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A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 19, 1912

Mon, 04/18/2016 - 13:00

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 19, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 201st diary entry from April 19, 1912, reminisces on time spent with friends.

 

Apr. 19th. Phyllis and I go over to meet Lillian, but we miss her, and she misses us.  When we get back I carry Mary Dennison's little nephew to the third floor. Just as we're starting back to meet the five o'clock car, Lillian comes up. We go over to see Addie.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Student Brigades Serve Ecuador and India with Shoulder to Shoulder Global

Mon, 04/18/2016 - 10:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 19, 2016)  Shoulder to Shoulder Global (STSG) led 52 University of Kentucky students, faculty, staff and community members in two multidisciplinary health brigade experiences to Santo Domingo, Ecuador and Mayasandra, India, during March 2016.

 

STSG is a UK organization that incorporates academic and community partners and seeks to improve the health and well-being of impoverished and underserved communities, while offering the opportunity to work in a multicultural and interdisciplinary setting.

 

The Ecuador brigade, which visited during UK’s spring break, was the culmination of months of preparation that included the credit-bearing course, "Interprofessional Teamwork in Global Health." Throughout the course, students learned about Ecuador, how to work in an interprofessional environment and how to apply basic principles of cultural anthropology, sociology, diversity and health care to the brigade experience.

 

Thirty-five STSG brigade participants visited UK’s Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. The clinic opened in 2007 and provides medical care, prevention services, oral health, and school-based services in the community. The CSHH operates year-round and employs a local staff, including a physician, a nurse, a dentist and support personnel who work as a team to improve the health of patients and the community.

 

"The Shoulder to Shoulder brigade trip to Ecuador was one of the most enriching experiences of my life,” said Rachel Stone, a first-year undergraduate studies student on the pre-pharmacy track. “Not only did it facilitate both personal and professional growth, but it also gave me the opportunity to develop a new perspective on global citizenship.”

 

Also during UK’s spring break, 17 STSG brigade participants visited the 5,000 inhabitant agrarian village of Mayasandra, in the Indian state of Karnataka. The interdisciplinary team from STSG visits every year to provide assessment and treatment recommendations for children with special health care needs and a wide range of disabilities.

 

­"The India brigade is a unique collaboration of special education professionals, physicians, and physical therapists gathered together to improve daily functional tasks of disabled children through assessments and treatment sessions,” said UK physical therapist Elizabeth Siereveld. “All professionals are working together to develop treatment plans, disability evaluations and appropriate care plans for each individual child and their families."

 

Amy Spriggs, assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling, has traveled three times to Southern India to conduct interdisciplinary assessments in the village of Mayasandra.

 

“This year’s trip was very eye opening,” Spriggs said. “The team was able to see many of the same children we saw last year. The improvements were amazing. The team was able to work with parents and teachers on simple techniques to enhance the learning of the children living in the village.”

 

During the brigades, participants worked directly with patients and community members, providing care in areas such as medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, communication disorders and public health. The health brigades are a great opportunity to apply what students learn in the classroom into practice, while serving others.

 

“I think that so often we go on these trips hoping to make an impact on the people and place that we’ve been, but for me, this trip gave me a lot more than I contributed,” said second-year medical student Sarah Czack. “Seeing the way that professionals can come together to meet the needs of a child and family is something anyone in my field would benefit from.”

 

In addition, the STSG Student Association donated laptops, books, notepads, pens, pencils, toothpastes, toothbrushes, disinfectants and a battery backup for the clinic in Ecuador.

  

The next STSG brigades to Ecuador are May 13-22, June 3-12, and Aug. 5-14. The June brigade is focused on health education while May and August are more clinically-focused. Nurses, providers, pharmacists and interpreters are encouraged to apply. Application information and a short video about the program are available at the STSG website.

 

Media Contact:  Kristi Lopez at 859-323-6363 or kristi.lopez@uky.edu 

'Hidden Wonders' Exhibit Gives Dementia Patients Art Outlet

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 15:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016) — "Hidden Wonders: Artworks from the Visual Arts Study" gives art patrons a chance to see how the visual arts can benefit patients of dementia with a new exhibition of work by participants in a University of Kentucky study. The exhibit, running through April 21, on the second floor of UK's new Art and Visual Studies Building, is free and open to the public.

 

Dementia is a decline of cognitive health that interferes with everyday life. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most recognizable form of dementia, but many other conditions can also affect cognitive health. There is no cure for AD, and almost all patients with dementia eventually require constant care from a caregiver or loved one. In 2015, there were 5.3 million Americans suffering from this devastating disease.

 

Beginning this past February, Ann Christianson-Tietyen and Allan Richards, researchers and art education faculty at UK School of Art and Visual Studies, have been looking at how the visual arts can have a positive effect on patients who suffer from mild to moderate dementia. The study also includes patient caregivers.

 

In the creation of art, multiple aspects of learning take place and multiple domains related to learning are engaged, including focus and concentration, problem-solving skills, tolerance to ambiguity, image and concept formation, imagination, and visual-spatial thinking. In addition, feelings and emotional sensitivities are involved in producing a work of art, as well as important motor skills like hand-eye coordination.

  

By having study participants create art — painting, ceramics and collage — the researchers hope to enhance problem solving skills, focus/concentration and hand-eye coordination for patients. They also hope to see an improvement in mood and in overall thinking, which would contribute significantly to quality of life.

 

The UK study was made possible through a grant from the U.S. Alzheimer's Disease Centers. The grant funded the implementation of an eight-week program for groups of 12 (six individuals with dementia and their partner caregivers) to participate in different types of visual arts activities, such as painting, sculpture or watching slideshow movies.

 

Christianson-Tietyen and Richards will present a second program in the fall starting Sept. 10, 2016. Those who are interested may contact Allan Richards at 859-361-1483 or Ann Christianson-Tietyen at 859-312-4553.

 

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studio, art history and visual studies and art education.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK College of Engineering to Make Announcement

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 15:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Engineering will make an announcement this afternoon at 2 p.m. on the verandah of the Center for Robotics and Manufacturing Building. Check back here for the full story after 2 p.m. today.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

DOE Grant Supports Continued UK Research, Outreach

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 13:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016) — The U.S. Department of Energy recently awarded a grant to the University of Kentucky to develop publicly available information related to the environmental cleanup of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site in Western Kentucky.

 

The five-year, $2.5 million grant will also continue public outreach initiated under a previous DOE grant, including informing stakeholders on cleanup activities and future use of the DOE site. This work involves UK’s Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and the Environment (KRCEE).

 

Rodney Andrews, director of UK’s Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), says the funding allows CAER to continue partnering with UK’s College of Design to envision potential cleanup strategies for the Paducah Site.

 

Read more about the UK College of Design, CAER and KRCEE's work with the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site. 

 

“This new DOE grant to support KRCEE is a great example of how CAER is working to improve education, research and outreach in Paducah,” Andrews said.

 

The grant will support educational outreach programs, including work with students at high schools, who prepare student summaries of DOE’s Annual Environmental Reports for the Paducah site to communicate complex cleanup information to the public.

 

“The Department of Energy values this university partnership that provides important research and outreach supporting the cleanup of our gaseous diffusion plants,” said Robert Edwards, acting manager of DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office. “This institution of higher learning plays an important role in helping DOE and the community address challenges and identify opportunities associated with these historic sites."

 

A recent addition to the KRCEE program, which is continued under the recently awarded grant, is the Virtual Symposium, a portal featuring presentations covering recent activities completed by both UK and Ohio University, which received a similar grant related to the cleanup of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

UK MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

The Arboretum to Celebrate Arbor Day April 30

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 12:37

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 18, 2016) — The number 25 is special this year. Not only does 2016 mark Lexington’s 25th year to celebrate Arbor Day, but it is also the 25th anniversary of the founding of The Arboretum, State Botanical Garden of Kentucky , which is located along the southern edge of the University of Kentucky campus, and is adminstered through the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

 

With generous support from presenting sponsor, Kentucky Utilities (KU) Company, the culminating event of The Arboretum’s annual month-long celebration, "Party for the Planet," will kick off at 10 a.m., April 30, in the Pennyrile region of the Walk Across Kentucky with a proclamation by 4th District Councilwoman Susan Lamb and Tree Campus and Tree City USA presentations. The Glendover Elementary School Chorus will perform, and there will be an official tree planting ceremony.

 

As in the past, many kinds of native trees will be given away while they last. At the University of Kentucky Department of Agricultural Economics table, visitors will be able to participate in a monarch butterfly survey. For each completed survey, the UK Department of Horticulture will provide a milkweed plant to The Arboretum. The plant is crucial to monarch survival in this region, as the butterflies feed exclusively off milkweed leaves.

 

The event will last until 2 p.m. and will include free admission to KU Day in the Kentucky Children’s Garden.

 

The Arbor Day event brings together experts on a wide range of subjects, including energy, the environment, invasive species, urban forestry, gardening, wild birds, butterflies and bees. Exhibitors from organizations and interests such as America in Bloom, Lexington Tree Foundation and Wild Ones will have information and knowledge to share with visitors. Children’s activities will be offered in the Kentucky Children’s Garden, including Leaf Magic, presented by the UK Department of Forestry.

 

“There will be an abundance of information that our guests can use in their home landscapes, as well as adding to their knowledge of Kentucky’s natural areas,” said Molly Davis, director of The Arboretum, part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

 

Other Arbor Day at The Arboretum supporters include sponsors Kentucky American Water Company; Lexmark International; Dave Leonard Tree Specialists; Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee; Lexington-Fayette County Environmental Commission; Lexington Tree Board; Braley Design; Community Tree Care Inc.; and partners Ian Hoffman, Big Beaver Tree Service and Keep Lexington Beautiful Commission.

 

In case of rain, the opening proclamation will move inside the Dorotha Smith Oatts Visitor Center.

 

The Arboretum began in 1991 as a joint effort between the University of Kentucky and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. It is located on the UK campus at 500 Alumni Drive and offers 100 acres of native plant collections representing the seven geographic regions of Kentucky, horticultural display gardens, trails, water features, native trees, the Kentucky Children’s Garden and seasonal events. For more information about the Arbor Day celebration, visit The Arboretum website, http://arboretum.ca.uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324

Phi Beta Kappa Inducts Largest Class in 10 Years

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 12:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 19, 2016) — The University of Kentucky chapter of Phi Beta Kappa (PBK) held its annual ceremony last Wednesday, inducting 59 students into the nation's oldest and most widely known academic honor society. This 90th class represents the largest number to be inducted into UK’s PBK Alpha Chapter in the last 10 years.

 

“This membership represents a rainbow of colors, careers and specialties, religions, political ideologies, and realms of knowledge and learning,” said Ernie Yanarella, chapter president and professor of political science in the UK College of Arts and Sciences.

 

In his remarks to the PBK candidates, Yanarella told them that they were joining six presidents who were elected to the society, 11 presidents who became honorary members, Eleanor Roosevelt, numerous writers (including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain and Susan Sontag), inventor Eli Whitney, educator Booker T. Washington, chief justices John Marshall and William Rehnquist, as well as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, feminist Betty Friedan and singer Paul Robeson. 

 

Michael Tick, dean of the UK College of Fine Arts, delivered a keynote address on the arts and campus life.

 

"I was humbled by the invitation to address an extraordinary group of students inducted in Phi Beta Kappa," Tick said. "My remarks, 'Arts On Campus: Central to Academic Life' focused on three areas: arts education as an integral part of all students’ lives, arts and economic prosperity, and arts and healing. Since PBK is the most prestigious honor society for undergraduates, I am quite certain that these remarkable students will one day sit on the boards of directors of the nation’s most venerable arts institutions, be among a handful of our major philanthropists, and influence policy makers."

 

The 2016 inductees include:

  • Tessa Louise Adkins
  • Kelsey Alexandra Allmon
  • Richard Joseph Ariel
  • Shiza Arshad
  • Hannah Lynn Bingham
  • David Hunter Blanton
  • Rex Bray, III
  • Jakob Burnham
  • Robert Cass
  • James Patrick Collard, Sr.
  • William Cox
  • Chad Davidson
  • Jill Anne Goettel
  • Vincent Gouge
  • Olivia Grothaus
  • Dorian Hairston
  • Charles Conyers Harpole
  • Christopher Stephen Hayden
  • Karl W. Hempel
  • Kaylee Robin Hicks
  • Kayla Hicks
  • Charly Alisa Hyden
  • Taylor Johnston
  • Zachary Joseph Kenton Jones
  • Alexander Francis Krupp
  • Hannah Lou Latta
  • Ethan Griffith Long
  • Jamie Teresa Love
  • Sally Beth Maddox
  • Malinda Massey
  • Jesse Steven Matherly
  • David Mathews
  • Wendell Lehr Maupin
  • Taylor Renee Moody
  • Caitlin Elizabeth Neuhaus
  • Matthew James Nolan
  • Claire Katheryn Oldfather
  • Alexander John Parmley
  • Emily Susan Payne
  • Nicholas Joseph Per
  • Kari Ann Popplewell
  • Anna Roe
  • William Lee Sanders, IV
  • Ann Bruner Scott
  • Natalie May Shofner
  • Landon C. Simpson
  • Sarah Nicole Smith
  • Christian David Soares
  • Austin Finley Sprinkles
  • Maxwell Costa Tague
  • Courtney VanWay
  • Victoria Votaw
  • Hasanki Madara Warnakula
  • Sarah Nicole Warren
  • Adrian Susanna Weldon
  • Logan West
  • Ratna  Setyaning  Widayanti
  • Kalin Leanna Wilson
  • Walker Ernest Yanarella

Phi Beta Kappa elects more than 15,000 new members a year from 270 chapters across the United States. There are also more than 50 associations that foster friendship and learning in their members' communities and provide a means for members to continue their active affiliation with the society after graduation.

 

UK's Phi Beta Kappa chapter is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, which is part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education at UK.

 

 UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK MBA Announces New Prerequisite Option

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 12:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016) — The Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky is making it easier for regional businesspeople to pursue an MBA with a new, more convenient online prerequisite option. Prospective students interested in both the One Year Accelerated MBA and Professional Evening MBA programs can now fulfill their prerequisites through IVY Software, an interactive online educational software that helps prospective business candidates obtain the required foundational knowledge to prepare for an MBA program.

Students can conveniently access IVY online and complete the coursework at their own pace. Each of the required UK MBA prerequisites is just $60 per course.

In addition, IVY is used by many other AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) accredited schools, and is a proven provider in helping business candidates obtain the basic fundamentals to enter into MBA graduate programs.

 

“We are pleased to introduce IVY as an additional option for our students to satisfy the required MBA prerequisites,” said Harvie Wilkinson, UK’s MBA program director. “Students can obtain the fundamental principles in economics and accounting at their own pace and through the flexibility of online learning.”

 

The One Year Accelerated MBA and Professional Evening MBA programs currently require four prerequisites: "Micro/Macro economics," "Financial Accounting" and "Managerial Accounting." Students can easily purchase the required courses that they need from the University of Kentucky’s E-commerce site on IVY.

In addition to taking the required economic and accounting courses for the UK MBA, students can also purchase optional courses through IVY in "Business Math & Statistics" and "Excel for MBA Students." “We want our prospective candidates, regardless of their academic or professional background, to be fully prepared to enter our MBA programs,” Wilkinson said.

 

Students may also continue to fulfill UK MBA prerequisite requirements through college coursework. More information on prerequisites for the MBA Program is available online. 

 

The UK MBA program is still accepting applications for both the One Year Accelerated and Professional Evening MBA programs. For more information on how to apply and admissions requirements, please contact Christopher Carney, director of MBA Recruitment at christopher.carney@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Ann Mary Quarandillo, annmary.q@uky.edu, 859-257-0750.

UK Student Awarded Phi Kappa Phi Study Abroad Grant

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 11:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016)University of Kentucky junior Savanah Sellars of Lexington, recently was awarded a Study Abroad Grant worth $1,000 from the honor society of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Sellars is one of 25 students nationwide to receive the award.

 

Currently a junior majoring in integrated strategic communication, within the College of Communication and Information, Sellars will use the grant to study abroad in London, England, over the summer. She will be working at Rosa UK (United Kingdom), a charitable fund that supports initiatives that benefit women and girls, as a communications intern. Her duties are expected to include event planning and marketing, writing press releases and blogs, website management and more.

 

"I am so thrilled to have the opportunity to work at an organization that empowers women," Sellars said. "Rosa UK has fewer than 10 employees, so I hope to be busy and 'all in' from day one. This is my first study abroad experience, and the support provided by the UK Education Abroad Office has been excellent. I’m exceptionally grateful for the financial assistance provided by Phi Kappa Phi and other organizations.”

 

Sellars, who attended high school in Yorkville, Illinois, said she chose to attend UK because of the high caliber Detachment 290, Air Force ROTC program and the wonderful support UK provides ROTC cadets.  

 

"After one visit to this beautiful campus, I was sold on becoming a Wildcat," she added.

 

Students interested in learning more about the UK Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi are invited to attend the organization's Spring 2016 General Membership meeting 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20, in room 203 at The 90. Please RSVP to Lynn Hiler at clynnhiler@uky.edu by Tuesday afternoon, April 19. Light refreshments will be served.

 

Phi Kappa Phi is supported by the Chellgren Center which is part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education at UK.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Jacob Smith, Jacob.Smith4@uky.edu, 859-361-2318; Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200.

Library Science Grad Student Selected for Alaska State Library Internship Project

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 10:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2016) — Library science graduate student William Henley, in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information's School of Information Science, has been selected as one of three interns to work on the Alaska State Library Internship Project in summer 2016.

 

The goal of this project will be to provide assistance to public libraries in Alaska who lack staff expertise to sustain long-term projects that would benefit their libraries and communities. The interns selected will be provided with housing, travel and a weekly stipend while they are working on projects for the local public library system.

 

Henley will be hosted by the Homer Public Library in Homer, Alaska. He will convert a collection of 2,200 books to subject-based classification as part of the "Alaska Books for Alaska Kids" project. The project's goal is "compiling an up-to-date, accessible and useful bibliography of accurate, culturally relevant, recommended books for youth about Alaska and the North."

 

"Since all of my experience is with literature for teenagers, I'm excited to get to dig into a collection of picture books and learn more about literature for the youngest readers," Henley said. "As a teacher, I strived to provide multicultural literature for my students, so they all had the opportunity to see aspects of their own identity represented in the books they read.  I want to continue to do this as a librarian, so helping to create a bibliography of culturally relevant texts for children about Alaska, Native Americans and the North in general will allow me the chance to hone this skill even more."

 

The School Librarian Program track is one of the most popular in the Library Science master’s program and offers licensed teachers the opportunity to earn their Master of Science in Library Science degree concurrently with school library media certification.

 

Maria Cahill, who advises students in the School Librarian Program, received the news of Henley’s internship with enthusiasm. 

 

“I love to see good things come to great students!” she told school representatives.

 

Henley begins his internship June 13, 2016.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Physician Assistant Students Learn in Swaziland

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 10:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) – The Community Faculty Program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine hosted its 22nd Annual Community Faculty Conference for community faculty, campus faculty colleagues, administration, professional staff and regional Area Health Education Center (AHEC) staff April 8-9. But some people may be surprised by the distance some community faculty travel for the conference and the chance to meet their UK colleagues in person.

 

 

Dr. Pawelos Beshah from Swaziland, a small landlocked African nation, attends the conference each year. Beshah serves as a preceptor in the physician assistant program and volunteers to provide medical education to students from the College of Health Science who travel to the his homeland, providing a unique experience for these students.

 

In January 2016, six UK students spent several weeks being trained at Releigh Fitkin Memnia, Beshah's home hospital. Students who are passionate, skilled and knowledgeable get hands-on experience and some may be allowed to see patients on their own and take on some of the workload. Though Beshah works in the pediatric department, he gives students the chance to explore other specialties, including emergency medicine, where they experience a variety of health issues caused by accidents and traumas. Students also spend time in the operating room (OR) gallery, watching surgeries and occasionally assisting surgeons. Students get experience in an inpatient and outpatient setting.

 

Students who travel to Swaziland to complete their rotation, have an opportunity to work with patients with unique needs and illnesses. As of 2012, Swaziland had the highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the world, with 25.8 percent of the population diagnosed with the disease. This population is affected by unique complications and HIV-related conditions that many medical students don't experience in the U.S. In addition to health disparities that provide unique patients, students also experience a culture very different than their own. The population of Swaziland is overwhelmingly Christian, however, there is a different family structure, many people in the state practice polygamy. Doctors must navigate any family turmoil created by this arrangement.

 

Beshah says he appreciates having the opportunity to contribute to the United States by helping train new doctors. He also believes he gets just as much out of volunteering his time as the students. "When you teach, you learn twice," he said. For the past 10 years Beshah has had the opportunity to learn many skills twice and has helped train about two dozen UK students.  

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

Travel to Wonderland with UK Theatre

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 20:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016)University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance is transporting audiences down the rabbit hole to Wonderland in an interactive and immersive production of Lewis Carroll's “Alice in Wonderland.” Be part of this mad show running through April 24, at Guignol Theatre.

 

One hundred fifty years after Carroll released his classic children's novel, UK Theatre is giving audiences a chance to travel to Wonderland, where nothing is quite as it seems. Alice’s whimsical adventure through this mad world finds her in mind-bending debates with an enigmatic Cheshire Cat, a dubious caterpillar and tea party companion, the March Hare. The cards are stacked against her when Alice finds herself face-to-face with the maleficent Queen of Hearts, a royal with a taste for beheading.

 

"Only getting into this production, do I realize now how maniacal and fanatic people are about the books and about their literal worship of Lewis Carroll. It's really fun to kind of take that ride with these fans of Lewis Carroll at this moment in time," said Nancy Jones, director of the UK Theatre production and chair of the department.

 

But who are you? That’s the puzzle. UK Theatre's production offers a new twist by seating its audience in a circus-like tent where the action is taking place all around them. The smaller, intimate and mad production, created by scenic designer and UK theatre alumnus Tom Burch, aims for viewers to feel like they, too, are part of this timeless adventure.

 

"Nobody has seen anything like this in the Guignol before," Jones said. "I think it is going to be really, really wild and surprising.

 

From the stage to even the lobby, where audience members can play games before the show, Burch has found several new ways to make the classic literary work interactive and pertinent to today's society.

 

"We're taking what we already know about the story and sort of stripping it away," Burch said. "We're leaving the stuff that we know that we love — the  croquet game, the mad tea party — and then finding contemporary and new ways to think about not only the story, but also to let the students bring their abilities and physicalities to the play."

 

Burch, whose work has been seen on stages in Louisville, Chicago, New York City and even Edinburgh, Scotland, is excited to bring his talents back to his alma mater. "It's been awesome to come home. My very first show I ever designed was in the Briggs (Theatre). The following year, I did a show in this space (Guignol), and the year before I actually met my wife right here (on Guignol' stage)."

 

And, the scenic designer is emjoying what he sees at UK. "It's awesome to see how much the department has evolved and that they are willing and excited to do different and exciting things. To see how not only the bar has been raised at such a great level by the people that came in after my group, but also the students are incredibly engaged."

 

Helping Burch and Jones bring "Alice in Wonderland" to life is a tremendous cast of students and local children. Students featured in this production and their roles are: Isaiah Archie, Cook; Treyton Blackburn, King of Hearts and Humpty Dumpty; Shaofei Chen, White Rabbit; Navji Dixon, Caterpillar 3; Tamia Fair, the Cheshire Cat; Kenny Hamilton, Tweedledum; Curtis Lipsey, Tweedledee; Taha Mandviwala, Mad Hatter; Beau McGhee, March Hare; Katie Noble, Red Queen; Joshua Randal Price, Duchess; Kelsey Reese, Dormouse; Colson Rich, Lewis Carroll; Casey Shuler, Caterpillar 1; Alexis Slocum, Alice; and Myranda Thomas, Caterpillar 2 and White Queen. Four local girls help guide the production, they are Maddi Rose Carter, Mackenzie Miller, Kya Paley and Abigayle Stokes. The show's ensemble also includes Nicolas Acosta, Macreena Groody and Ethan Maguet.

 

This production of "Alice in Wonderland" is a dark look through the rabbit hole, and may not be suitable for all audiences. It is recommended that children interested in attending be ages 8 and up.

 

Tickets for “Alice in Wonderland” are going fast with the first weekend of performances already sold out. Seats are currently still available for showings beginning 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, April 21-23, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 24. Tickets are $15 for the general public and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. A processing fee will be added upon completion of transaction. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Forestry Professor Wins Senior Research Award

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 17:01

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 15, 2016) — At its recent annual meeting in Concord, North Carolina, the Association of Southeastern Biologists awarded the Senior Research Award to the University of Kentucky’s Steven J. Price for outstanding research.

 

Price is an assistant professor of stream and riparian ecology in the Department of Forestry, part of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. He won the award for research that examined the impacts of mountaintop removal mining on stream salamander populations. The Journal of Applied Ecology recently published his paper, which was co-authored by Breneé Muncy, Simon Bonner, Andrea Drayer and Christopher Barton.

 

“Salamanders are the most abundant vertebrates in headwater streams,” Price said. “They play very important roles in these ecosystems.”

 

Price’s lab in the Department of Forestry focuses on the population ecology and conservation of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals, primarily reptiles and amphibians, groups that are experiencing record declines in their populations.

 

“We are proud of Steve for all of the accomplishments he’s had since he’s been here. He’s been extremely productive, not only in a research sense, but engaging the public around the state,” said Terrell Baker, Department of Forestry chair. “This is just another recognition of how important he is to the department and to the research community.”

 

Price has been a member of the Association of Southeastern Biologists (ASB) for about 14 years. As a requirement for receiving the singular honor, his paper had to have been published and he had to present his research at this year’s meeting.

 

“It’s an excellent organization, especially for students,” he said, noting that he brought two of his students to the meeting to present some of their own research. “I was pleased to get the award, as many of my mentors serve in ASB. It was a pretty nice treat to end the meeting.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324

High Street, Lexington Avenue Lots Temporarily Impacted for Stormwater Project

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 16:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — Beginning Monday, April 18, and continuing through Friday, April 22, a portion of the High Street E Lot and the entire adjacent gravel area near Lexington Avenue will be unavailable. The High Street Lot impact involves approximately 17 of the lot’s 81 spaces. During this time, access via Lexington Avenue will be unavailable.

 

This temporary impact is to facilitate remediation of the area and implement stormwater discharge controls. The project is expected to be complete by Friday, April 22; however, this timetable is weather-dependent.

 

Members of the university community with valid E permits who normally park their vehicles in these lots may park in other E lots on campus. E lots in the vicinity include the Warren Court Lot, the Coliseum Lot, the College View Lot and the South Limestone Garage (PS #5). Go to www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_parking-maps to view a campus parking map.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to:uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Baptist Health Joins UK HealthCare Organ Failure and Transplant Network

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 16:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016)  ̶  The Baptist Health system recently became a member of the University of Kentucky Organ Failure and Transplant Network (OFTN), a new UK HealthCare initiative focused on providing patients in organ failure with access to state-of-the-art care, including organ transplantation.

 

The OFTN will comprise systems, hospitals and independent physician practices across Kentucky and beyond. Its aim is to optimize the care of patients with advanced kidney, lung, liver and heart failure by providing seamless continuity of care from initial diagnosis through organ transplantation.

 

“The genesis of the Organ Failure & Transplant Network arose out of our realization that the existing model was not serving patients or the overall health care system well. Often, patients reached us too late, or not all, and missed the full benefit of services we offer," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “By building a network, we have a structure in place to support local providers in their efforts to manage patients with a very complex set of problems. Many of them will remain in the care of their local Baptist Health provider longer, close to home and family, with a little more support from us and open lines of communication.”

 

Under the OFTN umbrella, UK HealthCare and Baptist Health can offer a continuum of clinical expertise that will enhance the coordination and quality of care for Baptist Health patients who have reached advanced organ failure. Given Baptist Health’s statewide coverage, its addition to the network greatly extends care to Kentuckians in organ failure.

 

“Our practitioners want to stay informed and would rather send Baptist patients to a center where we have already been in communication, have been involved, and know what to expect when the patient returns to our care. We are also in a better position to prepare the patient for what lies ahead," said Steve Hanson, Baptist Health CEO. “This formal affiliation allows us to work more closely with UK toward the goal of providing the best organ failure and transplant care for patients.”

 

The UK Transplant Center has experienced unprecedented growth during the last five years as the program has grown to meet the state’s needs for end-stage organ failure management, including organ transplantation. Referrals are received throughout the state and region. Heart transplants set an all-time record in 2015, and abdominal transplant referrals have increased 164 percent to more than 1,400 since 2005.

 

As UK specialists have begun seeing increasing numbers of patients in end-stage organ failure, the need to collaborate with referring physicians around the care of the patient has grown.

 

“Internally, we are placing a stronger emphasis on multidisciplinary care of these patients,” said Dr. Roberto Gedaly, director of the UK Transplant Center. “We are working toward a seamless continuum of care so that those who present in our specialty clinics in organ failure receive the best evidence-based care management. If transplant becomes indicated, we can anticipate it and plan for that transition in the care plan.”

 

By working together and developing new models of “shared care,” patients of providers belonging to OFTN can receive care close to home as long as possible while maintaining access to advanced medicine offered at UK HealthCare. Many of UK’s resources and capabilities are not available elsewhere in the state, such as the bridge-to-transplant options available in the UK Gill Heart Institute’s Heart Failure Program.

 

Kentucky faces some of the highest rates of organ failure and mortality in the nation. With nearly 1,000 Kentuckians waiting for an organ transplant because of organ failure, the affiliation may also put more power behind raising awareness around the importance of organ donation.

 

As a member of the OFTN, Baptist Health also gains access to clinical education and training; affiliate administration and network support; and community outreach and education. OFTN members will choose the network-provided services that meet the unique needs of each.

 

Already, some Baptist Health providers have chosen to participate in mini fellowship programs and to shadow UK physicians to learn more about issues surrounding the patients they refer.

 

The Organ Failure and Transplant Network is an outgrowth of longstanding relationships UK has forged with Norton Healthcare and Nephrology Associates of Kentuckiana in Louisville and Western Kentucky Kidney Specialists in Paducah to provide state-of-the-art care for patients in heart, lung, liver, and kidney failure who require higher level care, including organ transplantation.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Kristi Lopez, kristi.lopez@uky.edu

 

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Looks at Undergraduate Research

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 16:30
LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. This week, guest host Alan Lytle, WUKY news director, talks with Diane Snow, director of Undergraduate Research at UK. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-undergraduate-research-states-flagship-school.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

International Student Receives Scholarship for Cross-Cultural Understanding

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 16:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — Business management and equine science student Tiffany Molina was awarded the University of Kentucky 2016 Viji Jeganathan Scholarship for Cross-Cultural Understanding for her dedication to promoting cultural diversity and inclusivity through her involvement at UK.

 

As president of the International Student Council and member of the International Student Leadership Team, Molina has devoted herself to fostering cross-cultural understanding across campus. She has organized and executed campuswide events such as Global Paw Prints, a celebration of UK’s diverse cultures, as well as the upcoming Kentucky Derby Fest, introducing international students to one of the most famous Kentucky traditions.

 

“Tiffany’s passion for bringing students from around the world together to celebrate our diversity has made a significant impact on the UK community,” said Karen Slaymaker, assistant director for International Student and Scholar Services.

 

Not only has she encouraged cross-cultural involvement, Molina has also courageously spoken up against incidents of discrimination and bias on campus, drawing attention to ways we can better understand each other as a diverse community.

 

“UK is striving to become more inclusive, and I believe that I've been a part of that change even if it's in a small way,” Molina said. “ Receiving this scholarship means a lot to me, because I know it is awarded to students who make a great impact on the growth of cultural diversity.”

 

The Viji Jeganathan Scholarship recognizes a student who demonstrates leadership on campus and a strong ability to bridge cultural differences at UK and within the Lexington community.

 

The scholarship is awarded annually in memory of Viji Jeganathan, an outstanding student from Sri Lanka who lost her battle to cancer while attending UK. When she was diagnosed, UK rallied around her raising funds for a transplant. Though she was unable to receive the transplant, her family wanted to honor her memory by setting up this scholarship fund with money raised by the community here at UK.

 

For more information about international student scholarships, please visit www.uky.edu/international/Scholarships.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

KSBDC to Host Statewide Google Event on May 4

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 15:57

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 15, 2016) — In honor of National Small Business Week, May 1-7, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center (KSBDC) network is partnering with Google to host a statewide event, "Get Found on Google Search and Maps," on Wednesday, May 4. The event will help businesses claim their local listing and introduces Google My Business, a free tool that allows businesses to manage their information across Google.

 

“Research shows that 97 percent of consumers search the web to find local goods and services, but only 37 percent of businesses have claimed a local business listing on a search engine,” said Becky Naugle, director of KSBDC. “This event provides an opportunity for businesses to create a public identity and presence on Google.”

 

In today’s technological world, having a consistent and accessible online presence is a necessity.

 

“Google My Business is a fast and easy way for businesses to manage their online presence with Google,” said Shawn Rogers, KSBDC program manager.

 

This statewide event will take place at 11 sites. For additional information please contact the KSBDC office most convenient to you.

 

Event locations:

· Bluegrass SBDC in Lexington, 859-257-7666

· Eastern Kentucky University SBDC in Richmond, 859-622-1384

· Elizabethtown SBDC, 270-765-6737

· Louisville SBDC, 502-625-0123

· Morehead State University SBDC, 606-783-2895

· Murray State University SBDC, 270-809-2856

· Northern Kentucky University SBDC in Highland Heights, 859-448-8801

· Owensboro SBDC, 270-926-8085

· Pikeville SBDC, 606-432-5848

· Southeast SBDC in Middlesboro, 606-248-0563

· Western Kentucky University SBDC in Bowling Green, 270-745-1905

 

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, www.ksbdc.org/.

 

The KSBDC is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of SBA.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Roberta Meisel, 859-257-7668.

UK College of Education Faculty Attend Educational Research National Meeting

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 15:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — The largest gathering of scholars in the field of education research takes place annually at the American Educational Research Association meeting. University of Kentucky College of Education faculty and graduate students in attendance showcased innovative studies in a diverse array of areas.

 

Held recently in Washington, D.C., the annual event allowed participants to encounter ideas and data that will shape tomorrow's education practices and policies, and to connect with leading thinkers from the U.S. and around the world. To learn more, visit www.aera.net.

 

UK College of Education presenters included:

· Kelly D. Bradley, Anthony P. Setari, poster session, "Validating a Montessori High School Teacher Evaluation Survey"

· Joseph J. Ferrare, Renee Setari, roundtable session, "Flocking Around the Facts? Measuring the Impact of Evidence on Philanthropic Convergence in Charter School Reform"

· Jennifer Wilhelm, Merryn Cole, Ronald Wilhelm (UK College of Arts and Sciences), poster session, "In-Service Teachers’ Alternative Conceptions of Lunar-Related Concepts"

· Ryan M. Crowley, Kathleen Owings Swan, roundtable session, "What Kind of Economic Citizen?"

· Christine Ann Mallozzi, Susan Chambers Cantrell, Margaret Rintamaa, paper session, "Female Struggling Adolescent Readers and Hegemonic Masculinities: A Necessary Focus"

· Shannon O. Sampson, Heather Arrowsmith, Kelly D. Bradley, Richard Kweku Mensah, paper session, "Using an Online Learning Course to Increase Retention and Enhance Experiences in an Online Program"

· Ellen L. Usher, Caihong Li, Amanda R. Butz (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Joanne P. Rojas (UK Human Development Institute), symposium, "What Is True About Grit: Relations With Self-Regulation and Motivation and New Innovative Interventions"

· Thomas Guskey (chair), symposium, "100 Years of Grading Research: Meaning and Value in the Most Common Educational Measure" Guskey also has a paper in this session, authored with Susan M. Brookhart, Early Studies of the Unreliability of Grades

· Pam Correll, Susan Chambers Cantrell, Victor Malo-Juvera (University of North Carolina Wilmington), paper session, "A Mixed-Methods Investigation of Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Culturally Responsive Instruction"

· Ellen L. Usher, Fred Danner, Stephen M. Tonks (Northern Illinois University), symposium, "Person-Centered Research: A Methodological Answer to Motivation Theory's Most Critical Questions"

· Xin Ma, poster session, "School Effects on Relationship Between Course Load and Achievement in China: Evidence From Large-Scale Assessment"

· Margaret Rintamaa, Nicole C. Miller (Mississippi State University), Nicole L. Thompson (University of Memphis), Chris Cook (Appalachian State University), Penny B. Howell (University of Louisville), Shawn A. Faulkner (Northern Kentucky University), poster session, "The Complexities of Middle-Level Teacher Certification: Status Report and Future Directions"

· Ruixue Liu, Kelly D. Bradley, Meng Fan (University of Delaware), poster session, "Using Multilevel Modeling in Substantive Research"

· Margaret Joan Mohr-Schroeder, Christopher R. Rakes (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Robert N. Ronau (University of Cincinnati),  Jon Sanderholm (Berea College), Sarah B. Bush (Bellarmine University), roundtable session, "The Critical Role of Well-Articulated, Coherent Professional Development Design: A Mathematics and Science Program Evaluation"

· Lauren Hargrave, Kenneth Maurice Tyler, roundtable session, "Supporting Students: The Significance of Relationships, Behaviors, Language and Abilities for Student Learning"
· Cindy Jong, Division K, Section 1 chair (Teaching and Teacher Education in the Content Areas)

· Joseph Waddington, Monica J. Kowalski (University of Notre Dame), James Mario Frabutt (University of Notre Dame), paper session, "The Use of Annual Student Assessment Data by (Arch)Diocesan Catholic School Systems"

· Kristen H. Perry, Leah Katherine Saal ( Loyola University Maryland), Donita Joy Shaw (University of Kansas), Fahad Abdullah Alharbi (University of Taibah), paper session, "Associations Between Adults' Education Skills and Political Efficacy: An Analysis of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies"

· David M. Brown, paper session, "Pleasant Places With Congenial Companions: Depictions of College Student Life in Early 20th-Century Fiction"

· Xin Ma, Maricela Guerra (California State University, Bakersfield), Jianjun Wang (California State University, Bakersfield), paper session, "A Comparative Study of Canonical Correlation Between Student Mathematics and Science Achievements in TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study)"

· Joseph J. Ferrare, Yougeon Lee (University of Wisconsin–Madison), paper session, "Finding One's Place or Losing the Race? The Unequal Impacts of Switching Majors on College Degree Completion"

· Jing Yuan, Letao Sun, poster session, "Examining the Individual Differences in Mathematics Achievement: An Application of Quantile Regression"

· Gene Wilhoit, Linda Darling-Hammond (Stanford University), Paul K. Leather (New Hampshire Department of Education), invited speaker session, "New Approaches to Accountability"

· Todd Hurst, roundtable session, "The Discursive Construction of Democratic Leadership by School Superintendents on Twitter"

· Victoria Sherif, roundtable session, "Examination of Rural High School Students’ Perceptions on Leadership"

· Ryan M. Crowley, Jane Bolgatz (Fordham University), Tamar Brown (Fordham University), Sara Skluzacek (New York Department of Education), Susan J. Chambre (Fordham University), Enrique Figueroa (Fordham University), roundtable session, "Institutional Factors Impacting Black Students' Success at an Elite Private Elementary School"

· Leslie D. Burns, symposium, "Realizing Social Justice and Educational Policy: Equity and Democracy Through Teaching and Teacher Education Standards"

· Thomas R. Guskey (discussant), paper session, "Teachers, Teaching, and Classroom Assessment"

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK STEM Faculty: Enhance Teaching Skills, Undergrad Collaborative Research Projects at Workshop

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 14:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2016) — A STEM-focused teaching enhancement workshop and scholarly forum will allow faculty members across the University of Kentucky campus to network, develop collaborations and augment STEM teaching skills. The workshop and forum will be held from 8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, April 29, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

 

The event will focus on course-based undergraduate research experiences to engage undergraduate students in authentic research and maintain their interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors. 

 

Inspired by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)-funded STEMCats Living Learning Program, the workshop will also offer innovative teaching tips, networking opportunities and a presentation of several posters presented at this year’s Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars.

 

The event, organized by UK Department of Biology Chair and STEMCats Director Vincent Cassone, is free and open to all faculty members from STEM or STEM-related disciplines. Faculty members can RSVP by contacting Jaclyn Gibson at jaclyn.gibson@uky.edu or 859-257-1064 by the deadline of Friday, April 22. Breakfast, lunch and refreshments will be provided. 

 

A tentative program agenda can be found here

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

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