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Understanding Risks, Refining Treatments Can Reduce Heartbreak of Infertility

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 16:54

This column first appeared in the June 5 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) — About 15 percent of couples in the United States suffer from infertility, which is when a couple has tried to become pregnant for a year without success. Infertility comes as a shock to many couples that have spent years preventing pregnancy. 

 

The inability to become pregnant leads to long-lasting and detrimental effects on a woman’s physical and emotional wellbeing. These detrimental effects include a decreased quality of life as indicated by increased levels of stress, impairments in physical and mental health, and diminished social functioning when compared to fertile women. Research has shown that being diagnosed with infertility has similar emotional and life-altering impacts as being diagnosed with cancer or a heart attack.

 

Infertility is a major public health concern as the diagnosis and treatment of infertility is estimated to cost society over $5 billion annually. For many couples, equally devastating is the realization that their health insurance does not cover infertility treatment, and all their medical costs must be paid out-of-pocket. It is critically important to understand the causes of infertility in order to refine treatments, decrease the costs associated with infertility, and benefit the overall wellbeing of those suffering from infertility.

 

The most prominent underlying causes of female infertility are defects in ovulation, or release of the egg from the ovary. The exact cause for defects in the woman’s reproductive tract is not entirely understood, but several risk factors are associated with infertility, including:

·      Untreated sexually transmitted infections

·      Pelvic inflammatory disease

·      Certain cancer treatment regimens

·      Endometriosis

·      Polycystic ovarian syndrome

·      Exposure to environmental toxicants

·      Lifestyle factors such as smoking, drug use, excessive alcohol use, abnormally high levels of stress, and extreme weight gain or loss

 

However, the single most significant contributing factor to female infertility is age. Fertility greatly declines with age due to the natural depletion of eggs within the ovary and decreased quality of the remaining eggs, leading to increased chances of miscarriage. Further, the potential health of the child can be impacted by a woman’s age due to genetic abnormalities in the eggs from older women. As women in today’s society are delaying child birth for personal, professional and financial reasons, age becomes an important factor contributing to infertility. 

 

To combat infertility, women can undergo treatment from a trained infertility specialist, which includes infertility testing, drug treatment to aid in ovulation, surgery to repair abnormalities in the reproductive tract and assisted reproductive technologies (ART), which includes the commonly used in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure. In ART, the egg is fertilized outside the body before being placed back into the woman’s uterus. Unfortunately, the challenges of infertility treatments, specifically ART, are that success rates are low (approximately 56 percent) and decline with age.

 

Scientists are continuing to refine and improve ART methods, such as working to optimize dosing regimens of the drugs that aid in ovulation, refining the conditions in which fertilization takes place outside the body, enhancing the procedures used to evaluate embryo quality prior to placing the embryo back into the woman, and investigating ways to preserve the fertility of cancer patients by using ovarian cryopreservation. In our laboratories here at the University of Kentucky, we are determining precisely how ovulation is controlled in women and are identifying novel factors that drive ovulation. Each of these advancements aims to improve efficacy, while decreasing the time and cost of infertility treatments.

 

Patrick Hannon is a post-doctoral researcher in the UK Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 

Media Contact: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

"Expressions of Courage" Art Exhibit at Markey this Friday

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 15:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) — This Friday, hundreds of patients, friends and family of patients, and University of Kentucky faculty and staff will gather in the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center courtyard to participate in "Expressions of Courage," a creative exhibit celebrating the work of those who have been affected by cancer.

 

This year's event will feature the creative work of more than 40 participants. 

Exhibits include visual art, poetry readings, dance exhibitions, and vocal and instrumental performances by patients, survivors, and friends and family.

 

Art displays of survivor contributions will go on display Wednesday in the Combs Atrium Building of the UK Markey Cancer Center. The official celebration begins Friday late morning with a full schedule of events, including:

 

·      11 a.m.: Registration and viewing of art exhibits

·      11:30 a.m.: Lunch for all attendees

·      Noon: Welcoming remarks

·      12:15 p.m.: Keynote speech by cancer survivor Dr. Tim Mullett

·      12:45 p.m.: Vocal and literary performances

·      2:45 p.m.: Closing remarks

 

This event is open to the public and all are welcome to come view the artwork and performances.

 

 

To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

UK Journalism Students Win Big at Kentucky Associated Press Broadcast Awards

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 14:20

Lexington, Ky. (June 6, 2016) — University of Kentucky students are known for their successes in the classroom and on the court. Now students in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications in the UK College of Communication and Information can add broadcasting to those categories.

 

For two years now, since the award has been in existence, a UK journalism student has won the coveted Best in Show award in the College TV category at the Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Awards. This year, the honor and a scholarship went to Meredith Helline. Last year, Sabirah Rayford shared the award with a Western Kentucky University student.

 

Adding to UK’s accolades was a sweep in the Best News Story TV category. Helline won both first place with her story “The Light of Jonathan Krueger” and second place with her “Remembering Officer Ellis” story. Rayford rounded out the top three with her piece “Campus Racism.”

 

Helline also took top honors in the Best College Television Reporter category with Rayford finishing third.

 

Casey Parker-Bell added another achievement to the list of firsts with his win in the Best College Newscast category. No UK student had previously won top prize in this category.

 

Rayford’s “Campus Racism” feature placed second in the Best Public Affairs TV category and Emily Markanich’s “Housing First” story placed third in the category.

 

UK students in the College Radio Contest did not disappoint either. Lee Mengistu’s piece titled “Childhood Sexual Abuse” placed third in the Best College Radio Reporter category while counterpart Noah Richard placed third for Best College Newscast Radio division.

 

The Best Public Affairs Radio division award was a near sweep for radio entries with the team of Alexa Wingate, Caitlin Schwartz and Lillie Ruschell placing in the top spot with their “Vaccinations” feature and the team of Richard, Mengistu and Riley Miller taking third with “The Cost of Housing.”

 

“When you look at where we won in TV and radio, what is clear is that we outperform other schools in hard news and public affairs (issues) reporting. And that is huge,” said Mel Coffee, associate professor of broadcast journalism.

 

Multi-year student winner Rayford couldn’t agree more.

 

“It’s truly an honor to win two years in a row," she said. "I can not only see my growth, but the growth as a program. Winning three awards this year is an amazing achievement and I am thankful for the support I have from Mel Coffee, Kakie Urch, Scoobie Ryan and Mike Farrell."

 

The Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Awards were held on April 30, at the Galt House in downtown Louisville. A complete list of collegiate winners is available here: http://discover.ap.org/contests/kentucky-broadcast.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: June 6, 1912

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 14:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 242nd and final diary entry dated June 6, 1912, recalls the senior's Commencement.

 

June 6. Thursday. Commencement Day and the diplomas and degrees we’ve worked so long to get. Dr. Halleck’s address was the best thing I ever heard. John, William, and Milton came down to see me graduate. There were about a hundred of us.

 

Inserted next to McClure's final diary entry on June 6 is the university's 1912 Commencement program, which included a list of the graduates.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

It's About Grand Time: 'Grand Night' Turns 24

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 13:59

 

Promotional ad for "It's a Grand Night for Singing!" Provided by UK Opera Theatre. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) Only a few more days remain before the sounds of some of Billboard and Broadway's most beloved songs fill the campus. Guaranteed to have you singing and dancing in your seats, University of Kentucky Opera Theatre presents the 24th annual production of “It’s a Grand Night for Singing!” June 10-19, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

 

Executive Producer and Music Director Everett McCorvey and Director Peggy Stamps bring together a company of more than 100 performers again to usher in the summer arts season in Central Kentucky. Students from UK Opera Theatre join forces with some of the most talented members of the Lexington community in this popular annual town-and-gown revue. Among this year's hits will be music from such icons as Prince and Gloria Estefan, as well as showstoppers from popular new musicals like "Hamilton," "Into the Woods," "Enchanted" and "School of Rock" and such classics as "Grease," "Les Miserables," "Oklahoma" and "Chicago."

 

With choreography by Jeromy and Lyndy Franklin Smith, this year's production will feature performances by such audience favorites as Tedrin Blair Lindsay, Everett and Alicia Helm McCorvey, and Gregory Turay.

 

Showtimes for the six performances of "Grand Night" are 7:30 p.m., June 10, 11, 17 and 18, and 2 p.m., June 12 and 19.

 

"Grand Night" tickets are $45 for general admission; $40 for seniors and UK faculty; and $15 for students with a valid student ID. In addition, each performance will also have a limited number of select seats available to UK staff for only $25. The special staff price is presented in memory of Russ Williams, the university's first representative of the staff on UK's Board of Trustees who died in 2009. Staff tickets must be purchased in person at the venue with a valid staff ID.

 

Tickets for "Grand Night" are available through the Singletary Center ticket office, by phone at 859-257-4929, online at www.scfatickets.com or in person at the venue. All applicable fees will be added to tickets upon purchase transaction.

 

UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Alum's Book Explores Rise of Notorious Brawler to Noted Horseman

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 13:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 8, 2016) As the eyes of horse racing enthusiasts worldwide turn to New York and the Belmont Stakes this week, another storied racetrack prepares for its summer meet less than 200 miles north. The Saratoga Race Course owes much of its history to its sometimes forgotten founder, a brawler turned congressman, John Morrissey.

 

From gang member, political muscle and prizefighter to New York state senator, United States congressman and industry leader of the sport of kings — John Morrissey (1831–1878) was all of these and more. When the Morrissey family arrived in America in 1831, there were not many doors open for Irish immigrants, but he did not let his bloodline stop him. He was the kind of man who would challenge the infamous William Poole, better known as “Bill the Butcher,” just to make a name for himself. Morrissey knew that when there was an opportunity, he had to take it. This bravado led to more than one brush with death, but also to wealth and prestige.

 

In "The Notorious John Morrissey: How a Bare-Knuckle Brawler Became a Congressman and Founded Saratoga Race Course," historian and University of Kentucky alumnus James C. Nicholson traces the remarkable rags-to-riches story of one of the most colorful characters in the sport of horse racing. Morrissey began his career as an enforcer for Tammany Hall and rose to become a well-respected businessman who served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

In this new book published by University Press of Kentucky (UPK), Nicholson traces Morrissey’s remarkable life while also shedding light on fascinating issues of the era, such as the underground prizefighting economy, the rancorous debate over immigration, and labor laws that protected owners more than workers. He digs most deeply, however, into the business of thoroughbred racing and Morrissey’s role as the founder of Saratoga Race Course, the longest continually run thoroughbred track in the United States.

 

The city of Troy, New York, home to the Morrissey family, was overwhelmed with Irish immigrants. Steady work was hard to find, which led to his involvement with the unsavory characters and practices of gangland New York. He eventually created his own gang, and in gory clashes with other rival gangs, his talent as a fighter became apparent. In the early 1850s, Morrissey travelled to San Francisco, gambling with and swindling prospectors, where he began his career as a prizefighter. Early in his fighting career, Morrissey earned the nickname “Old Smoke” when he was thrown into burning coals during one particularly rough bout. Despite a charred back, which smoked for the rest of the fight, he won. His grit and perseverance led to more than just a nickname; he earned fame and the respect of his peers.

 

Morrissey wanted more than a life on the margins, and prizefighting opened new opportunities for him, particularly after he defeated Yankee Sullivan to win the national championship in 1853. He soon turned his winnings and skills into an empire of gambling parlors that made him wealthy enough to convince his friend and railroad tycoon Cornelius Vanderbilt to invest in a new venture. In 1863, he established Saratoga Race Course, where his acumen as a proprietor and promoter helped the sport grow to be one of the most prominent in America. His success in business as well as his connections to Tammany Hall helped him gain election to the U.S. House of Representatives and later the New York State Senate, completing his rise from hardscrabble beginnings.

 

Despite Morrissey’s accomplishments, when Walter S. Vosburgh published an “official” history of American thoroughbred racing for the Jockey Club in 1923, nowhere was he mentioned. Morrissey participated in and contributed to some of the most significant sporting events of the 19th century. Up to that time, no one had done more to develop the commodification and commercialization of sports in America, but outside of Saratoga, New York, he remains all but forgotten, written out of history by the reformers of the Progressive Era who blanched at his origins and associations.

 

The track that New York Herald Tribune columnist Red Smith called “The dowager queen of American racing,” however, still stands as a lasting legacy to Morrissey’s place in both American history and the "sport of kings," as well as an emblem of the American dream.

 

Nicholson, who holds a law degree and doctoral degree in history from UK, is also the author of "The Kentucky Derby: How the Run for the Roses Became America’s Premier Sporting Event" and "Never Say Die: A Kentucky Colt, the Epsom Derby, and the Rise of the Modern Thoroughbred Industry."

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Math Professors Receive Simons Foundation Grants

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 13:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) — Five professors from the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences have received Simons Foundation Collaboration Grants for Mathematics. UK Department of Mathematics faculty members Richard Ehrenborg, Heide Gluesing-Luerssen, Margaret Readdy, Zhongwei Shen and Martha Yip will each receive five-year $35,000 grants.

 

The grants will fund travel and visitors that aim to support the "mathematical marketplace" by "substantially increasing collaborative contacts between mathematicians."

 

Professor Ehrenborg works in the area of combinatorics. His current research focuses on pattern avoidance in permutations using analytic tools, topological spaces associated with partitions, and polytopes and their stratified analogues. All three areas reflect his interdisciplinary approach to mathematics. Ehrenborg was the first Royster Research Professor in the UK Department of Mathematics and has held multi-year grants from the National Science Foundation and National Security Agency. The first year of the Simons Foundation Collaboration Grant will fund travel for Ehrenborg to visit and work with scholars Richard Stanley at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Mark Goresky at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and Michelle Wachs at the University of Miami.

 

Professor Gluesing-Luerssen’s research interests are in algebraic coding theory, which lies at the interface of algebra and information theory. Coding theory aims to design powerful mathematical tools for the protection of information against disturbances during data transmission such as communication via cell phone, internet or digital TV. Gluesing-Luerssen will use the Simons Foundation Collaboration Grant to collaborate with researchers from Switzerland on analysis and design of subspace codes.

 

Professor Readdy's research is in algebraic combinatorics, an interdisciplinary area of mathematics which focuses on enumerative questions from algebra, topology and discrete geometry. This is the second five-year Simons Foundation Collaboration Grant Readdy has been awarded. For the 2016-17 academic year, she will attend a research conference and workshop at the Clay Mathematics Institute at Oxford University, visit the Combinatorics group at the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University in Stockholm, Sweden, and visit colleagues at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study.

 

Professor Shen’s research interests are in the areas of harmonic analysis and partial differential equations. His Simons Foundation Collaboration Grant will fund research on homogenization of partial differential equations with highly oscillating coefficients, which are used to model composite and perforated materials. The grant will support Shen’s collaborations with researchers at the University of Chicago, New York University and several universities in China.

 

Assistant Professor Yip’s area of study is algebraic combinatorics. Her current research is focused on two projects. Yip has collaborated with Radmila Sazdanovic of North Carolina State University to develop a modification of an algebraic construction called Khovanov homology and associated it to a graph invariant X_G, called the chromatic symmetric function. This could lead to new ways to approach problems which have remained open for more than 20 years. Her second project focuses on a family of symmetric functions called Macdonald polynomials. Currently, Yip and Arun Ram of the University of Melbourne are studying a generalization of the well-known Weyl character formula for Macdonald polynomials.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Staff Elect David Melanson to Board of Trustees

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 12:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016)  David Melanson has been elected to serve the 2016-2019 term as the staff representative to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees. This will be Melanson’s inaugural year as a member of the Board of Trustees, following Sheila Brothers' two terms as the staff representative.

 

Melanson has worked at the university since 2004. He began his UK career in the Office of University Relations, serving as speechwriter for former UK President Lee T. Todd Jr. Melanson then worked as director of alumni and external relations for the UK College of Pharmacy for five years, before accepting a position as assistant director for external affairs and development at the UK Center for Applied Energy Research in December 2015.

 

He has remained engaged with the university throughout his 12-year UK career. He has been elected to two separate terms on the UK Staff Senate, having served as a committee chair. Melanson has also served on UK’s Ethics Committee, UK Appreciation Day Commission, College of Pharmacy’s Honors and Awards Committee, UK HealthCare’s External Affairs Collaboration Council, and a variety of other boards and commissions across campus.  

 

“I appreciate this opportunity to serve as a voice for my fellow staff members on the UK Board of Trustees,” Melanson said. “UK’s education, research and outreach are essential to improving lives and opportunities in all 120 Kentucky counties, and I look forward to working alongside my fellow trustees to continue the profound and life-changing progress that is taking place at the university.”

 

Melanson is a native of New Hampshire and a graduate of the University of New Hampshire. He moved to Kentucky in 1999 to work as a reporter at the Advocate-Messenger newspaper in Danville. Melanson worked for Optimist International in St. Louis, Missouri, for three years, before he and his wife, Sarah, moved back to Central Kentucky. He and Sarah are parents of three children. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UKAg Student Wins Alltech Young Scientist Award

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 11:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) Agricultural biotechnology junior Alonna Wright, a native of Morgantown, Kentucky, recently received the Alltech Young Scientist award (AYS).

 

The AYS program is the world's largest agriscience competition. The program offers the most innovative, scientific thinkers from colleges and universities around the world a chance to compete and be rewarded for their research achievements.

 

During the regional phase of the competition, with help from one of her mentors, Bruce Webb, professor of virology and molecular genetics in the Department of Entomology, Wright submitted her current research at UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment on nudivirus.

 

She won the award for the North American region of the AYS program. She then went on to present her research to an international panel of judges where she won the grand prize of $5,000 and a fully funded doctoral fellowship.

 

Wright works with a genetically selected, mutant form of nudivirus. Nudivirus causes a sexually transmitted disease only found in the corn earworm. In some cases, in nature, the virus infection results in insect sterility. Wright found that 100 percent sterility could help control the reproduction of the corn earworm and help prevent the damages the worm can cause.

 

Wright's research will help prevent destruction that corn earworms can cause to crops each year. Corn earworms cause nearly $2 billion in damages, including the cost to control them each year.

 

"We knew this could have an impact on millions of people and many crops. It was elating, I couldn’t be happier," Wright said.

 

After graduation, Wright is not sure what program she will study to get her doctoral degree but is glad she can focus on choosing something she is passionate about.

 

"The funding for my PhD will help me focus on choosing a program that I am truly passionate about without having to worry about the money," said Wright. 

 

A relief for Wright is not having to worry about funding for her education. She is grateful that she was chosen as the AYS winner and is honored to have won such an immense prize.

 

"Winning a fully funded doctoral degree opportunity has been an amazing feeling, knowing I won't have to worry about where the money for my higher education will come from. It's such an honor to have won this prize." 

 

Video by Jeff Franklin, UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Samantha Ponder or Carl Nathe, sjpo225@g.uky.edu, 859-257-1754

 

Campus Streets Closed for Fireworks Testing on June 6

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 11:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2016) — Due to the testing of a fireworks display 9 p.m. Monday, June 6, Alumni Drive, between University Drive and Tates Creek Road, and College Way, from Sports Center Drive to Alumni Drive, will be closed to traffic from 8:45 to 9:30 p.m. The Arboretum will also close to all traffic beginning at 8 p.m.

 

These roads will reopen at 9:30 p.m. Anyone normally using this portion of Alumni Dive or College Way during this time should find alternate routes and allow extra time for travel.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Time for Kentuckians to Take Mosquito Protection Measures

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 16:36

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 3, 2016)  University of Kentucky entomologists have captured Asian tiger mosquitoes in the Central Kentucky area during the past few days and are encouraging Kentuckians to take measures to prevent mosquito bites.

 

“The Asian tiger mosquito is the most common mosquito in Kentucky. We are seeing it earlier than normal this year,” said Grayson Brown, entomologist with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “What’s different this year is this mosquito is implicated as a possible carrier for Zika. Kentuckians who are concerned about Zika should start taking precautions.”

 

The Asian tiger mosquito normally begins to appear in Central Kentucky in mid-June and populations begin to climb throughout the summer, peaking in late July/early August. The mosquitoes tend to arrive in Western Kentucky a little earlier and appear in Eastern Kentucky a little later than Central Kentucky. The mosquito is the primary carrier of canine heartworm.

 

“The Asian tiger mosquito is an opportunistic feeder and will feed on other things besides humans,” said Lee Townsend, UK extension entomologist. “It tends to bite humans around the ankles, an area that is often overlooked when applying repellents.”

 

The Asian tiger mosquito was found to transmit Zika in Mexico, but so far, no locally acquired Zika cases have been reported in the United States. Kentucky has six Zika cases, and all have been individuals who acquired Zika while traveling to other countries. The Aedes aegypti, or the yellow fever mosquito, is the mosquito that has been the known carrier of Zika in most of the cases in South America. Kentucky is on the northern edge of the Aedes aegyti range, and they typically appear much later in the summer.

 

Kentuckians can take the following measures to minimize their chances of getting bitten this summer:

· Use Environmental Protection Agency-registered insect repellents. When used as directed, these repellents are proven safe and effective for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

· Drain any standing water as it creates potential mosquito breeding sites. This includes bird baths, bottles and any other items with water-holding capacity like old tires or trash.

· Fill in holes, depressions and puddles in yards.

· Keep gutters in proper working order.

· Make sure door and window screens are in good repair.

· Stay indoors between 4 and 8 p.m. when mosquitoes are most active.

· Wear long-sleeve shirts and pants when outdoors.

 

Individuals wanting additional information about mosquitoes in Kentucky should visit UK’s Zika website at http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/ZIKA/1kyzika.html. Additional information for women concerned about zika during pregnancy is available at www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/protect-yourself.html.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

UK Outlines New Drone Policy to Ensure Safety, Compliance

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 15:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016) — The use of drones for recreation or by hobbyists is prohibited on the University of Kentucky campus. Drone use requests for research or instructional purposes must be registered and approved by UK’s event management office.

 

Those are some of the primary provisions of a new UK policy regarding drones or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) announced Wednesday by the university.

 

“Our first and most important priority is the safety of our UK community and those who visit us,” said Eric N. Monday, the university’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “At the same time, we want to ensure that any policy we adopt is in full compliance with federal aviation requirements and the law. This new policy makes clear our priorities and how we will ensure the safety of our campus community.”

 

One of the chief concerns about drone use has been the proximity of any campus flight to a heliport located at UK HealthCare’s A.B. Chandler Hospital as well as Commonwealth Stadium. Federal Aviation Administration regulations generally restrict flights of unmanned aircraft systems near airports.

 

The new UK policy, adopted after recommendations by a committee that met multiple times over the last several months, can be read here. Specifically, the UK policy includes provisions that prohibit:

 

· Hobbyist or recreational use of drones or UAS on all UK owned, operated or controlled property. That includes the main campus in Lexington as well as other sites such as Coldstream Research Park and farms the university owns or operates across the state.

 

· Commercial use of drones, unless prior approval is granted by UK and the appropriate registration for use has taken place with the Federal Aviation Administration. Licensed operators — for commercial use or institutional purposes — must apply for permission through the UK Event Management Office at least seven days prior to the requested event.

 

· Operating drones or UAS directly above open-air events or above thoroughfares such as roadways, sidewalks, bike paths and pedestrian paths.

 

· Use above Commonwealth Stadium during any event.

 

The Event Management Office will work with the requestor on the appropriate certificate of waiver or authorization for flight operations. Anyone seeking to fly for a particular use on campus must have proof of general liability insurance that covers the operation of UAS.

 

“There are, of course, legitimate and important reasons for the use of drones or unmanned aircraft systems — including research and instruction that benefits significantly from the use of these systems,” Monday said. “To that end, this policy also creates the process in which such uses can occur, while also ensuring the safety of our campus community and the broader community we serve.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605

UK CAER Part of $317M Venture to Accelerate Fabric and Fiber Innovation

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 15:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been selected to participate in a five-year, $317 million public-private partnership announced in April by U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter.

 

The partnership, named the Advanced Functional Fabrics of America (AFFOA) Institute is the latest Manufacturing Innovation Institute and is designed to accelerate innovation in high-tech, U.S.-based manufacturing involving fibers and textiles. Matt Weisenberger, associate director of CAER’s materials group, will be leading the UK efforts. 

 

The partnership includes 32 universities, 16 industry members, 72 manufacturing entities, and 26 startup incubators, spread across 27 states and Puerto Rico.

 

The new initiative will receive $75 million in Department of Defense funding with $242 million in additional funding coming from industrial partners, venture capitalists, universities, nonprofits and states.

 

The partnership will focus on the development of new technologies through research and innovation. It also will include a network of community colleges and technical education experts to ensure necessary workforce development.

 

UK CAER’s materials group is home to the center’s fiber spinning and processing research. The center operates the largest solution spinline found in an academic setting in North America. UK CAER will receive $3.5 million over five years to fund advanced/smart fibers and textile research.

 

“We appreciate the opportunity to partner with some of the nation’s leading fiber and textile manufacturers to advance the next generation of functional materials,” said Rodney Andrews, director of the UK Center for Applied Energy Research. “This funding confirms what we have known at CAER for quite a while — that our fiber production capabilities is at the forefront in fiber research and development technology, helping advance manufacturing in Kentucky and across the nation.” 

 

UK CAER’s unique 100-foot-long fiber spinning line produces multifilament, continuous tow yarns. The line was designed to help provide solutions to the complex issues facing the fiber spinning industry, especially carbon fiber and multifunctional fibers.  

 

“Our spinline has made some very promising advances,” Weisenberger said. “We have developed the capability to continuously process hollow and multi-core fibers, which will pave the way for the future development of multifunctional fibers.”

 

Weisenberger said that these capabilities support AFFOA’s vision to develop fibers that, when processed into a fabric, will function as electronic devices or sensors. Such smart fibers hold great commercial promise.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343 or jenny.wells@uky.edu

A Vital Vision: UK Student Brings Wearable Technology to the OR

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 14:59

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016) — Surgeons and anesthesiologists prepped for their next bariatrics surgery: scrubs, masks, gowns, gloves? Check. And then the software engineer geared up: Google Glass, connected and fully charged? Check. They headed into the operating room.

 

The software engineer was University of Kentucky computer science student Zack Anderson, who watched the surgery from the corner as Dr. Alex Gandsas and an anesthesiologist wore Google Glass technology mounted on their eyeglasses. In the top right corner of the right lenses, they saw the patient's vital signs. Anderson watched as his work was put to the ultimate test, and it passed.

 

"It's one thing to just build an application and just put it to the side," Anderson said. "But it's another thing to actually go into the place that you've designed it for and see people using it. The look on people's faces when they use this application, I mean, it was just incredible."

 

The goal was to reduce the distraction surgeons and anesthesiologists must often face as they deal with many aspects of an operation. Applying wearable technology to glasses allows them to keep their eyes on the patient and monitor vitals at the same time.

 

"We found out that the anesthesiologist can get distracted easily," Anderson said. "He has a lot of things that he has to do." 

 

So Anderson, working with Dr. Gandsas of the Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC) in Maryland, built the programs needed to connect a computer to an anesthesia machine and Google Glass technology to the computer. And eventually, they thought, why not have both the anesthesiologists and the surgeons wearing the technology?

 

In May, after a series of tests, the team deployed their technology for surgery for the first time.

 

"He's (the user) not looking across the room to try and, you know, figure out what these vital signs are," Anderson said. "He can just focus on the patient and be able to get those vital signs in real time."

 

Here's how it works: a computer is hooked up to a particular type of anesthesia machine from GE Healthcare to receive the data. Anderson wrote code that essentially pulls specific vital signs — heart rate, blood pressure and blood oxidation level, all crucial to a patient's health — about every second. The Google Glass technology is connected to the computer and once the computer has the data, Anderson broadcasts it to the Google Glass lenses.

 

"I think that wearable computer technology has a place in today’s operating room to close the communication gap between team members while providing an extra layer of safety for our patients," said Dr. Gandsas, who is a bariatric surgeon and director of the AAMC Weight Loss and Metabolic Program.

 

Anderson pointed out that although the future of Google Glass is uncertain, wearable technologies are sure to revolutionize health care. Whether it's Google Glass, Oculus Rift or Microsoft's HoloLens; "it could be anything."

 

Believe it or not, Anderson had never really worked with wearable technologies before. The venture began as an undergraduate research project his freshman year, working with UK Department of Computer Science Chair and Professor Brent Seales. When Dr. Gandsas contacted Seales about the idea for wearable technology in the operating room, Seales called on Anderson.

 

"I really love creating new ideas and coming up with new things," Anderson said. " I got in contact with Dr. Seales and he gave me the ability to do those kinds of projects."

 

And while Anderson describes this project as incredible, it hasn't been a cakewalk. His greatest lesson learned from Seales is how to solve a tough problem: you must work on it from multiple angles. In fact, Anderson had to address his entire project from an unfamiliar angle.

 

 "Usually, when you think about computer science, you just think about coding," he said.

 

You don't think about a surgeon in the operating room.

 

"But to be able to say that I was able to build an application to where it could potentially save someone's life because they're able to see the vital signs all the time, any time … it was really cool," Anderson said.

 

For the 20-year-old computer whiz, he had to understand not only is he writing code, but he's working to solve a real, and significant, problem for people.

 

"And you don't exactly know what problems there are in the world until you actually go there and talk to the people who are experiencing them," he said.

 

Anderson believes undergraduate research gave him the opportunity not only to network with experts at UK and doctors across the U.S., but the ability to think about how computer science can make a difference.

 

"Because, you know, I feel like we all have a purpose here, we all want to help people and make our lives easier and better."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: June 3-5, 1912

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 13:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016) In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 239th, 240th and 241st diary entries dated June 3, 4 and 5, 1912, recall decorating the gym for an event, a bad turn in a friend's illness, and the business of the day before Commencement, including a job offer.

 

June 3. Monday. Jack calls for help to decorate the gym. and Alma, Jessie Mit, Cora, Addie, and I spend the morning at work. We cover numerous lattice work affairs, and are nearly through putting the wisteria on when in Ms. Stout marches and demands to know how we came by all the decorations! Jack explains — we sit and await results, she says she’ll send for what remains, and after she’s gone we see that few are left. Jack was so mad — oh my! Mr. Ramsey said he happened to remember that the class of ’11 paid for half of those things.

 

In the afternoon Addie tries to sleep but cannot. Then her dress comes and we take it back to be refixed. Later we go over to see the gym. Everything looks grand, and everybody has a grand time. Mary and I have the blues and go to town for some salted peanuts — also take in a picture show — bum and get back at ten o’clock. We can’t get anybody to answer the door and have a time getting in. I spend the night with Jessie Mit and Emily again, and can hear the music as plain as anything.

 

June 4. Tuesday. In the morning I go over and get Louise’s Annual. Everybody, nearly, has left and Patt Hall is just too lonely. After dinner Jessie Mit and Emily go with me to express the Annual, then we go to the Post Office, Library, Campbell-Hagerman, Hamilton, T.U., Hughes and get too tired for words. After supper Addie, Emily and Annie Louise and I go to a picture show.

 

Irene was taken to the hospital just after lunch, and is awfully ill all afternoon. Everybody is so distressed and when we hear that she must be operated on at once we cannot think of anything else, so Mrs. Barker’s reception is called off It is such a relief when we hear that the operation is over and she stood it well. Poor Irene! She has to miss everything of Commencement.

 

When we get back from the picture shows we went back to the kitchen and got some of the delicious cream that was to have been used at the reception. Irene is doing nicely and everybody is so happy about it.

 

When Addie and I go up the stairs we find that Jessie Milton has been in and left us a lovely waist apiece — exactly alike, and she did the work on them right before our eyes and we never dreamed what she was doing. We thought she was working on one for herself all the time!

 

Inserted next to McClure's June 4, 1912, diary entry is a small card that reads, “To Virginia, With love in every stitch from Jessie Mit.” The card accompanied a piece of clothing that likely resembled a wide sash or cummerbund which was to be worn at the waist.

 

June 5. Wednesday. Class Day! Bernice comes in time for the “doings.” We go to the Lunch Stand for breakfast, and later meet on the campus and march to the tent. It was all good, even if Mr. Galloway did give me a lemon squeezer as my gift! Judge Barker gave the boys the cigars which he had gotten for the reception and Addie and I got the seals from Jack’s

 

Inserted next to her June 5, 1912, diary entry, McClure included a cigar seal and a program for Class Day. Also she attached a telegram of a job offer that reads:

 

80 L RA 28 N L 1 Ex

Middlesboro Ky June 4-12

Miss Virginia McClure

                                            State University      Lexington, Ky.

Will you accept position as the first assistant in our high school at salary of seventy five dollars per month for nine months what branches are your preference.

MO Winfrey

 

I get a telegram and am a little scared at first, but not for long. Prof. Noe says “Take it!” After Class Day is over we take some pictures in caps and gowns, and then go to the car with Bernice. Lots of “families” have come to see the Commencement exercises. Alma, Lily, Annie, Louise, and I sit in the yard until lunch and talk about everything in general. In the afternoon Annie Louise, Addie, and I go to town and “shop” all kinds of stores and when we come back Addie, Jessie Mit, and I decide to go to the banquet.

 

Also inserted next to the June 5, 1912, diary entry is a program for the Senior Annual Banquet held by the Alumni Association.

 

The Dean, Babe, Cleo, Addie, and Jessie Milton, and I go to the Alumni Banquet, and have such a good time. The Dean, Babe, Prof. Miller, Prof. and Mrs. White, Addie, Jessie Mit and I are at the same table. The eats are dandy and we all get [illegible word] at Monk. The toasts were all fine. Judge Barker tells the T.U. man whose toast was just fine that he’s like the potato — or rather T.U. is — his best end is under the ground!

 

The banquet hall was full, and lots more came for the dance, but we didn’t stay. It was one o’clock when we got back to the Hall, and we were all tired and sleepy.

 

Another item is inserted here with the June 5, 1912, diary entry. The typed note reads, “Miss Virgie: May this be the ‘Commencement’ of great prosperity in your chosen field of labor, is the sincere wish of your friend, M.J. Goodwin.”

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Offers Short Course to Owners of Woodlands

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 13:50

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 3, 2016) — Kentucky’s rich woodlands can provide their owners with many advantages, but proper management is important to be able to reap all the benefits. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

 

Well-managed forests can provide extra income and recreation opportunities for their owners, as well as a healthy environment for wildlife. The 2016 Woodland Owners Short Course will cover all those aspects, for both novice and experienced landowners.

 

"Folks might not be aware of all the resources that are available to help owners care for their woodlands and achieve their objectives,” said Billy Thomas, UK extension forester. “The Woodland Owners Short Course brings landowners together with professionals who can help them achieve their particular management goals.”

 

The one-day course is offered once in each of the three geographical regions of the state. Planning committees have developed the regional programs with local needs in mind, so each region’s course will vary slightly from the others.

 

Two concurrent tracks, gold and green, target either new or seasoned woodland owners. Landowners who have just acquired woodlands or who are beginning to think about management and wondering what their options are should enroll in the green track, while more experienced woodland owners can take advantage of the information available in the gold track. Past attendees of the short course will also find valuable information by returning to the course through the gold track.

 

Depending on the track and the region, sessions will cover such topics as timber improvement practices, wildlife habitat management, invasive species, tree identification and hunt leasing, to name only a few. During one session offered in all three regions, participants will make their own cutting boards while learning how woodland management can lead to quality wood products.

 

In Central Kentucky, the course is scheduled for July 16 in the Henry County Cooperative Extension office, 2151 Campbellsburg Rd., New Castle. Sherman Dotson will host the field site visit at his farm.

 

The course in Eastern Kentucky, hosted by Breathitt County Cooperative Extension, is scheduled for July 30 at UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability, 176 Robinson Rd., Jackson, with the field site at the James Mullins farm.

 

In Western Kentucky, the course on Aug. 13 will be hosted by Caldwell County Cooperative Extension at UK’s Research and Education Center, 1205 Hopkinsville St., Princeton. The Lyndle Barnes farm will be the site for the field visit.

 

Organizers will provide transportation to all field sites.

 

Each short course begins at 9 a.m. local time, with on-site registration at 8:30 a.m., and concludes around 4:30 p.m. Lunch is included. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged as space is limited. When pre-registering, sessions are $20 for individuals and $30 for couples. The day of the program, sessions are $30 for individuals and $40 for couples.

 

For a detailed listing of course topics at each location and to register, visit the short course website at http://forestry.ca.uky.edu/wosc. Registration is also available by phoning 859-257-7597.

 

The 2016 Woodland Owners Short Course is a partnership between UK Cooperative Extension Service, UK Department of Forestry, Kentucky Division of Forestry, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Kentucky State University, Kentucky Tree Farm Committee, Kentucky Woodland Owners Association, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Kentucky Forest Industries Association, Sustainable Forestry Initiative and the Kentucky Chapter of the Association of Consulting Foresters of America Inc.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324.

UK Dining Adjusts Hours of Operation for Remainder of Summer

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 13:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016)  University of Kentucky Dining will implement new hours of operations beginning Monday, June 6. The schedule below will be in effect Monday through Friday from June 6 through Aug. 18. All locations will be closed Saturdays and Sundays during that time period.

 

Starbucks @ Kentucky Clinic: 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

 

Ovid's: 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

 

Starbucks @ William T. Young Library: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

 

Einstein Bros. Bagels: 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

Apothecary Café: 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

Intermezzo: 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

Wildcat Pantry @ The 90: 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

 

Chick-fil-A @ Bowman’s Den: 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

 

Starbucks @ Bowman's Den:  8 a.m.-3 p.m.

 

Subway @ Bowman's Den:  10 a.m.-3 p.m.

 

Greens to Go @ Bowman’s Den: 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

 

Panda Express @ Bowman’s Den: 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

 

la Madeleine @ The 90: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

Fresh Food Co. @ The 90: 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

 

For UK Dining updates, visit www.uky.campusdish.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Blair Hoover, 859-257-6396; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Staff Shared Leave Pool Donation Period Underway

Thu, 06/02/2016 - 11:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2016)  The University of Kentucky’s annual shared leave pool donation period is underway and will continue for a limited time. This program enables UK employees to help fellow staff members who have exhausted paid leave because of serious health issues affecting themselves or their family members.

 

For beneficiaries of the shared leave pool, UK employees’ generosity has made an important impact. Since the program’s inception in 2007, UK employees have donated nearly 26,000 hours of accrued vacation leave.

 

Employees can support the program by completing an online donation form. Half-day and/or full-day increments can be donated. More information is available on the Human Resources website. Employees are asked to consider donating before their unused vacation time is subject to loss.

 

The annual donation period closes Sept. 30.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Orofacial Pain Patient Becomes Advocate and Speaker at Mini-Residency Program

Wed, 06/01/2016 - 18:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 2, 2016) – It all started with a toothache. In 2002, Sandy Baker had a root canal but that dental work lead to additional work which left her with constant jaw pain. Eventually, the tooth was extracted; unfortunately, the pain was not removed with it.

 

Baker lived with severe pain; she didn't even get relief while she slept. After four months of seeing dentists and doctors, and being told the pain was in her head, her longtime family doctor referred her to Dr. Jeffrey Okeson and the University of Kentucky Orofacial Pain Clinic.  

After trying several treatments, Okeson was able to bring Parker's pain level down significantly, the closest thing to relief she had experienced. Unfortunately, side effects from the medications that reduced the pain left her unable to learn new things, drive, play piano or write. After 30 years as a teacher, and three years after beginning the medical regimen, she retired.

 

Throughout her treatment, Parker realized there was no one to talk to about her experience; there were no support groups or patient advocates. So, she decided to take on a new teaching role and she now helps patients in the clinic that helped her. She talks to patients and provides touch therapy. Additionally, for the past four years she has spoken at the Orofacial Pain Mini-Residency that UK hosts each year. While she misses her time in the classroom she says, "I thought my purpose was to teach; 30 years in the classroom prepared me for this."

 

As the world leaders in orofacial pain, UK organized a small conference to accommodate a group of doctors from England interested in observing patient care at UK. Now, 11 years later, that small conference has grown into the Orofacial Pain Mini-Residency which included doctors from 15 states and 17 countries last year. 

 

Participants in the mini-residency spend one week learning about the treatment of orofacial pain. During this 40-hour course, lectures are given on a variety of topics, from psychology to neuroscience.

 

Another unique aspect of this program is participation from Baker who shares her story and provides the patient perspective. She discusses how psychologically taxing orofacial pain can be and how that influences a patients interaction with their physician. "For many patients the orofacial pain specialist will have been the 10th or 15th physician they've seen for treatment," she said.

 

She also reminds the clinicians that more people are being affected by this chronic pain than just the patient. Sandy's daughter, a high schooler when her mother's pain began, had to take on more and more responsibility as the pain got worse and worse. Kate, now an engineer at NASA, works in medical research with the hopes of helping people like her mother. "Participating in the mini-residency each year is a reminder of where I was and where I could be," Parker said.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

###

 

UKNow is the official daily news site of the University of Kentucky and provides one-stop to everything that is happening at UK. Here you’ll find the latest changes to employee benefits, faculty and staff members who won prestigious awards, details of upcoming lectures, forums, concerts, exhibitions, festivals, etc. Visit www.uky.edu/uknow to access today’s news, in addition to archived news stories and announcements. Follow @universityofky and @UKNewsroom on Twitter for the latest on all things UK. Connect with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/universityofky.

 

Baker lived with severe pain; she didn't even get relief while she slept. After four months of seeing dentists and doctors, and being told the pain was in her head, her longtime family doctor referred her to Dr. Jeffrey Okeson and the University of Kentucky Orofacial Pain Clinic

High School Student Gains Valuable Research Experience at UK

Wed, 06/01/2016 - 16:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 2, 2016) Through one simple email, a unique research partnership was set in motion in the fall of 2015. Emily Liu, a high school junior in the Paul Laurence Dunbar Math, Science and Technology magnet program, was searching for a research mentor for her capstone project.

 

Through extensive reviews of website information, Liu became drawn to the work of Alison Gustafson, associate professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition. Liu contacted Gustafson and successfully found a research faculty member eager to serve as her mentor.

 

Since last November, Liu has been working with Gustafson to analyze research data collected through the School of Human Environmental Sciences obesity grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control.

 

Gustafson led the process of conducting random dial telephone surveys in 741 homes in Clinton, Elliott, Letcher, Lewis, Logan and Martin counties, the six counties included in the scope of the grant. Liu has worked with Gustafson to analyze the data examining fruit and vegetable intake, access to healthy foods, shopping habits, healthy lifestyle choices and community concerns.

 

Liu also developed descriptive tables summarizing the raw data, learned basic procedures for statistical analysis, and ran statistical tests to determine how research variables were associated.

 

Throughout the process, Liu advanced her research skills and explored key factors for obesity risk.

 

“Working on this research project, I have become really interested in statistics and population studies. I’ve learned the power of research as well as the power of behavioral and social sciences,” Liu said.

 

Liu's skill and knowledge development became quickly noted by her mentor.

 

“Emily has been a delight to work with, and I have been so impressed with her ability to grasp high level concepts. She has a true passion to give back to her state," Gustafson said.

 

In addition, Liu gained valuable experience in sharing research results as she competed in school, district, regional and state science fairs. Her project titled “Food Environment and Community Perception as Key Factors for Obesity Risk in Rural Appalachia Kentucky” garnered several awards along the way.

 

Liu was both a district and regional science fair winner in the behavioral and social sciences category, she received the American Psychological Association Award at the regional science fair, and went on to compete at the state level.

 

The overall learning process has been powerful for Liu.

 

“Through my work with Dr. Gustafson, I’ve learned that change can happen. People may feel like they are stuck and have no direction, whether it’s in research or in their food environment access. However, there are always new solutions and directions to go, as well as people who are out there trying to help.” 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe or Samantha Ponder, UK Public Relations, 859-257-1754

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