MenuMenu

Campus News

UK Virology Trainees Featured on LabTV

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 14:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) — In the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, a lab team led by Becky Dutch is studying a virus 99 percent of us get by age five, but most of us have never heard of called human metapneumovirus (HMPV).

 

HMPV is a respiratory virus that wasn’t identified until 15 years ago, but it’s "probably the second or third cause of viral pneumonia in children and in the elderly," Dutch said. Her lab trainees — Edita Klimyte, Nicolas Cifuentes and Stacy Webb — are conducting NIH-funded research on HMPV and other respiratory viruses, and they recently shared their stories with LabTV.

 

Edita Klimyte, an MD-Ph.D student in Dutch’s lab, was born in Lithuania and moved to the Chicago-land area when she was eight. Her mother, who went back to school to become a pharmacist while working full-time, inspired Klimyte to focus on academics.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

Her dissertation project focuses on exploiting the fact that HMPV needs a specific type of sugar in order to bind to and enter cells: "The virus needs the sugar, so how can we disrupt that interaction between the viral particle and the target cell?" Klimyte uses 3D models that resemble human lung tissue to test the interaction between the virus and target cells.

 

Six years ago she was recruited to UK, and although she had never been to Kentucky before, it only took one day to convince Klimyte that UK was where she wanted to be. "When I left my interview, I decided if I got in here this was going to be the place for me. I felt like everyone here was accomplished and smart and making great strides in science, but the main thing that got to me, that set it apart, is everyone is extremely down to earth and very oriented towards teamwork and collaboration," Klimyte said.

 

Stacy Webb, who grew up in Dayton, Ohio, is a graduate research assistant in Dutch’s lab. She is the first person in her family to graduate from college, and she credits her high school physics teacher as fostering her interest in science.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

"At Kentucky Wesleyan College I got my degree in chemistry and now I’m studying biochemistry to get my Ph.D. at UK," Webb said. During her first undergraduate research project, she said, "There was a moment where I realized I was the first person to see something and that was really exciting, and I loved that feeling."

 

Webb said, "UK is an amazing place to do science. There’s a great environment here. It’s been a very nurturing environment."

 

She studies the entry mechanisms of Hendra virus, a dangerous virus that can move from animals into humans. "There are these proteins that cover the surface of the virus and we want to see how those contribute to viral entry, and potentially how those can be targeted for viral therapeutic purposes."

 

Nicolas Cifuentes, a postdoc in Dutch’s lab, grew up in Chile, where he did undergrad and graduate work in biology. He credits his mom as the one who pushed him into science. "She gave me a microscope when I was 14 years old and I really was trying to see anything that I could like ants, hair, whatever. I was really curious about things. As most scientists, what drives you is curiosity to know things, to understand things," Cifuentes said.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

He studies Hendra virus and HMPV. "Basically, we’re trying to understand how these viruses assemble inside the cell and build a new viral particle that is going to be spread from one person to the other," said Cifuentes.

 

"I’m very happy with being in Becky’s lab," he said. "She’s a very well-connected person. She’s very smart and she teaches you a lot , not only about science, but also about how to be involved with other scientists. We’re doing great science, we’re publishing in the best journals, so it’s a great place to be."             

 

Dutch, who will become president of the American Society of Virology in June, is training her 17th Ph.D. student. "My trainees are the future of science. As much as I love it, there will be a point which I’m not doing science anymore. And so, me training them means science keeps going," Dutch said. "I think we live in a society that is not as scientifically trained as it should be. So the more scientifically literate people we have, the better. They are the voices for science in the future."

 

LabTV.com features videos with medical researchers, including 32 from UK, who tell where they came from, how they chose their career, what they do each day in the lab, and why they love it. LabTV’s founder, Jay Walker of TEDMED, said he started the site because if high school students can personally identify with a young medical researcher, they are far more likely to consider becoming one. LabTV’s network features researchers working at leading universities, corporations and the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu 

First-Year Honors Students Receive 2016-17 Lewis Scholarships

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 12:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Honors Program has selected 10 first-year students as recipients of the T.W. Lewis Scholarship beginning fall 2016. This third cohort of scholars represent Fayette County and a select number of Appalachian counties in Kentucky.

 

The 2016-17 Lewis Scholars are:

  • Caroline Ackerman, a graduate of Lafayette Senior High School in Fayette County, majoring in human health sciences.
  • Peter Briggs, a graduate of Trinity Christian Academy in Fayette County, majoring in mechanical engineering.
  • Halley Burge, a graduate of West Carter High School in Carter County, majoring in architecture.
  • Andrew Calvert, a graduate of Lexington Christian Academy in Fayette County, majoring in English.
  • Kelsey Cole, a graduate of Magoffin County High School in Magoffin County, major currently undeclared.
  • Alyssa Dyer, a graduate of Sheldon Clark High School in Martin County, majoring in art studio.
  • Elyssa Slusher, a graduate of Harlan High School in Harlan County, majoring in political science.
  • Mahala Walker, a graduate of Perry County Central High School in Perry County, majoring in biology.
  • Noah Welch, a graduate of Henry Clay High School in Fayette County, majoring in history.
  • Megan Yorkey, a graduate of Lexington Catholic High School in Fayette County, majoring in animal sciences.

Recipients are selected on the basis of their academic achievement, demonstrated leadership potential, entrepreneurial potential, strong personal character, intellectual ability and financial need. They each receive $5,000 toward the cost of tuition, room and board, with a maximum of $20,000 awardable per student.

 

T.W. Lewis is a former member of the UK Capital Campaign Steering Committee, serving during the "Dream, Challenge, Succeed" campaign. He received a degree in mechanical engineering from the university in 1971. Last fall, Lewis and his wife Jan gave the single largest gift in UK’s history: $23 million to establish the Lewis Honors College which was approved by the UK Board of Trustees this month.

 

For more information on the T. W. Lewis Scholarship Fund, visit www.uky.edu/academy/honors-incoming-scholarships or contact the Honors Program at 859-257-3111 or honprog@uky.edu

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK Alumna's First Novel Honored as Pulitzer Prize Finalist

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 11:58

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016)  Relying on her Native American roots for her first novel, “Maud’s Line,” University of Kentucky alumna and Lexington businesswoman Margaret Verble has been named a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction.

 

The Pulitzer Committee described “Maud’s Line” as “A novel whose humble prose seems well-suited to the remote American milieu it so engagingly evokes: the Indian allotments of 1920s Oklahoma.” 

 

“Maud’s Line” is set in 1928, a year after the worst Mississippi River flood in history, a year before the Great Depression, and only a handful of years before the devastating droughts that eventually led to America’s Great Dust Bowl — difficult years for the Cherokee Nation. The story focuses on Maud Nail, a young Cherokee woman yearning for a better life on her ancestral allotment land in Eastern Oklahoma.

 

Although raised in Nashville, Tennessee, as a child Verble often visited extended family members still living on their ancestral lands. She proudly remains an enrolled and voting citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and many of “Maud’s Line” characters and the setting are based on her childhood memories.

 

“Verble … tells a compelling story peopled with flawed yet sympathetic characters, sharing insights into Cherokee society on the parcels of land allotted to them after the Trail of Tears," reads a Kirkus review.

 

"Maud's Line" was pubished by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and the paperback edition is planned for release in June. Verble has also authored academic publications and television scripts. Her short stories have appeared in various publications, including The Saturday Evening Post and the Arkansas Review.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 23, 1912

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 11:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 229th diary entry from May 23, 1912, recalls ­­a lively event with friends and faculty, including the dean of women, where the students did their impressions of faculty members.

 

May 23rd. Kinky, Sister Nellie, Miss McCann and Dean Hamilton dress at the Hall for chapel exercises! Dean Hamilton carries numerous hand bags, and Jessie Mit’s coat and wears Miss King’s hat (unknown to Miss King.) Well, I took off the Dean, and I got more applause than I ever did before or after. Everybody has been calling me “Dean” ever since. Prof. Melcher said he didn’t know I had mimicking talents! Addie did Kinky up just too cute for anything, and Annie Louise as Sister Nellie, with Kathleen’s suit and Genevieve Johnson’s hat was fine. Miss McCann carried a butterfly net, but it was entirely superfluous. We had our pictures “took” after it was over. Wasn’t it too bad that Prof. Finley had to speak and spoil our program?

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UPK Book Makes Air Force Reading List

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 10:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) Brian D. Laslie’s book, "The Air Force Way of War: Training and Tactics after Vietnam" published by University Press of Kentucky (UPK), has been selected to the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force (CSAF) 2016 Professional Reading List. "The Air Force Way of War" was selected by Gen. Mark Welsh III, along with eight other books, several TED Talks, web publications, photographers, videos and journals.

 

The CSAF Professional Reading Program was started in 1996 to encourage a shared knowledge and reference base amongst members of the U.S. Air Force — including officers, enlisted members and civilians — that also advocates for air and space power. The reading lists are built around a common theme, and include inspiring material that motivates and offers perspective to Air Force members in all stages of their careers.

 

"This year’s reading list addresses every Airman on our total force team," Gen. Welsh said. "The profession of arms, Air Force heritage, and developing Airmen are topics that apply to all of us."

 

"The Air Force Way of War" is an unprecedented study of Red Flag, the groundbreaking training program introduced by the Air Force in the wake of heavy damage and casualties in Vietnam. The new program’s instruction methods were dubbed “realistic” because they prepared pilots for real-life situations better than the simple cockpit simulations of the past, and students gained proficiency on primary and secondary missions instead of superficially training for numerous possible scenarios.

 

In addition to discussing the program’s history and methods, Laslie analyzes the way its graduates actually functioned in combat during the 1980s and '90s in places such as Grenada, Panama, Libya and Iraq. Military historians have traditionally emphasized technological developments during this period and have overlooked the vital importance of advances in training, but Laslie’s exceptional study examines the seminal Red Flag program to illuminate the revolution in pilot instruction.

 

The Strategy Bridge, an online national security blog that is also featured on this year’s CSAF Reading List, called "The Air Force Way of War," "[A]n essential read for anyone who has ever experienced (or wanted to experience) the thrill of being a part of the world’s largest aerial exercise of 100+ aircraft battling over the Nevada desert, known as Red Flag." Their review also praised Laslie, who "skillfully illuminates the human depth and endeavors of a service that [...] works diligently and intelligently to integrate new technology with the humans who operate it."

 

"With thoughtful leadership, Gen. Welsh has put together a powerful list of diverse content that will challenge each airman to expand her or his worldview," said Vernā Myers, whose TED Talk on unconscious bias was also included on the list. "With this valuable information, airmen will be equipped to break down stereotypes, to understand the life experience of people different from themselves, and to foster a more inclusive, fair and high-performing Air Force."

 

"The Air Force Way of War" along with the other books on the reading list will be added to Air Force base libraries in the coming weeks. It is currently available wherever fine books are sold.

 

Brian D. Laslie is deputy command historian at the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM).

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Markey Cancer Center Director is Guest on WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 16:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 20, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. On today's program, guest host WUKY News Director Alan Lytle talks with Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center, about his annual state of the cancer center address.

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-mark-evers-and-markey-cancer-center.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Appalachian Research Day Brings Findings Back to the Community

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 14:26

HAZARD, Ky. (May 20, 2016) — For many University of Kentucky researchers who study health in Appalachia, the UK Center of Excellence in Rural Health (CERH) is an indispensible partner in conducting community-based research. The Center, located in Hazard, Kentucky, connects researchers with the local community and provides necessary infrastructure, from conference rooms to a team of community health workers, called Kentucky Homeplace, who engage participants and gather data. 

 

This week, researchers shared the findings from these community-based studies at the second annual Appalachian Research Day.

 

“Today is an opportunity for people who do research with the Center to report back about their findings, and see what we can come up with together to better our lives here in Appalachia,” said Fran Feltner, director of the CERH.

 

Rural Appalachian communities in Eastern Kentucky experience some of the nation’s most concerning health disparities, including elevated rates of obesity, diabetes, stroke, heart disease, depression, and cancer incidence and death. Residents of Appalachia might also face challenges in accessing health care, such as distance from providers, lack of insurance, or socioeconomic barriers.

 

Community-based research is essential in addressing disproportionate rates of poor health by collaboratively identifying problems and developing shared solutions that are a good fit for communities. For this type of research to succeed, it must begin at the local level, built upon the foundation of relationships with individuals, neighborhoods and groups who have common questions and concerns. In Eastern Kentucky, the CERH has enabled community-based studies since 1990, when it was founded to improve health through education, service, and research.

 

In 2015, the CERH launched Appalachian Research Day as an opportunity to share and discuss research findings with the communities that were involved in the studies. Feltner describes the day as an invitation for everyone involved in community health research to “come sit on the porch” of the Center and talk about their work and ongoing needs. More than 100 researchers, coordinatators, community health workers, community advisory board members, students, and staff participated this year, with four podium presentations and 13 poster presentations.

 

“These research findings drive new and exciting health initiatives that are transforming lives across our rural Appalachian region,” Feltner said.  

 

The presen­tations focused on community research related to healthy lifestyles, depression, lung cancer screening, drug use and risk behaviors in Appalachia.

 

Mark Dignan, professor in the UK College of Medicine and director of the UK Prevention Research Center, discussed his work with faith-based communities to study energy balance, obesity and cancer in Appalachia.  According to the CDC, the national obesity rate in adults is about 29 percent, while in Appalachian states the rate is 31-35 percent. Dignan was particularly interested in how to help people re-engineer their lives to include more physical activity.

 

“When you do research in the community, hopefully you’ll make change that will be lasting,” he said.

 

Rates of depression are also higher in Appalachia than the rest of the country. For Appalachian women, the rate of depression is four times higher than the national rate. They are also less likely to receive adequate treatment, according to Claire Snell-Rood, PhD, who shared her research on adapting treatment options for rural settings where the traditional mental health system is both inappropriate and inadequate.

 

“This research focuses on how to adapt evidence-based programs to address not only limited treatment options in rural areas, but the substantial social and health challenges that impede Appalachian women from obtaining the care they need,” she said.

 

Snell-Rood worked with Kentucky Homeplace community health workers to conduct interviews with women, and she is currently adapting a collaborative, peer-based practice to support rural individuals in developing their own processes for wellbeing.

 

Roberto Cardarelli, DO, MPH, professor and chief of community medicine in the UK College of Medicine, also presented his research project, the Terminate Lung Cancer study, which aims to understand the knowledge and attitudes of lung cancer screening among high-risk rural populations. Kentucky’s lung cancer mortality rate dramatically exceeds the national lung cancer mortality rate, with 73.2 deaths per 100,000 in Kentucky versus 49.5 nationally. Cardarelli and his team conducted focus groups in order to develop an effective campaign to promote lung cancer screening in the region.

 

“We like to focus on research that’s important to communities, and we couldn’t find a more important topic than tobacco cessation and lung cancer screening,” he said.

 

The final presentation of the day addressed drug use and prescription opioid use in Eastern Kentucky. Michele Staton-Tindall, PhD, associate professor in the UK College of Social Work, conducted research in jails to learn about drug use and health-related risk behaviors among rural women in Appalachia. She said that rates of drug use are “alarmingly high” in this area of Appalachia, with many users injecting.

 

“Injection is the preferred route of administration, which is coupled with increased public health risks including HCV and HIV,” she said.

 

The event was supported in part by the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, which aims to accelerate discoveries that improve human health, with particular focus on the Appalachian region.

 

For Feltner, a nurse who has worked in rural health for 35 years, Appalachian Research Day represents the best qualities of the place she calls home.

 

“What I love most about Appalachia is the fellowship we have together, as neighbors and friends, working together to solve problems.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, mallory.powell@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Registration Open for Kentucky Military Family Camp

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 14:16

LEXINGTON, Ky., (May 20, 2016) — Military families with young children can enjoy an adventure at a Kentucky camp designed to strengthen family bonds in a fun-filled atmosphere.

 

The 2016 camp is June 10-12 at the University of Kentucky’s Robinson Forest. It is open to families with at least one child who is 6 years old and under. Families must have a member serving in any active duty military branch, Reserve or National Guard, or have a member who is a veteran or a Department of Defense civilian or contractor.

 

Scheduled activities, which include creek walks, fossil making and scavenger hunts, will help families connect with nature and promote kindergarten readiness.

 

Priority is given to families who haven’t attended a previous Kentucky Military Family Camp. Though the camps are in Kentucky, they are open to military families throughout the country.

 

The free camp is funded through a grant the UK Cooperative Extension Service received from Kentucky’s System to Enhance Early Development.

 

Spots are quickly filling. Interested families can access the Kentucky camp application online at http://fcs-hes.ca.uky.edu/content/military-family-programs.

 

Several military youth and military family camps are offered throughout the United States. Individuals interested in the different options can visit the 4-H Military Partnerships website at http://4-hmilitarypartnerships.org/. For more information about the Kentucky camp or volunteer opportunities, contact Tyrone Atkinson, coordinator for UK’s Family and Consumer Sciences Extension military programs, at 859-218-1546 or tcatki2@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 20-22, 1912

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 12:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 20, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 226th, 227th and 228th diary entries from May 20, 21 and 22, 1912, recall a meeting with a professor on job prospects, a visit with the university's president about the school's student government, and a relaxing day reading "The Harvester" by Gene Stratton-Porter.

 

May 20th. "The plans of mice and men" — meant to put in the morning sewing, but Prof. Noe called for Hattie, Jessie Mit and me, and over we went. As a direct result I get some recommends and apply for a job. Shall I spend the year with Phyllis.

May 21st. Have a big class meeting at which I preside and appoint a few committees. We decide to have chapel and Addie, Dosty, and I fly around, see Prof. White, and Prof. Melcher — finally decide to have it on Thursday. After chapel Judge Barker called Jessie Milton and me into his office, and all unknowingly I found out that the Student Government Committee had been at work.

May 22nd. Read "The Harvester"

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

 

Researchers Present Cancer Studies at Markey Research Day

Wed, 05/18/2016 - 16:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2016) – The annual University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center Research Day not only provides researchers with the opportunity to share their work, but to get feedback from colleagues. An estimated 400 people were in attendance at the event, with about 50 staff members tasked with judging posters.

 

While many posters are presented by seasoned researchers, high school, undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students, as well as junior researchers and staff, also can submit work and request to have their poster presentation judged by faculty members.

 

For Kim Lakocy, a fourth year undergraduate nursing student, this year’s Markey Research Day was her introduction to cancer research. Working with Robin Vanderpool, associate professor and vice chair in the Department of Heath Behavior, Lakocy helped research the use of an application to meet a new American College of Surgeons’ requirement that 75 percent of patients have survivorship care plans. The team she worked with created an application to populate patient’s demographic information like name, age and cancer type into the necessary forms. This application is intended to save time and allow Markey to meet the requirement by 2018. This year, Lakocy learned about the interdisciplinary nature of research and plans to participate in research day in the future. 

 

A diverse array of specialties, from behavioral health to chemical engineering, were represented at the 2016 event with 107 posters on display. Oral presentations were made by one scientist; one senior research associate and two graduate students; and faculty oral presentations were made by Dr. Natasha Kyprianou, the James F. Hardymon Chair of Urology Research, and Dr. Robert DiPaola, the new dean of the College of Medicine. Dr. B. Mark Evers also presented the “State of the Cancer Center” address.

 

The event concluded with an award ceremony. Winners include:

 

Overall Winner

 

Stuart Jarrett, “AKAP12 is a UV-inducible scaffold which regulates nucleotide excision repair by promoting PKA-mediated ATR phosphorylation”

 

Basic Science – Graduate Student

 

1st place: Brittany Carpenter, “The integrin alpha6beta4 promotes pancreatic cancer invasion by altering DNA repair-mediated epigenetics”

2nd place: Maria Dixon, “AFP anti-sense transcripts in mouse liver and their potential role in gene regulation”

 

Basic Science – Postdocs

 

1st place: Lei Wang, “Autophagy deficiency stabilizes p62 and HIF-1α to promote stemness property in arsenic-induced transformed cells”

2nd place: Julia Schulz, “Dual PI3K/Akt Inhibition: A New Strategy to Improve Drug Delivery in Glioblastoma Therapy”

 

 

Clinical Science – Graduate Student

 

1st place: Nathan Pauly, “Smoking Cessation Quitline: A Return on Investment Analysis”

2nd place: Daniel Zetter, “Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition in Bladder Cancer Progression”

 

 

Clinical Science – Postdocs

 

1st place: Ramon Sun, “A liquid diet for mapping metabolic networks in PDX mice using stable-isotope resolved metabolomics”

2nd place: Anh-Thu Le, “Thromboelastography demonstrates perioperative hypercoagulability in hepato-pancreato-biliary patients and supports routine administration of preoperative and early postoperative venous thromboembolism chemoprophylaxis”

 

 

 

Markey Achievements Featured in Annual “State of the Cancer Center” Address at Markey Research Day

Wed, 05/18/2016 - 16:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2016) — Dr. Mark Evers, director of the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, gave his annual "State of the Cancer Center" address Wednesday at Markey Research Day, highlighting the center's major accomplishments in patient care, recruitment, research and outreach from the past year.

 

"Markey is making great strides in both clinical care and research, and we plan to continue that trend moving forward," Evers said. "Kentucky is still home to the worst cancer rates in the country, and we will continue to expand our reach and provide acute-level cancer care for not just Kentuckians, but patients from neighboring states and even across the country who are seeking services only we can provide."

 

Patient Care at Markey

Patient growth continues to increase with more than 94,000 outpatient visits in the past year, a four percent increase over 2015 visits and a 42 percent increase since Evers’ arrival in 2009. In addition, the number of analytic cancer cases seen by Markey doctors has nearly doubled — 49 percent — since 2009.

 

Markey’s five-year survival rates for lung, brain, prostate, liver and ovarian cancers are higher than the national average. In particular, Markey’s liver cancer survival rates are outstanding, with a 27 percent five-year-survival rate versus the SEER national average of 16 percent.

 

Cancer Research

Cancer funding continues to increase, with Markey bringing in $43 million in funds from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and other peer-reviewed and non-peer reviewed sources — a $5 million increase in research funding over the previous year.

 

Under a new partnership with the NCI-designated cancer center at The Ohio State University, Markey will be a phase I and II trial site for OSU’s NCI-sponsored UM1 grant, providing access to new clinical trials for Markey patients. The goal is to develop the most effective dose and schedules for further therapeutic investigation of new anticancer agents that will be tested in late-phase clinical trials by the National Clinical Trials Network

 

 

In early 2015, the cancer center launched the Markey Cancer Center Research Network (MCCRN), a new initiative conducting high priority cancer research through a network of collaborative centers with expertise in delivery of cancer care and conduct of research studies. Medical centers participating in the MCCRN will have the opportunity to either conduct clinical trials on-site or have a quick line of referral to Markey for trial participation.

 

Currently, the MCCRN has three sites on board, with several more to join over the next year:

·      King's Daughters Medical Center, Ashland

·      Hardin Memorial Health, Elizabethtown

·      St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead

·      St. Mary's Regional Cancer Center, Huntington, W.Va

 

Markey's Reach Across the State

Though based in Lexington, Markey also strives to provide access to top-notch cancer care across the state and beyond through the Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network (MCCAN). The MCCAN is a group of health care facilities that provide high-quality cancer services and programs in their communities with the support and guidance of the UK Markey Cancer Center, allowing patients to receive their care closer to home.

 

Currently, the MCCAN comprises 16 medical centers across the state of Kentucky:

·      Clark Regional Medical Center, Winchester

·      Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center, Danville

·      Frankfort Regional Medical Center, Frankfort

·      Georgetown Community Hospital, Georgetown

·      Hardin Memorial Hospital, Elizabethtown

·      Harlan ARH Hospital, Harlan

·      Harrison Memorial Hospital, Cynthiana

·      Hazard ARH Regional Medical Center, Hazard

·      Methodist Hospital, Henderson

·      Norton Cancer Institute, Louisville

·      Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital, Ashland

·      St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead

·      Rockcastle Regional Hospital, Mount Vernon

·      The Medical Center at Bowling Green

·      TJ Samson Community Hospital

·      Tug Valley ARH Regional Medical Center, South Williamson

 

Additionally, evaluations are under way for several other hospitals, further establishing Markey as the destination cancer center for the region. 

 

The Future of Cancer Care in Kentucky

The faculty and staff at Markey have a busy few years ahead of them, as the cancer center prepares to submit its application for an NCI designation as a comprehensive cancer center in 2017. Currently, 45 of the 69 total NCI-designated cancer centers in the country hold a comprehensive cancer center status.

 

To earn this top level of designation, cancer centers must show a depth and breadth of research in each of three major areas: laboratory, clinical, and population-based research, as well as substantial transdisciplinary research that bridges these scientific areas. Additionally, outreach is especially important, and comprehensive cancer centers must demonstrate professional and public education and outreach capabilities, including the dissemination of clinical and public health advances in the communities it serves.

 

"Earning a comprehensive cancer center designation from the NCI would be another giant leap forward for Markey," Evers said. “We’ve already established ourselves as the destination cancer center for the state, and moving forward, we will continue to push to become a leader in cancer clinical care and research across the country.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 19, 1912

Wed, 05/18/2016 - 13:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 225th diary entry from May 19, 1912, recalls the senior's Sunday plans.

 

May 19th. Go to church, and then to Elizabeth's for dinner.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

UK Student Selected for Fulbright Summer Institute in England

Wed, 05/18/2016 - 11:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2016) The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that history junior Abigail King, of Lexington, has been selected for a place at a Fulbright Summer Institute to study at England's Durham University in one of the most prestigious and selective summer scholarship programs operating worldwide. 

 

The U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission is the only bilateral, transatlantic scholarship program offering awards and summer programs for study or research in any field, at any accredited United States or United Kingdom university. The commission is part of the Fulbright program conceived by Senator J. William Fulbright in the aftermath of World War II to promote leadership, learning and empathy between nations through educational exchange. Award recipients and summer program participants are expected to be future leaders for tomorrow and support the "special relationship" between the U.S. and U.K.

 

As a participant, King has been selected from a strong applicant pool to experience the U.K. on a four-week summer program. The theme of the institute is "The Northern Borders of Empire to the Making of the Middle Ages." Durham's Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS) will guide students from the Roman Empire through Saxons, Vikings and the supreme kingdom of Northumbria and onto the medieval Northeast. The Summer Institute students will engage with a number of projects linked to the Binchester excavations which are exploring the Roman to medieval transformation of this frontier region.

 

"Upon learning I received the place I was in disbelief up until I called my parents, and then I was crying tears of joy. As a Fulbright summer program participant, I will gain experience in archaeology, learn more about medieval culture and current U.K. culture, and become an ambassador for my host university and the program," King said "I hope this work will enhance my teamwork and communication skills, my interest in archaeology, my knowledge on the Middle Ages, and I hope the program helps me grow as a leader."

 

Penny Egan, executive director of the U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission said, "In the 70th year of the Special Relationship, we can celebrate American students seeking study abroad opportunities through our Summer Institute program. This is a unique opportunity to get a taste of British higher education while interacting with students from across the globe. As part of a diverse and high-achieving cohort, these students will gain immensely from the experience."

 

The U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission selects participants through a rigorous application and interview process. In making these awards the commission looks not only for academic excellence but a focused application, a range of extracurricular and community activities, demonstrated ambassadorial skills, a desire to further the Fulbright Program and a plan to give back to the recipient’s home country upon returning.

 

Fulbright Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a re-entry session and opportunity to join the program's alumni networks.

 

King, the daughter of Dave and Deanna King of Lexington, is pursuing a degree in history and a minor in classics at UK. A member of the Honors Program, she recently completed an internship with the Special Collections Research Center Learning Lab, where she and her fellow interns processed the Frankel and Curtis Architectural Drawings Collection.

 

UK students interested in U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission may apply through the university’s Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the office assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

VSA Program Enables Expressive Learning, Artful Healing for KCH Patients

Wed, 05/18/2016 - 11:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2016) — With their legs folded in the yoga stance called Lotus pose, sisters Anayia and Armani Happy sat knee-to-knee on Anayia’s hospital bed, tapping the silver cylinders on sets of Indonesian xylophones.

 

After a few initial strikes of their mallets, the Happy sisters were entranced with the mellow sound produced by a gentle tap on these foreign instruments. With no prior training or practice with the xylophones, the two girls played their instruments to create an extemporaneous musical arrangement. As soon as the budding percussionists established a consistent and confident rhythm, musician Gregory Acker joined the ensemble with a flute solo — kicking up the energy in the Kentucky Children’s Hospital (KCH) room.

 

Acker then reached into a trunk full of abstract instruments and swapped out the sisters’ xylophones for a set of shakers and a West African hand drum. He then invited the sisters to use their instruments to perform and sing a familiar childhood song — the Alphabet Song —but with a West African twist. When the girls came to the letter ‘P’ in the song’s sequence of letters, they paused to shout a West African saying that translated to “let’s dance.”

 

Acker is a musical artist supported by a grant from the VSA Kentucky Arts in HealthCare program, which distributes funding for health care facilities to coordinate visits from creative and artistic professionals. These artists offer visual art, instrumental music, clowning, drama and other activities to assist with the healing process, interrupt the monotony of hospital care and empower patients to express themselves. In the past 15 years, KCH has received more than $25,000 from VSA award funding to bring artful healing to patients.

 

“It’s one of the nicest things I do in my artistic life,” Acker said of his visits to KCH. “You meet people in a really challenging place in their lives. Finding the beauty in life is super important at that point.”

 

Acker, a teaching artist who is part of the Sound Community in Louisville, Kentucky, enlivens patient rooms at Kentucky Children’s Hospital once a month by providing patients and families with the novel experience of playing musical instruments indigenous to West Africa and Indonesia. Pulling a trunk filled with cymbals, drums, shakers, xylophones and other musical instruments behind him, Acker stops in each pod of the hospital to invite children, families and sometimes hospital staff to try their hand at a few of his musical instruments. Acker, a former PeaceCorp volunteer who was based in two African countries and Indonesia, specializes in world music with study experience in India and Indonesia. With permission from the patients, he records a CD, which the families can take home to remember a positive moment during their hospital stay. 

 

In addition to Acker, KCH’s VSA grant supports visits from visual artist and muralist Christine Kuhn and Cambo the Clown, who entertains children and families with a combination of music, humor, and juggling and magic tricks.

 

“While our health care providers and Child Life team make every attempt to serve the needs and maintain the comfort of our patients and families, we realize that the hospitalization experience carries a tremendous burden, especially for a child who’d rather be playing,” Erin McAnallen, the VSA child life coordinator at KCH, said. “Getting artists here to engage with the children truly makes a difference. These artists turn a time in life that could be a lasting negative memory into something positive and enduring for the family.”

 

VSA Kentucky is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing inclusive arts and education programs for children, youth and adults with disabilities, in addition to professional development for artist and teachers in schools and communities statewide. For more information, click here.

###

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

UK Crime Bulletin Issued in Theft of Motor Scooters

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 20:17

 LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 17, 2016) —  The University of Kentucky Police Department issued the following UK Crime Bulletin today concerning motor scooter thefts.

 

In the interest of safety, the University of Kentucky Police Department has issued the following Crime Bulletin for the University of Kentucky Campus.

 

The University of Kentucky Police Department received reports of stolen motor scooters on the following dates from the following locations:  

  • Two from outside of 447 Pennsylvania Court on Thursday, April 21, 2016.
  • Two from outside of 429 Columbia Ave. between Friday, April 22 and Sunday, April 24, 2016.
  • One outside of Champions Court II, 326 S. Martin Luther King Blvd. around 2:44 a.m. on Wednesday, April 27, 2016.
  • One outside of Memorial Coliseum around 3 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3, 2016.
  • One outside of W.T. Young Library, 401 Hilltop Ave. around 1 a.m. on Thursday, May 5, 2016 (recovered by UKPD).
  • One outside of Woodland Glen I, 720 Woodland Ave. at 6:33 p.m. on Sunday, May 8, 2016.
  • One in Parking Structure 8-UK Medical Center Parking Garage on Monday, May 16, 2016.  

 

Suspect descriptions have varied across the incidents.    

 

University of Kentucky Police Department has issued this Crime Bulletin for the UK community in compliance with the “Timely Notice” provision of the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998.

 

If anyone has any information regarding these incidents, please contact UK Police at 859-257-8573.

 

The University of Kentucky values a safe community for all students, staff, faculty, and visitors. In the interest of promoting a safe and secure campus environment, UK Police offer the following safety precautions:

 

  • If you see something, say something; report suspicious activity to UK Police immediately. For emergencies, call 911.
  • Whenever possible, avoid thefts of opportunity and secure property with locks. Opportunity theft is the direct result of property and valuables left unattended and unsecured, even for short periods of time, which provides a thief with the opportunity to steal your valuables.
  • Maintain a thorough record of your valuables, to include photographs, serial numbers, makes and models, etc.
  • Mopeds and scooters on campus are required to have a motor scooter/motorcycle permit. Permits may be obtained at http://www.uky.edu/pts/.

 

 

 

William Clark Named Director of Research Information Services

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 19:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2016) —The University of Kentucky Office of the Vice President for Research (VPR) has announced that William “Billy” Clark has been appointed director of Research Information Services. 

 

As director, Clark manages the computing infrastructure for research administration, research support units and the centers and institutes that report to the VPR, and he oversees a staff of nine programmers, database administrators, server administrators and tech support personnel.

 

Research Information Services developed and oversees the sponsored projects administration database and is completing development of an electronic Internal Review Board system. These projects are integral to the grants administration and research integrity operations of the university, Clark said.

 

“I am honored to be appointed the Research Information Services director. Continuing to expand and strengthen our research IT infrastructure is instrumental in promoting research at the University of Kentucky,” Clark said. “Our accomplished staff are excited to provide innovative solutions to improve the strong foundation for research support.”

 

Clark has worked in Research Information Services since 2012 and has served as interim director since February 2015.

 

“We look forward to continuing to work with Billy and his team and thank him for taking on this important responsibility on behalf of UK researchers,” said Lisa Cassis, vice president for research.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 18, 1912

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 14:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 224th diary entry from May 18, 1912, recalls the senior getting an invitation to a Jackson Purchase Club event for a night of socializing and dancing.

 

May 18th. Go to the Library for Addie, but fail to meet her. See Winona on the street and loaf with her until her train comes.


Inserted next to the May 18, 1912, diary entry McClure included an invitation that reads, "You are invited to Patterson Hall next Saturday evening at eight; The Jackson Purchase Club entertains. Please come and don't be late."


In the evening we all go to the Reception and Dance. Lots of people here. "yes, that's true. That's just right. Exactly right!" I did finally, for once, shake one man to whom I did not want to talk. Jessie Mit and I escorted Mr. Sweetland to the gate.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

VIDEO: Why UK Professor Says the 2016 Presidential Election Is 'Unlike Any Other'

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 14:20

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2015) — People across the United States, regardless of political affiliation, seem to echo the same observation about the 2016 presidential election. 

 

They’ve never seen anything like it.

 

From a political science perspective is that really true and how does this year’s race for the White House actually compare to other election years in United States history?

 

In the video above, Stephen Voss, associate professor of political science at the University of Kentucky describes the 2016 Election in a nutshell.  

 

To listen to the full “Behind the Blue” podcast with Voss, click on the link below.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

UK Design Welcomes New School of Architecture Director

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 13:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2016) The University of Kentucky College of Design has announced the appointment of Jeffrey Johnson as the new director of the School of Architecture. Johnson joins the faculty from the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University where he was the founding director of the Asia Megacities Lab.

 

"I am thrilled to be joining the amazing team at the UK College of Design and look forward to working directly with the students and faculty of the School of Architecture at such an exciting time,” Johnson said. “We have a great opportunity to build on the school’s esteemed reputation as we continue its course as a leader in architectural education."

 

Johnson, a registered architect and a member of the AIA (American Institute of Architects), was chosen from nearly 50 highly accomplished international candidates for the position. “What impressed our committee is that he’s successfully oscillated between academia and professional practice throughout his career,” said Anne Filson, chairman of the search committee. “That combined with his record of intellectual leadership made him an exceptional candidate within a very competitive field.”

 

Most recently, Johnson has been critically examining the historically unprecedented "museumification" of China during the current museum building boom. He has lectured extensively and has taken part in numerous international events, symposia, forums and workshops on the topic of architecture, cities and urbanization. In addition to teaching at Columbia University, he has also taught at the Illinois Institute of Technology and at Tongji University in Shanghai.

 

“In addition to his balance of practice and academia, Professor Johnson is a promising leader in the school and college because of his experimentation at a range of scales from interiors to urban design,” Dean Mitzi Vernon said. “We are excited to have his voice at the table as we grow the College of Design.”

 

Johnson, who received his master's degree in architecture in 1992 and his bachelor's degree in architecture in 1990 from Ball State University, begins as director of the UK School of Architecture on July 1.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Julie Wilson, 859-257-5367, julie.wilson@uky.edu; or Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716, whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

UK College of Fine Arts Dean to Lead Arts College at Syracuse University

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 13:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 17, 2016) — After six years as dean of the University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts, Michael Tick will step down to assume the position of dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University. He begins at Syracuse July 1.

 

Syracuse University is a private, coeducational, urban institution located in the heart of Central New York. As dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Tick will lead more than 300 full-time and part-time faculty and nearly 2,500 undergraduate and graduate students in six schools and departments.

 

“I’m very appreciative of Michael’s leadership for the College of Fine Arts for the last six years. During his tenure, the college has made significant advancement through new facilities and programs, while maintaining a commitment to the highest standards of artistic expression, which have been recognized literally around the globe,” said Tim Tracy, UK provost. “We wish Michael and his family only the best as they pursue this newest chapter in their lives at Syracuse."

 

Under Tick’s leadership, the School of Art and Visual Studies moved into a new state-of-the-art facility through a nearly $24 million university investment in a renovated historic building. The building includes specialized areas such as digital media labs, a multipurpose 3D fabrication lab, student studios, and gallery space. In fall 2016, the college will launch the Creative Arts Living Learning Program in a new 1,100-bed residential hall with multidisciplinary spaces for visual, performing, and literary arts. The facility, a partnership with the College of Arts and Sciences, will dramatically enhance student opportunities for creative discovery and innovation on UK’s campus. Because of Tick’s advocacy and commitment to facility improvements, the initial scope and architectural program are in place for a new School of Music Instruction building, which will support rehearsal space for the Wildcat Marching Band.

 

During his tenure, Tick built a centralized administrative support infrastructure for the College of Fine Arts with new positions for communications, recruiting, development, and information technology. The college hired its first chief financial officer and developed an integrated business unit in anticipation of the university’s new budget model. This centralized infrastructure provides strong fiscal oversight of program expenditures as well as a unified identity for student success and patron and donor engagement.

 

One of the College of Fine Arts' many international successes under Tick’s leadership was a successful partnership with the Art College of Inner Mongolia University. In collaboration with the UK Confucius Institute, both colleges agreed to several terms including exchanges of students for study and research; exchanges of faculty members for research, lectures, and discussions; exchanges of academic materials and academic publications; and joint research activities. Delegates from Inner Mongolia came to UK’s campus in 2013 for a week of collaborative concerts, master classes, lectures, and exhibitions. Thirty-five faculty, staff, and students from UK traveled to Inner Mongolia in 2015 to do the same. At present there are nearly 20 students from Inner Mongolia completing their degree programs on UK’s campus through 2+2 and 3+1 programs. Discussions are underway for a similar program in Malaysia.

 

In the last six years, the College of Fine Arts has seen the addition of the University of Kentucky Art Museum as an auxiliary unit, Lexington’s only accredited art museum. The Department of Art was renamed the School of Art and Visual Studies and expanded its offerings with major growth in UK Core classes reaching thousands of students in other colleges. The Department of Theatre was renamed the Department of Theatre and Dance to reflect the growing popularity of dance within the department; at its inception the dance minor had six students and, in less than three years, enrollment grew to more than 50 students. The School of Music expanded its partnership with UK HealthCare through a graduate program in music therapy. The Arts Administration program launched an online master's in arts administration, the first of its kind at a public university. Most recently, University Senate voted to move the Arts Administration program to its own freestanding unit as a department, recognizing the growth in undergraduate and graduate students. Additionally, Tick realized his vision to build strategic partnerships across campus through initiatives with the College of Communication and Information, the College of Arts and Sciences, UK HealthCare, the College of Design, and the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, among others.

 

In 2015, Tick was elected for a three-year term to the Board of Directors of the International Council of Fine Arts Deans. Through his leadership in this and other professional organizations, Tick has brought the College of Fine Arts international recognition for its contributions to creative research and has affirmed the vital contributions of the arts to the health of UK’s campus.

 

Prior to joining UK in 2010, Tick spent 11 years as the chair of the Department of Theatre at Louisiana State University (LSU) and producing artistic director of Swine Palace, the department’s Equity theatre company. Before joining LSU in 1999, Tick served on the planning committee that established in 1985 the Virginia Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA), a regional secondary arts school affiliated with the Virginia Stage Company, the Virginia Opera, the Virginia Symphony, and the Virginia Ballet Theatre. As founding chair of the GSA Department of Theatre, Tick served on the faculty of Old Dominion University. He has also served the faculties of the University of Rhode Island, Northwestern University, Rend Lake College (Illinois), Harvard University (in association with the University of Rhode Island), the University of the Virgin Islands (St. Thomas), and Bretton Hall College of the University of Leeds.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605

Pages