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A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 25, 1912

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 156th diary entry from Jan. 25, 1912, recalls a trip downtown with her friend Addie for a suit fitting and hot chocolate.  

 

Jan. 25th. Meet Addie downtown and go with her to try on her suit, which is too dear. Hot chocolate at Hughes!

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

 MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Help Line Operating for UK Employees, Students and Visitors

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 08:39
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2016)  University of Kentucky employees, students and visitors to our campus may call the university's help line for non-emergency related issues. Call either 855-682-4115 or 859-257-9253 for help. You also can report weather-releated issues on the university's LiveSafe app. Go to "report tips" and then to "winter weather" to report non-emergency related items.

 

Classes Canceled Friday, Jan. 22

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 17:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday that classes are canceled tomorrow (Friday), Jan. 22, and only Plan B (designated) employees are required to report to work. 

 

Updated information about scheduled events and what will be open or closed tomorrow and over the weekend can be found at www.uky.edu/alerts. The site will be updated as conditions or schedules change.

 

"The safety of our campus community is our top priority at the University of Kentucky," Capilouto said. "Given the high probability of a significant weather event tomorrow, we are making this decision now to ensure that students, faculty and staff can make appropriate decisions regarding their safety, travel and child care.

 

This decision also will allow our facilities and safety officials the time they need to ensure that the campus is appropriately prepared to be re-opened as early as possible."

UK Appreciation Day Commission Accepting T-shirt Designs from Employees

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 15:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — Employees should mark their calendars for Thursday, May 26, as the University of Kentucky takes time out to say thank you to all those that make the university a thriving, collaborative academic community.

 

UK Appreciation Day returns to campus from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Seaton Center Gymnasium and Pieratt Field (corner of Cooper and University Drive), featuring some traditional activities that employees have enjoyed over the years as well as some new ways for employees to engage in the annual event.

 

As in past years, employees can enjoy food, live music, exhibits, a UK t-shirt giveaway, caricatures and more – all for free.

 

This year, the UK Appreciation Day Commission is offering employees a chance to design the t-shirt given away at the event. Those interested are encouraged to submit a t-shirt design to Trisha Clement at tclem2@uky.edu by Feb. 15 at 5 p.m.

 

Designs will need to be two colors maximum and be suitable for either a light or dark background. The winning design will have to be approved by UK Public Relations and Marketing (some minor modifications may be made by UKPR). The winner will receive a prize from the UKAD Commission.

 

The Appreciation Day Commission would love to hear from you. The commission is in the process of creating a frequently asked questions page. If you have any ideas or suggestions for future events, please do so at the following link: https://uky.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cN14LOX2Utqggrr.

 

UK Appreciation Day is sponsored by the Office of the President, coordinated by the Staff Senate, and brought to you by the Appreciation Day Commission.

 

For more information, contact the Office of the Staff Senate Office Coordinator Holly Clark at hclark@uky.edu or UKAD Commission Chairs Misty Dotson at misty.dotson@uky.edu and Orvis Kean at Orvis.kean@uky.edu.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

The Science Behind Snow's Serenity

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — A thick blanket of snow covering streets, walkways and rooftops can cause some major stress, but it can also be sort of calming, right? Think about it — when it snows, the world gets quieter.

 

Is it because people dare not to venture outside? That could be part of it. But there's actually some science behind snow's serenity.  

 

"Snow is a pretty good sound absorber," said David Herrin, an associate professor in the UK College of Engineering who studies acoustics.

 

Herrin said snow absorbs sound a lot like many commercial sound absorbing materials  do, such as fibers and foams used in cars, HVAC systems and other equipment.

 

Sound absorption is measured on a scale between 0 and 1.

 

"In the audible range, a couple inches of snow is roughly around 0.6 or 60 percent absorbing on average," Herrin said. "Snow is porous, in some ways like a commercial sound absorbing foam."

 

Even during a snowfall, when flakes hit everything in their path, they barely make a sound, especially compared to rainfall. That's because snowflakes are not very dense and tend to drift to the ground.

 

"Rain drops, on the other hand, fall at higher velocities and strike the pavement. You are hearing impact noise," Herrin said. "With snow, the impact force is much less partly due to the reduced speed."

 

Of course, a winter storm with wind and sleet can cause many to forget snow's own serenity.

 

Listen to Herrin talk more about how snow makes the world quieter in an interview with WFPL at http://wfpl.org/why-is-it-so-quiet-after-it-snows/

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Immunotherapy Research Leads to "Triple Play" for Sanders-Brown Researcher

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:23

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — In the late 1990s, Donna Wilcock was exploring electrical activity in the epileptic brain as part of her undergraduate study in England, but her focus took an interesting turn as her studies into brain function deepened.  

 

"I began to wonder what, exactly, was going wrong in the brain as people developed dementia? What made them forget things?" said Wilcock. And that question bloomed into a career path focused on the triggers for a disease process that affects millions of people worldwide.

 

After stints in several university laboratories in the U.S., Wilcock was recruited to the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging in 2011 and is now associate professor and the Sweeney-Nelms Professor in Alzheimer's Disease Research.

 

Wilcock's early graduate work in Alzheimer’s disease immunotherapy stimulated her interest in inflammation and vascular cognitive impairment. "I'm most curious about the role inflammation plays in the development of dementia, and about the vascular contribution to cognitive impairment," Wilcock said.

 

Her work in both areas has led to an interesting "triple play" that will help inform dementia research worldwide.

 

“It is a common misconception that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are synonymous, however, just over half of all dementia (cases) are a result of Alzheimer’s disease. The second most common cause of dementia is vascular dementia,” Wilcock explained.  "Moreover, it is rare that we see pure Alzheimer’s disease without other issues."

 

Cerebrovascular disease and vascular dementia can be caused by anything from strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) to the more exotic sounding —  but more common —  white matter infarcts or chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Wilcock shares the view of many of her colleagues that this mix of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease might explain why many promising drugs to combat AD have failed in clinical trials.

 

"If you are testing a drug against a single disease, but a person has more than one disease with similar symptoms, the drug may appear to fail," she says. "It's the prevailing view that, for this reason, the best chance for beating AD and other dementias will be a cocktail of drugs."

 

But the research community's work has been hampered by the lack of a reliable animal model that mimicked co-morbid AD and vascular dementia.

 

Then, in 2010, Wilcock read about the Oxford University's VITACOG study, which looked into the role B vitamins play in brain shrinkage and cognition in the aging population. Other researchers had also found memory deficits in mice given a diet deficient in B vitamins.

 

Since B-vitamin deficiency leads to elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood, termed hyperhomocysteinemia, or Hhcy, Wilcock wondered whether HHcy might be a reliable model for vascular cognitive impairment. 

 

"The literature was suggesting a link between homocysteine and dementia incidence. Also, HHcy was already identified as a risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular disease,” said Wilcock.  "So I thought, perhaps if we induce HHcy in mice, and they subsequently showed signs of cognitive decline, this could model vascular cognitive impairment.'"

 

It worked.

 

"Our HHcy mice showed a markedly higher error rate completing spatial memory tasks, such as successfully navigating a radial arm water maze, compared to our control mice," said Wilcock. 

 

Wilcock describes the maze test as the human equivalent of remembering where you parked your car.  "The HHcy mice couldn't remember how to navigate the maze to find where their car was parked, so to speak, and also couldn't retain the information once they learned it, as evidenced by a reduced success rate on the second day of testing," she said.

 

Furthermore, since a mouse model for AD already existed, it was possible to create a model with both HHCy and AD by feeding mice with AD a diet deficient in B vitamins — in other words, a closer mimic to what happens in many humans with cognitive decline.

 

Developing this animal model was a double-whammy for Wilcock and her lab. First was the development of a reliable animal model for vascular dementia. But in doing so, "it appears that we might have found in homocysteine a modifiable biomarker for vascular dementia."

 

Why is that a big deal?

 

"It's currently possible to measure homocysteine levels with a simple blood draw," Wilcock said. "If we can demonstrate a causative connection between high homocysteine and cognitive decline, we could diagnose the second most common form of dementia with a blood test — and treat it with an inexpensive B vitamin supplement."

 

"Even better," she says, "we could perform relatively inexpensive routine screenings for hypohomocysteinemia and catch vascular dementia early, much like we do with mammography for breast cancer.

 

Wilcock is beginning to explore this possibility in collaboration with groups in the United Kingdom.

 

"Oxford University's OPTIMA study has collected annual homocysteine levels on many of their research participants, along with careful assessment of memory and ultimately tissue collection," she said.  "We hope we will be able to establish what, if any, brain pathologies are associated with a long-term HHcy, which is a logical next step in looking for treatments for people with both vascular cognitive impairment and AD."  

 

The third leg of Wilcock's "triple play" involves just that.

 

"We know that mixed dementias all have some form of immune influence, although the exact pathways aren't yet defined," Wilcock says.  She likens the idea to tuning a radio: as there are many types of inflammation — some good and some bad — the key is to find the exact "frequency" that maximizes the influence of good inflammation and minimizes the bad.

 

Wilcock points out that this is where the concept of personalized medicine can take shape. "If we can use simple biomarkers, like blood or imaging studies, to determine what specific processes are contributing to dementia, then we may be able to formulate a cocktail of agents that will modulate, or fine tune, these processes," she said. "This might be the Holy Grail of treatment for most types of cognitive impairment. Our mouse is an important first step in that direction."

 

UK Law Symposium Commemorating 50th Anniversary of Kentucky Civil Rights Act

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2015) — The Kentucky Civil Rights Act was signed into law on Jan. 27, 1966. Fifty years later, on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, the University of Kentucky College of Law and Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will commemorate the anniversary with a one-day law symposium.

 

The symposium, taking place at the Law Building, will consist of speakers and panelists including Kentucky’s lieutenant governor, judges, lawyers and activists prominent in the civil rights arena discussing general topics of interest. In addition, students and activists will be asked to participate by posing questions throughout the symposium.

 

"It is indeed a privilege for UK Law to serve as co-host of this momentous occasion celebrating a pivotal time in the history of the Commonwealth and nation," said UK College of Law Dean David A. Brennen. “This will be more than a day of reflection. Instead, we will engage in dialogue and a collaborative effort to keep our great state at the forefront in advancing equal rights for its vastly diverse citizenry.”

 

Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the symposium will conclude at 5:00 p.m. A full agenda is available here. Panel discussions will focus on life in Kentucky before the Kentucky Civil Rights Act, the promise of civil rights law and current civil rights issues.

 

Patricia Timmons-Goodson, vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and nationally recognized scholar and jurist for civil rights, will deliver the keynote address at 11 a.m.

 

Prior to her appointment to the commission, Timmons-Goodson served as an associate justice on the Supreme Court of North Carolina from 2006 to 2012. She served as an associate judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals from 1997 to 2005 and a district court judge of the Twelfth Judicial District of North Carolina from 1984 to 1997.

 

The presentation of the Georgia Davis Powers Legacy Award for Individuals and Agencies Devoted to the Cause of Furthering Human Rights Throughout the Commonwealth will conclude the symposium.

 

To register, visit http://law.uky.edu/academics/registration-civil-rights-act-symposium

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Appalachian Research Symposium and Arts Showcase Accepting Abstracts

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 13:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Appalachian Center, Appalachian Studies Program, and the Graduate Appalachian Research Community are now accepting abstracts for the 2016 UK Appalachian Research Symposium and Arts Showcase. 

 

The symposium features diverse undergraduate and graduate student research, performances, art, and other projects from across the Appalachian region. Work must be original, produced within the past three years, and related to Appalachia. This year’s symposium theme is "Difference and Affinity: Representing Appalachia," and reflects on diversity and commonalities of the Appalachian experience.

 

Registration is free for both presenting and non-presenting attendees. 

 

The deadline for submitting an abstract is midnight, January 31. Submissions must be made online by simply clicking on the abstract submission link at https://appalachiancenter.as.uky.edu/app-symposium

 

The seventh annual Appalachian Research Symposium and Arts Showcase will be held March 5 and 6 at the UK College of Law Courtroom at 620 South Limestone in Lexington. Proximate pay parking is located in the South Limestone Parking Garage.  Symposium organizers are strongly committed to making the conference as affordable as possible for student presenters; please contact Symposium Chair Kathryn Engle at ksen223@g.uky.edu if you would like to room with a local student or faculty member during the symposium.

 

Tom Hansell, co-director of University Documentary Film Services at Appalachian State University, will be this year’s keynote speaker. Mr. Hansell will also be screening his documentary “After Coal” about economic transitions post-coal in Appalachia and South Wales, and a panel discussion will follow.

 

Those interested in attending the symposium but not presenting may also register online at https://appalachiancenter.as.uky.edu/non-presenter-registration

 

For more information, contact Zada Komara, president of the Graduate Appalachian Research Community at zko222@g.uky.edu

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 22, 1912

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 13:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 155th diary entry from Jan. 22, 1912, reflects her thoughts on work accomplished during the yearbook meeting she attended.

 

Jan. 22nd. Very effective Annual Meeting. Work in earnest.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.  

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.


The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.


McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.


The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots. 

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Friday's 'UK Perspectives' on WUKY Highlights Upcoming Event on Ky. Civil Rights Act

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 11:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  This week guest host Alan Lytle talks with Kentucky Human Rights Commission Executive Director John Johnson about a day-long symposium on the Kentucky Civil Rights Act, which was signed into law 50 years ago this month. The symposium, scheduled at UK Jan. 23, is co-sponsored by the commission and the UK College of Law. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-ky-civil-rights-act-50.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

UK Open and Operating on a Regular Schedule Today, Jan. 21

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 23:20

The University of Kentucky is open and operating on a normal schedule today, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016. Classes are in session, offices are open and UK HealthCare clinics are operating on a regular schedule.

 

Facilities Management and UK Housing personnel are working to keep side walks clear and walking condiitons safe.  Also visit the UK WalkSafe website for practical tips on safely negotiating pedestrian travel during inclement weather.

 

Nominations Being Accepted for Sarah Bennett Holmes Award

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 17:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — Now is the time to submit a nomination for one of the University of Kentucky’s most respected recognitions, the 2016 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award.

 

Created by the UK Women’s Forum, the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award has been among the most esteemed recognitions bestowed at the University of Kentucky. The award recognizes two female UK employees, one faculty member and one staff member, for their contributions to issues that affect women at UK and across the Commonwealth. For more information, visit the UK Women’s Forum website at http://www.uky.edu/womensforum/sbhal.html.

 

To make a nomination online, visit 2016 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award Nomination Form.

Nomination forms will be accepted through Monday, Feb. 1. Award winners will receive a prize of $1,000.

 

All nominees will be recognized during the annual Sarah Bennett Holmes Awards luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 10, at the Hilary J. Boone Center. Information about the luncheon will be available on the UK Women’s Forum website in February.

 

Sarah Bennett Holmes was a distinguished former dean of women at the University of Kentucky who tirelessly championed the rights of women throughout her career. Widowed at a young age, Holmes raised four children while completing her own education. She then began a successful career at UK where she inspired young women to persevere in the face of hardship and pursue their career goals. Among her accomplishments, Holmes developed work programs for women during the depression.

 

If you have questions about the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award or the luncheon, contact Kristie Law at kbrun2@uky.edu. You can also follow the Women’s Forum on Facebook or on Twitter @UKWomensForum for information about the award and luncheon. 

UK's Susan Cantrell Volunteers in Ecuador

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 16:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — Susan Cantrell has visited 10 schools on the coast of Ecuador during the past two days, administering a fluoride varnish on children’s teeth that has been shown to cut tooth decay by 80 percent. Teachers in Ecuador will administer the second round in six months.

 

Cantrell is volunteering with the Kentucky Ecuador Dental Health Initiative, a Partners of the Americas project. In 2002, Dr. Rankin Skinner and fellow volunteers with Partners started the Kentucky/Ecuador Dental Sealant Project, working with 15 clinics in the capital city of Quito and another 15 clinics in Winchester, Kentucky’s sister city of Ibarra and its surrounding communities.

 

According to a 2012 UK news release, dental decay in Ecuador is in the 85 percent range compared to 22 percent in the U.S., although it’s about 50 percent in Kentucky and significantly higher in some areas of the state. Skinner’s group trained 65 dentists to place sealants, and later, fluoride varnish, in each of these cities. After five years, a dramatic 50 to 78 percent drop in decay was noted.

 

Cantrell joined the University of Kentucky College of Education faculty in 2003. She is the interim department chair in the college’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Cantrell began her career as an elementary reading and classroom teacher and she earned her doctoral degree from UK. She teaches courses in reading methods for undergraduate and graduate students. Cantrell’s research is focused on teachers’ efficacy and development and the effects of classroom contexts on students’ reading comprehension and motivation.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Strategic Plan Seeks to Strengthen Graduate Education

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 15:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — The University of Kentucky aspires to global recognition as a nationally ranked public institution, focused intently on addressing the challenges confronting the Commonwealth it has served for nearly 150 years.

 

That vision — and how the university will measure its progress — are outlined in detail in UK's 2015-2020 Strategic Plan. The plan was endorsed by the UK Board of Trustees in October 2015, and it outlines five strategic areas where the university needs to continue building upon its progress of the last several years to meet its ambitious aspirations.

 

One of the cornerstones of the plan is progress in graduate education, where tomorrow's scholars and researchers are nurtured and developed.

 

"Graduate education is a critical aspect of our identity as a national and global research university," said Susan Carvahlo, interim dean of The Graduate School at UK. "Attracting and training top-quality graduate students allows our faculty to conduct research on a different scale than they could without the graduate component.

 

"In addition, graduate students entrust their professional development to UK, and we need to make sure we continuously assess our programs to align with the priorities of the professions they will enter."

 

As specified in the plan, the university's mission for graduate education is "to strengthen the quality and distinctiveness of its graduate programs to transform students into accomplished scholars and professionals who contribute to the Commonwealth, the nation, and the world through their research and discovery, creative endeavors, teaching, and service."

 

Toward those goals, the 2015-2020 plan proposes graduate education will:

  • Increase the selectivity of the university's graduate programs.
  • Provide incentives for top graduate programs through the awarding of block grants.
  • Increase the number of graduate degrees awarded at the master's and doctoral levels as well as education specialist.
  • Increase the diversity of graduate students.

"The 2020 goals focus on the national competitiveness and visibility that will bring us strong applicants, on providing them with the balance and the cutting-edge curriculum that they will need for their futures, and on helping them each find the most fulfilling professional path upon graduation," Carvalho said. "The Graduate School is providing assessment data and national benchmarks to ensure that our best graduate programs are on a par with the very best in the nation and the world."

 

More specifically, UK's graduate programs, according to the strategic plan, must make progress in:

  • Recruiting and retaining outstanding graduate students from all backgrounds.
  • Investing in graduate programs that have distinctive synergy with UK’s research priorities and/or whose graduate students demonstrate excellence at the national or global levels.
  • Elevating the quality and richness of the graduate student experience and increase the national competitiveness of UK’s graduate programs.

Carvahlo considers research and graduate education inseparable and mutually dependent.

 

"Just as the research informs the graduate training and curriculum, the graduate students accelerate and inform the research. It is no coincidence that our highest-ranked graduate programs are often aligned with our top-ranked research programs," she said.

 

UK graduates’ future success, especially at the doctoral level, often depends on the rigor of the research program that trains them. And in turn, those graduate students support the success of the grant applications and the implementation of UK research projects.

 

As a result, the research and graduate education goals set forth in the strategic plan are purposefully very ambitious, Carvahlo said. "We owe it to our present and future graduate students to provide the best training ground for their professional success."

 

"Each college will work, with the full support of The Graduate School, to develop plans that implement those goals within their own professional contexts, and our shared vision will provide the foundation and the resources to achieve those goals," she said.

 

The strategic plan in full can be read here. Over the next several weeks, UKNow will be exploring different facets of the plan, focusing on each of the five strategic areas:

  • Undergraduate student success
  • Graduate education
  • Research
  • Diversity and Inclusivity
  • Community engagement

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Campus Blood Donors Take on Gators in Big Blue Slam

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 15:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan 21, 2016)  Campus blood donors can bleed blue during the eighth annual Big Blue Slam, Jan. 25-29. Big Blue Slam is the blood drive competition between Kentucky and Florida.

 

Besides saving lives during Big Blue Slam, blood donors can also help DanceBlue at the same time. Kentucky Blood Center will make a $5 donation to DanceBlue for those blood donors who mention it at any of the Big Blue Slam campus drives.

 

Donors will receive a Slam T-shirt, a chance to win one of four Fitbit wireless wristbands and be entered to win a pair of tickets to the 2016 NCAA Men’s Basketball South Regional in Louisville March 24 and 26.

 

The campus blood drives are listed below:

 

Singletary Center for the Arts

Monday - Thursday

10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

 

The 90, Room 219

Monday, noon - 6 p.m.

Friday, noon - 6 p.m.

 

Baptist Christian Ministries

Wednesday, 4 - 8 p.m.

 

W.T. Young Library

Tuesday, 1 - 6 p.m.

Wednesday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

 

Johnson Center

Thursday, 1 - 6:30 p.m.

 

Kentucky and Florida meet on the court Feb. 6 in Rupp Arena and March 1 in Florida. KBC leads the competition against LifeSouth Community Blood Center in Gainesville four to three.

To schedule a donation, visit kybloodcenter.org or call 800-775-2522. Walk-ins are also welcome.

 

Blood donors must be 17 years old (16 with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds, be in general good health, show a photo I.D. and meet additional requirements. Sixteen-year-old donors must have a signed parental permission slip, which can be found at kybloodcenter.org.

 

KBC, founded nearly 50 years ago, is the largest independent, full-service, nonprofit blood center in Kentucky. Licensed by the FDA, KBC’s sole purpose is to collect, process and distribute blood for patients in Kentucky hospitals.

 

All blood that is donated with KBC is returned to the Beaumont Donor Center where it is processed, prepared and stored for shipment to Kentucky hospitals.

 

Blood needs are ongoing. Red cells last only 42 days and must be continually replenished to adequately support Kentucky hospitals. Statistics show that one in seven hospital patients will require blood transfusions during their stay. However, only 37 percent of the population is eligible to donate blood and less than 10 percent does. All blood types are needed, and there is a particular need for type O negative blood since it is the “universal donor” and needed in emergencies when the patient’s blood type is unknown.

 

The blood already on the shelf is the blood used in an emergency. That’s why KBC is always encouraging people to donate blood.

 

For more information, contact KBC Marketing and Communications Manager Denise Fields at dfields@kybloodcenter.org.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, (859) 257-1909/(859) 323-2395 

UK Professor Wins Research Award in Creative Music Movement

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 13:27

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016)Cecilia Wang, professor emerita of music education in the University of Kentucky School of Music, was named the recipient of the 2015 Excellence in Research Award presented by the American Orff-Schulwerk Association (AOSA). The award is given annually to an individual who is considered the top contributor of research scholars among the professional organization of educators dedicated to the creative music movement approach developed by Carl Orff and Gunild Keetman.

 

"I feel very happy about winning this award. I have been doing research for many years and I am happy that people are recognizing my work. In the field of music education, there are not many awards, so I am personally thrilled to receive it. To be nominated for this award by a former student makes it even more satisfying," Wang said.

 

Wang is viewed as one of the most gifted and giving scholars in the AOSA. She is credited with creating the first webliography of research for Orff Schulwerk that had been hidden in university archives and absent from major databases. In 2003, in collaboration with longtime research colleague David Sogin, professor of music education and director of graduate studies in music, Wang presented a state of the state address called "Evidence-Based Research in Orff Schulwerk" that detailed the 11 possible categories of research in music education and categorized and listed every known thesis and dissertation that pertained to Schulwerk. Her work provided the data, passion and motivation for scholars to develop needed research in areas that had not been addressed.

 

At UK, Wang has taught courses in general music education, research, arts in education, psychology of music, tests and measurements, as well as directed theses and dissertations in these areas. She recently stepped down as the director of the Orff Schulwerk Program at UK in the summer of 2015. Wang holds a bachelor's degree in music education from Viterbo University and a master's degree and doctoral degree in music education from Texas Tech University. She presents research papers and publishes regularly and internationally on research in music perception, music learning and development, creative thinking in music, and teacher effectiveness.

 

The American Orff-Schulwerk Association's mission is to demonstrate the value of Orff Schulwerk and promote its widespread use to support the professional development of our members; and to inspire and advocate for the creative potential of all learners.

 

The UK School of Music in the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered national acknowledgment for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK WalkSafe Campaign Provides Good Advice

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 10:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 20, 2016) — We can usually count on snow at some point during the winter.  Crews from the University of Kentucky Facilities Management division have been working since early morning to clear sidewalks and other paths through campus for safer walking conditions in the snow.  Other UK departments have also initiated the UK WalkSAfe campaign to promote practical information for students, faculty, staff and visitors who are walking on campus.

 

The WalkSafe website provides practical tips for walking in inclement weather and the proper footwear to use.  It also provides information on the priority snow clearing plan for campus used by Facilities Managment. Visit the website at: http://www.uky.edu/hr/hr-home/uk-walk-safe-winter.

 

The UK WalkSafe campaign is a service of UK Environmental Health and Safety, UK Human Resources and other campus partners.

UK HealthCare, Cincinnati Children's Finalize Agreement to Partner for Pediatric Heart Care Services

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 10:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 20, 2016) — UK HealthCare and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have finalized an agreement to partner for pediatric heart care and other services. A Letter of Intent (LOI) for a partnership was announced between the two health care systems last September.

 

The collaboration combines the strengths of the region's leading provider of advanced subspecialty care in UK HealthCare with one of the country's leaders in children's health care, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and will enable more Kentucky children to receive care closer to home.

 

The initial focus of the partnership will be pediatric heart care services with the goal of delivering outstanding surgical and clinical care, education and research in pediatric cardiology.  In addition, the master services agreement will provide the option of extending the partnership beyond these services in the future.

 

As part of the agreement, a heart surgeon will be jointly recruited and have a primary appointment at Cincinnati Children's in a 'one program, two sites' model; the surgeon will be based in Lexington and perform services at Kentucky Children’s Hospital.

 

"By partnering with Cincinnati Children's we will be teaming-up with one of the top children's hospitals in the country and a Top 10 pediatric heart care program," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. "Our goal is to keep patient care close to home when clinically appropriate with patients traveling to Cincinnati for the most complex surgical procedures but eventually having some surgical procedures, as well as post-surgical care and pediatric cardiology subspecialty care, available in Lexington."

 

The first surgical procedure at UK will likely be targeted for late 2016 or early 2017. UK HealthCare will also work toward having cardiac subspecialists performing diagnostics and therapeutic interventions at Kentucky Children's Hospital with the support of Cincinnati Children’s subspecialists when necessary.

 

Training, support, infrastructure development and reactivation of on-site surgery at Kentucky Children's Hospital will be done in a manner to ensure sustained outstanding outcomes as measured by national registries and reporting mechanisms. This includes developing and implementing shared and common clinical standards for environment, design, equipment and operations. Additionally, training will be provided by Cincinnati Children's initially and on an ongoing basis for Kentucky Children's Hospital personnel.

 

“We are excited about the opportunity to work with UK HealthCare to serve pediatric cardiac patients and their families in the Commonwealth,” said Dr. Andrew Redington, executive co-director of the Heart Institute and chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Cincinnati Children’s.

 

Currently the majority of Kentucky Children's Hospital pediatric CT surgery patient families who need clinical referrals for care already are choosing Cincinnati Children’s. However, this new 'one program, two sites' model will provide an even more seamless process for these patients and families as well as the new patients and families needing these services each year throughout the Commonwealth.

 

UK HealthCare voluntarily suspended Kentucky Children's pediatric cardiothoracic (CT) program in October 2012 and a task force charged with providing recommendations regarding the future of the program was established and convened in 2013. Initial joint negotiations with Cincinnati Children's began in early 2015 and led to the LOI being signed in September.

 

"We said we would only re-open the program when we were ready to provide the best care for our patients and their families and we are confident that this collaborative arrangement meets that mark with the highest quality surgical and clinical care, education and research in pediatric cardiovascular services for patients of Kentucky and their families," Karpf said.

 

Video on benefits of partnership with Cincinnati Children's: https://youtu.be/-FTdnEt_-8M

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UKPR CONTACT: Kristi Lopez, kristi.lopez@uky.edu, 859-323-6363 or 859-806-0445

CINCINNATI CHILDREN'S CONTACT:  Jim Feuer, jim.feuer@cchmc.org, 513-636-4656

Education Abroad Spring Expo Will Highlight Breadth of Study Abroad Programs

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 08:55

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — University of Kentucky Education Abroad (UK EA) is proud to host its Spring Expo from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4 in The Hub of the William T. Young Library. This event is open to all students and faculty who are interested in learning more about education abroad at the UK.

 

The Spring Expo will offer students the chance to explore all facets of UK EA, including study, research, intern, service and teach abroad. This will allow students to easily identify programs that will help them meet their academic or professional goals. In addition to these informational resources, students will be able to enjoy free food and prizes.

 

“The Education Abroad Expo showcases a variety of international opportunities available to UK students, from faculty-directed programs to internships abroad,” said Miko McFarland, UK EA assistant director. “It’s important for students to start making education abroad summer plans now, as many deadlines occur in March.”

 

The expo will introduce new 2016 programs, such as Language Immersion and First-Year Programs. UK EA’s three main portfolios — Global Design, Bluegrass Down Under and Celtic Blue — will also be highlighted.

 

The expo will feature colleges that will be reaching out to students from all majors for their education abroad programs. These faculty-directed programs will take place during summer 2016 and are a great opportunity to earn UK credit abroad.

 

Other campus resources such as the Stuckert Career Center and National Student Exchange will be present to share information about their services and answer students’ questions. For more information about the UK EA Spring Expo, please contact Austin Hughes, UK EA promotion and outreach coordinator at austin.hughes@uky.edu or call 859-323-2147.

 

About UK Education Abroad

 

Education Abroad at the University of Kentucky is a unit of the International Center. Its primary responsibility is to facilitate high quality, academically sound and experientially rich study abroad, research abroad and intern abroad programs for University of Kentucky students. More information about the International Center can be found at http://www.uky.edu/international/.

 

Connect with Education Abroad at http://uky.edu/international/educationabroad. Visit 315 Bradley Hall to talk with an Education Abroad Peer Ambassador, email educationabroad@uky.edu or call 859-257-4067 for more information.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Open and Operating on a Regular Schedule

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 05:27

The University of Kentucky is open and operating on a normal schedule today, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016. Classes are in session, offices are open and UK HealthCare clinics are operating on a regular schedule.

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