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UK is Home to 2016 Campus Kitchen of the Year

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — The Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky has been named the 2016 Campus Kitchen of the Year. The Campus Kitchens Project (CKP) national office recently announced awards at the third annual Food Waste and Hunger Summit at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. 

 

Founded in 2011, the Campus Kitchens Project is the leading national nonprofit empowering students to fight hunger and food waste.

 

The Campus Kitchen of the Year is selected from 51 Campus Kitchens across the nation. The honor recognizes the Campus Kitchen that excels not only in safe and efficient operations, but in community partnerships, participating in the CKP network, volunteer engagement and more.   

 

“Since their launch just two years ago, the Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky has had a significant impact on the issues of food waste and hunger in their community,” said Laura Toscano, director of the national organization. “Their innovative work includes not only providing meals, but also creating an intergenerational mentoring program that decreases isolation for older adults, which is one of the underlying root causes of hunger for the senior population. It is our pleasure to recognize their work through the Campus Kitchen of the Year Award.”

 

The Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky (CKUK) is an on-campus, student service organization established with faculty and staff support in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition in April 2014. It creates sustainable solutions to decreasing food waste while providing healthy meals to those struggling with hunger.

 

Sandra Bastin, chair of the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition (DHN), praised the CKUK student leaders and advisors including Tammy Stephenson, DHN assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies, and Amanda Hege, DHN director of community outreach.

 

“The department is proud to support these efforts and is especially pleased that this group of individuals have been recognized for their passion and hard work. They are a perfect example of uniting individuals from diverse backgrounds to work toward a common goal; in this case feeding those experiencing hunger. The program not only builds camaraderie and teamwork among the volunteers but individually promotes personal growth and self-esteem. I am humbled to be associated with the Campus Kitchen,” Bastin said.

 

"It has not only been an amazing opportunity to pursue my passion of service, but also allowed me to grow as a student leader,” said Ash Thenappan, CKUK president, “Receiving the Campus Kitchen of the Year Award shows the amazing work our leadership team and volunteers are making in ending hunger in Lexington."

 

Since November 2014, 1,180 UK students recovered 2,751 pounds of prepared food from UK Dining and gleaned 1,153 pounds of fresh produce through GleanKY and the UK South Farm. They served 4,080 meals to children, youth and older adults experiencing hunger and homelessness in Lexington.

 

“Whether our students are leading volunteers in the kitchen or establishing community partners, they are developing a commitment to service and building leadership skills that they carry with them into their future,” Hege said.

 

The Campus Kitchen at UK is an affiliate of the Campus Kitchens Project and is proudly supported by the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Food Connection, Student Sustainability Council and Student Government Association at UK. To learn more about the Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky (CKUK) visit: https://dhn-hes.ca.uky.edu/CKUK.

 

CKUK is operating this summer. If you are interested in volunteering, sign up online:

http://vhub.at/ckuk.

 

On 51 university and high school campuses across the country, student volunteers with the Campus Kitchens Project transform unused food from dining halls, grocery stores, restaurants and farmers’ markets into meals that are delivered to local agencies serving those in need. Each Campus Kitchen goes beyond meals by using food as a tool to promote poverty solutions, implement garden initiatives, participate in nutrition education and convene food policy events. To learn more about the Campus Kitchens Project, visit www.campuskitchens.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Terrance Wade, terrance.wade@uky.edu, 859-257-8716; Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200.

Two Obstetrics and Gynecology Researchers Study Problems of Fertility with Lalor Fellowships

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Two investigators in the UK HealthCare Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were recently awarded fellowships from the Lalor Foundation for projects designed to enhance women’s reproductive health and resolve problems of infertility.

 

Dr. Patrick Hannon and Dr. Yohan Choi were each selected to receive $50,000 to support their research activities during a 12-month period. Lalor fellows conduct postdoctoral research on reproductive biology related to issues of fertility. The Lalor Foundation provides assistance and encouragement to early stage investigators who are engaged in the area of mammalian reproductive biology as it relates to the regulation of fertility. 

 

In an effort to better understand the mechanisms that control ovulation, Hannon and Choi are seeking to advance treatment options for infertility and advance women’s health care. The release of the egg during the process of ovulation is paramount for fertility, and defects in ovulation attribute to more than 25 percent of all cases of female infertility.

 

Contributing to the knowledge base of this field, Hannon discovered levels of secretogranin II (SCG2), a protein with an unknown role in the ovary, are up-regulated, or positively stimulated, in response to treatment with luteinizing hormone (LH), the hormone that triggers ovulation, in human ovarian cells. These findings suggest that this protein might be involved in the onset of ovulation. Previous studies have shown that SCG2 is involved in regulating hormone action, the development of new blood vessels and the migration of immune cells. These processes are necessary for ovulation and fertility, but scientists have never before tested whether SCG2 preforms these tasks in the ovary to aid in ovulation. Hannon’s project will utilize human, monkey and mouse ovarian samples to understand when and how SCG2 is regulated in response to the ovulatory LH stimulus, and to determine how SCG2 drives ovulation across species. 

 

Choi studies the mechanisms involved in the production of prostaglandins (PGs) in ovulatory follicles in women. PGs are a group of physiologically active lipid compounds whose synthesis is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen. These types of drugs have been reported to block ovulation in women, demonstrating the importance of PGs in the ovulatory process. Because nothing is known about PG production and secretion in human ovaries, Choi has proposed identifying the regulatory mechanisms by which the LH surge and its key down-stream mediators coordinate the rise in PGs in human ovulatory follicles using in vivo and in vitro models. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Dining Adjusts Operating Hours During Finals Week

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 13:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Today, Monday, May 2, begins finals week at the University of Kentucky.

 

To accommodate students, faculty and staff, UK Dining has adjusted hours of operation at all campus dining locations. The image below reflects the adjusted hours.

 

As seen in the image below, Starbucks located in William T. Young Library will be open 24 hours.

 

For more information and to view the altered hours, visit https://uky.campusdish.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Welcome 2016-17 K Week Coordinators

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 12:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Summertime to most University of Kentucky students means getting ahead in summer courses, internships, studying abroad, employment or vacationing with family and friends. For two juniors, Pete Comparoni and Trent Patrick, it means devoting their time to leading hundreds of student leaders (K Crew) in putting the final touches on K Week, the university’s fall welcome week.

 

Designed to make the transition to college life at UK as smooth as possible, K Week is nine days with approximately 250 activities, sessions and social activities planned — each one offering a unique and exciting experience for incoming students.

 

Both Comparoni, a sociology major and criminology minor, and Patrick, a political science and sociology major with a pre-law track, signed up as freshmen for K Crew, followed by Super Crew as sophomores and finally they accepted the 18-month commitment as K Week coordinators.

 

Patrick, coming from a graduating high school class of 63 to a class of 5,000 here at UK, spoke about his transition as an incoming freshman and how his goal as a coordinator is to provide “the best way to help these new students transition in a way that would lead to their success.”

 

Comparoni’s favorite part of K Week is K Week Kick-off. "It is the first time the entire incoming class is in once place, and it is incredible to watch."

 

Patrick cites Big Blue U as his favorite event. “I love watching the excitement of new students as they sit with their class in Commonwealth Stadium,” Patrick said.

 

During his freshman year, Patrick says Big Blue U was the first moment where his life as a college student became reality.

 

Comparoni’s advice for incoming freshmen is simple: get involved.

 

"Get involved and take advantages of all the opportunities that UK has to offer,” Comparoni said.

 

Patrick agrees, “Enjoy the experience because it will pass quickly.”

 

Student organizations and departments interested in submitting a K Week event can do so here: https://orgsync.com/85753/forms/197711. Those interested in participating in We Are UK, an event that celebrates the uniqueness of the UK community, can submit their registration here: https://orgsync.com/85753/forms/196030.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Ashley Cox, 513-464-2548, aco264@uky.edu; or Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Ambati Named Among Top 100 Most Influential People in Ophthalmology

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 10:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) – Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, professor of physiology and vice chair of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been named to The Ophthalmologist Power List 2016 'Top 100 Most Influential People in the World of Ophthalmology.' This international list features the most influential and innovative individuals in the worlds of ophthalmic surgery, research and industry.

 

Ambati is an internationally recognized authority who has pioneered innovative concepts in macular degeneration, a blinding disease that affects nearly 200 million people worldwide. His lab has reported numerous seminal advances in top-tier scientific journals such as Nature, Cell, Nature Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and The Journal of Clinical Investigation, elucidating the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and ocular angiogenesis. Ambati's prolific body of research also more broadly addresses central questions in vision science and retinal disease.

 

Ambati, who is the Dr. E. Vernon & Eloise C. Smith Endowed Chair in Macular Degeneration, has received numerous prestigious awards including the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and  elected to The Association of American Physicians, The American Society for Clinical Investigation, and The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Recently, he became the first individual at UK to be induceted into The National Academy of Inventors. He also serves on the editorial boards of multiple journals including Ophthalmology, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, and Translational Vision & Science Technology. 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

 

Whistleblower Stanton Glantz Reflects on Tobacco Control Progress, Emerging Challenges

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 17:02

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — The name Stanton Glantz is revered by community health advocates and dreaded by the tobacco industry.

 

The University of California-San Francisco professor and distinguished tobacco control researcher led the movement to call out deceptive marketing messages disseminated by Big Tobacco companies and expose the dangers of tobacco products during the 1990s. His research illuminated the risks associated with secondhand smoke, as well as the correlation between high smoking rates and heart attack deaths in populations. His research has shown the power of strong smoke-free laws in reducing cardiovascular disease.

 

But despite progress made in the past 20 years to subdue persuasive marketing tactics from the tobacco industry, the work isn’t complete in states like Kentucky, where tobacco-related illness is the leading cause of preventable death. On April 28, Glantz addressed unfinished business in the fight against tobacco and identified modern threats posed by the tobacco industry during his keynote address at the Kentucky Center for Smoke-Free Policy’s annual conference titled “Mobilizing an Army of Smoke-free Advocates.” He commended community advocates in all corners of Kentucky for protecting individual rights to clean air and healthy environments for the more than 70 percent of Kentuckians who aren’t smokers.

 

“The whole battle is a battle about social norms and social acceptability, and once you win these fights, and you have a law that’s sticking —which takes a while — you don’t go back. And the tobacco companies understand that, and that is why they fight so hard,” Glantz said during his keynote address. “In the end, when you win, you’ve won. And the fight itself is an important part of making these laws work.”

 

After a stack of papers known as the “cigarette papers” landed at his doorstep in 1994, Glantz analyzed thousands of documents to build evidence against cigarette companies. The documents revealed that tobacco executives were aware of the dangers of their products while using aggressive marketing tactics to put these products in the hands of young adults and adolescents. Glantz published a groundbreaking book, The Cigarette Papers, as an indictment against the tobacco executives and marketers who were misleading the public.

 

Health experts and smoke-free advocates, including Glantz, have witnessed a resurgence of tobacco industry marketing efforts to target young people and normalize the use of the latest dangerous tobacco product on the market — electronic smoking devices or e-cigarettes.  Glantz applied the lessons he learned through exposing the secrets of Big Tobacco in the 90s to the tobacco challenges of today, and said the dangers of tobacco marketing still persist in American society. He also discussed strategies for researchers, activists, and health care workers to resist pro-tobacco sentiments and reduce the burden of tobacco-related illness in their communities.

 

The KCSP also recognized efforts to promote the health across Kentucky by honoring local communities and municipalities that enacted smoke-free legislation in the past year. The City of Pikeville and the City of Ashland received awards for amending legislation to include e-cigarettes in their smoke-free ordinances. Hazard Community and Technical College received the 2016 Tobacco-free Campus Award. The City of Middlesboro earned the 2016 KCSP Smoke-free Indoor Air Excellence Award for passing a smoke-free workplace ordinance in May 2015.

 

The 2016 Smoke-free Youth Advocate Award went to the 2015 Middlesboro Destination Imagination Team, a nonprofit group comprising seven fourth- and fifth-graders, their parents, and teachers. The group delivered a presentation about the hazards of secondhand to the Middlesboro City Council and garnered more than 400 signatures for a petition supporting smoke-free legislation, which was adopted in May 2015. 

 

“Embracing this year’s theme of mobilizing an army to end the burden of tobacco, we’re keenly aware of the fact that the tobacco companies have not loosened their grip in Kentucky,” Ellen Hahn, director of the KCSP and the Marcia A Dake Professor in the UK College of Nursing, said. “We’re proud of the communities that are taking a stand against tobacco in all its forms, and it is exciting to see children and adults alike making a big difference in their communities. Still, as Stan Glantz said in his keynote address, our work isn’t finished in Kentucky or across the nation.”

 

The Kentucky Center for Smoke-free Policy, housed in the UK College of Nursing, conducts research, collects data, and provides resources and strategies to assist advocates working on smoke-free campaigns across Kentucky. The conference was sponsored by UK HealthCare. 

 

For a full list of award winners and press releases, contact Elizabeth Adams at elizabethadams@uky.edu.

 UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

UK Cardiologist is Leading a Study to Explore a New Way to Heal Resistant Hypertension

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 16:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — What does your blood pressure have in common with a garden hose? Quite a lot, in fact.

 

Increasing the pressure in a garden hose (whether by opening your faucet to full force or by plugging the end of the hose opening) can cause it to become rigid or even burst.

 

Blood in the arteries functions in much the same way. Consistently high blood pressure -- also called hypertension -- damages the tissues of the artery walls. While it's fairly easy to replace a garden hose, hypertension can lead to serious medical problems and even death.

 

Hypertension is defined as a chronic condition in which the systolic blood pressure (the top number in the measurement that your health care provider gives you) exceeds 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) exceeds 90 mmHg. Although it's normal to experience minor fluctuations throughout the day, one in three Americans experience high levels of blood pressure (exceeding 140/90) even without activity or stress. That can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney disease and even death. This increased risk is compounded in people with diabetes, high cholesterol, or smokers.

 

Generally, patients with hypertension can help control their high blood pressure by adopting healthy lifestyle habits such as:

·      Losing weight

·      Exercising more

·      Stopping smoking

·      Reducing stress

·      Eating a balanced low-salt diet

 

When lifestyle changes aren't adequate, there are numerous drug therapies that can be used separately or in combination to reduce hypertension. Occasionally, however, some people have what's called "resistant hypertension," which despite lifestyle changes and medications cannot be brought under control.

 

Researchers are exploring a novel approach to treat hypertension by manipulating the sympathetic nervous system signals that contribute to high blood pressure. The sympathetic nervous system regulates the vital functions of the body by connecting the brain to major organs such as the heart, kidneys and blood vessels. If the sympathetic nerves connecting the kidney to the brain are overactive, blood pressure rises.

 

One study is exploring the effect of renal denervation, a minimally invasive procedure that may potentially decrease the sensitivity of nerves lining the walls of the kidney arteries, thereby reducing the signals that cause hypertension.

 

Because it has no direct symptoms, hypertension is known as the "silent killer." The best first step is to know your blood pressure readings and work with your doctor to control high blood pressure if necessary. If you've exhausted all other options, talk with your doctor about clinical trials such as this one that may contribute to better control of your hypertension.

 

For more information about this study, call 859-323-5259 or email  h.shinall@uky.edu.

 

Dr. Khaled Ziada is an interventional cardiologist at UK HealthCare’s Gill Heart Institute

 

This column appeared in the May 1, 2016 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Previews The Arboretum's Arbor Day Event Saturday

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 16:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today he talks to The Arboretum Director Molly Davis about plans for their annual Arbor Day celebration tomorrow, Saturday, April 30. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/arboretum-branching-out-arbor-day.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Three Grad Students Receive UKAEF Fellowships

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 15:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Association of Emeriti Faculty (UKAEF) Fellowship Committee has selected three UK graduate students as recipients of UKAEF Fellowships. The awards, valued at $2,500 each, will be presented to recipients Tammy Clemons, Wesley Hough and Kaitlyne Motl.

                          

Clemons is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology. Her doctoral coursework is focused on development, political economy, popular education and media literacy in Appalachian and Latin American contexts. A native Kentuckian, she is a first-generation college graduate committed to remaining in her home region. She is also a non-traditional student who has had extensive teaching and lecturing experience. After obtaining her doctorate, she plans to teach at the collegiate level.

 

Hough is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Mathematics. His doctoral research deals with measuring specific properties of certain mathematical structures under continuous deformation. He has received outstanding teaching evaluations and has been the sole instructor for a number of courses reserved for teaching assistants (TAs) having the greatest potential as teachers. He is a first-generation student who has definite aspirations to teach at the college level. Instead of teaching math as a dull subject taken only so that students can move on to other classes, he wants to introduce students to the beauty of mathematics as he sees it.

 

Kaitlyne Motl is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology. Her dissertation research explores the intersections of gender, sexuality and social class. She has been highly praised for her teaching ability as a TA and as a primary instructor in numerous courses at UK dating back to 2011. By using reflective journal writing in the courses she teaches she makes students accountable to the course concepts.

 

The UK Association of Emeriti Faculty was established in 1988 to encourage faculty and spouses to maintain their association with the university, to serve UK and its educational goals, to promote common interests and to guard retiree rights and privileges. Members serve the university in a variety of ways from teaching, mentoring and tutoring, review of UK student applicants for departments and the College of Medicine, and serving on committees that encourage community outreach.

 

With approximately 200 active members, UKAEF has an endowed fund in the Office of Philanthropy initiated by generous gifts from members and matched by Commonwealth of Kentucky's Research Challenge Trust Fund. Members continue to donate annually and from the account and member gifts, three $2,500 fellowships are awarded each year. Since 1996 when UKAEF initiated the fellowship program, UKAEF has awarded 62 fellowships worth a total of more than $92,000 to prospective university educators.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Terrance Wade, 859-257-8716, terrance.wade@uky.edu;

Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200, carl.nathe@uky.edu.

Portion of Avenue of Champions Temporarily Closing May 16

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 15:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2015)  On Monday, May 16, Avenue of Champions from South Limestone to Lexington Avenue will close for eight weeks as part of construction work on the new UK Student Center.

 

Specifically, the closure is scheduled to last until Monday, July 13 to facilitate underground utility work for the University of Kentucky Student Center renovation and expansion project.

Details about the closure include:

  • Avenue of Champions from South Limestone to Lexington Avenue will close to vehicular traffic.
  • The sidewalk on the north side of Avenue of Champions will remain open at all times.
  • During the utility work, Lexington Avenue will remain open to traffic.
  • Martin Luther King Boulevard will remain open for deliveries and access the UK HealthCare Good Samaritan Hospital parking areas.
  • Vehicles will not be able to access Avenue of Champions from Martin Luther King Boulevard.
  • Campus bus routes will be rerouted due to the road closures. More specific information on the route detour plans will be communicated as the project start date nears.
  • During this time, Patterson Drive will change to two-way traffic for emergency and service vehicles only between Rose Street and Administration Drive; no parking will be permitted to allow for traffic flow.
  • Access to the loading docks for White Hall Classroom Building and Bowman’s Den will be maintained throughout the project, as will access to the Singletary Center Lot.

“We appreciate everyone’s patience during this necessary closure to facilitate important utility work as part of the Student Center project,” said Mary Vosevich, UK vice president for facilities management.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Community Invited to Meet Staff Candidates for UK Board of Trustees

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 15:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — University of Kentucky community members and especially staff are invited to meet current candidates for the position of staff trustee to the UK Board of Trustees on Tuesday, May 3. This is an opportunity for employees to discuss with candidates the many challenges and opportunities now before the university.

 

The event is sponsored by the UK Staff Senate, which conducts both trustee and staff senate elections. The meet and greet will be held 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., in the Alumni Gallery at William T. Young Library. Light refreshments will be served.

 

The Staff Senate encourages employees to take the opportunity stop by — even if it is just for a few minutes — and let trustee candidates know about what is important to you. The thousands of non-teaching employees at UK play a critical role in achieving ambitious goals, and the trustee is the staff's voice for decision making at the highest level at UK. The person elected by staff has an important responsibility to the staff.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 29-30, 1912

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 14:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 210th and 211th diary entries from April 29 and 30, 1912, recalls McClure and others discussing self-government and her gearing up for another house meeting at Patterson Hall. McClure also receives a surprise letter from her brother, John, asking for her help with a math question.

 

Apr. 29th. The committee waits on the Dean, who is perfectly willing that we have self-government — Oh! We come away at eleven o' clock, with another housemeeting looming in the distance.

 

Apr. 30th. I am surprised by a letter from John. Annie Louise help me help him out of the exam.

 

Included beside her April 30, 1912, diary entry is a letter from McClure’s brother, John. He needs her to figure out an arithmetic question that can get him out of taking an exam, in return for her help he offers to come to her graduation.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Alumni Drive Improvement Project Receives State, National Engineering Awards

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 13:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky’s Alumni Drive Improvement Project completed in August of 2015 was awarded an American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) Kentucky Engineering Excellence Grand Award and a National ACEC Engineering Excellence Recognition Award.

 

The project — overseen by UK's Capital Project Management Department — reconstructed 1.4 miles of urban roadway at the southern entrance of UK, creating a transition between the natural environment of The Arboretum and a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) water control project to the south with UK sports facilities to the north.

 

The design used roadway geometrics to help manage speed along the corridor which included two roundabouts.

 

Providing access to Commonwealth Stadium and The Arboretum, Alumni Drive was reconstructed in 16 weeks — opening one day earlier than scheduled — while maintaining access to adjacent construction, the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass, as well as housing and parking facilities.

 

The project included complete pavement replacement and expansion of the existing two-lane roadway to safely accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists and 19,000 vehicles daily. The green roadway was designed in just three months and was widened to include bicycle lanes, a non-mountable median, a multi-use trail and LED street lights.

 

Two existing stop-controlled intersections were converted to roundabouts, increasing efficiency and reducing vehicle emissions. A specialized design feature allows bicyclists to either merge into traffic or use a slip lane to join the multi-use trail to traverse the roundabouts.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Merit Weekend 2016 Proves a Success

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 13:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016)  Students from across the Commonwealth and the region made their way to the University of Kentucky for Merit Weekend, which took place March 4-5, 11-12 and 18-19. The feedback from students and family members that attended Merit Weekend has been overwhelmingly positive!

 

These two-day events, hosted by the University Registrar and the Office of Undergraduate Admission, allowed top potential students early registration for classes and one last look at campus before they make their final decision of where to attend college. Each student was ensured to take away a personal touch of UK after the weekend!

 

This year, Merit Weekend proved to be a success with 1,127 students enrolled — the largest number in the history of the program, representing an 8 percent increase over last year's record. Students represented 89 different Kentucky counties along with 28 different states.

 

Merit Weekend was available to invited, admitted students that have displayed academic excellence in high school. The average ACT score of students present during the three weekends was 30.5 and the average SAT score was 1323.

 

Students not only met with individual advisors to register for fall 2016 classes, but they had the opportunity to talk to current students about what it's like to be a Wildcat. Current UK students offered insider information to Merit Weekend attendees on a more personal level.

 

These special weekends are not entirely about academics though. Students who attended a Merit Weekend gained a wide perspective of the opportunities, diversity and involvement that awaited them at UK through a variety of information sessions. UK provided countless opportunities to become involved on campus, offering a diverse array of over 550 student organizations.

 

This event was made possible through collaborations among many entities on campus. Thirteen undergraduate colleges were represented in the enrollment along with 85 different majors.

 

One consistent theme which buzzed throughout Merit Weekend centered around the personal approach UK took to provide students the upmost "see blue." experience!  The university looks forward to welcoming an outstanding freshman class this upcoming fall.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Work by UK's Graduating Artists Comes Together in 'Nexus'

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 16:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2016) – The University of Kentucky School of Art and Visual Studies is showcasing the work of 20 BA (Bachelor of Arts) art studio seniors in their exit show titled, "/ˈneksəs/." The school is hosting a full atrium of work through April 29 in the newly renovated Art and Visual Studies Building and encourages the Lexington community to participate in this capstone event. A reception honoring the artists will be held 4:30-7:30 p.m. today (Thursday), April 28. Both the exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

 

Student work that is part of this show has been exhibited locally as well as in regional exhibitions, and even published in journals. Expect to see a variety of art in the mediums of ceramics, fiber arts, metalworking, painting, drawing, printmaking and many other visual forms. All students have achieved a high level of quality and will be exhibiting their best work.

 

The exhibition "/ˈneksəs/" (or "Nexus") channels the idea of a series of connections linking two or more phenomenon and is the theme that surrounds the show. This year’s exhibition displays an immense amount of talent as each senior exits the university to continue his or her personal art careers. Show participants include:

 

Jeremy Brown

Brown is a motion graphics artist from Louisville, Kentucky. He is self-taught in various forms of art with video and graphic design content. Brown has created countless videos/works in both the gaming and the artistic worlds. His senior portfolio was developed with the idea of variety and style in mind. No two pieces are alike, showing his ability to create various works of motion graphic and video art in many different ways. He utilizes many programs during his creative process including Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe Illustrator and Sony Vegas Pro 13 to make his pieces. Brown currently lives in Lexington, where he continues to create and design various video and motion graphic related projects.

 

Ashley Carroll

Carroll, who is originally from Columbus, Ohio, knew at a young age that she had a strong interest in art and even participated in her town’s local art club. Currently she works with different methods of printmaking, creating installations, both big and small. Her interest in graphic design has aided her with her creativity when it comes to screen printing. Her inspirations derive from the key terms: feminism and identity. Carroll focuses on the art term "play," meaning the concept comes from the act of art making itself; make first, conceptualize later. This style of work is interesting to see because the artist does not always know what the outcome will be; it is a trial by error way of making.

 

Mary Celeste Clark

A native of Lexington, Clark is graduating with bachelor's degrees in both art studio in the College of Fine Arts and media arts and studies in the College of Communication and Information. She received the Presidential Scholarship to attend UK and has been on the Dean’s List every semester she has attended.

 

William Cross

Cross, who was born deaf, has been very reliant on visuals for communication. The Lexington native attended public school rather than the state's deaf school in Danville. He worked on his core education at Bluegrass Community and Technical College before transferring to UK. He studied architecture a year and a half before transferring into the School of Art and Visual Studies focusing on art history and art studio. Cross started doing commissions for work and selling his art at the first "Open Studio" in the Art and Visual Studies Building last December — and hopes to do more in the near future. He usually gets his ideas and inspiration from a small world that he created when he was child and needed to escape from reality. His imaginary world was becoming so huge and profound that he had to share it with others. In art school he learned how to integrate many different fields of study in arts media into his imagination, trying to draw it out into reality. Cross has been able to draw his stories in digital arts form by making comics and animations, which he has been doing for more than five or six years.

 

Molly Durham

Durham, a native of Casey County, Kentucky, is a senior seeking bachelor's degrees in art education and art studio. While studying at UK, she has spent much time working with educational programs within the community via tutoring and volunteer opportunities. Durham aspires to travel after graduating, participating in programs with the youth along the way. Through art, she hopes to inspire her students to entertain diverse perspectives and to develop deeper sympathies for those around them. Her work places emphasis on subtle concepts and is often inspired by music and the culture that surrounds it. She is interested in a large variety of media including painting, drawing, digital design, screen-printing and photography.

 

Janessa Gates

Gates is the daughter of Jim and Kelly Gates, of Winfield, Illinois. At UK, she was awarded a College of Fine Arts Scholarship recognizing excellence is academic/creative endeavors. In addition, she attended Griffith College in Dublin, Ireland, for a semester where she studied photography. Her interests include: traveling, reading books, hiking, painting, pottery and bookmaking. She has been very active in Chi Omega sorority as a member and officer. As the chapter's Recruitment Art Chair, Gates was in charge of designing all costumes, sets, backboards and banners for their events. After she graduates in May, she plans to find a job as a creative production artist/photographer. Gates previously interned with Missy Donavan Photography where she learned to work in a professional environment and how to manage her own business. Her photography portfolio is a collection of all forms of inspirations and ideas based on world travels and experiences. Her photographic portfolios are separated into different categories that included: street, portrait, landscape, nature, Ireland and backpacking. For her senior photography project, she asked 250 strangers on the street to write down a secret about them on a chalkboard and took the photo of each individual holding their secret.

 

Leah Hemenway

Hemenway was born and raised in Lexington and began the exploration of her artistic expression at a young age. She holds an associate's degree from Bluegrass Community Technical College in Lexington, and transferred to UK to work on her bachelor's degree in art studio with a double minor in art history and geography. Her interests include both ceramic and fabric elements, but they are not limited to these mediums. A resident artist for the statewide organization Kentuckians Against Heroin, Hemenway is creatively passionate about the education of the local community about the dangers of drug addiction.

 

Trebecca Henderson

Henderson is an art studio senior focusing on photography. A native of Lexington, she has been photographing and documenting cemeteries throughout her college career. Her recent focus has been on the more remote and older cemeteries across Kentucky and Ohio. Henderson has mostly worked with 35 mm black and white film, but is currently working and experimenting with a Holga and medium format film. She has been in three group shows recently: "53," "Here & There" and the "UK Photo Digital Canvas." Henderson has been featured at the Cincinnati Public Library's downtown location earning a spot in the top 25 photographs for the Frame Cincinnati competition.

 

Kimberly Hubbard

Originally from Washington, Hubbard is married to Jeff Hubbard, who attends school at Asbury Theological Seminary. She has been in the Army National Guard since 2008, and earned 60 credits from George Washington University through her Army occupational training. Her academic achievements include making the Dean’s List every semester, being awarded the College of Fine Arts Scholarship, and membership in the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. A resident of Wilmore, Kentucky, she is inspired by the idea of life, specifically the value of human life, and expressing the idea conceptually in a variety of media including cardboard, aluminum mesh, tape, fabric, yarn, glass, wood, paint and more. Hubbard enjoys creating large installation pieces that immerse the viewer in her work.

 

Janie Kegley

Janie is a practicing fiber artist and arts entrepreneur from Louisa, Kentucky. She has studied art her entire life and will be graduating from UK with bachelor's degrees in both art studio and arts administration. While her next career step is still undetermined, Kegley will be continuing her art and freelance work. Her art includes a wide variety of materials and emphasizes fiber art processes. She incorporates hints of history inside her work, all while expressing intense color. Kegley has been known to include kinetic sculpture and lighting design to further intensify the presence of her art. Recently, her work has been shown at the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science in Indiana at the 44th Mid-State Craft Exhibition.

 

Roddy Komo

Komo was born and raised in the Democratic Republic of Congo, in the capital city of Kinshasa. His love of art came from Kin la Belle; the city is full of artist musicians, painters, sculptors, drawers and much more. At a young age he discovered the love of drawing and wanted to go the Academy of Beaux-Art in Kinshasa to continue his higher education. However, Komo's parents decided to move to America, where he's gone on to pursue his bachelor's degree in art studio from the School of Art and Visual Studies in the College of Fine Arts at UK.

 

Ye Ma

Ma is from Inner Mongolia. Art is the most important part of her life; she studied oil painting for four years from 2011 to 2013 at Inner Mongolia University and then transferred to UK. In 2014, Ma became an art studio major at UK where she started to study contemporary art. She has studied 3-D form, 2-D surface, "Intro to Digital Art Space and Time," fiber art, black and white darkroom photography, and drawing. In 2015, she won the first place award in the Foundation Exhibition. Ma plans to continue to pursue art after graduation.

 

Aaron Mabson

A native of Lexington, high fantasy is the main subject matter of Mabson’s work. As such, his illustrations are designed to not only tell stories but also transport his viewers into a world where fantasy and magic are prevalent. All images are made to tell a story that is not just visually appealing for its audience but takes them and places them into the situations themselves. Choosing to focus on high aesthetic appeal, all images are dynamic, balanced and detailed through every square inch of their medium.

 

Suzanne Kathleen Napier

Napier, is the daughter of Mary and Bob Napier, of Lexington. She won best in show at the Bluegrass Regional High School Art Show in 2012 and was awarded the College of Fine Arts Scholarship for 2015-2016. Her senior portfolio consists of several pieces she created during her time at UK, including photography, illustration and traditional drawing. She is showcasing in particular her digital photography, pen illustration, as well as graphite and chalk pastel figure drawings. After graduating in May, she hopes to eventually earn her master's degree in art therapy and find a position working with troubled children and/or mentally and physically handicapped adults.

 

Abigail Omlor

A native of Lexington, Omlor's artworks include photography of places she has traveled and nature, as well as drawings of perspective, old photographs and sometimes things from her imagination like comics. Inspirations for the work include her travels, history, books and movies. References for the artwork include photographs taken, places she finds on Google Street View, and people or situations she observes. The materials used for most of the art is either a Nikon DSLR camera with one of three types of lenses plus Photoshop or paper and graphite for drawings. When Omlor started college, she planned on being a scientific illustrator, so she majored in both art studio and biology. As the years passed, she began taking a lot of photography and a few animation classes in addition to science and drawing classes. Today she still plans on being a scientific illustrator, but has other options if the need arises from her experience with animation, photography, travel and science.

 

Victoria Roman

Roman is the daughter of Dr. Jesse Roman and Iris Otero, who were born and raised in Puerto Rico. Her parents have always supported the artist as well as influenced her work. While her college career consists of most semesters on the Dean's List, her accomplishments in the art world consist of multiple group showings throughout the years. Medical imagery inspires the majority of her pieces, with subject matter consisting of CT scans, flesh, lung pathologies and spines. 

 

Josh Richards

A native of Versailles, Kentucky, Richards' work recently was selected to exhibit at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts as part of FiberArts International. He has also shown sculptural art in Lexington, Cincinnati, Detroit and Chicago. Richards is the recipient of the Fine Arts Merit Fellowship, a UK Travel Grant and a UK Summer Research Grant. He has been nominated for the prestigious Windgate Fellowship sponsored by the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design, in Asheville, North Carolina. Richards' work combines handmade craft processes with ready-made assemblages that explore texture, color, material, display and functionality. By merging commercially manufactured carpet with hand woven rugs and castings, he exaggerates differences in quality, tactility and versatility. Using a traditional floor-loom, Richards creates hand woven carpets and rugs using experimental and unconventional materials like carpet pad, carpet, construction fencing and materials used in building.

 

Hannah Schomaker

Schomaker, is the daughter of Denise and Charles Schomaker, from Fort Thomas, Kentucky. She started her studies at the University of Cincinnati before transferring to UK. During her education at UK as an art education and art studio major, she has always been on the Dean’s List. Schomaker also led the Art Education Student Chapter as president during 2015-2016 school year. For her senior portfolio, she draws inspiration from her past experiences, fashion, nature and culture. She has portfolios in many mediums, but focuses on fiber art. Schomaker creates silk paintings, weavings, felt pieces, wearable art, clothes, accessories and jewelry.

 

Kwangwon Son

Son, a Korean student, has studied for 10 years at UK. During that time he has participated in the weekend community drawing sessions and annual exhibitions guided by Professor Tony Roccanova in the Reynolds Building, the former art studio facility for the UK School of Art and Visual Studies. In addition, Son has worked in ceramics making tea sets, cups and Korean masks.

 

Sibei Tan

Tan is a transfer student who came to UK in 2013 from her hometown in China. There, she studied digital video, digital photography and 3D designs at the Art College of Inner Mongolia University from 2011 to 2013. At UK, Tan is focusing on artwork creations and preparing for graduate study. In August 2015, she designed, sold and tailored a dress for the online sales platform Tao Bao. Tan took part in a photography show at Art College of Inner Mongolia University in 2012 and UK's Foundation Exhibition in 2014.

 

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studio, art history and visual studies and art education.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Study May Explain the Nation’s Growing Racial Achievement Gap

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 15:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2016) — For decades, researchers and scholars have studied what some call the “racial achievement gap” in academics and careers, without having a clear understanding why such a gap exists. 

 

Edward Morris, associate professor of sociology and director of undergraduate studies at the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, and Brea Perry, associate professor of sociology at Indiana University, assert that racial disparities in academic achievement constitute “one of the most important sources of American inequality.”

 

“Racial inequalities in adulthood — in areas as diverse as employment, incarceration and health — can be clearly traced to unequal academic outcomes in childhood and adolescence,” the researchers wrote in an article published by the Society for the Study of Social Problems journal.

 

While the social science community has understood the potential impact of a racial achievement gap for decades, its root causes and mechanisms have not been clearly defined. The unique data collected from Kentucky’s secondary schools and the uncommon analysis presented by Morris and Perry postulate that racially disparate discipline in the schools is a critical, understudied factor in racial differences in educational achievement, and success later in life.

 

Finding that racial disparities in the educational system can start very young, the researchers conclude that exclusionary discipline in the schools — such as school suspensions and expulsions based on behavioral issues — have a great impact on early academic growth and later life achievements and successes. Their research confirms that minority students are more likely to be suspended from school than their white counterparts. It further confirms that suspensions are associated with significantly lower achievement growth, and that the effect is cumulative. The researchers postulate that lower achievement in school relates to less profitable employment and less success in adulthood.

 

Morris believes his study adds a critical new piece to the puzzle of racial disparities in achievement, because it demonstrates how suspensions and expulsions have important, racialized academic consequences. The study presents evidence that disparate suspension lowers school performance and contributes to racial gaps in achievement.

 

“The analysis revealed that school suspensions account for approximately one-fifth of black-white differences in school performances, demonstrating that exclusionary discipline can result in severe academic consequences for minority students,” Morris said.

 

 “We recognize discipline is vital to learning. However, unequal, exclusionary discipline severely restricts a student’s ability to learn. For genuine progress to be made in closing the racial achievement gap, we must also make progress in closing the racial punishment gap.”

 

Morris and Perry began their research with an exhaustive review of established research of the racial achievement gap, concluding that while it is generally accepted that the gap results from a complex interplay of school, family and societal factors, school punishments have not been adequately evaluated. Their research, the first empirical study of these factors, was based on their belief that punishment is a logical explanation. Morris points out that:

· school punishment varies widely by race;

· exclusionary punishment extracts students from a learning environment, threatening academic progress; and

· school suspensions increased sharply in the 1990s, while progress on narrowing the achievement gap waned.

 

The researchers maintain that in the 1990s, reflecting a societal impatience with crime, schools became increasingly authoritarian and intrusive, maintaining school discipline by “criminalizing” infractions. School suspensions in America’s public schools have doubled since the 1970s. In 2010 nearly 3 million children were suspended from school activities.

 

“In addition to security measures like cameras and random searches, zero tolerance policies require automatic suspensions for specified infractions, replacing milder punishments that do not remove the student from an academic setting, such as detention or loss of privileges. These policies disproportionately impact minority students, especially African Americans,” Morris said.

 

But how do exclusionary disciplinary practices specifically affect the student?

 

Admitting that their research cannot conclusively prove a causal link between school suspensions and achievement, Morris said his and Perry’s research reveals a strong relationship between the two. Their research and earlier investigations indicate that exclusionary discipline:

· does not improve behavior and may even exacerbate anger and apathy;

· weakens school and societal bonds; and

· can be correlated with low academic performance and higher dropout rates.

 

Morris pointed out a 2006 study that compared two groups of similar students, the only difference between the groups being one had been suspended, the second had not. After two years, the suspended group was nearly five grade levels behind the non-suspended group.

 

Established research suggests that African-American students are three times as likely as white students to be suspended. Nationwide, one in six African-American students in the public school system have been suspended at least once. Taking note of such research, two years ago the U.S. Department of Education set guiding principles for school discipline, encouraging schools to rely less on exclusionary discipline and reminding schools that school discipline may not be discriminatory.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Blonder Elected to UK Board of Trustees

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 13:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2016) — Lee X. Blonder, professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Behavioral Science and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, has been elected by the university faculty as a faculty representative to the UK Board of Trustees. Blonder was elected to a three-year term, which will expire June 30, 2019.

 

Blonder joins Robert Grossman, professor in the UK Department of Chemistry, as one of two faculty representatives on the board.

 

"I am honored to have been elected to serve as faculty trustee," Blonder said. "My goals include representing faculty across the university, promoting shared governance, and assisting the Board of Trustees in enabling the faculty to continue to accomplish UK’s statutory missions."

 

Blonder is filling the seat being vacated by John F. Wilson, whose term as faculty trustee expires June 30. He had served since February 2012. 

 

Blonder came to UK in 1989. In addition to the Department of Behavioral Science and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Blonder also has joint appointments in the Departments of Neurology and Anthropology at UK.

 

Her research focuses on the neural substrates of cognitive and emotional processing in healthy volunteers and patients with stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Blonder also collaborates with colleagues in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center at UK to study cognitive and emotional processing using functional and structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

 

She has served on the College of Medicine Faculty Council, and continues to serve as an elected member of the University Senate, representing the College of Medicine. Blonder served as chair of University Senate Council from 2012-2014 and was recently elected to serve on the University Senate Council in January 2016 for a three-year term. Nationally, Blonder has served as a consultant reviewer for a National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She is also actively involved in the peer-review of manuscripts for various journals.

 

Blonder received a bachelor's degree in fine art from Bard College and a master's degree in creative art at Hunter College, and went on to earn a doctorate in anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her postdoctoral training in neurology at the University of Florida.  

 

 

 UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky,edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 28, 1912

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 12:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 209th diary entry from April 28, 1912, recalls time spent reading the novel “A Girl of the Limberlost” by Gene Stratton-Porter, a book that mixes insightful observations on nature with the struggles of growing up in the early 20th century.

 

Apr. 28th. Spend most of the day reading "A Girl of the Limberlost", which has a heroine who is perfect, and hers a little short of it.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Indoor Barbecue Organized by UK Employee Provides Break for NICU Families

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 16:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — A cloudless sky and temperatures inching into the 80-degree range motivated many Lexington residents to dust off the grill for barbecuing on April 17.


And while barbecuing outdoors was an enticing thought for Jessica Lowery and Tyron Campbell, the couple was preoccupied with a much more important matter — the health of their newborn baby Elizabeth.

 

The couple from Richmond, Kentucky, checked in at the Kentucky Children’s Hospital (KCH) Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) early that Sunday morning and planned to camp out inside the hospital for the remainder of the day. They were taking advantage of every moment to bond with Elizabeth, who was born March 30, three months before her due date, and suffered from an underdeveloped respiratory system. They stayed with a relative in downtown Lexington and walked across town just to linger near Elizabeth’s incubator. Even when they were not at the hospital, they called to check in on Elizabeth every couple of hours.

 

For families whose babies are receiving extended care in the NICU, meals and housing accommodations are secondary concerns to spending time with a sick and vulnerable child. On April 17, a group of volunteers and employees from the NICU served hot barbecue, baked beans, coleslaw and cupcakes to families with a child admitted to the NICU. The option to provide a meal for NICU families was a prize chosen by UK Department of Women’s Health employee Julia Snow, who won a raffle drawing during a March of Dimes event last fall. Gigi’s Cupcakes and Roll ‘N’ Smoke owned by Justin Taylor provided the food for the event.

 

With her personal connection to the NICU, Snow intended to use the winning raffle ticket to help NICU families. Snow experienced the shock and distress of having a baby sent to the NICU 30 years ago after she delivered her son, who was born with minor complications related to his heart and jaundice. Snow remembers going to the nursery to admire her newborn, only to discover he’d been relocated to the NICU.

 

“He was going to be okay, but you don’t know that when you walk back there and your baby is covered in monitors,” Snow said.

 

The complications Snow’s son experienced were soon resolved, and her baby grew up to become a successful lawyer and businessman. But Snow remembers her own stress and uncertainty during the short time he was in the NICU, and delivering food to NICU families was a simple way for the NICU staff and volunteers to help ease that burden.

 

“I just want to soften an hour of their day,” Snow said. “We can’t do anymore than that. They are in a huge state of stress, and we just want to let them know that someone was willing to give them a meal and that they care.” 

 

Shelly Marino, the NICU nursing administrator, said caring for sick and vulnerable babies also means attending to the needs of their families. Those needs include bonding time with the baby and encouragement, as well as basic needs such as food and a place to rest.

 

“The NICU experience is a time fraught with uncertainty, inconvenience and stress for any family,” Shelly Marino, nursing operations administrator for the NICU, said. “Providing a barbecue is just one more way our staff can show these families we care about their wellbeing. We also provide support to families by encouraging Kangaroo Care, conducting daily family-centered rounds, and providing journey beads, which serve as symbols of progress during the time a baby is receiving care. We understand nurturing the family is an important component of NICU care.” 

 

Debbie Bruderle, who waited for a foster child being treated in the NICU, visited with Snow while enjoying a plate of barbecue. She said the meal was a nice break for families that spend several weeks waiting for children to come home from then NICU and often don’t get away for meals, showers or other duties part of their daily lives.

 

“I can’t imagine what these families have spent every day on food,” Bruderle said.

 

Lowery said she hopes to bring baby Elizabeth home to Richmond in July. With months of waiting ahead, she was grateful for the simple gesture of an indoor barbecue.

 

“It’s wonderful,” she said of the meal, pulling the wrapper off a cupcake.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Andrew Hippisley One of Only 33 Chosen for Prestigious ACE Fellowship

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 15:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2016) — University of Kentucky Professor Andrew Hippisley has been selected to participate in the American Council on Education's (ACE) ACE Fellows Program, the longest running leadership development program in the United States. Hippisley, in the College of Arts and Sciences' Department of English, is one of 33 emerging college and university leaders chosen for the 2016-17 class of ACE Fellows.

 

Hippisley joined the UK faculty in 2007 as an assistant professor of linguistics and became a full professor in 2012. He is director of the Linguistics Program in the College of Arts and Sciences, and has served as chair of the UK Senate Council for the past two years. With linguistic research interests in morphology, including its interface with syntax and phonology, Hippisley has co-authored three books, with his most recent being "The Cambridge Handbook of Morphology" (Cambridge University Press. 2016).

 

Raised in the United Kingdom, Hippisley earned his doctorate in linguistics at the University of Surrey and his master's degree in Russian language and literature at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University of London.

 

“We’re very proud of Andrew Hippisley’s achievement,” said UK Provost Tim Tracy, who nominated Hippisley. “This fellowship will help him further hone his skills as a leader, collaborator, and one who empowers his colleagues to make progress on behalf of our most important mission: student success.”

 

“I am thrilled Andrew will serve as an ACE Fellow during the next academic year,” said Mark Kornbluh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “Andrew is active not only in the College of Arts and Sciences, but throughout the University of Kentucky, and this honor offers an incredible experience, which will build on his commitment to professional development.”

 

Hippisley is looking forward to this new opportunity.

 

“I am tremendously  excited and honored to be participating in such a program that will help me learn about the multilayered roles and functions of a diverse range of higher education institutions, and apply these outside experiences to a student success based project here at UK," he said. "I am extremely grateful to UK's leadership for their commitment to support and mentor me throughout the program.”

 

Established in 1965, the ACE Fellows Program is designed to strengthen institutions and leadership in American higher education by identifying and preparing faculty and staff for senior positions in college and university administration. Nearly 2,000 higher education leaders have participated in the ACE Fellows Program since its inception, with more than 80 percent of fellows having served as chief executive officers of colleges or universities, provosts, vice presidents and deans.

 

"The ACE Fellows Program cultivates leaders prepared to meet the constantly evolving challenges of today’s higher education landscape,” said ACE President Molly Corbett Broad. "The diverse and talented 2016-17 Fellows Class demonstrates why the program has been such a vital contributor for more than a half-century to expanding the leadership pipeline for our colleges and universities."

 

The 2016-17 fellows class represents the diversity of America’s higher education institutions by gender, race/ethnicity, institution type and disciplinary background. More than half the members of the 2016-17 fellows are women and 42 percent are of minority descent.

 

Seven members of the class are partially sponsored by Council of Fellows Fund for the Future grants. This financial support from the ACE Fellows alumni organization provides stipends to defray costs for institutions unable to afford the cost of sponsoring a fellow.

 

"The intensive and customized learning experience of the ACE Fellows Program will enable these future higher education leaders to immerse themselves in the culture, policies and decision-making processes of another institution and gain the insights and skills that will position them to make valuable contributions in the years ahead to their home institutions and the entire higher education community," said Lynn M. Gangone, vice president, ACE Leadership.

 

Click her​e to see the members of the 2016-17 class of fellows.

 

The program combines retreats, interactive learning opportunities, visits to campuses and other higher education-related organizations, and placement at another higher education institution to condense years of on-the-job experience and skills development into a single year.

 

During the placement, fellows observe and work with the president and other senior officers at their host institution, attend decision-making meetings and focus on issues of interest. Fellows also conduct projects of pressing concern for their home institution and seek to implement their findings upon completion of the fellowship placement. Projects have included developing an internationalization process, designing a post-tenure review policy, creating a teaching-learning center and crafting an initiative to support the academic success of first-generation college students.

 

At the conclusion of the fellowship year, ACE Fellows return to their home institution with new knowledge and skills that contribute to capacity-building efforts, along with a network of peers across the country and abroad.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelli Meyer, ACE, 202-939-9328, kmeyer@acenet.edu​​; Kathy Johnson, UK, 859-257-3155 

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