MenuMenu

Campus News

Nathan Wright: UK Grad and Game Inventor

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 15:18

 

The original Kickstarter video for Nathan Wright's Game of Energy. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016) — Nathan Wright has always wanted to go beyond the status quo and create, to pursue ideas and make things that nobody else has made before. Now, putting the best of his recently completed University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics MBA together with the undergraduate degree he earned from the UK College of Engineering, Wright is doing just that. He has developed Game of Energy, a strategic game based on the world energy crisis.

 

Growing up in the hills of Eastern Kentucky, near Pikeville, Wright spent most of his early life living in the same house located 15 minutes from the main road, a creek with green mountains on one side and houses on the other side of the narrow road. He attended local public schools — John’s Creek Elementary for grades K-8 and Pike County Central High School for grades 9-12.

 

A big fan of Wildcat sports since he can remember, Wright said, “My entire room was painted and decorated in a UK theme.”

 

Yet that is not what sold him on choosing UK as the place to pursue his college education.

 

“I did a tour of the engineering college and the rest of campus and it was magnificent,” Wright said. “It also didn’t hurt that I received a bit of VIP treatment from UK staff after they learned I had a 35 (out of a perfect 36) on my ACT.”

 

Wright had attained a "superscore" of 36 (combining best results from several test attempts) and was being recruited by the likes of Massachusetts Insitute of Techonology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a number of other universities with nationally ranked engineering programs.

 

“Yet UK just felt right and was where I needed to be,” Wright said.

 

After seriously considering several engineering disciplines during his first couple of semesters at the university, Wright wound up majoring in mechanical engineering while also earning certification in aerospace engineering.

 

“During my time at UK, I was instructed by many great professors,” Wright said. “But the one who stands out is Alexandre Martin. His fluid mechanics class did more than teach me the required subject matter, but also to think differently and truly understand how calculus can be used as a practical tool to solve real-life problems. With Dr. Martin, instead of calculus being the usual ‘undergraduate annoyance’ that many students approach it with, I was energized.”

 

Wright began visiting Martin’s office regularly, discussing research and getting to know this faculty member better.

 

“This finally culminated in us co-writing a proposal for a NASA grant to design and build a prototype for a new satellite design at the University of Kentucky, called KRUPS (Kentucky Reentry Universal Payload System),” Wright said. “I was responsible for forming the team and overseeing the project as an undergraduate. The design has evolved over the years as other student teams have assumed the reins, but I have remained active with the project. KRUPS is currently set to be launched on its first mission in the summer of 2018.”

 

While possessing this impressive engineering acumen and experience, Wright also had an eye for business.

 

“I had started my own business in May 2012 in order to pursue high-risk projects beyond the co-op experiences typically chosen by students in engineering,” Wright said. “I set out to invent, patent and license products in a variety of fields. While a couple of these ventures showed promise for future development, I realized that I needed a better, more formal foundation in the ways of business. Besides, having an MBA would open doors for me with a unique combination of technical expertise from my engineering degree, plus the understanding of a manager’s point of view when dealing with projects at an engineering firm.”

 

Intrigued by the Gatton College’s strong reputation in supply chain management, Wright enrolled in the college’s two-year MBA program.

 

“It just made sense to do it at Gatton, especially since I was already so familiar with the University of Kentucky, a place that I loved.”

 

Describing himself as “a gamer of both tabletop and video games for pretty much my entire life,” Wright said it was a conversation with his father, David, that led him to the "Game of Energy" idea.

 

“My dad was dealing a lot in the energy market at the time, managing several surface mines in Eastern Kentucky while also watching the stock market. One day, he started asking questions of me about the various energy industries of the world, and thanks to classes I had taken at UK and some additional research I had done, I was able to provide some thoughtful answers to him,” Wright said. “Dad said, ‘this is really interesting stuff. There needs to be a way to bring this to the masses.’ I was thinking like a book, or a blog, but instead my father said, ‘a board game.’ And it simply clicked in my mind.”

 

Making the game come to life, making it fun and easily accessible to all was Wright’s new challenge — how to address each sector of the energy industry in an unbiased pros vs. cons manner that would help shed light on such a hot topic — Wright set out to meet the need.

 

Wright’s mother, Tammy, also loved the idea and encouraged her son to "go for it."

 

“My parents’ support, not just emotionally, but also financially, has been vital in making this entry into the tabletop gaming industry,” Wright said. “And having run this journey as a family has allowed us all to learn together and become even closer. In fact, the three of us have spent many a night playtesting the game together.”

 

Game of Energy is designed as a highly thematic strategy game of medium-to-light complexity. The primary methods of play are placing different sized tiles to control space on the board and managing resources. It involves one to four players and usually lasts between 30 and 60 minutes.

 

All modern, widespread technologies are represented in Game of Energy:

· biofuel

· fossil fuel

· hydroelectric

· nuclear

· solar

· wind

 

As of this date, the game is still in the crowdfunding phase of the venture with the deadline to reach the goal of $15,745 coming up at 1 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Aug. 30. The fundraising campaign is live on Kickstarter and anyone wishing to participate can do so by visiting http://GameOfEnergy.com and following the links.

 

Wright also is actively monitoring his social media accounts:

· Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/GameOfEnergyFans

· Twitter: @energy_game

· Instagram: game_of_energy

 

In addition to families playing Game of Energy at home together, there appears to be a strong potential market for educators to employ the game in their classrooms to help teach lessons about how best to meet the growing energy needs of the world.

 

“There has been a lot of interest by educators at various grade levels — from as young as fourth grade to as old as high school and college,” Wright said. “I think the youngest person we’ve had to play the game is 9 years old. Even though our initial recommendation is for ages 14 and up, the numbers used in Game of Energy are either based on five’s or 25’s, so the math being utilized is relatively easy to understand.”

 

Just in case you are thinking that 2016 is not the right time to develop and release a new board game, think again.

 

“Several recent national surveys indicate that board games are enjoying a renaissance,” Wright said. “While electronically based games dominate the overall commercial market, studies show that board games’ share of that market is up to around 11 percent from 8 percent a few years ago.”

 

While working hard to launch Game of Energy, Wright also is very close to accepting a professional position where he would be working in aerospace engineering. He is very proud to call himself an alumnus of UK.

 

“This university has given so much to me and so many other people,” Wright said. “And you better believe I will be recommending my future children attend this gem of the Bluegrass.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200, carl.nathe@uky.edu.

UK Art Museum Opens Citywide Retrospective on Artist Louis Zoellar Bickett

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 15:03

 

Interview with artist Louis Zoellar Bickett by Creative Lexington.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016) The University of Kentucky Art Museum will kick off a citywide retrospective of the work of celebrated Lexington-based artist Louis Zoellar Bickett. Since 1972, Bickett has maintained a rigorous practice of collecting and cataloging items from his daily life to form a vast archive of found, gifted, purchased and made objects. The free public survey exhibition, "Louis Zoellar Bickett: Saving Myself," will open this weekend, Saturday, Aug. 27, and run through Sunday, Nov. 27.

 

In "Saving Myself," the UK Art Museum brings together several specific projects that are part of what Bickett calls "The Archive," his vast and detailed accumulation of photographs, receipts, articles of clothing, books, toys, furniture and bodily fluids. All have been preserved and placed throughout his home/studio.

 

The exhibition affords viewers a chance to examine some of the artist’s most consistent subjects — religion, sexuality, family, friendship and history — both personal and cultural. Soil collected from Civil War battlefields and notorious gravesites are sealed in glass jars. Portraits of the artist holding some of his favorite books or wearing his collection of hats show a hyper-aware performer channeling his inner Buster Keaton. Postcards obtained by Bickett at faraway locales are modified and mailed to himself at home, revealing his Dadaesque spirit. Annotated objects and haiku poems are seen throughout the galleries, attesting to his love of language and assessing the importance of experiences and objects. As the artist states, “Life is a meaningless series of events that lead to the grave. The charge of civilization is to live as if that was not true.”

 

UK Art Museum Director Stuart Horodner comments, "This is a thrilling moment in the history of visual art in the Commonwealth. Louis Bickett has been making rigorously conceptual and emotionally rich work in our midst for decades, and this is a unique opportunity for audiences to encounter the scope of his creative activities. I believe visitors to these exhibitions will come away understanding something profound about paying attention to one’s life with humor, generosity and grace.”

 

“Saving Myself” is part of a citywide focus on Bickett’s art taking place throughout the fall at several venues. The other free public Bickett exhibits and installations are as follows:  

· “What You Don’t Surrender the World Strips Away,” Sept. 9-April15, 2017, at 21c Museum Hotel;

· “Selections from the Art Collection,” Oct. 27-Nov. 26, at Institute 193;

· “All We Ever Wanted,” Oct. 28-Nov. 27, at Lexington Art League; and

· “The Kentucky Dirt Project: 120 Counties,” a permanent installation at the new Chandler Dining located in UK A.B. Chandler Hospital Pavilion A.

 

Bickett has exhibited in galleries and museums, including Institute 193 and the Lexington Art League in Lexington; the Speed Art Museum, Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville, and Zephyr Gallery in Louisville, Kentucky; and Galerie Eugen Lendl in Graz, Austria.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the UK Art Museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

The UK Art Museum, located in the Singletary Center for the Arts at Rose Street and Euclid Avenue, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. For more information on membership, contact Lyndi VanDeursen at 859-257-8164 or lyndi.vandeursen@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

UK Named One of "Top Hospitals with Great Oncology Programs" by Becker's Hospital Review

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 12:19
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Hospital is one of the nation’s “100 Hospitals and Health Systems with Great Oncology Programs” in Becker’s Hospital Review magazine's recently released compilation of leading cancer care providers in the United States. The UK Markey Cancer Center, whose clinical programs are integrated with UK Chandler Hospital, received a National Cancer Institute cancer center designation in July 2013. According to the health care industry trade publication, organizations included on the 2016 list are “leading the way in terms of clinical expertise, patient outcomes and influential cancer research.” In choosing UK as a top oncology program, Becker’s noted Markey's NCI designation; its status as a Blue Distinction Center for Complex and Rare Cancers; and its role in caring for the patients of central Appalachia, one of the most economically disadvantaged and medically underserved regions in the U.S. Additionally, Becker's noted that Markey is one of just a few institutions across the country offering multidisciplinary care through Clinical Care and Research Teams. The Becker's Hospital Review editorial team selected hospitals for inclusion based on rankings and awards they have received from a variety of reputable sources. The following awards were considered as part of the criteria for inclusion on the list: U.S. News & World Report cancer rankings, CareChex cancer care rankings, National Cancer Institute designations, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer accreditations, and Blue Distinction Center recognition from the BlueCross BlueShield Association. Media Contact: Kristi Lopez, kristi.lopez@uky.edu

Low Back Pain Sufferers Experience Relief With UK Researcher's New Treatment

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 10:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 29, 2016) Millions of Americans suffering from low back pain could soon have a quick, cost-effective and permanent solution for the debilitating ailment. The solution, an injectable liquid called Réjuve, was pioneered by University of Kentucky researcher Tom Hedman and has received promising early results from a recent clinical study.

 

Réjuve, a product of Intralink-Spine Inc. and the focus of Hedman's research at UK, is an injectable orthopaedic device that mechanically strengthens the spinal disc and stabilizes the spinal joint. A key to Réjuve's effectiveness is the device's ability to promote crosslinking of fibrous proteins including collagen, which rejuvenates the spinal disk area.

 

According to an Intralink-Spine news release, one patient reported that he played 18 holes of golf three days after the Réjuve procedure and another climbed the Sydney Harbor Bridge a few days post procedure.

 

"This treatment addresses the core deficiencies that contribute to low back pain, rather than just temporarily masking the pain like existing approaches," said Hedman, who is an adjunct associate professor in the F. Joseph Halcomb III M.D. Department of Biomedical Engineering and chief scientific officer at Intralink-Spine. "Secondly, the benefit is almost immediate. Within days these patients are returning to work and strenuous activities with a dramatic reduction in pain."

 

Hedman also said both the cost of Réjuve and the 15-20-minute image-guided delivery procedure are considerably less than current and emerging treatments. 

 

"This is obviously extremely important as we see health care costs exploding in this country and abroad," he said.

 

The company is hopeful that patients will experience permanent low back pain relief with just one or two Réjuve injections. Currently, many low back pain sufferers receive numerous epidural steroid injections each year.

 

Hedman joined the UK faculty in 2010 and brought Intralink-Spine to UK's Coldstream Research Campus. He credits biomedical engineering faculty for providing collegial support and advice as Intralink-Spine has translated technology from the lab to the clinic. Additionally, the UK College of Engineering and College of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health and the Commonwealth of Kentucky provided a portion of the financial support needed to complete the preclinical testing of Réjuve. 

 

"The excitement of seeing technology that you've tested and developed for over 18 years, at long last, reach the clinical stage of testing is indescribable," Hedman said. "Health sciences researchers like myself choose this profession with the desire to see our life's work benefit others. It's still very early, but every one of our patients thus far are happy with the results of the treatment."

 

Hedman and the company are now planning a larger multisite clinical study. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Kentucky Wildcab Offers Free, On-Demand Rides for Students

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 10:29

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Student Government Association (UKSGA) and Parking and Transportation Services have partnered to provide free late night transportation to students. Kentucky Wildcab is a free, on-demand option for students, which uses 4-, 7- and 12-passenger vehicles, operated by student drivers.

 

“We are excited to work with UK Student Government to provide a new free, late night, on-demand transportation option for students,” said Lance Broeking, director of UK Parking and Transportation Services. “The integration of the Kentucky Wildcab service into our bus tracking app will simplify the experience for riders.”

 

Students interested in using Kentucky Wildcab should download the Transloc Rider mobile app on their smartphones. The app can be found on Google Play and the App Store. From the app, students can request a ride within the general campus vicinity and then receive text alerts notifying them of pick-up times. Once the driver arrives, students may be asked to show a valid student ID.

 

"Our hope is that Wildcab will offer students an alternative option to walking home and therefore better campus safety at our university," said Rowan Reid, Student Government Association president.

 

On Thursday, Aug. 25, Kentucky Wildcab began operating from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Thursday through Saturday. The transportation service will not operate during summer and winter breaks, on the weekend of fall and spring graduation, the weekend of Thanksgiving break or the weekend before or during spring break.

 

For more information on Kentucky Wildcab, go to www.uky.edu/KentuckyWildcab or www.uksga.org.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

J. Michael Clyburn Named Director of Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 10:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016) J. Michael Clyburn has been named director of the Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services at the University of Kentucky Human Development Institute.

 

Clyburn has served for 25 years in various education administration roles, including faculty member, department chair, dean, provost and college president. During his career, he planned and launched preschools in Kentucky and Tennessee. He has also supported professional development opportunities for teachers in Kentucky and surrounding states.

 

The mission of the Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services assures that the partnership enhances high quality services for children and families through active engagement in collaborative research and professional development. The partnership provides programs to support child care providers across the state in implementing high quality services through Child Aware of Kentucky. In addition, the partnership works collaboratively with the Kentucky Early Childhood Data System, Online Learning for Child Care teachers, School Ready Libraries, Stars Plus, and National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives.

 

The Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services partners with the Kentucky Division of Child Care, Kentucky Department of Public Health, Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives, Child Care Aware of America, Frank Porter Graham Institute of the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, the Human Development Institute and the UK College of Education.

 

"It is a privilege to work with dedicated partnership staff who diligently serve across the Commonwealth to assure the quality and positive impact of Kentucky early childhood services," Clyburn said. "I am also thankful for the work of Dr. Beth Rous, faculty member in the University of Kentucky’s College of Education, who has given stellar leadership to the development of partnership programs and services."

 

"The partnership has a bright future as it serves under the quality expansive umbrella of the Human Development Institute and works closely as a strong partner of the Kentucky Division of Child Care. The mission of the partnership is a high calling as it continues to serve Kentucky and the wonderful children of the Commonwealth.”

 

Find out more information about programs and services for Kentucky parents and providers at www.kentuckypartnership.org/

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK, Messer 'Top Off' New Student Center

Thu, 08/25/2016 - 08:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 26, 2016)  University of Kentucky Student Center, together with its partner, Messer Construction, will host a “topping off ceremony” today to mark the securing of one of the uppermost beams atop the new Student Center. The ceremony signifies near completion of the structural phase of the $201 million project.

 

Those attending include President Eli Capilouto, Student Body President Rowan Reid, Student Center Executive Director John Herbst, Messer Operations Vice President Mark Hill and many Messer employees. The topping off ceremony will be held on Stoll Field. From the field, attendees will be able to see firsthand the progress being made on the building, in addition to signing the construction beam.

 

“This remarkable facility will be a tribute to our past, present and future students who contribute so much to making the University of Kentucky an extraordinary and diverse community of scholars,” said John Herbst, UK Student Center executive director. “We look forward with great anticipation to the 2018 opening of what will be one of the premier student centers in North America.”

 

Construction on the new Student Center began fall 2015 and is scheduled to open January 2018.

 

The 365,000 square foot project will be located at 160 Avenue of Champions. The building will feature such spaces as the Grand Ballroom; Cats Den; Alumni Gym Health, Fitness and Recreation Center; as well as many campus offices such as the LGBTQ* Resources office and the Martin Luther King Jr. Center.

 

To find out more about the new Student Center, visit uky.edu/studentcenter/renovation. There you will find more details, news stories, renderings and videos.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Registration Extended Through Aug. 29 for UK Entrepreneurs Bootcamp

Wed, 08/24/2016 - 16:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2016) – The opportunity to learn how to become an entrepreneur is available to everyone at the University of Kentucky.

 

If you have ever dreamed of creating a startup, or wanted to see if your idea could be the next big thing in technology, product design, or web-based services, then Bootcamp is for you. This program is free and is open to all faculty, students, staff, and community members.  

 

The Entrepreneurs Bootcamp Program is organized by the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship, part of UK's Gatton College of Business and Economics. The program lasts for 14 weeks, beginning with the opening session at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1, in the Gatton College building and continuing each Thursday at that same time through Dec. 1. The program is divided into weekly sessions tailored to company creation. Bootcamp is designed for highly motivated individuals interested in becoming an entrepreneur, and is not offered for academic credit.  

 

For more information about Entrepreneurs Bootcamp, what it's all about, how to apply, and a complete schedule, go to http://vace.uky.edu/venture-studio/EntrepreneurialBootcamp.php.

 

Registration will be limited to the first 80 applicants. Applications and new projects will be accepted through Aug. 29. All applicants and new project ideas will be screened for acceptance into the program.

 

If you are interested in joining a project team, you can review the complete list of Bootcamp Projects at http://vace.uky.edu/venture-studio/BootcampProjects.php.

 

Please direct all inquires to Mariam Gorjian, at mariamgorjian@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is  the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200, carl.nathe@uky.edu;

Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750, annmary.q@uky.edu.

 

SEC University Libraries Commit to Enhanced Resource Sharing

Wed, 08/24/2016 - 16:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2016) To support scholarly research efforts within the Southeastern Conference (SEC), library deans from all SEC member universities, including the University of Kentucky, have committed to sharing in new ways their respective institutional collections with other conference schools, effective immediately.

 

“Individually, SEC university libraries have strong collections of national distinction with unique strengths and areas of emphasis,” said David Carlson, dean of University Libraries at Texas A&M University. “As strong as our individual libraries are, however, none of us are as strong as we are together. This SEC library sharing agreement allows the users of the SEC libraries — our faculty, staff and students — to find and use materials as if our libraries were a single, unified collection.”

 

During a recent meeting of SEC library deans at the SEC office in Birmingham, Alabama, the group discussed ways their universities could collaborate beyond existing practices, such as the Interlibrary Loan Code. As a result, this agreement gives individuals access to print and digital resources at other conference university libraries upon request, and at no charge. SEC requests will be given priority, and loan periods will match what the lending library allows for its local undergraduate students.

 

“The library sharing agreement will provide all SEC students and faculty with unprecedented access to the wealth of information available within our 14 research universities,” said SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey. “It will serve as a bridge between each SEC campus in a unique way, and I commend the deans of our libraries for their commitment to SEC‐wide collaboration in this important area.”

 

While SEC university libraries collectively house nearly 60 million volumes, each university has one‐of‐a‐kind collections that will now be available to all SEC faculty, staff and students.

 

"UK Libraries is pleased to be collaborating with our SEC partners.  By working together, we can make all SEC research libraries better resources for our students, faculty and researchers," said Terry Birdwhistell, dean of UK Libraries and William T. Young Endowed Chair.

 

This most recent initiative is one of several collaborative efforts in the SEC. The SEC Faculty Travel Program supports faculty travel between SEC universities in the areas of research and the arts. Also, SEC students may access education abroad programs offered at any SEC university via a cooperative agreement. Each of these initiatives is administered by SECU, the academic initiative of the SEC.

 

As the premier research library in the Commonwealth, UK Libraries provides ever-expanding access to quality information resources, services and programs. UK Libraries locations include the William T. Young Library, the Agricultural Information Center, the Hunter M. Adams College of Design Library, the Education Library, the John A. Morris Library (Gluck Equine Research Center), the Kentucky Transportation Center Library, the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center, the Medical Center Library, the Science and Engineering Library and the Special Collections Research Center.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

High Street Lot Expansion Complete

Wed, 08/24/2016 - 16:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2016) — The High Street Lot expansion is now complete, resulting in a net increase of 77 parking spaces in the employee lot. The lot, located at the corner of East High Street and South Martin Luther King Boulevard, now has 158 spaces, compared to its previous capacity of 81 spaces.

 

However, South Martin Luther King Boulevard must be used to access and to exit the lot at this time; this condition is temporary while improvements in the shared use alley are completed.

 

The expansion of the High Street Lot will provide proximate parking for North Campus employees, including those who work at UK HealthCare Good Samaritan Hospital and the Kentucky Utilities building.

UK Professor Joins Next 100 Coalition to Change the Future of National Park System

Wed, 08/24/2016 - 16:34

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2016) — All summer, Carolyn Finney has been flitting back and forth between Lexington and Washington, D.C., with a fiery hope to impact the future. The University of Kentucky assistant professor of geography and other concerned colleagues, all members of the Next 100 Coalition, met over and over again with members of President Obama’s administration to hammer out a plan to assure that all people — regardless of race, religion, gender identification or national origin — are welcome in America’s national parks and all public lands.

 

The National Park Service (NPS) — and the spectacular 84 million acres it protects — enters its second century today, hence the name Next 100 Coalition. Although many, including President Obama, have declared the National Park Service the best idea America ever had, many others say the national park system is flawed because a significant portion of Americans simply don’t feel welcome. Members of the Next 100 Coalition have made public their hopes for the future in their vision statement, Our Public Lands: An Inclusive Vision for the Next 100 Years. A petition regarding the issue has been created as well.

 

A 2008-09 survey by the University of Wyoming and NPS quantifies this feeling of unease among minorities. Non-Hispanic whites accounted for approximately 78 percent of the visitors to national parks; Hispanics, 9 percent; African Americans, 7 percent; Asian Americans, 3 percent; and Native Americans/Alaskans, 1 percent.

 

While whites were significantly over-represented by population in the survey, African Americans were just as significantly under-represented. African Americans say they don’t see themselves among park employees and guests. The same survey found that African Americans feel the parks were too expensive, too far from home, and too unfamiliar.

 

Finney, a self-declared lover of nature and frequent park visitor, took a very long, hard look at the nation’s parks in her first published book, “Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors.” Taking it a step beyond specifically visiting national parks, Finney explores why it may seem that her fellow African Americans do not seem interested in nature, outdoor recreation and environmentalism.

 

Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the great outdoors and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. During that era, she says, a common phrase was: “Too many trees; too much rope.”

 

“In the case of race and the environment, it’s not just who we imagine has something valuable to say,” she wrote. “These assumptions, beliefs, and perceptions can be found in the very foundation of our environmental thinking, how we define the ‘environment’ and how we think of ourselves in relationship with the environment. Who do we see, what do we see?"

 

She sometimes wonders if white Americans have ever seen a black person hiking or pitching a tent.

 

“I have always been astonished at how often white people are surprised by my presence in these spaces,” Finney said. “For the most part, people are not unkind. Still, it never ceases to leave me with a deep-seated feeling of discomfort, of being different, and feeling decidedly out of place in these outdoor settings.”

 

Finney herself is no stranger to old and new tales of African Americans who were first to explore the early American wilderness and opened the great outdoors to a nation. She wrote about several African-American “heroes of the great outdoors” in a recent article in Outside Magazine, “It Matters Who You See in Outdoor Media.”

 

There are individuals like NPS ranger Shelton Johnson, a man of African-American and Native American descent, who tirelessly seeks ways to encourage minorities to visit the national parks and who believes, “one of the great losses to African culture from slavery was the loss of kinship with the earth.” And then, there’s the Jones family of Florida: Israel Lafayette Jones bought three islands in Key Biscayne in the late 1800s and his son, Lancelot Jones, resisted real estate developers and gifted the islands to the NPS. MaVynee Betsch convinced the NPS to protect 8.2 acres of sand dunes on Amelia Island’s American Beach, land that her great grandfather purchased in the 1930s so that African Americans could visit the beach during Jim Crow segregation.

 

“The parks are about us,” said Finney, “And that ‘us’ has always been diverse, even if those in the positions to write the stories and make the policies have not.

 

“When I look at the majority of environmental and outdoor media these days, I don’t see me. More specifically, I don’t see a space for me. By seeing people who look different from us in these spaces — with their histories, memories and their possibilities — our story about the parks, and environment in general, can more fully embrace the complexity of the human experience,” she said.

 

She is making that difference a reality with the Next 100 Coalition, an ethnically and racially diverse group of civil rights, environmental justice, conservation and community activists. The group’s intention is to design the next 100 years of the Park Service to be highly reflective of the diverse population of the United States.

 

“We have asked President Obama to issue a Presidential Memorandum that addresses workforce diversity, landscape scale conservation, stakeholder engagement, historical and cultural preservation, and access to public lands,” she said. “We want today’s reality to reflect the populations that lived in our national parks before modern man and the diverse population of Americans who helped build the parks as they exist today.”

 

To view a petition regarding the movement, visit https://www.change.org/p/public-lands-for-all-americans

For more information:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz2cONmEyvRKbklxWEFMOUk3NE0/view?pli=1

http://joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/This-Moment.mp3

https://soundcloud.com/joytrip/the-buffalo-soldiers-story

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/audrey-peterman/fears-that-diverse--quali_b_11404398.html?

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3200, gail.hairston@uky.edu

DanceBlue Opens the Semester With DanceBlueU

Wed, 08/24/2016 - 11:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2016)  This year is DanceBlue’s biggest yet as it goes into its 12th year of supporting the kids! After a decade of rapid growth and hard work, there is no better way to kick off the semester than with DanceBlueU tomorrow from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Seaton Center gym.

 

DanceBlueU is a three-hour mini dance marathon for freshmen. It serves as a way for the new students to get the feel of the 24-hour dance marathon. During the three hours, freshmen will stand, get to know their morale group, meet DanceBlue committee members and learn the line dance.

 

DanceBlue is not just 24 hours; it is a culmination of 365 days of work. And as we get back to school, DanceBlue has planned some exciting events for the UK community, starting with DanceBlueU.

 

DanceBlue is the University of Kentucky’s 24-hour no-sitting, no-sleeping dance marathon that benefits the Golden Matrix Fund and the DanceBlue Kentucky Children’s Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic. Now in its 12th year, DanceBlue has raised more than $9.8 million dollars for pediatric cancer research and child life efforts.

 

For more information about DanceBlue, registration information or to support its efforts, please visit danceblue.org. Connect with DanceBlue on Facebook at facebook.com/danceblue and on Twitter at twitter.com/UKDanceBlue.

 

DanceBlue is a program housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote life-long community service. For more information about the CCO, visit getinvolved.uky.edu/cco.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, (859) 257-1909; katy.bennett@uky.edu; Rebecca Stratton, (859) 323-2395; rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

Behind the Blue: What to Expect for New UK Students

Tue, 08/23/2016 - 16:50

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 24, 2016)  The 2016 fall semester has arrived at the University of Kentucky, and with it, the beginning steps for thousands of new students preparing to make their mark on the world. For these students, those beginning steps take them through K Week, the fall welcome week for all new undergraduates at the university. K Week is nine days of more than 200 programs and events designed to welcome students and kick off the fall semester, and with events like Big Blue U, Campus Ruckus, pancake meals and water balloon fights, many students remember K Week as one of their favorite times of their first year.

 

This is the second of a two-part series taking a look at the college transition for both students and families. Last week, Nancy Stephens, from UK’s New Student and Family Programs, discussed the college transition for families and parents. This week, it’s a look at “What to Expect as a New UK Student."

 

Trent Patrick, a K Week coordinator, and Loretta Stafford, a UK 101 peer instructor liaison, offer insight on everything from how to make the most of the K Week experience, to things to experience both on and off campus, to setting yourself up to succeed during your first year and beyond at UK.

 

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of "Behind the Blue" each week. UK's latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

 

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu, or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

 

Click here for "Behind the Blue" on iTunes.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kody Kiser, kody.kiser@uky.edu, 859-257-5282; Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395

OLLI Marks 10 Years Engaging Lifelong Learners in Morehead

Tue, 08/23/2016 - 15:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 24, 2016) — The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Kentucky will celebrate its 10th year providing educational opportunities in Morehead during a Fall Open House Thursday, Aug. 25. The Open House is from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Morehead United Methodist Church Wesley Hall, 227 W. Main St. in Morehead. 

 

The Morehead Fall Open House is a chance for prospective students to review course offerings, meet with instructors, get plugged into interest groups and register for courses. To celebrate the 10th anniversary in Morehead, special guests Morehead Mayor Jim Tom Trent and Lisa Higgins-Hord, the UK assistant vice president in the UK Office of Community Engagement, will attend the Open House. Entertainment by Scott Miller and students of the Center for Traditional Music, refreshments, and door prizes will be provided. 

 

The fall semester Morehead course offerings include classes about traveling, flora and fauna, World War II, family history and nonfiction books. OLLI membership is $25 for the fall through summer. Registration for classes is an additional fee, and most classes are $20.

 

Registration for courses will open at Open House on Thursday, Aug. 25.  Online registration will open on Friday, Aug. 26, at 10 a.m. Members in Morehead can also register for courses in Lexington. For more information, click here.

 

OLLI offers educational and enrichments courses, programs and events for lifelong learners ages 50 and older.  For more information, please contact the OLLI Office toll-free at 866-602-5862, or visit www.uky.edu/OLLI

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

VIDEO: A Conversation With UK President Eli Capilouto

Tue, 08/23/2016 - 09:59

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 24, 2016) — It is obvious Eli Capilouto takes seriously his role as the leader of Kentucky’s flagship institution. 

 

As the University of Kentucky president begins his sixth academic year at the helm, he has a laser-like focus on the physical transformation of campus as well as putting the university’s Strategic Plan into action. 

 

But there is more to the Alabama native than what you see in speeches, openings and media interviews.  We sat down with Capilouto to have a conversation about everything from his favorite childhood teacher to what it was like growing up in the South during the civil rights movement.  We even talked about his favorite “cheat food” and what he’s listening to on his personal playlist. 

 

Watch the video above to learn more about Eli Capilouto, the person.  This is the first video in our new monthly UKNow series, “5 Questions with…”   The goal is to learn more about the people leading, teaching, healing, discovering and learning at the University of Kentucky.   

 

If you think of someone in our community who you would like to see featured, please email us.  Who knows?  We might just choose your suggestion  for our next “5 Questions with…” conversation on UKNow!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

Commonwealth Stadium Green Lot for BCTC Only During Daytime Hours

Mon, 08/22/2016 - 18:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2016) – The Commonwealth Stadium Green Lot, located on the north side of Commonwealth Stadium between Bluegrass Community and Technical College and the stadium, is now designated for the exclusive use of BCTC during regular daytime control hours. 

 

E-BCTC and C-BCTC permits are only valid in the Green Lot, and may not be used in the stadium Blue or Red Lots.  The Green Lot was expanded and resurfaced over the summer, resulting in 100 additional parking spaces.  If the Green Lot reaches capacity, E-BCTC and C-BCTC permits may be used in the designated overflow parking area along Wildcat Court in the UK soccer/softball area, accessible via College Way.

 

UK Parking and Transportation Services is providing dedicated shuttle service from the overflow area to the Green Lot during the morning hours until mid-afternoon. This shuttle route will be incorporated into Green Route in the coming weeks.

 

After 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, those with any valid UK or BCTC parking permit – including K, Employee, Employee Periphery (EK), Commuter, Residential or Off-Peak permits – may park in the Green Lot.

New UK Trustees Sworn In

Mon, 08/22/2016 - 18:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2016) — The newest members of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees were sworn in during a ceremony on campus Aug. 20.

 

The three trustees appointed by Gov. Matt Bevin are:

 

·         Jennifer Yue Barber, a UK alumna and attorney with Frost Brown Todd in Louisville.  She replaces William Farish of Versailles.

·         Michael A. Christian, a UK alumnus and dentist from Ashland.  He replaces Terry Mobley of Lexington.

·         Kelly Knight Craft, a volunteer and civic leader from Lexington.  She replaces Keith Gannon of Mt. Sterling.

 

The terms of these new trustees will expire in 2022.

 

Other newly elected trustees who had been sworn in previously were also recognized at the ceremony.  They are:

·         Lee Blonder, faculty trustee and professor in the Department of Behavioral Science;

·         David Melanson, staff trustee and assistant director for external affairs and development in the Center for Applied Energy Research; and

·         Rowan Reid, student trustee and UK Student Government president from Louisville.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Talbott Todd Way Named in Honor of Former Cat, Current Supporter

Mon, 08/22/2016 - 17:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 24, 2016) — The alley between the University of Kentucky's Commonwealth Stadium and Nutter Field House has been named Talbott Todd Way in honor of Talbott Todd, a Kentucky football letterman from 1963-65 and supporter of the program diagnosed with ALS last year. The announcement was made at a special unveiling Aug. 19 at the Woodford Reserve Club at Commonwealth Stadium.

 

“I am overwhelmed, humbled and extremely proud of this tremendous honor and very grateful to UK Athletics and to my special friends who made this possible,” Todd said. “At the same, I would like to dedicate this to all former, current and future football players that so proudly wore, wear and will wear the Blue and White.”

 

Talbott Todd Way will be the new site of UK’s pregame Cat Walk presented by Chevy, where fans cheer the Wildcats on their arrival to Commonwealth Stadium each game day. Players and coaches will proceed from outside Gate 1 down Talbott Todd Way to the new Kentucky Football Training Facility two hours and 15 minutes prior to kickoff.

 

“We are so pleased to honor one of Kentucky football’s best people with the naming of Talbott Todd Way,” Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart said. “Talbott and his family have been incredible supporters of this program for so many years, exemplifying what it means to be a Wildcat.”

 

Todd – nicknamed the Richmond Rocket during his high-school days – came to UK from Richmond, Kentucky, as a highly sought-after quarterback/defensive back. He played both positions for Charlie Bradshaw, but spent most of his time in the secondary. He led the team in interceptions with four as a sophomore and memorably secured the game-clinching fumble recovery as UK ended top-ranked Ole Miss’s 22-game regular-season winning streak on the road in 1964.

 

After his playing career, Todd went on to an ongoing 49-year career with Northwestern Mutual and built a family with his wife of 51 years, Marilyn. The couple has two children, Jeff and Jim.

 

When he isn’t working or spending time with family, Todd is likely to be found cheering on or at least talking about UK sports, especially the football team. He has been steadfast in his support of the program, building relationships with countless coaches and players over the last five decades. In spite of being diagnosed with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease, Todd has remained a fixture at UK games and practices.

 

                                                    

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Guy Ramsey, 859-257-3838; guy.ramsey@uky.edu.

 

Transit Options Help Students, Employees Travel to and Around Campus

Mon, 08/22/2016 - 15:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2016) — The campus and city bus systems are a quick, convenient way for members of the University of Kentucky community to navigate their way to, from and around campus. As fall semester begins later this week, UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is reminding students, faculty and staff of the variety of free transit options available to them.

 

As of July 1, the Blue and White Campus Shuttle routes (Lextran 14) now operate year-round. This popular bi-directional campus shuttle service, which began in fall 2015, is a simple and convenient way to traverse campus. During the fall and spring semesters, service hours have been extended and routes will run from 6:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday. Despite reduced population, expansion of this service during the summer and other breaks will allow consistency of service year-round. The Blue and White routes will run from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, during the summer and academic breaks.

 

Also beginning July 1, the Green Route (Lextran 26) switched to year-round service and provides a connection from the Greg Page and Shawneetown residential areas to the Blue and White Route bus stop at Commonwealth Stadium. The Green Route will also operate from 6:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday during summer and academic breaks.

 

Due to the extended hours of the Blue, White and Green Routes, the campus Yellow Night Route will now operate from 8 p.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. The Night Route operates every 15 minutes from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. and every 30 minutes from 10 p.m. to midnight.

 

After the Night Route service concludes for the evening, the On-Demand Night Bus provides on-campus transportation. Riders may call (859) 221-RIDE (7433) to make a pick-up request between the hours of midnight and 5 a.m. Monday through Friday, and from 7 p.m. to midnight on Sunday. Calls must be received at least 30 minutes prior to the end of service.

 

The Orange Route (formerly known as the Purple Route) and the Pink Route (Kentucky Clinic Shuttle) provide ride options for students and employees whose destinations are in the UK HealthCare sector of campus. The Orange Route operates from 5 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday, while the Pink Route provides weekday shuttles during the peak arrival and departure times of 6:45 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

 

Campus buses can be tracked in real time using the TransLoc Rider app on iPhone and Android devices allowing for users to plan for delays caused by traffic, accidents or inclement weather. TransLoc is a GPS-based tracking system that tracks all campus buses as well as the Red Mile Route (Lextran 15) frequently used by the campus community. Users should be sure to select both Lextran and the University of Kentucky under Current Transit Systems in order to include the Blue, White and Green Routes and Route 15 data on the app.

 

The free mass transit options are not restricted to campus. Last spring, Parking and Transportation Services announced an extension of the BluPass partnership with Lextran, which allows students, faculty and staff to ride any Lextran route free of charge when showing their Wildcard ID. The popular program resulted in more than 650,000 trips during the first nine months of BluPass service. The BluPass agreement has been extended through June 2019.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Info and Resources for Student Safety Now Available on myUK

Mon, 08/22/2016 - 14:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2016) — This past spring, UK officials made several recommendations that addressed student safety issues, which included making reporting information more accessible through UK’s website and other channels.

 

Now, UK students (and employees) may easily access this information via myUK, the online portal where students, faculty and staff manage all of their UK information.  On the main login page of myUK, students will have access to all of the information they need on how to report a safety concern (publicly or confidentially) as well as a link to a campus community page with more detailed information. 

 

"The University of Kentucky is committed to student success – in all its dynamics and definitions – which is why we’ve invested millions in technology and personnel over the last five years to improve campus safety,” UK President Eli Capilouto said. "It is also why we initiated the CATS Survey, one of the nation's most comprehensive examinations of campus safety. This announcement marks the next step in providing easier access to important reporting tools for the UK family."

 

The myUK portal may be accessed at https://myuk.uky.edu/irj/portal or via the UK homepage.

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

The primary information includes:

 

Reporting a Safety Concern (Public)

UK's Office of Institutional Equity and Equal Opportunity

UK Police

 

Reporting a Safety Concern (Confidential)

VIP Center

Counseling Center

University Health Services

 

In the spring 2015 semester, Capilouto and endowed faculty of the UK Center for Research on Violence Against Women initiated the first of five Campus Attitudes Toward Safety (CATS) surveys. UK officials believe the university is among the first in the country to undertake mandatory, campuswide surveys regarding sexual assault and campus climate.

 

Data from this first survey showed more than 90 percent of UK students believe campus is safe and officials are responsive to safety concerns. However, many students reported not knowing what resources are available for reporting an instance of sexual assault or bullying. By displaying this information prominently on myUK, officials hope students will be more aware of how to report, as students are required to login to myUK frequently to update personal information, register for classes, manage financial information, etc.

 

The second CATS survey was administered this past spring and preliminary results will be available later this fall.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

Pages