the UK campus at 6 a.m. and finish at the Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Frankfort.  The route will take runners on Old Frankfort Pike, where community volunteer organizations, such as JROTC, Civil Air Patrol, Boy Scouts of America and more, will provide water stations along the way.

"The POW/MIA Run is not just a run to remember, it's a run so that we never forget the torture, the pain, the uncertainty, and the solitary confinement that they endured in lands far away from home," said event organizer Bradley Shimfessel, C/1st LT, AFROTC, Arnold Air Society commander and special projects officer. "The POW/MIA Run allows us to bear the physical weight of hardship and the opportunity to bond with brothers and sisters in arms and anyone who truly honors that sacrifice while we reflect."

Following the run, the 290th Cadet Wing’s Honor Guard will perform a brief wreath laying ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial site at noon, followed by a presentation by the Quilts of Valor.

Kentucky Air Force ROTC Detachment 290 cadets commemorated POW/MIAs last year with an annual 29-mile run from Lexington to Frankfort, Kentucky. This year's run is Nov. 12.Organizational Unit: Arts and Sciences

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Jenny Wells
jenny.wells@uky.edu
859-257-5343 Summary: Air Force ROTC cadets of the 290th Cadet Wing at the University of Kentucky will run from Lexington to Frankfort — 29 miles — 6 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12 for the annual POW/MIA Run to honor the sacrifices of the nation's prisoners of war and those still missing in action.Section Feature: Section Feature

Photographer Nicholas Nixon to Continue May Lecture Series

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 15:44

 

"The Brown Sisters," a 40-year photographic project by Nicholas Nixon.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 10, 2016) The University of Kentucky Art Museum will continue the Robert C. May Photography Lecture Series this month with a photographer known for his emotionally deep pieces exploring aging and mortality. Nicholas Nixon will give a talk on his life and work 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11, in the Kincaid Auditorium in the Gatton College of Business and Economics Building. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Nicholas Nixon brings a deep empathy to his image-making and has never shied away from difficult subjects such as aging and mortality. After volunteering in a nursing home, he began making portraits of elderly residents, as well as photographing AIDS patients at a time when the diagnosis was a death sentence. In a recent series, he turned an unflinching gaze on himself and his wife of more than four decades — two “timeworn mammals” still in love.

 

A recipient of National Endowment for the Arts and Guggenheim fellowships, Nixon has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among others.

 

The May Lecture Series explores photography's roots in the 19th century and its reinvention in the digital world. The lecture series is made possible through the Robert C. May Photography Endowment, a museum fund established in 1994 for the support of acquisitions and programs relating to photography. Other speakers coming to town as part of the 2016-17 series include Andrea Modica, Feb. 10, and Graciela Iturbide, April 14.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection. 
 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue
 

 MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, whitney.hale@uky.edu, 859-257-8716

 

Rare Complication Requires Treatment Only UK Dentistry Can Provide

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 14:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2016) – When a patient has their wisdom teeth extracted, surgeons provide information about what to expect post-operatively, as well as potential complications that may occur from the surgery.

 

For most patients, following the guidelines for proper care keeps these issues from arising. Unfortunately, that’s not true for all patients; it certainly wasn’t for Davina Leedy. A wisdom tooth that wouldn’t grow through the gums caused several infections, and ultimately the tooth had to be removed.

 

A local oral surgeon performed her initial surgery but shortly after, Leedy realized something was amiss with her recovery. When Leedy went back to the doctor a week later, her lower jaw was still numb. When the numbness in her face eventually went away, it was replaced by excruciating pain in her lower chin and lip. “It hurt when the wind would blow or even when my hair would touch it [her face,]” Leedy said. There was only one physician in the state of Kentucky who had the training to provide the treatment Leedy needed, Dr. Larry Cunningham, chief of the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Kentucky's College of Dentistry.

 

As Leedy eventually learned, the root of her wisdom tooth had been positioned so close to the nerve in her jaw that removing the tooth had disrupted the nerve, causing the numbness and then the pain she was experiencing. Initially the issue was treated with medications to try and relieve her pain, but these medications were only marginally helpful. In January 2016, Leedy required a more permanent and extensive fix: neuroplasty and a graft of her inferior alveolar nerve. While Leedy worried about the procedure, she was thankful she was able to receive the care she needed in Lexington, just a short drive from her home. “As a mom of three boys, it was much better to just drive an hour and a half than to have to travel out of state,” she said.

 

The procedure Leedy needed was extensive and complicated. The injured nerve travels within the lower jaw bone. Therefore, the lower jaw bone needed to be cut in order to see the nerve and repair it. The injured portion of the nerve is removed, and a nerve graft in placed in the defect. After the repair is completed, it can take several months before feeling comes back to the affected area. The procedure takes about four hours to complete. Thinking back on how complicated the procedure sounded, and was, Leedy said, “I’m amazed there’s someone that has the knowledge to do something like this.”

 

As Leedy’s original physician pointed out to her, the issue she experienced is not very common. The doctor told her that in his 30 years practicing, her case was only the third time he’d seen this complication. According to Cunningham, “Nerve injuries after dental work or dental extractions are uncommon and occur in less than 1 percent of wisdom tooth extractions.” That explains why Leedy had “no idea this complication could happen.”

 

Since her procedure, Leedy has been pain free and has regained much of the feeling in her jaw. “The pain is gone, I can feel pressure in the area but it’s way better than what it was,” Leedy said. Leedy will continue to have post-op visits to check if there are any additional improvements; so far, it’s a good sign the pain hasn’t returned.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

###

 

UK's Outstanding Staff Announced

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 16:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) — Sixty-One University of Kentucky staff members were honored during the 2016 Outstanding Staff Awards (OSA) recognition ceremony recently at the Woodford Reserve Room in Commonwealth Stadium. This was the seventh year for the event sponsored by the UK Staff Senate and the UK President's Office.

 

More than 100 people were in attendance to honor the award winners, including UK President Eli Capilouto, Executive Vice President for Finance and Administration Eric Monday, colleagues and other campus leaders.

 

“UK is defined by its people, and the Outstanding Staff Awards program illustrates the high-level commitment and exceptional talent our staff have to advance the mission of the University of Kentucky,” Capilouto said.

 

OSA winners were all referred by their respective work units as their most deserving employees of 2015-16.

 

“We were very happy this year to add the College of Medicine to the growing list of colleges and departments included in the ceremony,” said Jon Gent, the OSA program chair. “We are delighted that administrators see the value in engaging staff by recognizing their successes.”

 

The 61 OSA winners represented 20 colleges and administrative units, including the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, College of Arts and Sciences, Gatton College of Business and Economics, College of Communication and Information, College of Dentistry, College of Education, College of Engineering, College of Health Sciences, College of Law, College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy, College of Public Health, Human Resources, Office of Philanthropy, Office of the Treasurer, Student Affairs, UK HealthCare, UK HealthCare IT, UK Libraries, and Undergraduate Studies.

 

2016 Outstanding Staff Award winners and their award titles are:

 

Center for Applied Energy Research

Alice Marksberry -- Marybeth McAlister Memorial Outstanding Staff Award

 

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

David Lowry -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Award-Technical and Paraprofessional Category

Jackie Harper -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Award-Service, Maintenance and Skilled Crafts Category

James Dollarhide -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Awards-Technical and Paraprofessional Category    

Kevin Veach -- Outstanding Staff

Le Anne Herzog -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Awards-Executive/Administrative Category

Louise Gladstone -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Award-Administrative/Executive Category

Shirley Harris -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Award-Clerical and Secretarial On-Campus Category

Sue Rice -- CAFE Outstanding Staff Award-Clerical Secretarial, Off-Campus Category

 

Gatton College of Business and Economics

Matthew Cosgrove – Gatton College of Business & Economics Employee of the Year (Hourly Staff)

Shonta Phelps – Gatton College of Business & Economics Employee of the Year (Professional Staff)

 

College of Communication and Information

Heather Burke -- Outstanding Staff Award

Megan Sizemore -- Outstanding Staff Award

 

College of Dentistry

Chelsea Elam -- Employee of the Quarter - 1st Quarter 2016

Debra Grant -- Employee of the Quarter - 4th Quarter 2015

Denise Marshall -- Employee of the Quarter - 3rd Quarter 2015

Jill Townsend -- Employee of the Quarter - 2nd Quarter 2016

 

College of Education

Gary Schroeder -- Outstanding Staff Award - Exempt

Gwen Winder --Outstanding Staff Award - Non Exempt

 

College of Engineering

Kenny Blair -- Staff Excellence Award (exempt category)

Richard Anderson -- Staff Excellence Award (non-exempt category)

 

College of Fine Arts

Andrea Richardson -- Outstanding Staff Award

Belinda Rubio -- Outstanding Staff Award

 

College of Health Sciences

Doug Long -- College of Health Sciences Employee of the Year Award

 

College of Law

Alison Begor -- Outstanding Staff Award

Jeanie Powell -- Outstanding Staff Award

 

College of Medicine

Beth Hartmann -- Honorary Member of the College of Medicine 2016 Class

Jon Gent -- Honorary Member of the College of Medicine 2016 Class

Julie McDaniel -- Honorary Member of the College of Medicine 2016 Class

 

College of Nursing   

Joanne Davis -- Employee of the Year Award

 

College of Public Health

Tom Collins -- College of Public Health Employee of the Year

 

Human Resources

Austin Dyer -- HR ACE Award- Peer to Peer

Jennifer Peavler -- HR ACE Award - Game Changer

Jennifer Wrather -- HR  Ace Award Raising the Bar

Josh Hamperian -- HR Ace Award

 

Libraries

Joshua Monroe -- Dean's Award for Outstanding Performance

Beth Reeder -- Dean's Award for Outstanding Performance

Kopana Terry -- Dean's Award for Outstanding Performance

 

Office of Philanthropy

Jennifer Combs -- Front Line Award

Laura Sutton -- Professional Achievement Award

Sarah Fitzgerald -- Rising Achievement Award

 

Robinson Scholars  

Neomia Hagans-Flores -- Outstanding Staff Award

 

Student Affairs

Courtenay Lancaster -- Outstanding Non-Exempt Professional

Diane Follingstad -- Outstanding Faculty Partner

Grace Hahn -- Outstanding Exempt New Professional

 

Treasurer

Alexis (LexI) Bugay -- Henry Clay Owen Outstanding Employee of Year

 

UK HealthCare

Angela Dalton-Tibbetts -- Supervisor of the Year

Ben Nicholls -- Motivator Award

Brig Wakeland -- Sixth Man

Carolyn Smiley -- Nightingale Preceptor Lamp Award

Heather Murphy -- Eastern State Foundation Award

Judy Garrett -- Karen Sexton Firestarter Award

Kim Manning -- AI Quilt of Teamwork Award for Nursing Support

Kristy McMillan -- Supervisor of the Year

Lisa Thornsberry -- Diana Weaver Leadership/Management Award

Margaret Durbin -- NPA Award

Margie Summers -- M.J. Dickson Quality Nursing Care Award

Mary Allen -- Team Player

Tammy Lloyd -- Servant Leader Award

Teresa Chase -- Karen E. Hall Nursing Education Award

Veronica Fennelly -- Dorothy Brockopp Annual Nursing Research Award

 

Gatton’s Professional MBA Open House is on Nov. 17

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 16:37
Campus NewsBy Carl Nathe Wednesday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) – The University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics will be hosting a Professional MBA Open House for interested UK employees and companies in Central Kentucky at 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, at the Hilary J. Boone Center on campus.

This event will focus on UK’s professional MBA options, which include the Professional MBA, Professional MBA For Leaders in Healthcare, and Executive MBA.

Attendees and prospective candidates will have the opportunity to interact and network with current MBA students, alumni, instructors and other important constituents affiliated with the professional MBA program. The alumni spotlight at this event will showcase professionals of Messer Construction, who will talk about how the UK MBA helped them gain the necessary skills to move into different leadership roles at Messer.

Harvie Wilkinson serves as director of the Gatton MBA programs.

"If you want to make yourself more marketable, advance in today's competitive job market or if you want to expand your skill set so that you can be successful in your career, then acquiring a professional MBA may be an attractive option for you," Wilkinson said. Due to limited spacing, registration is required for the Professional MBA Open House. RSVP at www.gatton.uky.edu/mba-rsvp

Organizational Unit: Business and Economics

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Carl Nathe
carl.nathe@uky.edu
859-257-3200 Chris Carney, 859-257-7645, christopher.carney@uky.edu. Summary: UK's Gatton College is providing an opportunity to get an in-person look at its Professional MBA program. Section Feature: Section Feature

UK Superfund Researchers Discover Interaction Between Environmental Toxin Exposure, Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 16:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 10, 2016) — In an industrial society, pollutants are everywhere — in the soil, in the air and absorbed in the bodies of most people. Unfortunately, exposure to environmental pollutants associated with chronic disease development is difficult to control.

 

However, people can control what they eat, and healthful dietary choices might help the body put up a natural defense system against the adverse effects of environmental toxicants.

 

Investigators at the University of Kentucky Superfund Research Center (UK-SRC) were the first to obtain evidence that healthy nutrients and biological components rich in plant-derived diets, as well as increased physical activity, can counteract the negative effects of environmental pollutants. Such pollutants, which include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), remain in the environment for a long time and can accumulate in the body.

 

The study, led by nutritional biochemist and UK-SRC director Bernhard Hennig, was featured this month as a National Institute of Environmental Health Science/National Institutes of Health “Story of Success.” These online articles highlight NIEHS/NIH-funded scientists working in a variety of disciplines and performing groundbreaking research into how the environment influences the development and progression of disease.

 

PCBs, which were banned from industrial uses decades ago for hazardous effects, continue to exist in soil, water, air and sediments, especially in areas designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as Superfund sites. Researchers in the UK-SRC investigate persistent organic pollutants common at Superfund sites in Kentucky with the objective of detecting and reducing such toxic chemicals from the environment. Biomedical researchers in the UK-SRC are interested in discovering whether nutrition, or the type of food we eat, can modulate the adverse effects of environmental pollutant exposure at the molecular level, utilizing mostly cell culture and animal models. Major findings suggest that consuming healthful diets rich in nutrients with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, such as green tea-derived polyphenols, can reduce the disease risk caused by exposure to PCBs.

 

The results of a recent animal-model study, which was selected as a Research Brief for the National Institutes of Environmental Health’s website, show an interaction between dioxin-like PCBs and a biomarker for cardiovascular disease. Exposure to a dioxin-like PCB was associated with increased production of a biomarker for cardiovascular disease called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is produced when the body metabolizes animal-derived foods including dairy and meat. Several studies have shown an association between TMAO and a high risk for cardiovascular disease in animals and in humans.

 

The UK study was the first to suggest that exposure to dioxin-like PCBs can increase the circulating level of TMAO in the body, and the researchers proposed that PCBs contribute to individual variability of a common biomarker for cardiovascular disease. The researchers observed an association of higher levels of PCB in the blood with the metabolic process that produces TMAO. The researchers believe this mechanism reveals a link between exposure to PCBs, diet and cardiovascular disease risk. 

 

Hennig said their research generated optimistic findings with evidence that people can potentially moderate the adverse effects of ubiquitous pollutants through dietary choices. Hennig said the research within the UK-SRC gives insight into how stressful chemical elements interact in the body and create a ripple effect in human cells that leads to dysfunction and disease. Understanding the interplay of diet and chemical toxicity in the development of many diseases will allow health providers to recommend healthful nutrition to fight disease risks associated with exposure to environmental pollutants and related chemical toxicants.

 

“The idea is that healthful nutrition, and even physical activity or exercise, is helpful and it actually makes you less vulnerable to disease potential that is a result of exposure to these pollutants,” Hennig said.

 

Hennig, with fellow UK-SRC scientists Andrew Morris and Michael Petriello, will continue work with researchers at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to explore mechanisms of diet-derived biomarkers like TMAO and leverage this knowledge for human health. They will test blood samples of individuals exposed to high levels of PCB living in Alabama to verify their findings in animals which suggest associations between PCB exposure, high circulating levels of TMAO and an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Hennig is hopeful that their continued research will show that healthy dietary choices, such as diets rich in fruits and vegetables, can reduce the negative impacts of chemical stressors that can contribute to heart disease, atherosclerosis and stroke.

 

“There is a lot of opportunity throughout life for this disease to be modified,” Hennig said. “Individual food components can modulate environmental stressors, and nutritional interventions may provide the most sensible means to develop primary prevention strategies of diseases associated with many environmental toxic insults.” 

 

Petriello, Morris and Hennig’s study looking at the relationship between PCB exposure and production of TMAO was published earlier this year in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The paper was selected as the NIEHS website Paper of the Month in the September issue of Environmental Factor.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

Gatton's Professional MBA Open House is Nov. 17

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 16:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics will host a Professional MBA Open House for interested UK employees and companies in Central Kentucky from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, at the Hilary J. Boone Center on campus.

 

This event will focus on UK’s professional MBA options, which include the Professional MBA, Professional MBA For Leaders in Healthcare, and Executive MBA.

 

Attendees and prospective candidates will have the opportunity to interact and network with current MBA students, alumni, instructors and other important constituents affiliated with the professional MBA program.

The alumni spotlight at this event will showcase professionals of Messer Construction, who will talk about how the UK MBA helped them gain the necessary skills to move into different leadership roles at Messer.

Harvie Wilkinson serves as director of the Gatton MBA programs.

 

"If you want to make yourself more marketable, advance in today's competitive job market or if you want to expand your skill set so that you can be successful in your career, then acquiring a professional MBA may be an attractive option for you," Wilkinson said.

Due to limited spacing, registration is required for the Professional MBA Open House. RSVP at www.gatton.uky.edu/mba-rsvp.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

  

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200, carl.nathe@uky.edu; Chris Carney, 859-257-7645, christopher.carney@uky.edu.

 

UK Education Graduate Wins IU Distinguished Alumni Award

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 14:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) University of Kentucky College of Education alumnus Richard Trollinger has been named the second annual recipient of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Distinguished Alumni Award. Trollinger, who is vice president for college relations at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, is one of the nation's top experts in educational fundraising.

 

Trollinger earned a master's degree in philanthropic studies from the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and his Ph.D. in educational policy studies from UK. He also earned a bachelor's degree at Emory and Henry College and a master's degree in higher education administration from Vanderbilt.

 

Trollinger has dedicated more than 40 years to educational fundraising. Prior to his tenure at Centre College, he served in several roles at Emory and Henry College, including vice president for development and external affairs. He was also an admissions counselor, director of alumni affairs and the first director of development at his alma mater.

 

Trollinger is the co-author of "Philanthropy and American Higher Education," with UK's John Thelin, which describes how philanthropic support of higher education is integral to the character of colleges and universities. He currently chairs the board of directors for the Danville-Boyle Economic Development Partnership in Kentucky. He has also served as a board member and chair of the Kentucky School for the Deaf Charitable Foundation.

 

The Distinguished Alumni Award was created in 2015 by the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s alumni board to assist the school in recognizing significant achievement in the fields of philanthropic research, practice and academic study.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Markesbery Symposium Focuses on Healthy Brain Aging, Care for Caregivers

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 13:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016)  — University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) hosted its sixth annual Markesbery Symposium on Aging and Dementia last week with speakers focused on brain health and self-care for caregivers.

 

The two-day program offered sessions for both scientific and community audiences.

 

On Friday, Nov. 4, the scientific session in the UK Chandler Hospital Pavilion A auditorium featured speakers Dr. Gary Small of UCLA and Dr. Julie Schneider of Rush University, who presented their latest findings and answered questions from the audience. 

 

Schneider provided an overview of her observations that, there are brain changes in addition to the well-characterized plaques and tangles that may also cause cognitive dysfunction and dementia.

 

Small gave the audience an overview of the scientific underpinnings for the hypothesis that lifestyle changes – including diet and exercise — can be protective against Alzheimer's disease, particularly when combined with pharmacological therapies.

 

Afterward, Sanders-Brown Center on Aging faculty members Joe Abisambra, PhD; Harry LeVine, PhD; Peter Nelson, MD, PhD; and Linda Van Eldik, PhD, presented findings from their latest research.

 

A poster session highlighted work from younger scientists researching a wide range of topics related to aging and dementia. One postdoc, Ishta Parikh, looked at the gut biome in animals carrying either the ApoE3 or the ApoE4 gene (which is associated with increased incidence of Alzheimer's disease). She found an interesting correlation in which animals carrying the ApoE3 gene had greater diversity in the gut biome.

 

"My work suggests that bacterial genetics can influence human genes, opening up the possibility that what you eat really does affect how well you think," Parikh said. 

 

On Saturday, Nov. 5, the Bluegrass Ballroom at the Lexington Convention Center was filled with close to 300 members of the community who came to hear Dr. Small and Mary Austrom, PhD, of Indiana University.

 

Small has authored or co-authored several books on memory and memory loss, including "The Alzheimer's Prevention Program," "2 Weeks to a Younger Brain," and the international best-seller "The Memory Bible." Dr. Small shared with the audience his recommended techniques for healthy brain aging.

 

Austrom is an expert on late life transitions and adjustment to retirement. She is also interested in non-pharmacological interventions for dementia patients and their caregivers, and the stress and grief associated with caring for someone with dementia.

 

Austrom spoke on the burden of caregiving and the importance of ensuring adequate respite for caregivers.

 

Following the formal presentations Austrom, along with Sanders-Brown’s own Dr. Gregory Jicha and Marie Smart, answered questions from the audience ranging from the challenges of caring for someone with dementia to end-of-life decision making to the need for early and accurate diagnosis, and what is on the horizon with respect to research and clinical trials.

 

"It's always invigorating to have clinicians and researchers from UK and other institutions come together to share current findings and trends on dementia and aging," said Van Eldik, director of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. "We consider it part of our responsibility as a world leader in Alzheimer's research to foster collaboration among institutions and share our insights with members of our community."

 

The Markesbery Symposium is named in honor of the late Dr. William R. Markesbery, the founder and long-time director of the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and an internationally renowned expert on aging and dementia.

 

Media contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

Gill Heart Institute Cardiovascular Research Day Presents Scientific Achievement in Heart Health

Mon, 11/07/2016 - 09:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — Clinicians and basic scientists convened to discuss challenges, triumphs and future directions in cardiovascular disease research during the 19th Annual Gill Heart Institute Cardiovascular Research Day on Nov. 4.

 

Hosted by the UK Gill Heart Institute, the annual research day showcased scientific advancement in understanding and treating the various diseases of the blood vessels and heart. Topics presented at the conference ranged from identifying genomic markers correlated with heart disease to urging members of the public to put CPR training to action during an emergency. Burgeoning scientists and trainees throughout the region were provided the opportunity to present their cardiovascular scholarship during poster sessions and program presentations.

 

Heart attack and stroke are leading causes of death in America, and, according to the American Heart Association, heart disease accounts for more than $300 billion in annual medical costs. Researchers at the Gill Heart Institute are dedicated to translating scientific evidence into clinical efforts to prevent and manage the causes of these major killers, such as myocardial infarction and arthrosclerosis.

 

Dr. Barry Coller, vice president for medical affairs and David Rockefeller Professor at The Rockefeller University, and Dr. Helen Hobbs, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, delivered the annual Gill Award Lectures. UK alumnus Brian Eigel, the senior vice president of emergency care programs at the AHA, proposed a formula of science, education and action for reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease during the Alumni Presentation. Keynote speaker Mark Creager implored scientists to reverse the burden of global vascular disease in his keynote lecture, “Vascular Disease and the Journey to Vascular Health.”

 

"As we learned through today's presentations, cardiovascular diseases are among the most critical public health problems in this country, with the spectrum of heart attacks, strokes, and other vascular diseases being the major causes of death and disability." Alan Daugherty, associate dean for research in the UK College of Medicine, said. "We've made progress in prevention, but many questions regarding the precise mechanisms that cause cardiovascular disease remain unanswered. Basic science and clinical researchers at UK span the realm of cardiovascular diseases in search of findings that can help reverse or prevent these common killers." 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Winter Break Ride Home Express Tickets Now Available

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2017)  University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is now selling tickets for the Winter Break edition of its Ride Home Express bus service.

 

The buses, which serve three routes and a total of 15 stops, will depart campus Friday, Dec. 16. All buses will return to campus on Sunday, Jan. 8. Fares for the PTS Ride Home Express range from $55-$155 for round-trip rates; one-way fares begin at $30.

 

Ride Home Express is open to both students and employees. UK students and employees are able to register and pay for their trip via the web by logging on to the Parking Account Manager with their Link Blue ID. Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC) students are also able to pay for trip registration online using their Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) login. Ride Home Express registration will be available as an option under the "Purchase Permits" section once logged in. All other riders must register and pay for their seats in person at the PTS office, located in the Press Avenue Garage, at the corner of Press and Virginia Avenues. One-way fares may be purchased in person only. The office is open 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

PTS recommends registering for the trip as soon as possible. Space is limited, and seats will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

PTS can provide transportation for Ride Home Express riders to and from Commonwealth Stadium. Riders interested in this option simply need to submit the Ride Home Express Shuttle to Commonwealth Stadium request form at least two business days in advance of the shuttle’s departure.

 

For more information on the Ride Home Express, including a list of fares and route maps, visit the Ride Home Express page or the Ride Home Express Frequently Asked Questions.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Winter Break Ride Home Express Tickets Now Available

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:49
Campus NewsStudent LifeBy Chrissie Balding Tune Monday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2017) University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is now selling tickets for the Winter Break edition of its Ride Home Express bus service.

The buses, which serve three routes and a total of 15 stops, will depart campus Friday, Dec. 16. All buses will return to campus Sunday, Jan. 8. Fares for the PTS Ride Home Express range from $55-$155 for round-trip rates; one-way fares begin at $30.

Ride Home Express is open to both students and employees. UK students and employees are able to register and pay for their trip via the web by logging on to the Parking Account Manager with their Link Blue ID. Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC) students are also able to pay for trip registration online using their Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) login. Ride Home Express registration will be available as an option under the "Purchase Permits" section once logged in. All other riders must register and pay for their seats in person at the PTS office, located in the Press Avenue Garage, at the corner of Press and Virginia Avenues. One-way fares may be purchased in person only. The office is open 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

PTS recommends registering for the trip as soon as possible. Space is limited, and seats will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis.

PTS can provide transportation for Ride Home Express riders to and from Commonwealth Stadium. Riders interested in this option simply need to submit the Ride Home Express Shuttle to Commonwealth Stadium request form at least two business days in advance of the shuttle’s departure.

For more information on the Ride Home Express, including a list of fares and route maps, visit the Ride Home Express page or the Ride Home Express Frequently Asked Questions.

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Blair Hoover
blair.hoover@uky.edu
859-257-6398 Summary: Tickets for Winter Break Ride Home Express, provided by UK Parking and Transportation Services, are now available.

Math Professor Receives Grant to Study Algebraic Geometry

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:37

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — David Jensen, an assistant professor of mathematics in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, received funding this fall from the National Science Foundation for his research in algebraic geometry, a central topic in mathematics with applications to many other disciplines.

 

Jensen will use the three-year, $136,000 grant to study the geometric properties of curves that are described by polynomial equations. Many natural phenomena of interest in physics, biology and computer science can be modeled by polynomials, making algebraic geometry a useful tool for the scientific community at large. While some curves may have exotic or pathological properties, it is expected that most curves do not. This goal of Jensen's project is to show that "typical" curves are geometrically well-behaved, using techniques from the recently developed field of non-Archimedean analytic geometry.

 

More information at www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1601896&HistoricalAwards=false.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK Community Serves in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) —The week of Nov. 13 – 18 is a time for the University of Kentucky family to come together with the Lexington community and make a positive impact locally by participating in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week (NHHAW).

 

National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week is held the week before Thanksgiving each year. It is a time to be thankful, while also a time to share compassion with your neighbors who are experiencing homelessness. This week is a chance to help solve the problem of Hunger and Homelessness, so that no one has to experience it, especially during the holiday season. For more information on this movement, visit the National Coalition for the Homeless website.

 

Thanksgiving is a holiday spent surrounded by people you are thankful for, and many are fortunate enough to have food on the table. UK's Center for Community Outreach (CCO) organizes NHHAW to get students at the University of Kentucky and the greater Lexington community involved by promoting active citizenship and experiential education activities. This week provides an opportunity to collect food, serve homeless shelters and to build awareness of the social and economic conditions that promote poverty globally and locally.

 

Beginning Monday, Nov. 14 and ending at 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18, donations will be collected for the annual Thanksgiving Basket Drive.  These will be donated to students and their families in the Fayette County Public School System and to residents in the Hope Center's Housing First program. A list of foods accepted can be found here. Any extra donations of gift cards or toiletries are also appreciated.

 

UK will take part in this week of awareness by offering the following events:

 

Saturday, Nov. 12: The University of Kentucky will host the first Kentucky Hunger Dialogue.  The Hunger Dialogue connects students to community leaders, policy makers, and fellow students who fight hunger.  This event will educate students on how to get involved in the fight against hunger.  Featured speakers include UK President Eli Capilouto, former senior advisor to the governor Colmon Elridge, Kentucky Association of Food Banks Executive Director Tamara Sandberg, and more.  More information on the day's schedule, speakers, and location can be found on this website: http://www.kyhungerdialogue.com/

 

Sunday, Nov. 13: The CCO will host a Can Castle contest.  As part of the Thanksgiving Basket Drive, student organizations, residence halls and individuals will compete to see who can raise the most canned goods — and build the coolest castle! This will take place at the Seaton Center at 3 p.m.

 

Monday, Nov. 14: The CCO will share a meal with the residents at Arbor Youth Services (AYS), a home in Lexington for homeless youth.  The meal will be provided by the Campus Kitchen and participants will dine in Room 536, W. Third St. at 6:30 p.m. They will share stories with the children from AYS. Contact nhhaw@ukcco.org for information about transportation to the event. 

 

Tuesday, Nov. 15: The annual Hunger Banquet, a simulation of global hunger designed by Oxfam International, will be at 6 p.m. in Woodward Hall, Room 307 of the Gatton College of Business and Economics Building. Join the CCO for dinner and a valuable experience and discussion.

 

Wednesday, Nov. 16: On the NHHAW Day of Service, UK students will have the opportunity to volunteer for two-hour time shifts at a variety of local nonprofits that are engaging daily  in the fight to end hunger and homelessness. The day will begin at 8 a.m. and run until 8 p.m., allowing volunteers to meet the needs of Lexington community partners and have a wide range of scheduling availability for students' busy schedules. There will also be an opportunity for students to hear from Lexington's director of Homelessness Intervention and Prevention at The Gathering: Engaging the Issues, where students will be encouraged to think critically and practically about the needs in the community and beyond. Student groups ranging from five to 25 will be serving with the following community partners: Lexington Rescue Mission, New Life Day Center, God's Pantry, Salvation Army, Arbor Youth Services, Community Action Council, Seedleaf, HOPE Center, and The Lighthouse Ministries. 

 

Thursday, Nov. 17: In collaboration will the Student Activities Board, the CCO will host a panel on homelessness called #TrendingTopics: Homelessness, featuring two speakers from the National Coalition for the Homeless's Faces of Homelessness Speaker's Bureau, Steve Thomas and Candi Darley, and the director of a nonprofit serving Los Angeles' homeless, John Maceri.  The event will be held in the Kincaid Auditorium of the Gatton Building at 7 p.m.

 

Friday, Nov. 18: The CCO will collect Thanksgiving Baskets throughout the whole week, ending at 5 p.m. Friday.  The baskets will be donated to homeless students in the Fayette County public school system, to residents in the Hope Center's Housing First program and to others in need.  A list of ingredients for the baskets can be found here:

http://www.ukcco.org/programs/nhhaw/.

 

Partners for this year's NHHAW who have helped make the week possible are the Campus Kitchen at UK, Delta Sigma Theta, SSTOP Hunger and the Student Activities Board.

NHHAW is an initiative housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote lifelong community service. For more information about the CCO, visit www.ukcco.org.

 

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

CCO CONTACT: Erica Daly, publicrelations.ukcco@gmail.com

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

Gatton to Dedicate Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — This Thursday, Nov. 10, at the University of Kentucky, lifelong entrepreneur John H. Schnatter, founder, chairman and CEO of Papa John's International, America's third-largest pizza chain, will present the story of Papa John's success, "Building a Business, Slice by Slice." UK’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will also formally dedicate the new John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise at the event, which begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Gatton College’s new Kincaid Auditorium.

 

Papa John’s has nearly 4,900 stores in all 50 states and 37 countries. Consumers have consistently rated them No. 1 in customer satisfaction among national pizza chains in the American Customer Satisfaction Index. Schnatter and his wife, Annette, have been active philanthropists, establishing the John H. Schnatter Family Foundation which supports numerous education and community causes.

 

The John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise was founded in 2015 with a generous gift from the John H. Schnatter Family Foundation and the Charles Koch Foundation to the Gatton College. This research and teaching institute works to engage the university community and the public in a serious and sustained examination of the impact of private enterprise and entrepreneurship on society.

 

“The role of free enterprise is at the center of so many debates, it’s critical for people to gain a deeper understanding of how it works so they can be thoughtful participants,” said John Garen, BB&T Professor of Economics at the Gatton College and director of the Schnatter Institute. “This is a great opportunity for students and the community to hear insights from one of Kentucky’s — and the world’s — most successful entrepreneurs.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; or Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750.

UK Community Serves in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:18
Campus NewsBy Rebecca Stratton Wednesday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2016) –  For the week of Nov. 13 – 18, come together to positively impact the Lexington community by participating in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week (NHHAW).

National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week is held the week before Thanksgiving each year. It is a time to be thankful, while also a time to share compassion with your neighbors who are experiencing homelessness. This week is a chance to help solve the problem of Hunger and Homelessness, so that no one has to experience it, especially during the holiday season. For more information on this movement, visit the National Coalition for the Homeless website.

Thanksgiving is a holiday spent surrounded by people you are thankful for, and many are fortunate enough to have food on the table. The Center of Community Outreach organizes this week to get students at the University of Kentucky and the greater Lexington community involved by promoting active citizenship and experiential education activities. This week provides an opportunity to collect food, serve homeless shelters and to build awareness of the social and economic conditions that promote poverty globally and locally.

Beginning on Monday, Nov. 14 and ending Friday, Nov. 18 at 5 p.m., donations will be collected for the annual Thanksgiving Basket Drive.  These will be donated to students and their families in the Fayette County Public School System and to residents in the Hope Center's Housing First program. A list of foods accepted can be found here. Any extra donations of gift cards or toiletries are also appreciated.

UK will be taking part in this week of awareness by offering the following events:

Saturday, November 12: The University of Kentucky will host the first annual Kentucky Hunger Dialogue.  The Hunger Dialogue connects students to community leaders, policy makers, and fellow students who fight hunger.  This event will educate students on how to get involved in the fight against hunger.  Featured speakers include UK President Eli Capilouto, former senior advisor to the governor Colmon Elridge, executive director of the Kentucky Association of Food Banks Tamara Sandberg, and more.  More information on the day's schedule, speakers, and location can be found on their website: http://www.kyhungerdialogue.com/

Sunday, November 13: The CCO will host a Can Castle contest.  As part of the Thanksgiving Basket Drive, student organizations, residence halls and individuals will compete to see who can raise the most canned goods - and build the coolest castle! This will take place at the Seaton Center at 3 p.m.

Monday, November 14: The CCO will be sharing a meal with the residents at Arbor Youth Services (AYS), a home for homeless youth.  The meal will be provided by the Campus Kitchen and participants will be eating at 536 W. Third St. at 6:30 p.m. They will be sharing stories with the kids from AYS.  Contact nhhaw@ukcco.org for more information on transportation to this event.

Tuesday, November 15: The annual Hunger Banquet, a simulation of global hunger designed by Oxfam International, will be at 6 p.m. in Woodward Hall, room 307 of Gatton. Join the CCO for dinner and a valuable experience and discussion.

Wednesday, November 16: On the NHHAW Day of Service, UK students will have the opportunity to volunteer for two-hour time shifts at a variety of local non-profits who are daily engaging in the fight to end hunger and homelessness. The day will begin at 8 a.m. and run until 8 p.m., allowing volunteers to meet the needs of Lexington community partners and have a wide range of scheduling availability for students' busy schedules. There will also be an opportunity for students to hear from Lexington's Director of Homelessness Intervention and Prevention at The Gathering: Engaging the Issues, where students will be encouraged to think critically and practically about the needs in the community and beyond. Student groups ranging from five to 25 will be serving with the following community partners: Lexington Rescue Mission, New Life Day Center, God's Pantry, Salvation Army, Arbor Youth Services, Community Action Council, Seedleaf, HOPE Center, and The Lighthouse Ministries. 

Thursday, November 17: In collaboration will the Student Activities Board, the CCO will be hosting a panel on homelessness called #TrendingTopics: Homelessness, featuring two speakers from the National Coalition for the Homeless's Faces of Homelessness Speaker's Bureau, Steve Thomas and Candi Darley, and the director of a non-profit serving Los Angeles's homeless, John Maceri, which will be held in the Kincaid Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Friday, November 18: The CCO will be collecting Thanksgiving Baskets throughout the whole week, ending at 5 p.m. on Friday.  The baskets will be donated to homeless students in the Fayette County public school system, to residents in the Hope Center's Housing First program and to others in need.  A list of ingredients for the basket can be found here: http://www.ukcco.org/programs/nhhaw/.

Partners for this year's NHHAW who have helped make the week possible are the Campus Kitchen at UK, Delta Sigma Theta, SSTOP Hunger and the Student Activities Board.

NHHAW is an initiative housed in the UK Center or Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote lifelong community service. For more information about the CCO, visit www.ukcco.org. 

To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the right hand corner.

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Rebecca Stratton
rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
859-323-2395 Summary: For the week of Nov. 13 – 18, come together to positively impact the Lexington community by participating in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week (NHHAW).

No Classes Tuesday, Resources Still Available

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 16:12
Campus NewsBy Blair Hoover and Jay Blanton Monday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) – Tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 8 is Presidential Election Day. Offices at the University of Kentucky are traditionally closed in observance of this important day in the life of the country.

That means classes will not be in session and faculty and staff will not report to work.

As always, an exception to that is UK HealthCare hospitals and clinics, which will be open and operating normal hours. Staff are expected to report for duty as normal.

In addition, UK officials said, several campus resources will be available for students to report any issues or concerns resulting from what has been – and continues to be – a tumultuous election cycle.

“Although it is an academic holiday, UK is committed to maintaining a safe campus where everyone can find a sense of belonging, safety and inclusion,” said Terry Allen, UK’s interim vice president of institutional diversity.  “As a result, many campus resources will remain available Tuesday for students and employees to utilize, if necessary.”

Allen said that students and employees who may experience bias, negative interactions or are seeking a safe place of support are encouraged to utilize the following services:

  • Bias Incident Support Services (BISS) Bias Incident Support Services are available to any student or employee member who has been impacted by an instance of racism, bias, hate, or identity-based violence due to their actual or perceived identity. BISS can be accessed on Wednesday, Nov. 9 when the VIP Center opens at 8:30 a.m. No appointment is needed to access support. Walk-ins are welcome.
  • Bias Incident Response Team The Bias Incident Response Team is the official reporting system for students, staff, and faculty to notify the University of instances of hate, racism, bias, and identity-based violence due to a person or group’s actual or perceived identities.  Reports can be made anonymously if necessary. Reports can be made here.
  • UK Police Department 859-257-8573
  • Counseling Center 106 Frazee Hall, 859-257-8701 (closed Tuesday, will reopen Wednesday, Nov. 9 at 8:30 a.m.)
  • Community of Concern Students and employees may file an online report if they have concerns about a current student or employee. File a report here.

“Our expectation is that Tuesday will be a day where all Americans make their voices heard – through the voting process and speaking out on issues of fundamental importance to our country,” Allen said. “There will be disagreements, but we expect our campus community to find common ground around the idea that we all have a voice and we all have an expectation that ours is a community where everyone can and should belong.”

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Blair Hoover
blair.hoover@uky.edu
859-257-6398 Summary: Tuesday, Nov. 8, the university will be closed for Presidential Election Day. However, several campus resources will be available for students to report issues or concerns.

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