MenuMenu

Campus News

UK Education Professor Appointed to American Psychological Association Council of Representatives

Mon, 09/12/2016 - 10:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sep. 13, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Education's Candice Crowell has been appointed to the Council of Representatives for the Society of Counseling Psychology, a division of the American Psychological Association (APA). Crowell is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology.

 

In the APA, Crowell is an early career professional – having completed a doctoral degree within the past 10 years. She is the first early career professional in the Society of Counseling Psychology’s 70-year history to be appointed to the Council of Representatives, and among only a handful of early career professionals who represent their states and organizations on the council. The Council of Representatives is the legislative body of the APA, the largest organization of psychologists in the world.

 

In addition to serving on the council, the appointment also includes serving on the executive board of the Society of Counseling Psychology. Her appointment begins in January 2017 and will last for three years. In this position, Crowell is committed to navigating the landscape of APA governance in a way that accomplishes goals, rather than keeping them at the level of conversation.

 

Specifically, she intends to “contribute to transforming psychology from a field that aspires to be ethical and socially just to a field that has actualized these goals in word and deed.”

 

“Psychology has come a long way, and because I love this field, I know how much further we can go," she said.

 

Crowell earned her Ph.D. from the University of Georgia in 2015 and her bachelor's degree from Spelman College. Her research interests include sexual health broadly, with a specific, although not exclusive, focus on black sexuality. Her secondary research focus includes education and training issues in psychology (e.g., social justice, cultural competence, and leadership). She is an APA Minority Fellow.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

If Your Rest is Disrupted Because of Sleep Apnea, Get Medical Help

Mon, 09/12/2016 - 09:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 13, 2016) – The following column ran in the Lexington Herald-Leader Sunday, Sept., 11, 2016.

 

Unbearable snoring is often the reason sleep apnea is diagnosed. Sleep apnea occurs in about 18 million Americans, or about one in 15 people. The two types of sleep apnea are central and obstructive. Central sleep apnea is less common and is often associated with other conditions, like stroke. It occurs when the brain does not tell the muscles to breathe. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common and is caused by a repetitive (partial or complete) airway collapse which prevents air from reaching the lungs.

 

Sleep apnea can have negative consequences if it goes undiagnosed and untreated. First, it can cause chronic tiredness, which can lead to cognitive impairment including trouble concentrating and memory problems. Cardiovascular problems can also occur, the most common issue caused by sleep apnea is hypertension.

 

Often times, when a patient is not responding to medication for hypertension it may be due to undiagnosed sleep apnea. Additionally, the regulation of glucose levels can be negatively affected by lack of sleep; this problem increases the risk of diabetes.

 

Some people are more likely to be affected by obstructive sleep apnea. A high Body Mass Index is the number one indicator of sleep apnea. The higher the BMI, the greater risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Having a large neck circumference is another indicator. Men are also at higher risk than women, that is, until menopause when the risk increases for women. Smokers are also at increased risk. A large uvula and long soft palate, big tongue, deviated septum and enlarged tonsils can also cause the disorder.

 

In the 1950s sleep behaviors started being studied and became part of medical care. In the 1970s sleep clinics were developed so people could be monitored and diagnosed with sleep disorders. Today, sleep physicians are able to diagnose the disorder and decide on a course of treatment, which can include referral to a dentist.

 

The most common treatment option is a CPAP machine, which a patient wears that works to keep the airway open with steady airflow. Oral appliances can be used to move the lower jaw forward to improve airflow. Surgery is a less common treatment option, tonsilectomies may be done when the cause of the sleep apnea is enlarged tonsils.

 

Behavioral modification is a treatment option that should go along with other treatments. For example, if a patient is overweight weight reduction could be a solution, quitting smoking or changing sleeping positions can also help.

 

Sleep is an incredibly important part of living a healthy life. Anything that gets in the way of a sound night of sleep needs to be addressed and remedied.

 

Dr. Isabel Moreno-Hay is an assistant professor in the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry’s Orofacial Pain Clinic

 

UK Board Accepts $10 Million Gift From Don Jacobs Sr. Charitable Foundation

Fri, 09/09/2016 - 17:06

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees today accepted a $10 million gift from The Don Jacobs Sr. Charitable Foundation during the board's meeting in Bowling Green.

 

Announced earlier in the week, the gift is a further investment in UK's undergraduate science education.  The majority of the funds — $8 million — will go toward the recently completed academic science building that now takes the name Don & Cathy Jacobs Science Building. The remainder of the gift will fund future academic and research investments yet to be determined.

 

The legacy of Lexington businessman and philanthropist Don Jacobs, who died in April 2015, and his wife Cathy already lives on across the UK campus.  Their gifts to UK, now in excess of $20 million, are also benefitting the Gatton College of Business and Economics, UK Chandler Hospital, Markey Cancer Center and the College of Medicine. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-699-0041

 

Celebrating a Bridge to the Past

Fri, 09/09/2016 - 15:32

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2016) — Although Patterson Hall may look familiar on the outside, once you step through its doors, you will see the inside of the historical building has been transformed. Today at 10 a.m. in Patterson Hall, the University of Kentucky will celebrate the renovation of the building as well as the many women pioneers who passed through its doors.

 

UK alumna and former Patterson Hall resident, Myra Tobin, treasures the time she spent in Patterson Hall as a student.

 

"It was a dorm that had character. It was well built. It was stately. It was right in the center of a beautiful grove of trees. It was a prestigious place to live," Tobin said.

 

Women were admitted to the university beginning in 1880, but they were not permitted to live on campus until Patterson Hall opened in 1904.

 

"Patterson Hall had a meaning that went far beyond just a place where students lived," said Deirdre Scaggs, associate dean of UK Libraries Special Collections Research Center.

 

As the first women's dormitory, the hall gave female students the chance to further their education and truly experience campus life — an opportunity they had not had before.

 

"It is important that we not forget the legacy of those pioneers and then how we cast the buildings around it to further remember that we didn’t just have a founding father at the University of Kentucky," said President Eli Capilouto. "Our history is built on the endurance and perseverance of — what I like to say — ‘our founding mothers.’"

 

Through the doors of Patterson Hall passed many of the university's women pioneers including Sarah Bennett Holmes, Cleona Belle Matthews Boyd, Georgia M. Blazer and Frances Jewell. As the university celebrates the transformation of Patterson Hall, it is also celebrating the legacies those women left behind.

 

"This place, that building, its halls and its ground are hallowed and sacred because these people had to go through something that was difficult in their time," Capilouto said.

 

Outdated residence halls bearing the names of these four women were torn down to make way for UK's recent residential transformation. During today's ceremony, UK will formally announce the renaming of four north campus residence halls surrounding Patterson Hall to honor these women. Champions Court I has been named Frances Jewell Hall. Champions Court II has been named Georgia M. Blazer Hall. Limestone Park I has been named Sarah Bennett Holmes Hall. Limestone Park II has been named Cleona Belle Matthews Boyd Hall.

 

As renovation began on Patterson Hall, the design team reviewed original plans in order to best capture and preserve the building in a way that will better serve current and future students. During the renovation, many remnants of the past were found throughout the building including a 1906-07 class assignment schedule and old postcards.

 

"It should be a tribute to what UK was and where it’s going in the future," said Mary Vosevich, UK vice president for facilities management.

 

"I think you need bridges to the past and Patterson Hall is one of those bridges," said Tobin.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Bicycles Must Be Parked at Campus Bike Racks

Fri, 09/09/2016 - 14:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2016) — University of Kentucky students and employees are choosing bicycles as a means of getting to, from and around campus, in growing numbers. UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) would like to remind cyclists that bicycles may only be parked at bicycle racks, located at all residence halls, classroom buildings and throughout campus.

 

Bicycles may not be parked at any area other than a bike rack. Securing bikes to areas such as handrails or doors could block building access and egress, creating a hazard and nuisance. Parking bicycles along disabled ramps is prohibited. Likewise, bicycles may not be locked to benches, poles, signs or trees.

 

Over the past few months, more than 700 bicycle parking spaces were added or upgraded. Students and employees who notice a need for more bike parking in a particular area of campus may submit a request via www.uky.edu/pts/help-and-resources_forms.

 

Here is a complete map of campus-area bicycle lanes and facilities (PDF), including rack locations.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Parking and Transportation Services Reminds the UK Community to Share the Road

Fri, 09/09/2016 - 13:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2016) — As the start of fall semester brings an increase in campus population and a corresponding increase in vehicle and foot traffic around the University of Kentucky campus, UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is reminding all roadway users — including motorists, bicyclists and motor scooter users — to use caution when interacting with each other, in order to safely share the road. As part of these efforts, PTS has developed safety tips for each of these groups.

 

PTS, in conjunction with the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Fayette County Public Schools, UK and Lexington Police and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, wants to promote safety on our roads. Cyclists and motorists (including motor scooter users) have the same rights, rules and responsibilities on most Kentucky roads.

 

Below is a list of tips that will help keep the road a safe way to travel:

 

Motorists:

  • Don’t Speed or Text: Follow posted speed limits and follow distracted driving laws; don’t text message while your vehicle is in motion.
  • Every Lane is a Bike Lane: Bicyclists have a right to the road. Be alert and patient. Expect cyclists on the road at any time, especially on signed bike routes and on roads displaying the sharrow symbol on the roadway surface. Do not use a bike lane as a turn lane, for loading/unloading or to park.
  • Be Alert: Check your mirrors. Watch for pedestrians and cyclists, yielding to them at crosswalks and intersections; pay special attention while driving on or around campus. Scan for cyclists before turning across a bike lane, driveway or onto another road.
  • Pass with Care: Bicycles are considered vehicles and should be given the appropriate right of way. A minimum of three feet is recommended for passing cyclists. Stay behind cyclists when you are turning right. Do not honk your horn when approaching cyclists; doing so could startle the cyclist and result in a crash.

Cyclists:

  • Respect the Rules: Bicycles are vehicles. Obey traffic rules for safety and to gain respect from motorists. Never ride against traffic; it is illegal and unsafe.
  • Be Safe, Be Seen: Use front and rear lights and wear bright or reflective clothing. Be predictable and make eye contact with motorists, and use hand signals to indicate your intentions.
  • Pass with Care: A minimum of three feet is recommended for passing vehicles.
  • Wear a Helmet: Helmet use dramatically reduces the risks of brain injury and death for cyclists involved in accidents.
  • Always Park at Bike Racks: Locking your bike to anything other than a bike rack can cause access issues, fire hazards and other problems and is prohibited by University of Kentucky regulations. Just park at a bike rack. Rack locations can be found on the Bicycle Facilities map.

Additionally, cyclists are reminded to engage in safe sidewalk riding behaviors. Some campus sidewalks have been designated as shared sidewalks and, under certain conditions, serve as important connections for cyclists. These shared sidewalks are wide, do not run parallel to vehicular traffic and connect important campus destinations. Nonetheless, these walks were designed for pedestrian traffic and bicyclists should always yield.

 

If you choose to ride your bike on any campus sidewalk, please follow these basic rules:

  • Always Yield to Pedestrians: Give audible warning, or dismount to pass when sidewalks are crowded or narrow.
  • Go Slow: Sidewalks are not designed for speeds faster than a slow jog.
  • Check Every Cross Street and Driveway: Vehicles often pull across the sidewalk before entering traffic or turn into driveways without scanning very far down the street.
  • Only Cross the Street at Crosswalks: Darting into the street mid-block is extremely dangerous.

Motor scooter users:

  • Use Appropriate Travel Avenues: Scooters, motor scooters and motorcycles are not permitted to drive or travel on sidewalks, bike paths, bike lanes or lawns.
  • Utilize Appropriate Parking Areas: Scooters, mopeds and motorcycles must use moped/motorcycle parking areas on campus. These areas are conveniently located throughout campus and are marked by the presence of signage, green lines or both. Motor scooters may also park at motor scooter-only parking racks, which are located in front of Memorial Coliseum and between Funkhouser Building and the Advanced Science and Technology Commercialization Center (ASTeCC). Scooters, motorcycles and motor scooters are not authorized to park at bicycle racks, or in any area that is not listed above.

For more information about sharing the road, visit www.moveitpeople.com/bike/safety. For a complete list of local bike ordinances, visit www.lexingtonky.gov/bikewalklex.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Training Available for UK Faculty, Staff Who Want to Assist in Disaster Response

Fri, 09/09/2016 - 12:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2016)  Recognizing that managing events following a serious emergency on campus can quickly overwhelm the resources of first responders, University of Kentucky Police Department’s Division of Crisis Management and Preparedness will host the third annual Campus Community Emergency Response Team (C-CERT) training for faculty and staff. Beginning Thursday, Oct. 13, training will be held each Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for five weeks in The 90. The training will end with a mock disaster exercise Thursday, Nov. 10. 

 

The primary purpose of UK C-CERT is to apply the established CERT curriculum, adopted by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to the university environment. Every campus is a virtual “city within a city,” with many of the same challenges to public health and safety faced by any other community, but also some unique risks and vulnerabilities. UK has a large, diverse and multicultural population of faculty, staff and students on campus in offices, residence halls, classrooms and patient areas. The complexity of UK's critical infrastructure and the tens of thousands of visitors for special events and conferences underscore the need to educate employees about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact campus and its vital resources.  

 

UK C-CERT members will receive hands-on training in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety and suppression, light search and rescue, disaster medical operations, team organization, disaster psychology and terrorism. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, C-CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help.

 

UK Police Chief Joe Monroe encourages faculty and staff to become part of the university’s investment in emergency preparedness and disaster resiliency. “Utilizing the skills and knowledge of campus volunteers will not only tremendously enhance the safety and security of our entire campus community, but support an environment of teamwork and an attitude toward readiness,” Monroe said. “I challenge you to discover new perspectives on your limitations and capabilities for providing assistance to those around you.”

 

Registration is open now through Oct 7. Class size is limited and enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis. The training is free and open to regular full-time UK faculty and staff. To register, please click here.

 

Prospective participants will be expected to obtain approval from their supervisor and submit to an electronic background check. Refresher trainings on a variety of topics will be planned each year for UK C-CERT members along with opportunities to utilize these skills in responding to campus events or emergencies. 

 

To find out more, visit UKPD’s C-CERT website, UKPD Facebook page or contact Laurel Wood by calling 859-257-6655 or by email at laurel.wood@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

A Preview of Fall Shows at the Singletary Center on WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 22:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Matt Gibson, UK Singletary Center for the Arts marketing and ticketing director, is today's guest. He previews the various shows coming to the Singletary Center this fall.

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/theres-something-everyone-fall-singletary#stream/0.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

VIDEO: UK Board Underscores Commitment to State With Meeting in Bowling Green

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 21:24

 

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2016) – For the second year in a row, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is taking to the road for its regularly scheduled meeting, further underscoring the statewide commitment of the Commonwealth’s flagship, land-grant institution.

 

“We are the university for Kentucky,” said UK Board Chair Britt Brockman. “Meeting in Bowling Green exemplifies two things – that statewide reach and commitment and the power of partnership as we are working with outstanding institutions such as Western Kentucky University to further health care and grow the number of physicians who are serving our state.”

 

UK’s board is holding a series of meetings yesterday and Friday on the campus of WKU. UK currently has 288 students from Warren County and more than 1,500 alums from UK live in the county.

 

Some of those outstanding students are featured in this video:

 

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

Over the two-day meeting, trustees highlighted two recent partnerships, involving WKU and Med Center Health:

 

 

  • In addition, UK trustees heard details of a recently announced partnership with regional health leader Med Center Health to provide orthopaedic medicine to Bowling Green and the region. The partnership in orthopaedic care formally began in January 2015 with the opening of Medical Center Orthopaedics located on the Med Center Health campus. Medical Center Orthopaedics combines the excellent staff and facilities of Med Center Health with fellowship-trained UK orthopaedic surgeons. Currently there are three UK faculty members providing orthopaedic care at Med Center Health.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jay Blanton, 859-699-0041 or jay.blanton@uky.edu

UK Takes Steps to Reduce Pedestrian-Vehicle Conflicts on Rose Street

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 16:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2016) — Safety must come first on the University of Kentucky campus. This includes continually assessing and making changes when necessary in order to enhance pedestrian safety.

 

It is with this focus on safety that UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS), in partnership with the UK Police Department, is actively diverting non-authorized traffic away from the restricted portion of Rose Street between Columbia Avenue and Funkhouser Drive.

 

The university’s goal is to enhance pedestrian safety by reducing vehicular traffic in the area, specifically by eliminating non-authorized traffic. A traffic study conducted earlier this week by university officials showed that the majority of non-authorized vehicles included those dropping off or picking up passengers as well as lost motorists.

 

Drivers wishing to drop-off or pick-up passengers are encouraged to do so in areas outside of the campus core, which would result in little to no impact on traffic or pedestrian flow.

 

For those who are lost or trying to get to A.B. Chandler Hospital or Kentucky Clinic, officials are handing out maps to assist them with appropriate routes.

 

Authorized traffic includes delivery vehicles, official vehicles and those with permits for the Funkhouser Drive area, which includes a mixture of ADA accessible, employee and reserved parking.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Geologists Focus on Issues Making Headlines in the Energy Field, Sept. 25-27

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 11:58

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2016) — The Kentucky Geological Survey at the University of Kentucky and the Geological Society of Kentucky will host a significant meeting of geologists, earth-science educators and students interested in energy resources from around the eastern U.S. and Canada on Sept. 25-27.  

 

The 45th annual meeting of the Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) will focus on the opportunities and challenges of energy resources in the eastern part of North America. Borrowing from the world-famous bourbon industry of the region, organizers have chosen the theme of “Basins to Barrels” for the event.

 

Dozens of technical talks on current industry issues, research and regulation are planned for two days of morning and afternoon sessions, with poster sessions and networking breaks in between. Many session topics will include issues making headlines in the energy field. They include emerging sources and locations of oil and natural gas, new methods for improving energy resource recovery (such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing), the potential for inducing earthquakes with oil and gas exploration activities, and environmental issues (greenhouse gas emissions, disposal of wastewater, and others).

 

Most of the meeting sessions will be held at the Lexington Convention Center complex in downtown Lexington. Pre- and post-meeting field trips are also planned, allowing participants to visit unique features in the Bluegrass region, such as the water resources needed for the bourbon industry and the coal geology of eastern Kentucky. A geochemistry workshop is also available, to give participants opportunities to improve their professional knowledge and skills.

 

University students and young professionals in the oil and gas field will have the chance to mingle with industry representatives, make presentations on their research, and share networking opportunities.

 

The Eastern Section is one of six North American sections of the AAPG, which was formed in 1917 to advance and promote the science of geology and energy exploration. The Geological Society of Kentucky is the state affiliate of the AAPG.

 

For more information, contact: Liz Adams, eladam2@uky.edu, 859-343-0518; or Mike Lynch, mjlync2@uky.edu, 859-323-0561

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

UPK Biography on Russell Kirk Wins Paolucci Award

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 10:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2016) University Press of Kentucky’s (UPK) biography, "Russell Kirk: American Conservative" by historian Bradley J. Birzer, has been named the winner of the Henry and Anne Paolucci Book Award given by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI).

 

ISI is a nonprofit educational organization devoted to the promotion of conservative thought on college campuses. It was founded in 1953 by Frank Chodorov with William F. Buckley Jr. as its first president. "Russell Kirk" was selected from among 60 nominees for this year’s award, which honors the book that best advances conservative principles. The judges who selected the Paolucci Book Award winner include: Amity Shlaes, author of "Coolidge" and "The Forgotten Man"; Angelo M. Codevilla, author of "Advice to War Presidents" (winner of the 2010 Paolucci Book Award); Serphin Maltese, former chairman of the Conservative Party of New York; Clara Sarrocco, executive director of the Council on National Literatures; Matthew A. Pauley, chair of political science and legal studies at Manhattanville College; and Ronald F. Docksai, president of the Walter Bagehot Council.

 

Emerging from two decades of the Great Depression and the New Deal and facing the rise of radical ideologies abroad, the American right seemed beaten, broken and adrift in the early 1950s. Although conservative luminaries such as Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin all published important works at this time, none of their writings would match the influence of Russell Kirk’s 1953 masterpiece "The Conservative Mind." This seminal book became the intellectual touchstone for a reinvigorated movement and sparked a change in Americans’ attitudes toward traditionalism.

 

In "Russell Kirk," Birzer investigates the life and work of the man known as the founder of postwar conservatism in America. Drawing on papers and diaries that have only recently become available to the public, Birzer presents a thorough exploration of Kirk’s intellectual roots and development. The first to examine the theorist’s prolific writings on literature and culture, this magisterial study illuminates Kirk’s lasting influence on figures such as T. S. Eliot, William F. Buckley Jr. and Sen. Barry Goldwater — who persuaded a reluctant Kirk to participate in his campaign for the presidency in 1964.

 

The winner of the Paolucci Book Award will receive a $5,000 cash prize. In addition, Birzer will deliver a talk about the legacy of Russell Kirk at ISI’s awards dinner in Philadelphia on Saturday, Oct. 1. C-SPAN’s “Book TV” has broadcast the Paolucci winner’s talk each of the past ten10 years and plans to do so again this year.

 

Bradley J. Birzer is the Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies and a professor of history at Hillsdale College. He is also the second Visiting Scholar of Conservative Thought and Policy at University of Colorado-Boulder. Birzer is the author of "American Cicero: The Life of Charles Carroll" and "Sanctifying the World: The Augustinian Life and Mind of Christopher Dawson."

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Mains New Leader of Kentucky 4-H

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 10:50

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Sept. 9, 2016)  A lifelong 4-H’er has taken the helm of one of Kentucky’s most popular and storied youth development programs.

 

The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has named Mark Mains the assistant director of Kentucky 4-H after a national search. He began this role Sept. 1.

 

Mains has served as a Kentucky extension specialist for 4-H youth development since 2004. Prior to that, he was the 4-H youth development agent in Kenton County.

 

“The work he has done to develop the middle school and upper teen programs, the state teen council and his mentorship of the state 4-H officers has been nothing short of amazing,” said Jimmy Henning, director of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service. “The program has grown in quantity and quality, and while it takes many to do these programs, Mark provided clear and insightful leadership.”

 

Developing young leaders has been one of Mains’ top priorities since he was an agent.

 

“One of the greatest things about 4-H is the leadership opportunities it provides for countless young people,” he said. “It has been very exciting and fulfilling for me to work with the state 4-H officers each year to see how they develop within that year of service and then to see what they go on to accomplish as adults.”

 

As assistant director, he will provide oversight to Kentucky 4-H and work with state extension specialists to conduct state-level awards programs and events as well as the 4-H camping program.

 

“In this position, I want to continue to develop and promote volunteerism across the state. I also want to identify the core life skills that 4-H helps youth develop and use and communicate those successes to our stakeholders,” he said.

 

Mains comes from a family with ties to extension. Both of his parents have served as 4-H leaders in Kenton County for decades and continue to do so. In fact, his first experience as a 9-year-old 4-H’er was in Captain Clovers, a club run by his mother, Cathy. As he progressed through the program, Mains was particularly active growing a variety of vegetables for 4-H horticulture projects and raising and showing rabbits.

 

In addition to 4-H, Mains is a product of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, earning three degrees from the college including a bachelor’s degree in agricultural biotechnology, a master’s degree in vocational education and a doctoral degree in family sciences.

 

Mains replaces Charlene Jacobs, who retired from the position.

               

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774

'UK at the Half' Features UK President Eli Capilouto

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 18:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) – University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto was featured during "UK at the Half" that aired during the UK vs. Southern Mississippi University basketball game, broadcast on radio Sept. 3.

 

He discussed the many elements of the UK campus transformation that has been taking place over the last few years.

 

"UK at the Half" airs during the halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast and is hosted by Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing.

 

To hear the Sept. 3 "UK at the Half," click on the play button below. To view a transcript of the show, click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Moving Forward Together: Increasing Accessibility to Resources and Funds

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 17:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) — Last November, African-American student representatives met with President Eli Capilouto, Provost Tim Tracy, Interim Vice President for Institutional Diversity Terry Allen and other administrators at Maxwell Place. The gathering was held to discuss the campus racial climate. The students presented their top five concerns with solutions that referenced the strategic plan.

 

The concerns presented are as follows:

1. Accessibility to resources and funds for organizations, scholarships, African-American programming, etc.

2. The Office for Institutional Diversity is not effectively structured or empowered.

3. Measurable benchmarks for diversity and accountability measures.

4. Lack of African-American professors and their retention on campus.

5. Class on race and ethnicity should be a graduation requirement for all students.

 

"The students provided a thoughtful and comprehensive list of recommendations that have been, and will continue to be, taken very seriously and acted upon. We must communicate these actions with transparency," said Interim Vice President for Institutional Diversity Terry Allen. "Our primary objective is equally valuing the contribution of every student and providing an inclusive environment that supports student success."

 

Through a series of UKNow stories, updates on the on-going work associated with each of the students' concerns will be communicated.

 

The first of the concerns being addressed is the accessibility to resources and funds for organizations, scholarships and African-American programming.

 

UK has increased investment in diversity scholarships at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

 

During the 2015-2016 academic year, 209 students were awarded the Provost Persistence Grant — a grant that assists undergraduate students who are experiencing financial challenges. Of the 209 students that received the grant, 115 (54 percent) were underrepresented minority students.

 

Additionally, scholarships for minority students have increased. The amount of the Parker Scholarship fund for undergraduate students has more than doubled from $7.5 million in the 2009-2010 academic year to $16 million in the 2016-2017 academic year. The amount of the Lyman T. Johnson Fellows Award fund for graduate students has increased from $926,000 in the 2011-2012 academic year to $1,064,900 in the 2015-2016 academic year.

 

As it relates to African-American student programming, Student and Academic Life and the Office for Institutional Diversity have taken the students' comments into consideration. Adjustments have been made to ensure any requests and needs are appropriately considered in a timely manner. Last semester, Underground Formal was reinstated by the Student Activities Board. The event took place on Feb. 19, and more than 400 students attended. As it relates to programming needs, $5,000 has been allocated to the Martin Luther King Center for programming. The 2016-2017 fiscal year budget will also retain a $10,000 annual increase to the Diversity Organizations Council programming budget.

 

Students were also concerned with access to campus facilities for programming. With the decommissioning of the Student Center, more demand has been put on existing facilities. Administrators across campus have been working diligently to identify appropriate venues for routine meeting and special events and off-campus facilities to the extent necessary.

 

In the Graduate School, new positions have been established as Health Colleges Student Diversity Services expanded its mission to include all graduate and professional students and changed its name to the Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives (CGPDI).

 

Allies for Diversity — a mentoring program for underrepresented minority graduate students — has been established. The Graduate School has compiled a list of faculty mentors that expressed interest in being involved in this initiative. Processes are underway to identify online resources that will provide guidance to faculty mentors on the mission, purpose and best practices for the program.

 

"These initiatives, and many more currently underway and yet to come, require the commitment and involvement of every member of the university community," Allen said. "It takes well-focused strategies and ongoing assessment to remedy disparities, to implement sustainable change over time. Much work remains."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Dig Into 'The Archive' of Louis Zoellar Bickett

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 16:08

 

Interview with artist Louis Zoellar Bickett by Creative Lexington.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) — Since 1972, artist Louis Zoellar Bickett has maintained a rigorous practice of collecting and cataloging items from his daily life to form a vast archive of found, gifted, purchased and made objects. As part of a citywide retrospective of the work of this celebrated Lexington-based artist, the University of Kentucky Art Museum is currently presenting the free public survey exhibition, "Louis Zoellar Bickett: Saving Myself," through Sunday, Nov. 27.

 

In "Saving Myself," the UK Art Museum brings together several specific projects that are part of what Bickett calls "The Archive," his vast and detailed accumulation of photographs, receipts, articles of clothing, books, toys, furniture and even bodily fluids. All have been preserved and placed throughout his home/studio.

 

The exhibition affords viewers a chance to examine some of the artist’s most consistent subjects — religion, sexuality, family, friendship and history — both personal and cultural. Soil collected from Civil War battlefields and notorious gravesites are sealed in glass jars. Portraits of the artist holding some of his favorite books or wearing his collection of hats show a hyper-aware performer channeling his inner Buster Keaton. Postcards obtained by Bickett at faraway locales are modified and mailed to himself at home, revealing his Dadaesque spirit. Annotated objects and haiku poems are seen throughout the galleries, attesting to his love of language and assessing the importance of experiences and objects. As the artist states, “Life is a meaningless series of events that lead to the grave. The charge of civilization is to live as if that was not true.”

 

UK Art Museum Director Stuart Horodner comments, "This is a thrilling moment in the history of visual art in the Commonwealth. Louis Bickett has been making rigorously conceptual and emotionally rich work in our midst for decades, and this is a unique opportunity for audiences to encounter the scope of his creative activities. I believe visitors to these exhibitions will come away understanding something profound about paying attention to one’s life with humor, generosity and grace.”

 

Next week, Horodner will present a Director Tour of "Saving Myself." As part of the tour, Horodner will discuss the exhibition and aspects of self-portraiture and archive strategies beginning 6:30 Friday, Sept. 16. The tour, like the exhibition, is free and open to the public. 

 

“Saving Myself” is part of a citywide focus on Bickett’s art taking place throughout the fall at several venues. The other free public Bickett exhibits and installations are as follows:  

· “What You Don’t Surrender the World Strips Away,” through April15, 2017, at 21c Museum Hotel;

· “Selections from the Art Collection,” Oct. 27-Nov. 26, at Institute 193;

· “All We Ever Wanted,” Oct. 28-Nov. 27, at Lexington Art League; and

· “The Kentucky Dirt Project: 120 Counties,” a permanent installation at the new Chandler Dining located in UK A.B. Chandler Hospital Pavilion A.

 

Bickett has exhibited in galleries and museums, including Institute 193 and the Lexington Art League in Lexington; the Speed Art Museum, Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville, and Zephyr Gallery in Louisville, Kentucky; and Galerie Eugen Lendl in Graz, Austria.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the UK Art Museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

The UK Art Museum, located in the Singletary Center for the Arts at Rose Street and Euclid Avenue, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. For more information on membership, contact Lyndi VanDeursen at 859-257-8164 or lyndi.vandeursen@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Presents Bounty of Community Art Classes for Fall

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 15:43

Students talk about a few of the many classes offered through the UK Fine Arts Institute. Videos courtesy of UK School of Art and Visual Studies.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) Are you interested in further developing your artistic skills and exploring your creativity? University of Kentucky Fine Arts Institute is offering classes and workshops this fall through the School of Art and Visual Studies that may fit the bill. These noncredit community education courses offer a wide array of class options to suit your creative side. The courses are designed to fit into the working schedules of most adults with courses taking place during the evenings and on weekends.

 

Classes are offered three times a year at the institute and vary from the more tratiditional drawing and painting to metalworking and an introductory Photoshop class. The institute's programs range from beginner to advanced levels. This fall, the institute is offering 16 courses including: 13 classes and three workshops. Classes meet once or twice a week for typically eight-10 weeks, and workshops may meet from one to six times. Locations for the courses include the School of Art and Visual Studies Building, Dancin’ Dogs Designs Studio, Metal Arts Building and the Farmers Market Fifth Third Bank Pavilion on West Main Street

 

The institute's fall 2016 classes are:

  • “Beginning Ceramics” with Jill Coldiron, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 22-Nov. 17;
  • “Taking Ceramics to the Next Level” with Coldiron, 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 20-Nov. 17;
  • “Explorations in Drawing” with Christine Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 12-Nov. 14;
  • “Figure Drawing for Advanced Students” with Thomas Baker, 6-9 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 12-Nov.14;
  • “Foundational Portrait Drawing” with Baker, 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 14-Nov. 16;
  • “Jewelry-Making for Beginners" with Dwayne Cobb, 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 13-Nov. 15;
  • “Metalworking” with Jeremy Colbert, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 15-Nov. 10;
  • “Learn to Paint. Yes, You Can!” with Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 13-Nov. 15;
  • “Layering It On: Mixed Media Painting Techniques” with Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 14-Nov. 16;
  • “A Fresh Approach to Improving Your Painting Skills” with Kuhn, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 15-Nov. 17;
  • “Printmaking Using Contemporary Woodcut Practices” with Sarah Brown, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 22-Oct. 27;
  • “Photoshop for Beginners” with Lennon Michalski, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 20-Nov. 17; and
  • Open Drawing Sessions with Anthony Roccanova and Brandon Smith, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays and/or 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays (throughout the fall session).

Due to its popularity, the “Woodworking” class led by Lynn Sweet is already full for the fall session. If you are interested in being put on a waiting list for this course, contact Jane Andrus at either Jane.andrus@uky.edu or 859-257-8151.

 

Individuals looking for more abbreviated experiences like one- or two-day workshops have multiple options to select from as well. The institute’s workshops include:

  • “One Day Digital Photography Workshops for Beginners” with Michalski, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, Sept. 10, Oct. 8 or Nov. 12;
  • “An Introduction to Architectural Photography and Walking Tour” with Rich Greissman, 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, (rain date: Oct. 2); and 
  • “Felting on the FeltLOOM Felting Machine” with Laverne Zabielski, 1-3 p.m. Saturdays, Oct. 1, 15 and/or 22, and/or Nov. 5, 12 and/or 19.

For more information on any of the Fine Arts Institute courses or to read more about specific instructors, class costs and other details, visit the institute online at http://finearts.uky.edu/art/FAI/.

 

The Fine Arts Institute is an outreach program at the UK School of Art and Visual Studies in the UK College of Fine Arts. It demonstrates all the resources and classrooms that the school has to offer through its noncredit art offerings. All courses and workshops are open to the public and are not restricted to students of the university.

 

Registration for UK Fine Arts Institute courses is available by visiting http://finearts.uky.edu/art/FAI/registration, by calling the institute at 859-257-8151, or by emailing Jane Andrus at jane.andrus@uky.edu

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Outstanding Staff Awards Ceremony Slated for October

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 13:55

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) — The sixth annual University of Kentucky Outstanding Staff Awards (OSA) ceremony will be held in October at the Woodford Reserve Club room in Commonwealth Stadium.

 

The Office of the President and the UK Staff Senate sponsor OSA to recognize the professional accomplishments of staff across the university and the work of their colleges and units. Individuals who have been designated as outstanding staff of the year in their respective areas will be honored by President Eli Capilouto, Staff Senate Chair Troy Martin and others. 

 

Registration is now open, and award sponsors may click here to register. The registration deadline is Sept. 23.  

 

Official invitations will be extended in the fall to honorees and other special guests. For questions regarding the OSA program, please contact Jon Gent, chair, at Jon.Gent@uky.edu, 859-323-6540 or Brittany Begley, vice chair, at BrittanyBegley@uky.edu, 859-257-9242.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

Confucius Institute Asks Community to Explore 'China in My Lens'

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 10:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2016) The University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) wants to get to know your China — the people, places and cultural aspects dear to you as part of it's 2016 "China in My Lens" photo contest. UK students and faculty as well as local high school students who have visited China are encouraged to enter.

 

Individuals are asked to submit original work taken in China by the participant. Each participant can submit two original photographs. Submissions should include a title and indicate where and when the photo was taken. Selected photos will be exhibited in the Headley-Whitney Museum from Nov.19 to Dec.18. To guarantee professional quality, all entries should ensure the photo pixel count is no lower than 300 dpi.

 

The contest will be divided into three groups: UK faculty, UK students and KY high school students. A review committee will select one first prize, two second prizes and three third prizes from each group. Individuals submitting designs to the Confucius Institute are authorizing UKCI and UK to make unlimited, unrestricted use of their design for promotional purposes. Awards will be announced and given in the first week of November. Prizes by division are as follows:

 

· Faculty Group - first prize: $800; second prize: $500; third prize: $300;

· UK Student Group - first prize: $500; second prize: $300; third prize: $150; and

· High School Student Group - first prize: $200; second prize: $100; third prize: $50.

 

Submit entries for "China in My Lens" to Zengxiang Yang at zya229@uky.edu by the submission deadline of Oct.10. 

 

A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, UKCI provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth. To keep up with UK Confucius Institute and future events, join the institute's listerv and follow them on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat (UKConfucius). 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Employee, Cancer Survivor Faces Second Birthday as an Inpatient

Tue, 09/06/2016 - 20:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 7, 2016) – On his 45th birthday, University of Kentucky employee Jimmy Thomas got some dire news. After weeks of feeling under the weather, Thomas was diagnosed with leukemia on Sept. 8 of last year.

 

“The news from my doctor telling me that I had leukemia was shocking and devastating,” Thomas said. “As many times as I’ve visited friends and family in Markey, I never thought in a million years that I myself would be a patient there.”

 

Thomas underwent several rounds of chemotherapy at the UK Markey Cancer Center. As the months passed, the prognosis looked good: his cancer appeared to be in remission. After being off of work for 11 months, he was finally cleared to return to his job.

 

But on Aug. 12, a mere few weeks after returning to UK, his routine bloodwork and a bone marrow biopsy showed that leukemia had come back. Thomas was readmitted on Aug. 22. This time, he’ll need a bone marrow transplant to beat the cancer if he can get back in remission. As an African-American — a population that only makes up roughly 7 percent of the bone marrow registry – Thomas knows that finding a bone marrow match will be difficult for him.

 

For the second year in a row, Thomas will spend his birthday as an inpatient at Markey. But to make the day as special as possible, his family came up with a plan: since Thomas cannot leave the hospital, they’re bringing the party to him.

 

On Sept. 8 at 6 p.m., Thomas’s friends, family, UK coworkers and others will gather at the Markey courtyard to sing “Happy Birthday” to Thomas as he sits on the balcony of the inpatient floor. Attendees have been asked to wear orange, bring orange balloons or carry orange signs in honor of National Leukemia Awareness Month in September.

 

Immediately following the serenade, Thomas’s family, along with a representative from Be The Match, will be in the Combs Atrium with a supply of bone marrow registry kits from the Be the Match registry. Testing only requires a sample of cells, taken with cotton swab on the inside of the cheek. The kits will be mailed back to Be the Match and added to the registry.

 

Joining the registry is not a guarantee that you will be asked to donate – some people are never called; others may be called multiple times as a potential donor. Additionally, medical research shows that younger donors are best for patients and provide the greatest chance for transplant success. Because of this, doctors request donors in the 18 to 44 age group more than 95 percent of the time and the cost for this age group to sign up on the registry is free. Potential donors age 45 and older can participate but must enroll online and are required to make a $100 payment to cover the cost to join the registry. Potential donors over the age 44 are also able to join the registry through another donor site, DKMS, for a slightly lower fee of $60.

 

Though there’s no guarantee that any participants in their bone marrow registry drive will be a match for Thomas, he hopes the event will at least help raise awareness about bone marrow donation and the need for minority donors. While he says that dealing with the disease itself and side effects from chemotherapy are hard, knowing that he might face difficulty finding a bone marrow match is even harder.

 

“I guess the hardest part of it all is knowing that my best chance of survival is a bone marrow transplant and knowing that there’s such­­ a low percentage of finding a possible match because I’m African-American,” Thomas said. “I encourage, plead, and beg not only African-Americans, but everyone to sign up on the National Bone Marrow Donor registry. There still might not be a match out there for me after people sign up, but at least it will give someone else a better chance for a life-saving match.”

 

Visitors are welcome to attend both Thomas’s birthday serenade in the Markey courtyard and the ensuing bone marrow registry drive at 6 p.m. Thursday evening. Public parking is available in the UK HealthCare garage on the corner of South Limestone and Transcript Avenue.

 

If you are interested in joining the Be the Match registry but are unable to attend the drive, visit Be the Match for information on requesting your own testing kit.   

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

Pages