MenuMenu

Campus News

'I Was Running Out of Time:' Louisville Man Receives New Heart, Kidney at UK

Fri, 06/24/2016 - 11:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 27, 2016) – He pushed through a failing heart for a decade, determined to avoid undergoing a transplant. But in the past year, 49-year-old Conrad Webster knew its time was almost up.

 

The stoic Louisville resident and Operation Desert Storm veteran, who was used to showing no weaknesses, was ready to seek serious help.

 

“I was getting scared because I was just getting so sick,” he said. “I was sick all the time, it just drained me.”

 

Diagnosed with cardiomyopathy – thickening and weakening of the heart muscles – in 2006, Webster spent the next several years managing the disease with medications. As his condition worsened, he experienced transient ischemic attacks (mini-strokes) from blood clots around his neck and heart.

 

Complicating matters further, Webster had also inherited polycystic kidney disease unrelated to his heart problems. This condition causes the kidneys to fill with cysts and ultimately fail. He began going in for dialysis three times a week, ultimately receiving medication for his heart during these trips as well.

 

In March, Webster’s problems came to a head when he collapsed at his fiancee’s house in Cincinnati, complaining of a severe headache.

 

“I couldn’t stand up,” he said. “I think I was crashing.”

 

As his daughters held him up, his fiancée, Leticia Willis, called 911 and he was rushed to a local community hospital. But Webster needed both a heart and kidney transplant, and dual organ transplants aren’t performed at every transplant center. After being turned away at three different regional transplant centers, Webster's sister contacted UK's transplant coordinators and he came in for an evaluation.

 

“Nothing seemed to work,” Willis said. “We were happy to come here. We were ready to try anything.”

 

At UK, he was evaluated by members of both the heart and kidney transplant teams. Due to the severity of his medical issues, Webster says UK cardiothoracic transplant surgeon Dr. Alexis Shafii told him he needed to be admitted right away.

 

“Dr. Shafii looked at me and said, ‘you’re not gonna leave here today,” Webster said. “He said I probably wouldn’t have made it back home.”

 

On April 11,  he was listed for transplant, holding a spot high on the waiting list.

Many patients endure a lengthy hospital stay once they’re listed for transplant, but Webster’s wait was surprisingly short – just three weeks after he was admitted, and only a week of being listed for transplant, he learned that doctors had found a compatible donor. Willis, a nurse who works night shift, had returned to Cincinnati to work when she got a call from Webster to come back to UK.

 

“He called me and said, ‘you have to get back right away, they have a donor,” she said. “He was talking so fast and crying, I could barely understand him.”

 

On April 18, around 2 a.m., Webster officially received his new heart, while his kidney was transplanted about 12 hours later. Following heart transplants, patients are usually encouraged to become mobile, often walking laps with assistance around the cardiovascular intensive care unit on the 8th floor of UK Chandler Hospital’s Pavilion A. A few days after Webster’s surgery, medical staff had him up out of bed and moving around, and within weeks, he had already regained a surprising amount of strength and stamina.

 

“I was walking so fast, they said they knew I’d be out of there real quick,” Webster said.

 

On May 14, just under a month after his double-organ transplant, Webster was discharged to go home. Since then, every day is an improvement on the last.

 

“I already feel a lot better,” he said. “I’m getting my stamina back, I’m breathing better.”

 

After overcoming a decade of serious illness, Webster can finally focus on enjoying life. He’s making plans to travel more, and in October, he and Willis – partners for 11 years – plan to get married. Though Louisville is his hometown, UK and its staff of transplant specialists will always hold a special significance.

 

“They’re unbelievable, they keep up with me all the time,” he said. “I found the right place. No one else would do my transplant, and I was running out of time.”

 

***

Although hospitals are obligated by law to identify potential donors and allow the organ donor procurement program to inform families of their right to donate, anyone can sign up to become an organ donor by joining the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry. The registry is a safe and secure electronic database where a person’s wishes regarding donation will be carried out as requested. To join the registry, visit www.donatelifeky.org or sign up when you renew your driver’s license.  The donor registry enables family members to know that you chose to save and enhance lives through donation. Kentucky’s “First Person Consent” laws mean that the wishes of an individual on the registry will be carried out as requested. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

Matching Money to Mission: UK Board Approves University Budget Today

Fri, 06/24/2016 - 11:00

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Friday today approved a $3.5 billion budget for the 2016-2017 academic year that will increase scholarships and financial aid, invest more in faculty and staff, and target goals in the institution’s strategic plan such as increased graduation rates and research that addresses the state’s challenges.

 

“An institutional budget signals for everyone our priorities. You fund what you care about," UK President Eli Capilouto said. "As the university for Kentucky, this budget represents investments in the strategic goals and objectives that our board made a priority in October 2015 when they endorsed the 2015-2020 Strategic Plan. It invests in student success and academic excellence, research and care that tackles our Commonwealth’s most pressing challenges and creating and sustaining a community where everyone is welcome regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity, religion, perspective, or identity. And it invests in our people, who do the remarkable work essential to the success of our students and our Commonwealth.”

 

UK’s 2020 strategic plan, for example, calls for increasing graduation rates to 70 percent, growing total research expenditures to more than $350 million annually, and further expanding diversity and inclusion throughout the campus community. Capilouto said the budget being considered by the UK board contains significant investments in all those strategic plan goals.

 

“The proposed capital and operating budget further invests in the priorities outlined in the university’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan, endorsed by the board at its October retreat,” said UK Board of Trustees Chairman Dr. Britt Brockman. “This is the right direction for the university to move in achieving its bold agenda for improving student success, enhancing research and discovery, fostering an inclusive campus community, and continuing to serve Kentucky and heal patients.”

 

Highlights of the budget include:

 

·         Increasing student scholarships and financial aid by 12.5 percent in 2016-2017 – a record $117 million to help ensure greater access and affordability.

 

  • A proposed 5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state or resident students, from $5,390 a semester in 2015-2016 to $5,660 in fall 2016-2017; out-of-state or non-resident tuition and fees will increase by 8.5 percent. UK officials expect to enroll another first-year class of well more than 5,000 students with about two-thirds of those students being from Kentucky.

 

  • Average tuition and fee increases for the last five years for UK students are approximately 4 percent for the first time in nearly 10 years. Since 2007, the average out-of-pocket tuition and mandatory fee expense for resident students has increased by only $364 per semester because of UK’s additional investment in financial aid and scholarships.

 

  • A merit pay raise of 2 percent for faculty and staff – the fourth consecutive year of pay raises for UK employees as part of an effort to ensure regular, predictable increases to provide competitive compensation to retain the best instructors, researchers and support staff.

 

  • A realignment of more than $6 million in areas under the Office of the Provost, focused on student success, as well as in Enrollment Management and the colleges of Medicine and Agriculture, Food and Environment. The realignment is part of an effort to increase investments in areas of direct student support like advising and counseling. Up to 75 jobs could be impacted as part of the realignment and reallocation.

 

  • The provost and the colleges also are working on initiatives through realignment to invest millions more in student success at the college level and targeted research efforts that are responsive to UK’s Strategic Plan.

 

  • Another $7 million in increased revenues and efficiencies through areas such as energy conservation, campus sponsorships and more efficient e-payments of bills.

 

“Our focus is student success. Our focus is Kentucky. Our focus is creating a campus community where our students and scholars thrive,” said Tim Tracy, UK’s provost. “In this budget, we are focused more than ever before on matching money to our mission – a mission of education, research, care and service as the university for Kentucky.”

 

Analysis and decision-making about how best to fund that mission began in October 2015 following the Board of Trustees adoption of the new Strategic Plan. It has required several months of work to evaluate key funding needs as well as identifying mechanisms to generate the resources to fund institutional goals and priorities, university officials said.

 

UK, for example, had more than $48 million in projected funding needs that had to be addressed in the wake of decreased levels of state support, increases in compensation, expanded scholarships and aid that students don’t have to repay, and other fixed costs, such as utilities. Those funding needs are being addressed through realignment initiatives, increased revenues gained through more efficient operations and tuition.

 

“We undergo this process of strategic reallocation and realignment each year,” said Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “President Capilouto and the board have set forth clear budget goals – access and affordability for our students; competitive compensation; no across the board cuts; and an increasing commitment to diversity and inclusion across the campus. This proposed budget represents our efforts in each of those key areas to fund our priorities and our plans for the future.”

 

Learn more about UK’s 2016-17 operating and capital budget here

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605

UK Board Extends Contract for President Capilouto to Continue, Sustain Momentum

Fri, 06/24/2016 - 10:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Friday extended the contract of President Eli Capilouto for three years as part of a move to continue to “invest in the future” and the “undeniable progress” UK has made in the last five years.

 

“We are Kentucky’s indispensable institution. I believe we have an indispensable leader,” said UK Board Chairman Britt Brockman. “We have made undeniable progress. But there is still much to do. Now is not the time to be guilty of ‘dreaming too little dreams.’”

 

Specifically, the board Friday considered changes to Capilouto’s current contract that include:

 

  • An extension to June 30, 2021. Capilouto’s current contract expires June 30, 2018.

 

  • An increase in his base salary to $790,000, effective Jan. 1, 2016. His current base salary is $535,500. The increase reflects a review of presidential salaries at other universities in the Southeastern Conference and, more specifically, the five presidents hired most recently. Under terms of the new contract, Capilouto will be eligible, going forward, for the same raises afforded to UK faculty and staff.

 

  • A new longevity incentive equal to Capilouto’s approximate base salary in 2020-2021. The new contract also would remove provisions related to performance bonuses and the use of a university-owned vehicle.

 

The contract changes come after a comprehensive review last year of Capilouto and the beginning of a new, five-year Strategic Plan, Brockman said. “We are at a critical juncture – a point at which vision, the ability to execute and implement, and continuity are essential.”

 

Brockman pointed out that five SEC presidents have been hired in 2015 and 2016. Four of the five were provosts, while Capilouto has five years of experience as a president. And, Brockman said three of those institutions are far less complex, as they don’t have a large academic medical center on their campuses, and the other two are more similar in scope to UK. Yet, Brockman said the contract proposal would place Capilouto’s compensation at less than the 75th percentile for those hires.

 

“We exist in a marketplace,” Brockman said to board members. “This contract proposal reflects that fact.”

 

Brockman said Capilouto’s record of the last five years, since beginning at UK in July 2011, represents a period of incredible progress, including:

 

  • Nearly $2 billion in campus construction, including new residence and dining halls, as well as classrooms and research facilities. The vast majority of that transformation has taken place with university resources, such as philanthropy, rather than state funding.

 

  • Record growth of students, with enrollment now of more than 30,000 and increased applications of more than 70 percent.

 

  • Near record graduation rates, record retention numbers and all-time highs for diversity and student academic quality, as reflected by UK’s place as one of the top 10 public institutions in the country for numbers of National Merit, Achievement and Hispanic Scholars students.

 

  • A more than doubling of student scholarships and financial aid, which does not have to be repaid, to $117 million this coming academic year, reflecting UK’s focus on access, affordability and student success.

 

  • Significant increases in sponsored research, particularly in areas that most impact the state, such as cancer, heart disease and energy.

 

  • Annual patient discharges at UK HealthCare of nearly 40,000 and continued expansion of affiliations across the state and region that bring high-tech, sophisticated care closer to more Kentuckians in their homes.

 

  • Nearly $200 million in annual giving for the first time, and doubling of financial gifts to UK in the last four years.

 

“We have every right to be proud. But we have no place to be satisfied,” Brockman said of the record of achievement over the last five years. “We still have transformational dreams to make real, promises to be made and kept, potential to be met.”

 

Most significantly, Brockman cited the university’s five-year Strategic Plan, adopted by the board in October 2015. The plan calls for substantial increases between now and 2020 in graduation and retention rates, diversity and inclusivity, and research that impacts the Commonwealth. And, at the same time, Brockman said more is being expected of the university in terms of performance for the state’s investment and challenges such as increased competition for students.

 

“President Capilouto is tough, determined, and focused. He possesses a clear vision of how and where he wants to lead. But he combines those … skills with a sense of deep and abiding humanity, of compassion and concern for others,” Brockman said. “He is, in short, the right leader at a pivotal moment for this special place …Now is not the time to be guilty of ‘dreaming too little dreams.’”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

UK Exploring Mixed-use Development, Parking Options at Jersey Street Lot

Fri, 06/24/2016 - 09:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) – The University of Kentucky will seek proposals this summer to construct a mixed-use retail and parking development on the Jersey Street lot location near the north end of campus.

 

In addition to promoting a broad range of transportation and mobility alternatives, the university’s recently published Transportation Master Plan (TMP) identified a parking shortage on campus.

 

At the same time, university officials have been working in partnership with the city on a long-term plan to create and promote more commercial development along near-campus corridors. And with another 1,100-plus residence hall beds opening this fall, UK will have almost 2,500 students living on the north end of campus.

 

The Jersey Street lot is located between Limestone and South Upper Streets. Currently, there are about 150 spots in the parking lot that are utilized by UK employees and surrounding retailers.

 

“We have an opportunity to create more retail along an important community and campus corridor as well as being responsive to the transportation and parking needs we have at UK,” said Eric N. Monday, the university’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “A mixed-use retail and parking development is consistent with our long-term master plan and transportation plan and it has the potential to address retail needs we have on the campus and in the community.”

 

Specifically, UK plans to release a Request For Proposals (RFP) later this summer that would seek potential partners interested in:

 

--Developing a project on the current Jersey Street lot that provides ground-floor retail to service the needs of the campus, the surrounding neighborhood, and the broader downtown community.

 

--Constructing a multi-level parking structure above the retail space that fits within the context of the built environment of surrounding neighborhoods and downtown. A new parking structure would significantly expand that parking capacity for both the campus and nearby business community and public.

 

--Designing a structure that is consistent with the design of urban and downtown buildings as well.

 

Monday discussed the RFP with the UK Board of Trustees Finance Committee during their meeting Friday. He said the timing of a potential project will be dependent upon responses to the RFP. Monday said UK officials have begun discussions with city officials about the potential project as well as area businesses and neighborhood leaders.

 

“UK has utilized innovative public-private partnerships over the last several years to be more responsive to campus needs in a way that is economically efficient and has improved quality of service,” said Board Finance Committee Chair Bill Britton, citing collaborations to expand student housing and dining services. “This proposal may be another opportunity where we can utilize a partnership to be responsive to campus needs in terms of retail and parking, but also the broader community we call home and that we serve.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

Matching Money to Mission: UK Board to Vote on University Budget Today

Thu, 06/23/2016 - 20:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees today considers a $3.5 billion budget for the 2016-2017 academic year that would increase scholarships and financial aid, invest more in faculty and staff, and target goals in the institution’s strategic plan such as increased graduation rates and research that addresses the state’s challenges.

 

“An institutional budget signals for everyone our priorities. You fund what you care about," UK President Eli Capilouto said. "As the university for Kentucky, this budget represents investments in the strategic goals and objectives that our board made a priority in October 2015 when they endorsed the 2015-2020 Strategic Plan. It invests in student success and academic excellence, research and care that tackles our Commonwealth’s most pressing challenges and creating and sustaining a community where everyone is welcome regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity, religion, perspective, or identity. And it invests in our people, who do the remarkable work essential to the success of our students and our Commonwealth.”

 

UK’s 2020 strategic plan, for example, calls for increasing graduation rates to 70 percent, growing total research expenditures to more than $350 million annually, and further expanding diversity and inclusion throughout the campus community. Capilouto said the budget being considered by the UK board contains significant investments in all those strategic plan goals.

 

“The proposed capital and operating budget further invests in the priorities outlined in the university’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan, endorsed by the board at its October retreat,” said UK Board of Trustees Chairman Dr. Britt Brockman. “This is the right direction for the university to move in achieving its bold agenda for improving student success, enhancing research and discovery, fostering an inclusive campus community, and continuing to serve Kentucky and heal patients.”

 

Highlights of the budget proposal include:

 

  • Increasing student scholarships and financial aid by 12.5 percent in 2016-2017 – a record $117 million to help ensure greater access and affordability.

 

  • A proposed 5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state or resident students, from $5,390 a semester in 2015-2016 to $5,660 in fall 2016-2017; out-of-state or non-resident tuition and fees will increase by 8.5 percent. UK officials expect to enroll another first-year class of well more than 5,000 students with about two-thirds of those students being from Kentucky.

 

  • Average tuition and fee increases for the last five years for UK students are approximately 4 percent for the first time in nearly 10 years. Since 2007, the average out-of-pocket tuition and mandatory fee expense for resident students has increased by only $364 per semester because of UK’s additional investment in financial aid and scholarships.

 

  • A merit pay raise of 2 percent for faculty and staff – the fourth consecutive year of pay raises for UK employees as part of an effort to ensure regular, predictable increases to provide competitive compensation to retain the best instructors, researchers and support staff.

 

  • A realignment of more than $6 million in areas under the Office of the Provost, focused on student success, as well as in Enrollment Management and the colleges of Medicine and Agriculture, Food and Environment. The realignment is part of an effort to increase investments in areas of direct student support like advising and counseling. Up to 75 jobs could be impacted as part of the realignment and reallocation.

 

  • The provost and the colleges also are working on initiatives through realignment to invest millions more in student success at the college level and targeted research efforts that are responsive to UK’s Strategic Plan.

 

  • Another $7 million in increased revenues and efficiencies through areas such as energy conservation, campus sponsorships and more efficient e-payments of bills.

 

“Our focus is student success. Our focus is Kentucky. Our focus is creating a campus community where our students and scholars thrive,” said Tim Tracy, UK’s provost. “In this budget, we are focused more than ever before on matching money to our mission – a mission of education, research, care and service as the university for Kentucky.”

 

Analysis and decision-making about how best to fund that mission began in October 2015 following the Board of Trustees adoption of the new Strategic Plan. It has required several months of work to evaluate key funding needs as well as identifying mechanisms to generate the resources to fund institutional goals and priorities, university officials said.

 

UK, for example, had more than $48 million in projected funding needs that had to be addressed in the wake of decreased levels of state support, increases in compensation, expanded scholarships and aid that students don’t have to repay, and other fixed costs, such as utilities. Those funding needs are being addressed through realignment initiatives, increased revenues gained through more efficient operations and tuition.

 

“We undergo this process of strategic reallocation and realignment each year,” said Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “President Capilouto and the board have set forth clear budget goals – access and affordability for our students; competitive compensation; no across the board cuts; and an increasing commitment to diversity and inclusion across the campus. This proposed budget represents our efforts in each of those key areas to fund our priorities and our plans for the future.”

 

Learn more about UK’s 2016-17 operating and capital budget here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

Board of Trustees Approves Changes to Code of Student Conduct

Thu, 06/23/2016 - 15:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) – Today, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees approved proposed changes to UK's Code of Student Conduct. The changes to the code come as the university is continuing to invest in ‒ and improve ‒ the campus safety environment.

 

"We undertake a regular review of our Code of Student Conduct to improve the health, safety, and success of the University of Kentucky," said President Eli Capilouto. "The changes within – guided by feedback from students, faculty, staff, and community members – will improve the safety and climate of the campus community."

 

The Code of Student Conduct is regularly reviewed by the university community and vetted through the Health and Safety Committee, which is composed of faculty, staff and students, to evaluate current best practices and legal changes. The changes approved today were reviewed and researched for nearly two years through several open forums and student groups. The changes are the first to be made to the code since 2010.

 

“We have sought input from our entire campus community, particularly students, to ensure that our Student Code of Conduct is a strong, but fair tool to help ensure the safety of, and sense of inclusion within, our campus community,” said Angela Edwards, chair of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee. “But it also should be a critical tool in helping us create a climate where everyone and every member of our community feels welcome and a sense of belonging.”

 

The board approved several key policy changes including:

  • Defining the scope of the code;
  • Ensuring that the code is in compliance with recent interpretations of federal and state law (the Clery Act, Title IX, etc.);
  • The addition of a formal amnesty policy;
  • The inclusion of UK’s affirmative consent policy; and
  • The addition of a cyberbullying policy.

 

 

“Many members of the UK community have worked diligently to create a comprehensive approach to the issues that our students face on and off campus,” said Victor Hazard, interim vice president for student affairs. “These changes will help ensure the overall safety of our students and the community.”

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Five Residence Halls Get New 'Old' Names

Thu, 06/23/2016 - 14:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Friday approved the renaming of five residence halls in honor of the achievements of prominent leaders in UK’s history.

 

Five years ago, much of UK's campus infrastructure was in need of improvement as it did not serve the technology and learning needs of students. Now, physical spaces across the campus are changing to meet the demands of a 21st century living and learning experience.

 

Under the leadership of President Eli Capilouto, and with the support of the Board of Trustees, UK has been able to execute a $1.9 billion transformation. The vast majority of that transformation has been paid for through a combination of university resources, partnerships with private businesses and UK Athletics, and private giving.

 

Today, campus looks far different. However, that transformation does not change the university's history. Rather, it should serve to enhance it, Capilouto said.

 

“UK is a place defined by its people – the mothers and fathers of this institution, on whose shoulders we stand and whose earlier successes and hard work made our achievements today possible," Capilouto said.

 

"Even as we are focused on the future and the transformation that continues to take place on our campus, we also must ensure that we honor our history and the legacy of accomplishment that has helped shape this special place," said UK Board Chair Britt Brockman. "Renaming these residence halls for those who made UK's mission of education for all of Kentucky possible is just one way we remind ourselves and those we serve of the path we have taken and the work by so many to help make this institution the university for Kentucky."

 

That is especially true on north campus where a number of previous residence halls held the names of many of the university's mothers:  Holmes, Boyd, Jewell and Blazer.  Those names are now returning to campus – to the new residence halls -- those opened two years ago and others scheduled to open this fall across Avenue of Champions and around Patterson Hall, which was the first women's residence hall on campus.

 

Following are the new names of the residence halls and information about the people of significance for whom the buildings are being named:

 

Sarah Bennett Holmes served as UK's dean of women from 1942 until 1957. She defended the rights and welfare of female students. Holmes earned two degrees from the University of Kentucky, and in honor of her service, was named state mother of Kentucky and received the Sullivan Medallion. The original Holmes Hall was named in honor of Sarah Bennett Holmes on May 25, 1958.

 

Limestone Park I will be named Sarah Bennett Holmes Hall.

 

Cleona Bell Matthews Boyd, a native of Missouri, taught Greek and Latin at Park College Academy until she married Dean Paul P. Boyd in 1906 and they moved to Kentucky. She was a teacher of the classics, Greek and Latin. An active member of the UK community, Boyd was president of the UK Woman's Club and the Board of Control of Women's Dormitories for 25 years. Because of her service to women's residence halls, the original Boyd Hall was named for Boyd around 1933.

 

Limestone Park II will be named Cleona Belle Matthews Boyd Hall.

 

Francis Jewell McVey was a native Kentuckian and graduate of Vassar College and Columbia University. Beginning as an instructor at UK in the English department from 1915-1921, Jewell served as dean of women from 1921 until she married President Frank McVey in 1923 and ended her employment with the university. However, she became well known across the state as an ambassador for UK. She opened Maxwell Place to the campus and community for various social and cultural events and remained engaged in campus and civic life.

 

Champions Court I will be named Frances Jewell Hall.

 

Georgia M. Blazer served continuously on the Board of Trustees from 1939 to 1961. The current Blazer Hall is no longer in service as a residence hall and will be razed in 2018. After the new Blazer Hall is dedicated, the current Blazer Hall will be known simply as Blazer Dining until it is decommissioned. The original Blazer Hall was named to recognize Mrs. Blazer's long service to the Board of Trustees and the Blazer family's support of the university.

 

Champions Court II will be named Georgia M. Blazer Hall.

 

On central campus, a dormitory formerly known as Donovan Hall was demolished to accommodate the construction of the new Academic Science Building. Donovan Hall will return as well.

 

Herman Lee Donovan, UK's fourth president (1941-1956), guided the university through World War II and desegregation. He focused much of his energy on post-war planning for UK, which witnessed an influx of returning service men and women. Donovan pushed for the opening in 1955 of the northern Extension Center in Covington, the establishment of new academic programs, and made preliminary plans for the establishment of a medical school. In retirement, Donovan published "Keeping the University Free and Growing." Born in 1887 in Mason County, Kentucky, Donovan died on Nov. 21, 1964.

 

Central Hall II will be named Herman Lee Donovan Hall.

 

Capilouto said the renaming of the residence halls on north campus is especially important as it “reflects the significance Holmes, Boyd, Jewell and Blazer had in the development of the university. As importantly, it reflects – as they did so well – our commitment to placing students at the center of everything we do. That’s what these women and President Donovan did. They devoted their time, energies and talents to the development of students, who in turn were prepared for lives of meaning and purpose in Kentucky and around the globe.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Traditions T Voting Open Until June 27

Thu, 06/23/2016 - 08:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 23, 2016) —Voting is open for the annual Traditions T contest. The Traditions T, sponsored by the University of Kentucky Alumni Association, unites the UK student body in celebrating what it means to be a Wildcat. Artwork is student designed, and the UK student body has the opportunity to vote to determine the winning design.

 

Two final designs have been selected for student voting. Students may vote for the winning shirt until 5 p.m. Monday, June 27, at www.ukalumni.net/2016tshirtvoting. The winning student will receive a $500 cash prize along with five shirts to give to friends or family. The winning shirt will be revealed at Big Blue U on Saturday, August 20.

 

For information about the program, visit www.ukalumni.net/traditionst or contact Jill Smith at jhsmith@uky.edu.

 

The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Club at Spindletop Hall Offers Discount

Wed, 06/22/2016 - 16:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 27, 2016)  The Club at UK’s Spindletop Hall urges University of Kentucky faculty and staff to save on memberships during the final days of its spring promotion.

 

UK faculty and staff who have never joined Spindletop Hall receive a 50 percent initiation discount throughout the year, but they can save an additional 33 percent off the initiation fee through June 30.

 

Fewer than 20 minutes from the heart of campus, amenities of the Club at UK’s Spindletop Hall include:

· Chipping and putting greens; swimming pools; tennis courts; volleyball courts; picnic areas; access to Lexington's Legacy Trail; outdoor event space; and access to Spindletop Hall Mansion.

· Year-round programming such as family activities, Book Club, Wine Club, Bourbon Club, Gardening Club and more.

· Various membership levels for families, couples, single parents, individuals and seniors.

· World-class dining at Roxie's, the upscale casual member dining room; dining on the Veranda in spring, summer and fall; and the Tiki Bar and Grill during the summer.

 

Spindletop is on the south side of Iron Works Pike, between Georgetown Road and Newtown Pike. It is about one mile from I-75, exit 120. The Kentucky Horse Park is located nearby, and Spindletop can be accessed from the Legacy Trail.

 

Click on the link for a video that shows just a taste of what Spindletop has to offer: https://vimeo.com/169775429.

 

Email holly.clark@uky.edu or call 859-255-2777 for more information.

 

 

 

12 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships Cap Off Great Year for UK Student Scholars

Wed, 06/22/2016 - 15:53

 

Video by Jenny Wells/UK Public Relations and Marketing. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 23, 2016) — More than 30 of the University of Kentucky's students and recent graduates had the world's most prestigious scholarship, fellowship and internship organizations take note this year, including what is believed to be a record-breaking group of 12 current and former UK students who were selected to receive National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships, which carry an award of more than $100,000 to use toward research-based master's or doctoral degrees.

 

Helping prepare these UK students and recent alumni to compete for and win such honors is the mission of the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. The office, under the direction of Pat Whitlow, is dedicated to identifying and working with young scholars on the application process for large scholastic prizes.

 

"It has been an exciting year," Whitlow said. "These are very, very competitive awards and students have worked very hard to be prepared to apply. Applicants have to do well in their academics. They have to show a strong record of involvement in extracurricular activities or research or public service. We've had a number of UK students interview for the Rhodes in recent years and we have a student on her Marshall Scholarship studying right now. So, I want UK students to know that they can be very competitive for these awards."

 

This year's UK students and alumni award winners are:

 

Astronaut Scholarship

· Corrine Elliott

 

David L. Boren Scholarship

· Shauna Rust

· Amaris Wade

 

Critical Language Scholarship

· Lee Clark

· Lauren Copeland

· Ruth Dike

· Faiyad Mannan

· Bridget Nicholas

· Katka Showers-Curtis

 

English-Speaking Union Scholarship

· Abby Schroering

 

Fulbright and Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship

· Daniel Ball

· Emily Furnish

· Malinda Massey

· Gabriel Pike

· Katka Showers-Curtis

· Katelyn Wiard

                                  

Fulbright Summer Institute (United Kingdom)

· Abigail King

 

Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship

· Rebecca Blair

· Jarred Brewster

· Austin Eirk

· Tiffany Johnson

 

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship

· Corrine Elliott

 

National Institute of Standards and Technology Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship

· Benjamin Riley

 

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

· Sarah Barney

· Robert Cass

· Michael Crocker

· Matthew Fahrbach

· Charles Fieseler

· Marc Higginson-Rollins

· Christopher Karounos

· Jessime Kirk

· Edward Limin Lo

· Andrew Arthur Nelson

· Cassandra Porter

· Danielle Schaper

 

Princeton in Asia Fellowship

· Calvin Hong

· Brittney Woodrum

 

One of the primary responsibilities of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards is to administer a campus nomination process for 13 major awards that require institutional endorsement. For these specific opportunities, which include such honors as the Truman and Rhodes Scholarships, students must apply first to a campus review committee. The university committee then selects the students who will represent UK. Nominees receive feedback on their application and are officially nominated by the institution. 

 

Recently, UK was selected for another of this type of program. This spring UK became a Churchill Foundation Scholarship Institution. The Churchill Foundation’s scholarship program offers students of exceptional ability and outstanding achievement the opportunity to pursue graduate studies in engineering, mathematics or the sciences at Cambridge University

 

"This is just terrific. It is specifically for STEM students," Whitlow said. "We can nominate two students; the deadline is in the early fall. We will do a campus deadline, so we will actually have our students submit materials in September, and we will do interviews on campus to select our two nominees for that award. It will be a wonderful opportunity."

 

But the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards doesn't just work with those 13 awards alone, the primary goal of the office is to recruit and prepare UK students with strong academic and extracurricular records to help them be successful in pursuing any nationally or internationally competitive programs. The office shares its knowledge of the process helping UK students find scholarships, fellowships and even internships that match their particular area of study or research, which are funded by nonprofit groups, government agencies and companies.

 

Funding opportunities abound, ranging from the STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields to the arts and humanities for many student scholars.

 

"You can come from any discipline. You can come at a variety of points in your academic career," Whitlow said. "I just get a sense of what their interests are and what it is they think they want to do. I am happy to walk them through things that I know about based on their interests."

 

The Office of Nationally Competitive Awards can help students determine if they are eligible for a particular award, assist them in crafting personal essays, offer opportunities to practice for an interview, and shepherd them through the application and/or nomination process. These efforts help the office reach its goal to increase the number of UK students and alumni who apply for, and receive, these national and international awards each year.

 

"I will help students with drafting essays for awards that permit that. We do a lot of practice interviews for students, because interviewing is a skill. We also talk to them about what makes a good recommender and how do you cultivate a contact for a recommendation," Whitlow said.

 

In addition to programs that work with the university, there are many scholarship opportunities that allow direct application. For those awards, the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards also is willing to provide advice and assistance to students preparing an application.

 

The process of applying for a nationally or internationally competitive scholarship is, in itself, a learning experience. It challenges the student to think through his or her career plans, to set ambitious long-term goals, and to imagine how they can use their talents to shape and change the world. In order to be a successful candidate for one of these highly competitive awards, the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards recommends students begin to consider opportunities as early as their freshman year, building extracurricular and leadership background, as well as participating in community and public service while maintaining a high grade point average.

 

"I encourage them to come in early. I encourage students to come see me or come to an info session. We hold an information session nearly every Wednesday evening during the fall term," Whitlow said.

 

But students need not wait until fall to get started — in fact, Whitlow encourages them to take advantage of the summer months in preparing to apply for these opportunities. Her office, located in 221 Funkhouser Building, is ready and waiting for students wanting to talk with her in person or by phone.

 

The UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards is part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Student Opportunity Grant Recipients Announced

Wed, 06/22/2016 - 15:30

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 23, 2016)  The Food Connection at UK has announced the recipients of this year’s Student Opportunity Grants. Covering the gamut from the classroom to food-insecure areas in Lexington to Oaxaca, Mexico, eight projects received a total of $40,200.

 

The income of a $1 million Aramark endowment to promote student opportunities in food studies funds the grant program, which is in its second year. The endowment is a result of the agreement between the University of Kentucky and Aramark to run UK Dining.

 

The Food Connection gave priority to projects directly related to food or food systems that focused on experiential education, community engagement, undergraduate student research, activities linked to dissertation work, professional development and co-curricular activities.

 

“Through this endowment, UK Dining has created a wonderful opportunity for UK students to engage more deeply in food studies, expanding their horizons for a career or for public service,” said Scott Smith, The Food Connection faculty director.

 

The eight projects that received 2016 grant funds are:

 

Experiential Nutrition and Culinary Education: Connecting Intergenerational Audiences in Food Insecure Areas.

This project brings together community mentors and local youth within food-insecure areas for an experiential education program. The curriculum “Cook. Eat. Grow.” seeks to engage “junior sous chefs” in cooking and nutrition education. The program is a collaboration between the UK Department of Community and Leadership Development in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the community organizations FoodChain and GleanKY.

 

Coffee Rust Outbreak in Oaxaca, Mexico: Livelihood and Environmental Impacts.

The spread of coffee rust disease has created a crisis in many of the most important coffee farming regions of the developing world. Traveling to the farms around Oaxaca, Mexico, anthropology undergraduate student Natalie St. Clair will investigate the economic and environmental consequences of the epidemic on smallholder farmers this summer.

 

Food Pathways in Ancient and Modern Times: An Anthropology Course.

In this course students trace the food pathways of plants and animals from prehistoric into modern times. They employ ethnobotanical sources to track the uses of plants and animals among and between indigenous groups focusing mainly on those of the Eastern woodlands and Southeastern United States. The class also incorporates comparisons with historic period food pathways in Kentucky.

 

Experiential Learning and Presenting Undergraduate Research.

The Food Connection is continuing its partnership with and sponsorship of Campus Kitchens at UK and Sustainable Solutions to Overcome Poverty, also known as SSTOP Hunger. To date, Campus Kitchens has recovered more than 5,000 pounds of food, created more than 4,000 meals, and served about 300 clients per month. SSTOP Hunger’s student leadership has propelled UK into becoming a leader in the international organization Universities Fighting World Hunger. The Student Opportunity Grant will support student participation in and presentations at national meetings of these organizations.

 

Undergraduate Internship Opportunities with the Food Systems Innovation Center.

Student interns are immersed in research and development projects of the Food Systems Innovation Center, which assists small and medium food producers and entrepreneurs with food safety and processing technology and provides access to consultation and training to address the wider ranging challenges of bringing a food product to market. Areas of work emphasized this year include pre-and post-harvest safety methods in the field and educational strategies for value-added, Food and Drug Administration-regulated foods.

 

Growing Fresh Stop Markets through Neighborhood Leadership.

Fresh Stop Markets are a successful model for bringing fresh, local produce at affordable prices to low-income neighborhoods. UK students and staff will connect with North Lexington residents to increase local fresh food access for limited-resource residents. Working within the framework of Fresh Stop Markets in North Lexington, the team will offer expanded opportunities for leadership development.

 

Sustainable Production of Living Organic Container-Grown Kitchen Herbs.

This project’s goal is to develop an organic production system for market quality container-grown kitchen herbs. Two undergraduate students, under the direction of faculty and staff in the Department of Horticulture, will evaluate production methods including fertilization and seeding. The product will be test marketed at the UK Horticulture Club’s weekly campus market.

 

Food Systems, Food Justice and Race: Innovation in Instruction.

UK faculty and students in the departments of Community and Leadership Development, Geography, and African American and Africana Studies will join with community leaders and the Lexington Fresh Stop program to develop a multidisciplinary course, the goals of which include developing knowledgeable and engaged citizen-students and community leaders who are prepared to address issues related to food systems with a level of proficiency with regard to race.

 

The purpose of The Food Connection at UK, which is administered by the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is to promote a healthy, sustainable food economy. It serves as a hub and information source on campus and as a sourcing tool to help UK Dining meet its contractual obligations to supply locally produced food.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu.

University Drive Garage Closure Set for June 25-26

Wed, 06/22/2016 - 11:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 23, 2016) — As part of the ongoing annual routine maintenance work on the University of Kentucky's parking structures, the University Drive Garage (PS #1) entry will be closed starting 5 p.m. Friday, June 24. All vehicles must be removed from the garage by 8 a.m. Saturday, June 25. The garage will remain closed until 11 p.m. Sunday, June 26. The project is weather-dependent and the dates are subject to change.

 

This closure is necessary to apply a protective coating to the facility. Parking and Transportation Services is undertaking this process to help extend the useful life of the facility. This work has been scheduled to take place on a weekend to minimize the impact to the university community.

Former Truck Driver Seeks to Improve Working Conditions, Safety for Women on the Road

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 16:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) — After 13 years working as a trauma, emergency room and flight nurse in Western Kentucky, Kim Bourne decided it was time to put rubber to the road — 18 gargantuan wheels of rubber to be exact.

 

Bourne, a doctoral student in the UK College of Nursing, broke away from her routine as a double-time nurse in 2008 to join her husband Ricky in the cab of a semi-truck. The transition to the truck driving profession also positioned Bourne as a gender minority in the workplace. Of the 3.5 million truck drivers in America, an estimated 200,000 are women.

 

“I got really burnt out of nursing and needed a break,” Bourne said. “I thought, ‘You know, I’ve always wanted to do this.’”

 

After Bourne earned her trucking license, which required hours on the road with a trainer and a series of tests to show her ability to maneuver a 53-foot trailer carrying as much as 80,000 pounds of freight, she and Ricky started accepting runs as a driving team. About a year after teaming up as drivers, the couple married on a Friday night in 2009 and hit the road first thing the following Saturday morning. They started running their favorite route transporting packaging material from Owensboro, through the heartland of America, and ending at their drop-off location in California. They returned to Kentucky every other weekend, in time for Bourne to work a couple nursing shifts at the hospital and spend a few hours with her children.

 

Life as a truck driver demanded long stretches of time at the wheel, strict delivery schedules and a constant alertness on the road, as the couple were always trying to anticipate dangerous conditions and erratic drivers. But the couple also romanticized the truck-driving profession. Working as a truck driving team allowed the newlyweds to exercise free-reign and explore America’s vast landscape together.

 

“When he and I went out on the road, it was a lot of fun,” Bourne said. “We have been all over the United States and Canada. We’d occasionally get to bobtail and go to dinner and the movies.”

 

Every workday took the couple to new locations with new challenges. They dug their semi-truck out of blizzards in Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming. They fell in love with the tiny border town of Laredo, Texas, where they made a ritual of dropping the trailer at the company yard and parking the bobtail at the mall to see a movie. Since their drop-off location was usually in the pristine city of San Diego, they bought season passes to Sea World where they boarded Bourne’s Pomeranian, the third passenger who was their faithful “truck dog.”

 

While Bourne enjoyed the traveling aspect of the truck driving profession, she also witnessed a darker side of her profession. She noticed the fellow women in the male-dominated profession were often victims of sexual harassment and assault. Truckers used CB radios to make harassing or threatening remarks to women drivers they encountered on the road. Truck stops were often unsafe places for female drivers, and many women suffered from sexual assault and oppression. Bourne remembers being solicited by a male truck driver who offered his wife for sexual services in exchange for money, essentially acting as her pimp in unmonitored environments. Bourne and Ricky deliberately avoided some truck stops in the West because of the known threat to women.

 

“I would get snide comments about a being a woman and going into a truck stop,” Bourne said. “It’s just a different mindset in trucking. Women are intruders in a male-dominated world, and a lot of the men don’t like it.”

 

Bourne also recognized domestic violence as a common, but unspoken, occurrence among truck driving teams who were also couples. A female colleague who finished orientation at the same time as Bourne reported to the truck terminal with signs of abuse from her partner. Bourne said when couples share tight living quarters, tension eventually mounts between them and confrontations can lead to abuse and violence. Women are often helpless in these situations, which is why reporting rates of abuse and violence in trucking are low. In addition, women have limited accessibility to support resources or health care services while on the road.

 

Yearning for more time with her children, Bourne retired her role as a truck driver to attend graduate school at Western Kentucky University in 2010. She aspired to teach nursing at the college level. Ricky continued truck driving for a local company, which allowed him to come home every evening. When she advanced to the doctoral program at UK College of Nursing in 2015, her encounters with gender inequality, assault and domestic violence on the road resurfaced in her mind. She knew her doctoral studies should concentrate on an issue for which she felt a personal connection and deep understanding, so she founded her scholarly work on the topic of health disparities among female truck drivers and domestic violence in the trucking industry.

 

“It had always bothered me, what had happened on the road,” Bourne said. “We saw the intimate partner violence within the trucks going on and heard sexual harassment over the CB radio — even now it irritates the fire out of me.”

 

Bourne plans to conduct research in this vulnerable population of America’s workforce with the ultimate goal of informing policies to protect women drivers and prevent domestic violence on the road. Bourne also wants to develop transitional programs and interventions to help women access health care services and domestic violence support while traveling from state to state. Insurance coverage discrepancies and inconsistency in health care policies have prevented women from receiving adequate care while on the job.

 

She also hopes to look at methods for preventing human trafficking, which has been facilitated by the truck driving industry. She thinks heightened awareness about these critical dangers and injustices will encourage trucking companies to reinforce safety policies and implement programs to make truck driving more conducive for women, like her, who are bold enough to get behind 18 wheels. 

 

“The research I’m doing is something I’m passionate about — nobody should have to work in those conditions,” Bourne said. “Nobody should have to do their job and know they are not safe.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

Ad Astra Announces David Timoney Leads Client Advisory Board as President

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 16:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) — David Timoney, associate registrar for communications at the University of Kentucky, is serving as president of the Ad Astra Information Systems™ Client Advisory Board in 2016 and recently provided leadership at the annual board meeting in Kansas City in April. He has served on the board for the last two years, and supported the board as president-elect in 2015. Timoney has presented innovative scheduling insights at many of Ad Astra Users’ Conferences and will do so at the upcoming conference in October 2016. 

 

“Serving as president of Ad Astra’s Client Advisory Board has been an incredible honor, and it’s also been a privilege to share ideas and work with peers from across the country on various student success initiatives as it relates to the schedule of classes,” Timoney said.

 

The Client Advisory Board (CAB) represents the needs and concerns of Ad Astra’s clients, and plays a valuable role in defining Ad Astra’s strategic direction and solutions. The company’s teams work with CAB members to explore trends and opportunities in academic leadership, scheduling, resource allocation and event management.

 

Ad Astra Information Systems LLC, the industry leader in higher education software services, has partnered with more than 800 higher education institutions and systems worldwide. Based in Overland Park, Kansas, Ad Astra offers data-informed software solutions and professional services to enable campus leaders to effectively allocate space and faculty resources, forecast student demand for courses, and accelerate student program completions.

 

For the past four years, Timoney has served as the associate registrar for communications and publication at UK. In his current role, Timoney oversees the academic course and academic event scheduling process of all centrally-scheduled classrooms at the university.

 

In addition to overseeing the classroom scheduling process, Timoney also helps oversee the University Course Catalog and Bulletin. UK is currently on Astra version 7.5, and uses SAP as its student information system.

 

Timoney has worked at UK for the past three years. He received his bachelor's degree from UK and his MBA from Bellarmine University.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

 

UK Political Science Professor, Student Publish in Top Journal

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:57

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) Recently, Comparative Political Studies (CPS), a highly recognized political science journal, published an article titled “Addressing the Gender Gap: The Effect of Compulsory Voting on Women's Electoral Engagement.”

 

The article was written by two University of Kentucky affiliates in the Department of Political Science of the College of Arts and Sciences, Assistant Professor Abby Córdova and co-author Gabriela Rangel, a UK fourth-year doctoral student and teaching assistant.

 

 

CPS is known for publishing the most up-to-date information on methodology, theory and research in comparative politics. The esteemed journal is a forum for students and scholars of comparative politics to exchange ideas. CPS-published articles usually discuss the innovative work being done on comparative methodology, theory and research from around the world.

 

In "Addressing the Gender Gap," the authors hypothesize that mandatory voting laws will help narrow the gender gap by creating opportunities and motivations for women to engage in the electoral process.

 

The authors use strong cross-national survey data to support their hypotheses. The research they have collected shows that countries with mandatory voting laws show a much smaller gender gap not only in voting but in other forms of electoral engagement, such as political party information.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Teen Volunteers Give Back and Learn About Health Care

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 15:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) – Some teens spend summer vacation doing advanced placement homework while others play video games or find summer jobs. Three students from Henry Clay High School are spending their summer volunteering with UK HealthCare through the Teen Volunteer Program.

 

Lauren Spivey, Emily Spivey and Reagan Smith each spend several hours a week giving back and providing support and smiles to those receiving treatment at Albert B. Chandler Hospital. This is the second year sisters Emily and Lauren Spivey will spend participating in the volunteer program. After their mother told them about the opportunity, they decided to participate because they enjoy helping people. Smith, also a second-year volunteer, decided to participate again for “the chance to give back while gaining medical experience.”

 

The Spivey sisters and Smith have a variety of responsibilities that rotate throughout their time of service. For example, after patients are out of surgery and in the recovery area, Lauren Spivey escorts their families to visit them from the waiting area. Although she enjoys the task, her favorite area  is the Pavilion A gift shop.

 

While Emily Spivey also enjoys working in the gift shop, her favorite task is delivering mail and flowers to patients throughout UK HealthCare. She prefers this task because she “likes seeing patients happy and enjoying visitors and the flowers make them smile.” Smith appreciates the variety in his responsibilities, delivering toys to the patients at Kentucky Children’s Hospital, providing direction to guests and assisting radiology and imaging. Emily Spivey and Smith envision working as health care providers in their future and consider volunteering an opportunity to learn about different specialties. Lauren would like to work in marketing; she likes learning how the hospital and health care providers engage with the community.

 

The Teen Volunteer Program has been part of UK HealthCare for more than 50 years and on average there are about 60 volunteers each summer. After applying and interviewing for the program, the selected teens attend an orientation to learn more about their volunteer roles, take a tour of the hospital and hear about a variety of health care career opportunities. After meeting all necessary requirements, volunteers receive a certificate of completion for their summer of service.

 

To learn more about volunteering with UK HealthCare click here.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

###

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Mullins and Gonsalves Discuss Oral Health on KET

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 11:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) – As part of KET's "Inside Oral Health Care" initiative, funded in part by a grant from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, Drs. Raynor Mullins, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry emeritus faculty, and Wanda Gonsalves, vice chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Kentucky, were interviewed on KET’s “One to One with Bill Goodman” show.

 

Goodman spoke with Mullins and Gonsalves regarding coordinating oral health and primary medical behavioral health care. This coordination is important, as a person’s oral health is crucial to their overall wellness.

 

During the interview, Mullins shared, “It’s clear to me that oral health has many consequences that are not readily recognized by our public officials or in healthcare policy and finance.”

 

This lack of knowledge about oral health leads to significant hidden costs for Medicaid and Medicare as well as private insurance companies, according to Mullins.

 

If primary care providers, dentists and dental hygienists can begin to work together, Mullins and Gonsalves contend those costs can be reduced and oral health improved.

 

The segment is available and can be viewed online here. It will also air again on KET2 and KETKY on the following dates and times:

  • KET2: June 22, 2016 at 7:30 a.m. ET
  • KET2 June 22, 2016 at 7:29 p.m. ET
  • KET2: June 22, 2016 at 7:30 p.m. ET
  • KETKY: June 23, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. ET
  • KETKY: June 26, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. ET

DENTISTRY CONTACT: Ann Jarvis, ann.jarvis@uky.edu, (859) 323-6526

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

###

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Valerie Perry Named Special Libraries Association Fellow

Tue, 06/21/2016 - 09:51

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2016) Valerie Perry, director of Branch Libraries and head of the Agricultural Information Center at University of Kentucky Libraries, has been named a Special Libraries Association (SLA) Fellow. The SLA Fellowship recognizes mid-career information professionals for their past, present and future service to the association and the profession. No more than five SLA members may be selected for the fellowship each year. 

 

SLA Fellows are called upon and expected to advise the association's board of directors and alert the membership to issues and trends warranting action. Individuals receiving the honor may use the title “Fellow of the Special Libraries Association.” Perry's SLA Fellowship was conferred last week during the 2016 SLA Annual Conference, held June 12-14, in Philadelphia.

 

Soon after joining SLA in 1998, Perry took on leadership roles in the Kentucky chapter, serving as secretary, archivist, chair of the Strategic Planning Committee, and subsequently as president in 2012. She has been treasurer of the Science-Technology Division and business manager of Sci-Tech News and has also served in numerous leadership roles in the Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition Division, including chair for two consecutive terms (2009 and 2010) and conference program planning chair.

 

At the association level, Perry is currently a member of the SLA Nominating Committee. She has also served on the SLA Board of Directors as past division cabinet chair (2014) and on the Member Preferences Task Force, the Volunteer Experience Task Force, and the Online Content Advisory Council.

 

As much as her colleagues admire her extensive knowledge of agricultural and biological sciences, Perry is equally revered for her outgoing personality and eagerness to help and teach others. She has been honored several times for her many contributions to SLA and the information profession. The Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition Division gave her its Distinguished Member Award in 2007, and the Kentucky chapter of SLA honored her with the Kentucky Chapter Professional Award (2007) and the Larry Besant Professional Award (2014).

 

The SLA is a nonprofit international organization for innovative information professionals and their strategic partners. SLA serves information professionals in more than 60 countries and in a range of working environments, including business, academia and government agencies. SLA promotes and strengthens its members through learning, advocacy and networking initiatives.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

PTS Powers Permit Holders with Free Jump-Start Service

Mon, 06/20/2016 - 14:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 21, 2016)  After a successful pilot year, University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS)  is extending its trial of free jump-starts into an established service and integrating this into the motorist assistance program.

 

From July 15, 2015, to April 30, 2016, PTS received 141 motorist assistance calls — an average of 14 calls per month.

  

"The PTS team is committed to being accountable and innovative — consistently looking to discover ways to provide the best possible support services to the university and its students, faculty, staff, visitors, patients and fans," said Eric Monday, UK executive vice president for finance and administration.

 

If your car battery dies on campus and you need a jump-start, call 859-257-5757 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, or call the university’s towing contractor, Bluegrass Towing, at 859-231-0197 after hours and throughout the weekend; these numbers are also listed on the back of each UK parking permit for easy reference.

 

PTS reserves the right to refuse free battery jump-start service due to excessive use of this service by a single permit holder or to visitors parked in violation. Requesting individuals are responsible for any advance service required due to vehicles being unable to start through typical jump-start procedures or situations where batteries fail to hold adequate charge.

 

PTS, in partnership with Bluegrass Towing, offers the following discounted motorist assistance services to all valid UK parking permit holders

  • Vehicle tow
  • Flat tire change (using owner supplied spare tire)
  • Off-campus battery jump-start
  • Vehicle lock
  • Out of fuel (standard rate + cost of fuel)

These services are offered 24 hours a day, anywhere within Fayette County. Cost for each of these services is $49 within New Circle Road and $49 + $3 per mile outside of New Circle Road unless otherwise noted below.

 

To be eligible for the UK discount, Bluegrass Towing will record your permit number prior to providing the service. For your convenience, tow truck drivers accept cash, check or credit card at the scene.

 

For more information about the PTS discounted motorist assistance program, visit www.uky.edu/pts/help-and-resources_motorist-assistance.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Katie Terrell Named Winner of 2016 Paul Kevin Burberry Award

Mon, 06/20/2016 - 11:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 21, 2016)  University of Kentucky student Katie Terrell has been named the 2016 Paul Kevin Burberry Award winner by the UK Human Development Institute (HDI).

 

Terrell is an educational specialist student in the UK College of Education and a research assistant at HDI. She has completed the Graduate Certificate in Developmental Disabilities and presented her research on mentoring partnerships for college students with disabilities at the 2015 American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities conference in Louisville, Kentucky. She is also the HDI trainee liaison to the Association of University Centers on Disabilities for 2015-2016.

 

The Burberry Award is named in memory of the Berea, Kentucky, native who pioneered a trail in the public school system as the first student with significant physical disabilities, due to cerebral palsy, to complete Berea Community High School. Kevin Burberry graduated with highest honors and went on to attend Berea College and UK, where he majored in philosophy. He was an exemplary student and self-advocate, and worked on an HDI project that created training modules in developmental disabilities for medical school students and other allied health student professionals that are still used today. Burberry’s life was cut short prior to his anticipated graduation, and he was awarded his UK degree posthumously, with highest honors, in May 2004.

 

The Burberry Award is HDI’s highest student honor and is given to a student involved with HDI who has exemplified in his or her life the leadership, advocacy and commitment to persons with disabilities and their families that Burberry demonstrated in his own life.

 

“Katie has always gone above and beyond … She has personally mentored no fewer than six students with developmental disabilities, facilitating their successful completion of postsecondary courses,” said co-nominator Barry Whaley. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Pages