MenuMenu

Campus News

Camp Raises Awareness for Next Generation of Natural Resources Leaders

Thu, 06/16/2016 - 16:11

JABEZ, Ky., (June 21, 2016)  Under blue skies and perfect early June weather conditions, 24 high school students gathered recently in Southern Kentucky to explore a future in natural resources — and in the process, had a little fun, got a little dirty and learned a lot.

 

The Kentucky Forest Leadership Program is a weeklong, overnight camp where University of Kentucky forestry, entomology and wildlife experts from the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment join with foresters and biologists from the Kentucky Division of Forestry to expose high school students to career opportunities available in natural resources. Campers, 14 to 18 years old from 11 Kentucky counties, as well as Indiana, Wisconsin and Florida, chose one of the three areas of concentration, but by the end of the camp, they had a better understanding of all three subjects and their mutually beneficial relationships in the natural world.

 

In addition, the campers learned about many other environmental topics from UK and state specialists, such as water education and technology.

 

Elijah Schultz from Taylorsville, Kentucky, said bugs have fascinated him since he was little. He came to camp to find out if he wanted to pursue a career in studying or working with them. In the meantime, he was finding all kinds of interesting insects in the woods that weren’t in his backyard at home.

 

“I was able to see a lot in person here that I’ve only read about in books, which is really cool,” he said.

 

The camp’s location at the Lake Cumberland 4-H Education Center in Jabez, with its adjacent woodlands was ideal for the week’s activities. With meadows, woodlands, a still-water wetland and a tributary stream that is spring-fed and flows into Lake Cumberland, students could see different ecosystems within walking distance.

 

“It’s a way to show the very big differences between ecosystems that aren’t very far apart,” said Blake Newton, UK entomology extension specialist. “For example, even though both wetlands are freshwater, they have totally different kinds of creatures in them.”

 

Dragonflies, moths, beetles and even a winged queen ant went into the collections the campers took home with them. One of those collections went back to Wisconsin with Lucy Brown, who was enthusiastic about all she had found.

 

“I’ve found all sorts of things, especially beetles,” she said. “We don’t have as many of those up in Wisconsin. I caught a stag beetle last night and a bess beetle the night before. They’re really big.”

 

Down the road a bit, Levi Howell from Lexington and James Worthington from Louisville discussed their field data with Division of Forestry forester Steve Rogers. Both were carrying Biltmore sticks, which they used to measure tree diameter and height. In the first three days of camp, they had already learned a great deal.

 

“We learned how to identify trees and how to set (live release) traps, and what kinds of bugs are around here,” Howell said.

 

“And mushrooms,” Worthington added. “That was fun. I like fungi. It’s been fun meeting new people and learning a lot of new things.

 

A group of eight campers came out of the woods on the third day after an early morning exploratory hike and gathered on benches to start developing a management plan to encourage more pollinators in that particular woodland. To do that, they had to consider a variety of aspects: timber, plants, wildlife, insects and water.

 

“This program is a total integration of everything out here. Everything interacts in the forest. They’ll come away from camp understanding that a little more,” said Doug McLaren, camp director and retired UK extension forester.

 

Stacy White, agriculture and natural resources extension agent from Bell County, led the wildlife section in studying, as he put it, “all creatures small and great,” from pollinators to deer.

 

"The value to a program like this is we have a lot of students who have an interest in forests and wildlife; this is a good opportunity to see how deep their interest is and that they can actually get an education and build a career," he said.

 

Laurie Thomas, UK extension forester and program coordinator, said many of the campers indicated at the beginning that they wanted to learn if natural resources was a field they wanted to pursue for a career.

 

“It’s a great opportunity for them to see their possibilities and meet people who they can contact in the future if they’re really interested,” she said.

 

With that in mind, Wayne Centers and Geri Philpott from the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, spoke to the campers about degree programs and scholarship opportunities. To cap off the experience, Bill Steele, director of the Kentucky Division of Forestry, arrived on the last day to hear the campers’ presentations and to present them with their certificates of completion.

 

The Kentucky Forest Leadership Program is open to high school students who have completed their freshman year. Next year's camp is scheduled for June 5-9. The program is limited to 25 campers and spots are filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Interested individuals can contact Thomas at 859-257-2703 or laurie.thomas@uky.edu with any questions.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu

62nd Annual Kentucky Youth Seminar at UK This Week

Thu, 06/16/2016 - 14:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 20, 2016) — Eighty young people from across the Commonwealth will be on the University of Kentucky campus this week for the 62nd annual Kentucky Youth Seminar (KYS). These high school students will spend three days and two nights learning more about the American economic system and global economy through individual and group study.

 

Benjamin Locke of Larue County participated in the program last year.

 

"The experience for me was epic," Locke said. "Not only did my knowledge in business expand with regard to corporations and cooperatives, but my underlying extrovert side came out. The importance of networking became ingrained in me to spread as far as I can manage. And with networking came strong friendships, which I am beyond grateful for."

 

The 2016 edition of KYS opens Wednesday, June 22, and concludes Friday, June 24. The program is a joint effort of the UK Cooperative Extension Service, part of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, and other partners. The Kentucky Council of Cooperatives, composed of rural electric cooperatives, co-sponsors the event. Other major supporters include Farm Credit, Central Kentucky Ag Credit, and Kentucky Farm Bureau.

 

During the seminar, participants gain a better understanding of America's private enterprise system by solving problems as they take on the roles of officers and directors of corporations and cooperatives. Workshops help prepare these students both for college and for business with leadership training, communication training, interviewing skills, money management training, and more.

 

The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment's Assistant Dean and Director of Diversity Quentin Tyler, serves as state coordinator of the American Private Enterprise System, which provides program support and case studies for the Kentucky Youth Seminar.

 

"I love having the students come from all over the state and experience being on the UK campus for the first time," Tyler said. "Seeing them work in teams and form relationships that will last a lifetime is just terrific. These youth have the best personalities and really are dedicated to learning about cooperatives and corporations."

 

Reagan Kidd of McCreary County heard about the youth seminar from her extension agent Greg Whitis and took part in 2015.

 

"I absolutely fell in love with the program," said Kidd. "It was by far the best few days of my summer."

 

Kidd, who like her fellow participants at the state conference, qualified to come to Lexington by sucessfully completing a local program, which tests students on topics such as how America is organized to do business, e-commerce, and the role of government in business. She excelled at state and was one of 20 Kentuckians to earn an all-expense paid trip to the week-long 2015 National Institute on Cooperative Education (NICE) conference held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.

 

"I walked away from both the state and national events with nothing but big grins and happy memories," Kidd said. "And being on campus and getting a feel for Lexington persuaded me to make UK my home for the next four years."

 

In addition to the chance to go to the 2016 NICE conference to be held again at Virginia Tech from July 23-27, there is even more incentive for KYS participants to work hard this week.

 

"The students compete for cash prizes throughout the conference and also are awarded over $10,000 in scholarships based on their scores from individual and group exams over content," said Tyler. "These scholarships assist the students in attending college."

 

Among the special events on the schedule for the upcoming KYS is a tour of Marksbury Farm in Garrard County and a food demonstration at The 90. A variety of workshops are on the agenda, including keys to collegiate student success; meaningful volunteerism; the use of drones; and, entrepreneurship.

 

Locke, who also made it to nationals last year, is now pursuing a business degree with an emphasis on computer information systems at Campbellsville University. He reiterated just how much the knowledge and experience he gained through KYS and NICE continues to help him.

 

"To anyone in high school reading this, I encourage you to strive your hardest to get into this program," said Locke. "The rewards from this program are investments for your knowledge and life. The impacts are outstanding."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu.

 

 

UPK Title Honored by Army Historical Foundation

Thu, 06/16/2016 - 13:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 17, 2016) The Army Historical Foundation recently recognized outstanding contributions to U.S. Army history that were published in 2015. Among those select works honored by the foundation was "Jacob L. Devers: A General's Life" by University Press of Kentucky (UPK) author James Scott Wheeler which won in the category of biography.

 

The Army Historical Foundation (AHF) is a member-based, nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the history and heritage of the American soldier. Established in 1983, the foundation funds projects such as educational programs, research, publication of relevant historical materials, and the acquisition and preservation of Army artifacts.

 

Gen. Jacob L. “Jake” Devers (1897–1979) was one of only two officers — the other was Omar C. Bradley — to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944–45 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany. After the war, Devers led the Army Ground Forces in the United States and eventually retired in 1949 after 49 years of service. Despite incredible successes on the battlefield, Gen. George C. Marshall’s “dependable man” remains one of the most underrated and overlooked figures of his generation.

 

In this definitive biography, Wheeler delivers a groundbreaking reassessment of the American commander whose contributions to victory in Europe are topped only by those of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Wheeler’s exhaustively researched chronicle of Devers’ life and career reveals a leader who demonstrated an extraordinary ability to cut through red tape and solve complex problems. Nevertheless, Eisenhower disliked Devers — a fact laid bare when he ordered Devers’ Sixth Army Group to halt at the Rhine. After the war, Eisenhower and Bradley’s accounts of the generals’ disagreements over strategy and tactics became received wisdom, to the detriment of Devers’ reputation.

 

This exceptional work of military history was recognized at an annual awards program on June 16, at the 19th Annual Members’ Meeting at the AUSA Building in Arlington, Virginia. The finalists were judged by a select awards committee of distinguished military historians and writers against a set of criteria, including significance to U.S. Army history, historical accuracy and quality of writing.

 

Wheeler's win marks the ninth time a UPK title has won an award from the AHF and fourth win in the biography category. UPK’s previous winners in the category are "Beetle: The Life of Walter Bedell Smith" by D.K.R. Crosswell, "Exposing the Third Reich: Colonel Truman Smith in Hitler’s Germany" by Henry G. Gole, and "Alvin York: A New Biography of the Hero of the Argonne" by Douglas V. Mastriano.

 

Retired Army Lt. Col. James Scott Wheeler is a retired professor of history at the United States Military Academy. He is also the author of several books, including "The Big Red One: America’s Legendary 1st Infantry Division from World War I to Desert Storm" and "The Irish and British War, 1637–1654: Triumph, Tragedy, and Failure."

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

UK Welcomes Student Congress on Compromise to Campus

Thu, 06/16/2016 - 12:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 17, 2016) In the coming week, college seniors from across the nation will travel to the University of Kentucky to participate in a weeklong program hosted by UK's Martin School of Public Policy and Administration in conjunction with the Henry Clay Center for Statesmanship (HCCS).

 

The HCCS works to impart the skills of public dialogue and leadership to bring about change in an increasingly polarizing environment. The HCCS Student Congress gathers exceptional college students from every region to engage in groups where next-generation leaders and public servants learn the seemingly lost arts of negotiation, goodwill and compromise.

 

The Clay Congress experience comes at a critical time, said Merl Hackbart, professor and interim director of the Martin School.

 

“As future leaders in their states and in the nation, the Clay Congress participants will gain valuable knowledge and experience in the art of public policy development,” he said. "Such experience will be valuable to them as citizens and active participants in the development of issue-resolving government policies which continually emerge in a democracy such as ours.”

 

President Eli Capilouto will welcome the 2016 Clay Center Student Congress to UK at 9:30 a.m. Monday, June 20, at the new Gatton College of Business and Economics building. During the congress, students will focus on means of compromising on major national policy issues such as immigration, economic development, climate change and education. This project will be supplemented by events featuring important speakers discussing various topics associated with fostering ways to reach such compromises. These speakers include former U.S. Sen. Trent Lott and Robert Clay, owner of the renowned Three Chimneys Farm.

 

Throughout the week, events will take place on the UK campus, at the Council of State Governments offices in Lexington, and at the Old Statehouse in Frankfort. The program will conclude with an event hosted by the Martin School Friday (June 24) evening at Spindletop Hall.

 

The Martin School of Public Policy and Administration excels in research, education and service by applying intellectual resources to public policy and management issues. It accomplishes its purpose by engaging in cutting-edge, policy analytics research, providing an innovative environment reflective of strategic thinking, and providing service to the Commonwealth, national and international communities. The Martin School offers graduate degrees at both the master's and doctoral degree levels.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; or Loretta Stafford, llst227@g.uky.edu

From Surviving to Thriving and Beyond for Brandie Cobb

Wed, 06/15/2016 - 16:15

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) — Her childhood was at times ugly and terrifying. Her early adulthood often showed residual signs of the harm that abuse can do as her suffering continued and she failed classes at the local community college. Then one day, her journey took a different path, beginning with the supportive ears of advocates at her local rape crisis center.

 

In 2013, Cobb’s advocate at Sanctuary in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, told her about a special scholarship for abuse survivors that had been created by the University of Kentucky Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women (OPSVAW) in the College of Arts and Sciences.  The suggestion that Cobb apply for the Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship seemed unlikely at the time, but within hours Cobb had completed and submitted the application.

 

Cobb’s journey became a whirlwind with the news that she had been selected as the inaugural recipient of the Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship.

 

As her academic life progressed, Cobb collected one honor after another. She was named a member of the National Honor Society with a 3.5 GPA and a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars for her “commitment to the ideals of scholarship, leadership and service.”

 

With her head high, shoulders back, eyes bright with justifiable self-pride, Cobb stepped on the University of Kentucky Commencement stage last month to accept the diploma in health science clinical leadership and management she earned. The inaugural Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship recipient held a diploma in her hand.

 

That’s far from the end of the Brandie Cobb story, however.

 

Her days in the collegiate classroom are not over. Graduate school is firmly dead center on Cobb’s horizon, a destination she never imagined for herself, but one that many of her friends imagined for her.

 

“The Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship changed my life, and now I want to show other women what they are capable of accomplishing,” said Cobb, a Muhlenberg County native. "I’ve been given the opportunity to start a whole new life for myself. I want to do whatever I can to bring awareness to the issue of abuse.”

 

The UK Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women (OPSVAW) in the UK College of Arts and Sciences created the Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship in 2013 to give women access to education as a means of escaping violence and abuse or diminishing the effects of child or adulthood victimization. A second scholarship winner currently sits in the wings, impatiently waiting for her first day in a college classroom this coming fall.

 

Verizon Wireless was the first to generously support the scholarship program with a $100,000 donation from its HopeLine phone-recycling program, but the ultimate goal, said OPSVAW Executive Director Carol E. Jordan, is find sponsors to fund a total of five Women’s Empowerment Scholarships.

 

“Watching Brandie use the Verizon Wireless Women’s Empowerment Scholarship to launch a new life will be a great motivation for all survivors who follow her in holding the scholarship,” Jordan said. “It has been a profound inspiration for those of us who have stood with Brandie to cheer her on.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Dean Donna Arnett Stresses Role of Research to Eliminate Health Disparities

Wed, 06/15/2016 - 15:57

 

Video produced by Alicia Gregory of REVEAL Research Media. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) — In her former career as a nurse, Donna Arnett found herself engaging in the natural process of scientific inquiry: asking an unanswered question about a problem observed in health care, then devising a plausible solution.   

While working adjacent to a dialysis clinic at a Veteran’s Affairs hospital, Arnett noticed more African-American men were sent to the clinic than men of other racial categories. Arnett, who came to the University of Kentucky earlier this year as the dean of the College of Public Health, wanted to understand why this group of veterans was more susceptible to kidney disease. Even before a research proposal was in writing, she formed an informal hypothesis that some innate characteristic hidden in the genetic code of African-American men put them at a heightened risk of kidney failure — and she was right.  

 

“I’ll never forget, in my hallway in this VA hospital, every day men would be coming down the hallway, and they’re almost all African American,” Arnett said. “I said, ‘You know, there has to be something about being African American and having kidney failure.’”

 

While her original hypothesis evolved through time, the marrow of her original idea was validated after numerous studies. A genetic mutation was attributable to a higher risk of kidney failure in this population. Since that turning point toward research, Arnett has continued to delve deeper into knowing how genetic variation and environmental factors predict health outcomes in certain groups and populations.

 

“I think I’ve been asking questions my whole life, and I just discovered epidemiology later in my nursing career,” Arnett said. “And it just really excited me about the potential to answer really important questions.”

 

Arnett’s inquisitive nature propelled her into a career in public health, which culminated her earning a doctorate in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Arnett was eager to conduct research on human genetics, and launched her research career with a study examining why some people with hypertension develop enlarged hearts. She measured the variability of blood pressure in 12 men over 12 hours with the same condition and presented her findings at a scientific conference, which was a definitive and confirmatory moment in her research career.

 

“I wrote my first abstract and presented it at a national meeting, and it was just life-changing,” Arnett said.

 

Arnett joined the faculty at the University of Minnesota in 1994 where she expanded her research portfolio of National Institutes of Health-funded research projects. She has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for more than 20 years, bringing three active NIH projects to UK. In addition, Arnett assumed leadership roles at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and on the national stage as the president of the American Heart Association (AHA). Serving as AHA president showed Arnett that solving the most urgent health problems in the nation requires the collaboration among different professionals and organizations devoted to health and uniting the research efforts and knowledge of diverse investigators.

 

Even before President Barack Obama launched the Precision Medicine Initiative, which seeks to maximize the effectiveness of medical treatment by factoring genetics, environment and lifestyle choices into an individual’s care, Arnett was investigating these three predictive factors of health. Her expertise as a genetic epidemiologist placed her at the forefront of the Precision Medicine movement in America.

 

While she is enthusiastic about Precision Medicine, she understands the importance of research to reduce the existing health disparities in Kentucky. A native of London, Kentucky, Arnett has witnessed the devastating impact of diseases such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as unintentional injuries and deaths caused by opioid abuse.

 

“Public health is at the heart of answering the challenges of those critical diseases in Kentucky,” Arnett said. “We in public health are really at the forefront of first detecting these epidemics, and then finding strategies and interventions to help eliminate those disparities.”

 

While Arnett has contributed to the expansion of knowledge in the field of genetic epidemiology, she has also mentored and primed young researchers for successful careers in the study of how diseases impact populations. She believes watching students develop as scientists and coordinating teams of multidisciplinary health professionals are some of the most rewarding aspects of her job in research.

 

Today Arnett is adamant about educating the public and university community about the role of public health in society. Her second goal as dean involves establishing partnerships with clinical faculty outside the College of Public Health and at the state and community level to enhance Kentucky’s health care infrastructure. She also wants to build on the momentum of the productive research she inherited as dean, with ambitions to elevate the UK College of Public Health’s status on the national scale. None of these efforts will overshadow the mission of developing the next generation of researchers and public heath professionals in Kentucky — the students who come through the college.

 

This video feature is part of a monthly series called ‘“see discovery:” The People Behind Our Research.’  The videos, produced by UKNow and REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

 

Since this is a monthly feature on UKNow, we invite you to submit future ideas. If you know of a researcher who you think should be featured, please email us

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

 

Actor Steve Zahn Helps Raise Money for UK Art Museum

Wed, 06/15/2016 - 15:28

 

 

Steve Zahn as Marvin in "Daddy Day Care."

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) Actor Steve Zahn, known for his roles in "Dallas Buyers Club," "Modern Family" and the upcoming "War for the Planet of the Apes," will talk about his life and career in a conversation with Director of the University of Kentucky Art Museum Stuart Horodner. The event will benefit the museum's free admission policy. The talk will begin 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 23, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall.

 

Zahn was born in Marshall, Minnesota, in 1968, and first began doing improvisational acting in high school. He attended the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later starred in a traveling production of "Bye, Bye, Birdie" where he met his wife Robyn. Zahn's first film was Ben Stiller's "Reality Bites" in 1994 and he has since performed many lovable comedic and dramatic characters in such films as "Out of Sight," "Rescue Dawn," "Riding in Cars with Boys," "Sahara," "Saving Silverman," "That Thing You Do" and "You've Got Mail." He has also appeared on TV in such shows as "Treme" and "Mind Games." Zahn and his wife live in Georgetown, Kentucky, with their two children.

 

Tickets for "Steve Zahn: One Night Only" are $15 for general admission and $10 for museum members. Tickets may be purchased through the Singletary Center ticket office online at www.scfatickets.com. A reception at the museum will follow the event.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the UK Art Museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

The UK Art Museum, located in the Singletary Center at Rose Street and Euclid Avenue, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. For more information on membership, contact Lyndi Van Deursen at 859-257-8164 or lyndi.vandeursen@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Rose Street Offices Still Up and Running

Wed, 06/15/2016 - 10:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) The University of Kentucky's offices for the Alumni Association, Opera Theatre, James W. Stuckert Career Center and Singletary Center for the Arts are open and operating on normal business hours. Access to the main entrances of these buildings is temporarily blocked by a city (Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government) project to widen Rose Street and connect the Rose Street bike lanes with the bike lanes on Avenue of Champions/Euclid Avenue.

 

Though the main entrances are currently blocked, other entrances such as back doors and side doors remain open to all visitors. The project is expected to be completed no later than mid-September.

 

Anyone wanting to visit the UK Alumni Association, housed in the King Alumni House, can enter through the back door/elevator entrance or a side door located on Euclid Avenue.

 

"We have signs at the Euclid Avenue entrance directing visitors to our entrance, as well as a sign on the back door confirming the entrance," said Administrative Service Assistant Nancy Culp.

 

The Stuckert Career Center's main entrance is also closed due to the construction. But the back door to the building is open and visitors are asked to use that entrance.

 

"The most important thing that we want to communicate to the campus community is that we are still open, and that we apologize for any inconvenience resulting from the construction. We don’t want any students, faculty, staff, alumni or employers to be deterred from visiting us by the construction," said Assistant Dean for Career and Academic Exploration Ray Clere.

 

Guests visiting UK Opera Theatre's Schmidt Vocal Arts Center are also asked to enter through the back door, which is accessible via Rose Lane.

 

Finally, patrons attending any shows at the Singletary Center should allow themselves extra time because of the construction.

 

"While most all of the streets and sidewalks leading to the Singletary Center will be open, we would advise patrons to allow extra time for parking and entry to the building," said Singletary Center Marketing and Ticketing Director Matthew Gibson. "The current performances of UK Opera Theatre’s 'It’s a Grand Night for Singing!' are on track to draw record-setting crowds this year, so please allow extra time to navigate the construction areas. We don’t want anyone to miss a moment of this fantastic show."

 

To help individuals planning on attending "Grand Night," the UK Bicycle Advisory Committee is paying an officer from UK Police Department to assist patrons crossing from Rose Lane to the Singletary Center for the show.

 

A bit further up Rose Street it is business as usual for UK College of Fine Arts and the UK Office of Philanthropy. The construction has not affected the Fine Arts Building or the Sturgill Philanthropy Building, where patrons have not experienced any inconveniences due to the construction.

 

"Guests and staff of the Sturgill Philanthropy Building have not experienced any delays due to the construction now occurring on Rose Street. In fact, we have found the process to be operating quite smoothly," said Director of Philanthropy Communications Marc Whitt.

 

Rose Street is currently under construction to expand the street, which will accommodate new bicycle lanes. The work on Rose Street is also near the construction that is being done on Avenue of Champions for the new UK Student Center.

 

Construction on Rose Street, between Euclid Avenue and Rose Lane, is due to current conditions that create safety hazards for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians. Bicycle lanes on Rose Street abruptly end, forcing cyclists to merge left into vehicular traffic or right onto the existing sidewalk.

 

"Completing this section will significantly enhance the connectivity and safety of this section of our bicycle facilities network, and we are excited that we were able to partner with LFUCG to start it this summer," said Shane Tedder, UK Sustainability Coordinator and chair of the facilities working group for UK’s Bicycle Advisory Committee. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Budget Proposal: Matching Money to Mission

Tue, 06/14/2016 - 18:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 15, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees will consider increasing investments in student scholarships and financial aid by 12.5 percent in 2016-2017 – a record $117 million to help ensure greater access and affordability.

 

That increased investment in scholarships and aid is part of a $3.5 billion budget for 2016-2017 President Eli Capilouto will propose to the UK Board of Trustees at their June meeting. The university’s funding priorities focus on improving student success – with goals of 90 percent retention and 70 percent graduation rates by 2020 – and objectives included in the recently adopted strategic plan. UK President Eli Capilouto said the “record investment represents an intentional and focused effort to place students at the center of everything that we do.”

 

“An institutional budget signals for everyone our priorities. You fund what you care about," Capilouto said. "As the university for Kentucky, this budget represents investments in the strategic goals and objectives that our board made a priority in October 2015 when they endorsed the 2015-2020 Strategic Plan. It invests in student success and academic excellence, research and care that tackles our Commonwealth’s most pressing challenges and creating and sustaining a community where everyone is welcome regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity, religion, perspective, or identity. And it invests in our people, who do the remarkable work essential to the success of our students and our Commonwealth.”

 

UK’s 2020 strategic plan calls for increasing graduation rates to 70 percent, growing total research expenditures to more than $350 million annually, and further expanding diversity and inclusion throughout the campus community. Capilouto said the budget being considered by the UK board contains significant investments in all those strategic plan goals.

 

“The proposed capital and operating budget further invests in the priorities outlined in the university’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan, endorsed by the board at its October retreat,” said UK Board of Trustees Chairman Dr. Britt Brockman. “This is the right direction for the university to move in achieving its bold agenda for improving student success, enhancing research and discovery, fostering an inclusive campus community, and continuing to serve Kentucky and heal patients.”

 

Highlights of the budget include:

 

  • A proposed 5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state or resident students, from $5,390 a semester in 2015-2016 to $5,660 in fall 2016-2017; out-of-state or non-resident tuition and fees will increase by 8.5 percent. UK officials expect to enroll another first-year class of well more than 5,000 students with about two-thirds of those students being from Kentucky.

 

  • Average tuition and fee increases for the last five years for UK students are approximately 4 percent for the first time in nearly 10 years. Since 2007, the average out-of-pocket tuition and mandatory fee expense for resident students has increased by only $364 per semester because of UK’s additional investment in financial aid and scholarships.

 

  • A merit pay raise of 2 percent for faculty and staff to take effect in September – the fourth consecutive year of pay raises for UK employees as part of an effort to ensure regular, predictable increases to provide competitive compensation to retain the best instructors, researchers and support staff.

 

  • A realignment of more than $6 million in areas under the Office of the Provost, focused on student success, as well as in Facilities Management and the colleges of Medicine and Agriculture, Food and Environment. The realignment is part of an effort to increase investments in areas of direct student support like advising and counseling. Up to 75 jobs are being impacted as part of the realignment and reallocation.

 

  • The provost and the colleges also are working on initiatives through realignment to invest millions more in student success at the college level and targeted research efforts that are responsive to UK’s Strategic Plan.

 

  • Another $7 million in increased revenues and efficiencies through areas such as energy conservation, campus sponsorships and more efficient e-payments of bills.

 

“Our focus is student success. Our focus is Kentucky. Our focus is creating a campus community where both students and discovery can and do thrive,” said Tim Tracy, UK’s provost. “In this budget, we are focused more than ever before on matching money to our mission – a mission of education, research, care and service as the university for Kentucky.”

 

Analysis and decision-making about how best to fund that mission began in October 2015 following the Board of Trustees’ adoption of the new Strategic Plan. It has required several months of work to evaluate key funding needs as well as identifying mechanisms to generate the resources to fund institutional goals and priorities, university officials said.

 

UK, for example, had more than $48 million in projected funding needs that had to be addressed in the wake of decreased levels of state support, increases in compensation, expanded scholarships and aid that students don’t have to repay, and other fixed costs, such as utilities. Those funding needs are being addressed through realignment initiatives, increased revenues gained through more efficient operations and tuition.

 

“We undergo this process of strategic reallocation and realignment each year,” said Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “President Capilouto and the board have set forth clear budget goals – access and affordability for our students; competitive compensation; no across the board cuts; an increasing commitment to diversity and inclusion across the campus. This proposed budget represents our efforts in each of those key areas to fund our priorities and our plans for the future.”

 

Learn more about UK’s 2016-17 operating and capital budget here

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605; jay.blanton@uky.edu

New UPK Book Represents Fenton Johnson's Return to Fiction

Tue, 06/14/2016 - 17:51

 

Kentucky author Fenton Johnson discusses his work, including his new book "The Man Who Loved Birds: A Novel," with Bill Goodman on KET's "One to One."

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 15, 2016) Two weeks before Fenton Johnson left his home in Nelson County, Kentucky, for college, the state police kidnapped and murdered a local renegade and pot grower from neighboring Marion County whom they had been unable to convict. No autopsy was performed.

 

About the same time, his small hometown acquired its first doctor in years, a Muslim woman from Pakistan. Though Johnson was only 17 both events left an indelible impression.

 

The murder of the marijuana grower fed questions about conflict between the free spirit and the constraints of the law, whether imposed by state or church. The hiring of the doctor led him to wonder what it would mean to be a Muslim woman practicing medicine in the insular Roman Catholic knobs of Central Kentucky. Now, 45 years later, Johnson combines these two incidents with his fascination with monastic life as the inspiration for his new novel, "The Man Who Loved Birds," published by University Press of Kentucky (UPK).

 

In Johnson's novel, Brother Flavian, a Trappist monk curious to explore the world of experience, including his own sexuality, beyond the monastery’s walls; Dr. Meena Chatterjee, a Bengali-born physician who immigrates from India to establish a rural practice near the monastery; and Johnny Faye, a charismatic, pot-growing Vietnam veteran living just outside of the law, form an unconventional love triangle. Faye, who lives to tell a good story, teaches Flavian and Chatterjee how to love, radically transforming all they thought they believed about desire, duty, action, contemplation, reason and faith.

 

Faye makes a game of taunting the police until he comes up against an ambitious district attorney. Their struggle leads to an end that is both inevitable and poignant, as Flavian and Chatterjee each must make a life-or-death choice. Their choices force the reader to confront the relationship between fate and destiny, what chooses us and what we choose.

 

As an American man, Brother Flavian believes in our capacity to direct and control our lives. As a Bengali woman, Chatterjee understands choice as an illusion. From their evolving relationships to their ultimate fate, Johnson uses this trio of unforgettable characters to explore the redemptive power of love in a society whose indifference and ignorance permit a moral inversion in which what should be good is evil and what should be evil is redemptively good.
 

Johnson spent two decades researching his latest novel. In 1989, he wrote his first New York Times Magazine feature on the marijuana growers of Central Kentucky. The interviews he conducted and the characters he encountered fed his imagination. He traveled to Calcutta, India, visiting the Calcutta Medical College, where Chatterjee would have pursued studies.

 

For the character of Brother Flavian, Johnson drew inspiration from the Abbey of Gethsemani near his hometown, as well as the time he spent living in contemplative communities while writing "Keeping Faith: A Skeptic’s Journey Among Christian and Buddhist Monks."
 

"The Man Who Loved Birds" engages social issues, from immigration policy and draconian drug laws to police violence and social mobility, even as it expands on eternal themes that have been present in Johnson’s fiction from the first. What is the nature of family? What is the relationship between the families we are given by fate and those we choose? What does it mean to love? What does it mean to have and to keep faith?

 

In "The Man Who Loves Birds," Johnson weaves together a tapestry of characters with different backgrounds and socio-political views to create a quintessentially American story.
 

To coincide with the release of his new novel, Johnson’s previous ones have been reissued in paperback.

 

In Johnson’s debut novel, "Crossing the River," Martha Bragg Pickett carries her Confederate heritage like a flag. She crosses the river to go on a date, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side.

 

Johnson published his second novel, "Scissors, Paper, Rock," to broad acclaim. Through the intricately interwoven stories of Raphael Hardin and his parents and siblings, Johnson's second novel contrasts the families we inherit, our blood ties, with the families we choose, our partners in love and our friends. At times funny, at times heartbreakingly poignant, "Scissors, Paper, Rock" explores with wisdom and humor the many kinds of family, the infinite varieties of love.

 

Taken together, these three novels show the development of Johnson as a novelist over the course of nearly three decades. According to Johnson, "The Man Who Loved Birds" merges the themes present in his previous novels.

 

“The contemporary concerns of 'Scissors, Paper, Rock,' integrate with the more timeless concerns of 'Crossing the River,'” the author said. With the rerelease of these two paperbacks, Johnson’s oeuvre can now be enjoyed in its entirety.

 

In the years between his first two novels and "The Man Who Loved Birds," Johnson turned his attention to nonfiction, publishing "Keeping Faith" and "Geography of the Heart: A Memoir."

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

CEDIK Grants Fund Rural Health Care Projects

Tue, 06/14/2016 - 15:44

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 16, 2016) — A summer health careers camp and a project to strengthen the nursing care continuum in a rural hospital system recently received seed grants from the Kentucky Rural Community Health program.

 

Administered by the University of Kentucky’s Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky, the Kentucky Office of Rural Health and the Kentucky Hospital Association, the program provides funds to rural hospitals and health care coalitions. It assists them in addressing health issues and concerns that were identified when the hospitals completed their community health needs assessments, as required by the Affordable Care Act.

 

Marcum and Wallace Memorial Hospital in Irvine will use their $5,000 grant to improve care coordination, which will lead to improved quality of care and patient outcomes, which, in turn, will result in a positive impact on the hospital’s financial picture.

 

“With the many changes in health care, including the addition of electronic health records, the hospital recognized that the nursing staff is spending more time in front of computer screens, resulting in a reduction of face-to-face contact with patients,” said Melody Nall, CEDIK extension specialist. “The purpose of their Care Coordination Coalition Project is to identify how to capture the vital health information nurses need and still maintain the patient-provider contact that is so essential in care.”

 

Barbourville Appalachian Regional Hospital will use their $2,500 grant to team up with the Southern Kentucky Area Health Education Center and Union College Nursing Program to host the Summer Rural Health Scholars, a three-day health careers camp for high school students.

 

“Participating students will be exposed to a variety of health care opportunities,” Nall said. “There is a shortage of physicians and other health care providers in rural areas. This is the best way to recruit health providers in rural areas, because those who are most likely to come work there are people who are from there. Health career camps like this can begin a long-term recruitment process.”

 

CEDIK, part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, has a history of working with rural hospitals, health coalitions and networks throughout Kentucky. Nall said local hospitals and doctors’ practices often have the largest economic impact in a rural community, providing jobs and returning dollars to the local economy. Good health care is also vital to attracting employers to a region.

 

“They want a healthy workforce, and they also want to have health care available for their employees,” she said. “Having both of those components in a community is vital for strong economic development.”

 

Nall said the seed grants are a way for CEDIK, the Kentucky Office of Rural Health and the Kentucky Hospital Association to continue their work with rural hospitals to address health needs as well as provide funding to communities to start new, innovative projects.

 

“These two projects are very different, but I think they both show the value of investing back in our communities,” she said. “At the heart of both is the desire to improve health care and economic stability in rural communities.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324.

UK Faculty, Staff Invited to Wonderful Recruiting Partnership

Tue, 06/14/2016 - 15:19

LEXINGTON, Ky., (June 15, 2016)  University of Kentucky faculty and staff who are interested in creating a student recruiting partnership with one of the nation’s largest agri-food businesses are invited to an informational session with The Wonderful Company.

 

Angela Huntsman, director of organizational development at The Wonderful Company, will be on campus June 28. She is recruiting and developing leaders within her company and would like to establish a connection with those who are interested in internship and employment opportunities in a company that is committed to sustainability initiatives. Faculty and staff can meet with Huntsman from 2 to 3 p.m. EDT in the Food Connection kitchen-dining room on the second floor of The 90.

 

FIJI Water, POM juices, Wonderful Almonds and Pistachios, JUSTIN and Landmark wines, as well as HALOS mandarins and Sweet Scarletts grapefruit are just a few of the brands from this private company. Their new Wonderful Bees is actively hiring and training young apprentices and bee biologists. They also support engineering research at the Resnick Sustainability Institute at the California Institute of Technology, the mission of which is to find solutions to global energy and climate change challenges.

 

For more information, email Lissa Pohl, of the UK Department of Community and Leadership Development in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, at lissa.pohl@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu.

 

 

College of Social Work to Host Conference on LGBTQIA Issues for Behavioral Health, Other Helping Professionals

Tue, 06/14/2016 - 09:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 15, 2016)  The University of Kentucky College of Social Work in collaboration with the UK Office of LGBTQ* Resources, Bluegrass Center for Teacher Quality and licensed clinical social worker, Cassie Brown, will be holding a conference titled “Out in the Open: LGBTQIA Issues for Behavioral Health and Other Helping Professionals” on June 30, 2016, at the Fayette County Extension Office.

 

The conference will provide a variety of workshops designed to provide additional knowledge and awareness to behavioral health and other helping professionals. Plenary speakers and licensed clinical social workers Edwin Hackney, presenting on LGBTQ history, and Cassie Brown, presenting on gender variance, bring immense experience to the "Out in the Open Conference."

 

The conference will incorporate a panel discussion including two transgender allies and one health care professional to serve as a platform for bringing together diverse voices within the LGBTQIA communities and allies.

 

“My hope is that this conference will create an open and honest environment that sparks conversation, encourages understanding, and results in new knowledge and resources gained,” said Christina Gevedon, of the College of Social Work.

 

With a remarkable lineup of speakers, panelists and much more, the goal of this conference is to encourage open conversations and open minds through gained knowledge of LGBTQIA topics.

 

Geared for professionals at the basic, intermediate, advanced and clinical levels, this conference will discuss the following topics: LGBTQ history, HIV/AIDs (fulfills HIV/AIDs SW requirement), LGBTQ* 101, transgender experiences, working with cultural competency, LGBTQ* health care considerations, working with LGBTQ youth, and gender variance.

 

This conference will provide 7.5 continuing education units (CEUs) for social workers and psychologists through the UK Office of Professional Development and Continuing Education. Teaching professional development credit for this conference will be provided by the Bluegrass Center for Teacher Quality.

 

While geared towards behavioral health and other helping professionals, all individuals seeking additional knowledge regarding LGBTQIA issues are encouraged to register.

 

“It is not simply our participants that this event will touch but also those they come into contact with, as professionals, and as citizens, siblings, children, parents and friends,” said Cassie Brown, licensed clinical social worker and conference guest speaker.

 

The deadline to register for the "Out in the Open Conference" is June 24, 2016. For more information on this conference, or to register visit http://ceu.uky.edu. Teachers, students and those not seeking CEs can register by phone with Christina Gevedon 859-257-2035.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Providing Dental Care in Appalachia, Reducing Student Loan Debt

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 17:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) — By supporting a region that desperately needs dental providers, two University of Kentucky College of Dentistry students will have their student loan debt significantly reduced. Drs. Candace Flora and Adam Tackett were each awarded $100,000 through the Appalachian Dental Loan Forgiveness Program.

 

Started in 2015 through the bipartisan efforts of then Governor Steve Beshear, a Democrat, and United States Representative Hal Rogers, a Republican, this program works to encourage dental providers to practice in Appalachia Kentucky. The dental schools at the Universities of Kentucky and Louisville administer the program.

 

After completing UK's dental program, Flora will practice pedicatric dentistry and Tackett will begin his work as an orthodontist.

 

Flora, a native of Whitley County, chose to participate in the program to help the people of a community where she has ties. She welcomes the opportunity to share her skills and knowledge with the people of Eastern Kentucky.

 

"I want to help take care of the children of Appalachia and help educate parents on how to better their oral health," Flora said. "It has been a goal and dream of mine to return back to the area that I grew up and give to the community."

 

Tackett, who is originally from Floyd County, is also looking forward to the work he can do in Appalachia and what the award will mean for his family and career.

 

"I’m excited to return there with my family because the people of these small town communities are so genuinely nice and caring," Tackett said. "I hope to reciprocate those feelings through my orthodontic practice and community service there."

 

According to the Kentucky Oral Health Coalition's 2015 Overview, Kentucky has the fifth highest rate of toothlessness among residents 65 and over. Additionally, a 2007 survey revealed one in three children experienced one or more oral health problems. The Appalachian Dental Loan Forgiveness Program is part of the Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) initiative whose goal is to "expand job creation, enhance regional opportunity, innovation, and identity, improve the quality of life, and support all those working to achieve these goals in Appalachian Kentucky."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

 

 

BLOG From Terry Allen: We Are UK and We Are Orlando

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 16:32

In the aftermath of this weekend’s horror in Orlando, the call went out across a grief-stricken community, asking for volunteers to donate blood to aid the wounded and critically injured.

 

By early Sunday morning, the line around the Orlando blood bank reportedly stretched for more than a mile. People — most of whom didn’t know a victim — waited in the baking Florida sun for more than six hours.

 

They wanted to help. And in so doing, they painted a powerful picture, a compelling symbol, of what it means to be a member of a community.

 

We are all different — different colors, different perspectives, religions, identities, genders and ethnicities.

 

But we are members of a community. The people of Orlando understand that.

 

At the University of Kentucky, our community, too, is heartbroken and filled with deep sadness over the tragic events in Orlando.

 

We are the University for Kentucky. But, in a powerful way, we are Orlando, too. And we want to join in humanity’s chorus that is unified behind the idea that our differences and our diversity are what collectively make us and our community stronger.

 

To show our support and honor those who lost their lives in this tragedy, as well as those who will be impacted long after the physical injuries have been tended, the following buildings will be illuminated in various colors during the next few days.

 

The colors represent the rainbow that stands for many as a symbol of the LGBTQ* community:

  • Memorial Hall 
  • Lyman T. Johnson Hall – Red
  • Central II – Purple
  • Haggin Hall and K-Lair – Green
  • The 90 – Orange   

A memorial gathering entitled "We are UK. We are Orlando" also will take place from noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 15, in the VIP (Violence Intervention and Prevention) Center. The entire campus community is welcome to join for reflection, conversation and food.

 

As a university campus, as a home for discourse and debate, dialogue and discussion, one of the best ways we know to deal with the horror of what happened is to join together in the search for meaning and for how best we can move forward together.

 

Wednesday’s memorial — and the symbolic lighting of our signature campus building (Memorial Hall) and our residence halls — represent a step forward. Many more must follow.

 

To that end, we also know that members of the LGBTQ* community at UK may be filled with a sense of anxiety and pain in the aftermath of Orlando. We all are.

 

Your UK community is here for you.

 

The VIP Center has support services available for those who are feeling the impact of this tragedy. Over the coming days, we will continue to share support, information and resources. We continue to be in solidarity with the LGBTQ* community, the Latino community, and the Muslim community, as well as others around the globe, who are committed to ending violence and hate.

 

Below are some resources at UK, and elsewhere, that may be helpful during this time:

If you need immediate health and safety related support, contact the UK Counseling Center at 859-257-8701 or the UK Police Department at #UKPD.

 

On the night that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. died, Robert F. Kennedy stood on the top of a flatbed truck in Indianapolis, and told the gathering throng, for the first time, what happened.

 

Quoting the Greek poet, Aeschylus, Kennedy told those gathered that, “even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.”

 

Kennedy went on to say that “what we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country …”

 

Let us resolve, some 50 years later, to continue on the journey toward justice for everyone, in every community. At UK, let us resolve to be a beacon of light and hope for those who would join us on that path.

 

#WeAreUK and #WeAreOrlando.

 

 

Terry Allen

Interim Vice President for Institutional Diversity

UK College of Public Health Faculty Selected for National Executive Leadership Program

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 16:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016)University of Kentucky College of Public Health professors Kathryn Cardarelli and Nancy Schoenberg recently joined the 2016-2017 class of fellows for the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program at Drexel University College of Medicine.

 

Cardarelli and Schoenberg were among 54 women chosen for participation in the

22nd class for ELAM, the only program in North America dedicated to preparing women for senior leadership roles in academic health science institutions. ELAM Fellows enhance institutional leadership diversity while contributing to organizational strategy and innovation. The one-year, part-time program combines three week-long in-residence sessions with distance learning, designed to take the leadership lessons gained from the classroom to practice in the fellows’ institutions.

 

Cardarelli serves as associate dean of academic and student affairs and an associate professor of health behavior in the College of Public Health. Schoenberg is the associate dean for research in the College of Public Health and the Marion Pearsall Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science in the UK College of Medicine.

 

Upon completion of the one-year Fellowship in April 2017, the 54 members of this class will join a community of more than 1,000 alumnae, who are all accomplished women serving in a variety of leadership positions around the world, including as department chairs, research center directors, deans and college presidents, as well as chief executives in health care and accrediting organizations.

 

ELAM is a core program of the Institute for Women’s Health and Leadership at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Institute continues the legacy of advancing women in medicine that began in 1850 with the founding of the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, the nation’s first women’s medical school and a predecessor of today’s Drexel University College of Medicine. For more information on the ELAM program curriculum, faculty and participants, visit www.drexelmed.edu/elam.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

Behind the Blue: UK's Suzanne Smith Talks Drones

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 15:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016)  The drone revolution continues to impact numerous industries — photography, real estate and public safety are just a few. But drones are also presenting unprecedented opportunities for research in numerous other fields like agriculture, atmospheric science, biology, engineering and more.

 

University of Kentucky faculty and students have been at the forefront of using unmanned aerial vehicles for research and recently received a blanket certificate of authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct research with drones across the nation.

 

At the same time, safety remains a top priority and a new UK drone policy will ensure compliance and well-being of all campus community members.

 

In this week’s edition of the “Behind the Blue” podcast, UK College of Engineering's Suzanne Smith, director of the UK Unmanned Systems Research Consortium, discusses UK's research efforts using drones, the impact of the drone industry on Kentucky and the future of drones.

 

You can download this edition and others of "Behind the Blue" at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/behind-the-blue/id1114911777?mt=2#episodeGuid=8da5caa459bdb1dd190505ea1549257c, or search "Behind the Blue" in your Podcasts app. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Cavanaugh Awarded Cambridge Fellowship; Mingst Named Interim Director of Patterson School

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 15:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016) — Carey Cavanaugh, director of the University of Kentucky Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, has been awarded a fellowship at Cambridge University’s Clare College. Established in 1326, Clare College is the second oldest of Cambridge’s community of 31 independent colleges.

 

Cavanaugh has also been selected to be an executive-in-residence and fellow at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP) beginning July 1. The Swiss government established GCSP in 1995 to promote the building and maintenance of peace, security and stability. GCSP has become one of Europe’s leading academic and research centers, providing executive education and practical training to foreign policy and military professionals from around the world.

 

After 10 years of service as Patterson School’s director, Cavanaugh will spend this fall semester on sabbatical, writing and conducting research on international conflict resolution.

 

At Cambridge, he will be analyzing the inherent contradiction between two fundamental competing principles: acknowledging people's right to self-determination, but also backing support for maintaining the territorial integrity of states. He will also be probing the political challenge of how to prepare publics to support compromise solutions that have been negotiated in secret and are not yet fully known.

 

In Switzerland, Cavanaugh’s focus will be more policy-oriented, exploring diplomatic options to address the renewed fighting in the South Caucasus. Violence between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh flared up in April, with the greatest loss of life since a ceasefire was brokered between the two nations in 1994. Cavanaugh will also work with the Austrian Study Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution. Vienna hosts the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe which continues to play a key mediation role in peace efforts in the Caucasus.

 

Retired UK political science professor Karen Mingst will return to UK on July 1 to serve in an administrative capacity as interim Patterson School director through December.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

US Army Research Office Awards Grant to UK Physicist for New 2D Material

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 08:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016) — University of Kentucky Professor Madhu Menon, of the Center for Computational Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, has been awarded a $50,000 Short Term Innovative Research (STIR) grant from the U.S. Army Research Office.

 

The grant will fund Menon's work to synthesize the new 2D material he predicted using theoretical simulations. In February, he predicted that a new one atom-thick flat material — made up of silicon, boron and nitrogen — could upstage the wonder material graphene and advance digital technology.

 

Menon will collaborate with an experimental group at the University of Louisville, led by Professor Mahendra Sunkara.

 

The Materials Science Division of the U.S. Army Research Office seeks to realize unprecedented materials properties by embracing innovative, long-term, high-risk, high-payoff basic research opportunities for the U.S. Army with special emphasis on four programs: Materials by Design, Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Physical Properties of Materials, and Synthesis and Processing.

 

To learn more about Menon's work, visit http://uknow.uky.edu/content/university-kentucky-physicist-discovers-new-2d-material-could-upstage-graphene

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Peers Say Olson Displays Lifetime Achievements

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 16:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — Robert Olson’s “The Kurdish Nationalist Movement in the 1990s: Its Impact on Turkey and the Middle East” (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) was reissued recently by Mazda Publishers.  

 

A University of Kentucky distinguished emeritus professor of history, Olson wrote a new five-page introduction about the current status of the Kurdish question in Middle East politics for the new volume. He also published “Turkish Air Force’s Role in the Development of Turkish and Kurdish Nationalism” (Kürt Tarih) in March 2016.

 

Olson gave the plenary talk “Fifth Years with the Kurds” at the Kurdish Studies Association meeting in Denver in November 2015. For his career-spanning interest in the peoples of the Middle East, Olson was awarded a “Lifetime Achievement Award in Recognition of Exceptional Contribution to the Field of Kurdish Studies.”

 

Olson and his colleague, Michael Gunter of Tennessee Technical University, are the principal co-founders of Kurdish studies in the United States, said Olson.  The two professors authored 22 books, 10 edited books, 275 scholarly articles and 390 book reviews. Of these, Olson authored 10 books, edited four, published 106 scholarly articles, 60 essays and 240 book reviews.

 

Until the publication was shut down by the Turkish government in March 2016, Olson was an op-ed writer for Today’s Zaman, an English-language newspaper published in Istanbul, Turkey, and widely read in Europe and throughout the Middle East. He also writes for LobLog, which is edited by Jim Lobe and John Feffer and deals with critical issues concerning U.S. foreign policy.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Pages