Campus News

UK, Lexington Celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week Nov. 14-20

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 14:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) Lexington's sixth annual Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) will take place from Nov. 14-20, with events including an Open Mic Pitch for researchers, a workshop on how to fund your high-tech startup, a session on mobile app marketing and monetization, and much more.

 

The week of exciting events, many of which are free, is organized and hosted by the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership (BBDP). BBDP is comprised of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network within the University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics, the Bluegrass Small Business Development Center (SBDC), the city of Lexington and Commerce Lexington.

 

Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) is an international initiative that celebrates today's creative thinkers, who bring ideas to life and foster economic growth and human development. Each November, Lexington’s growing entrepreneurial community joins together with participants in 160 different countries in this effort to inspire people to explore their potential as self-starters and innovators. GEW is the flagship campaign of the Global Entrepreneurship Network.  

 

"We are excited about the wide range of events that will be available for the Central Kentucky entrepreneurial community, including opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship, network with fellow entrepreneurs, and compete for prizes,” said Eric Hartman, director of the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network.

 

While the events are open to the public, advance registration is required due to space limitations. More detailed explanations of each event are available on the registration page at http://gewlex.eventbrite.com.

 

Among the highlights for UK faculty and researchers is a workshop titled, “A New Roadmap: University of Kentucky IP, Technology Commercialization, and Entrepreneurship.” The workshop will kickoff with remarks by UK Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis; include presentations by Ian McClure, the new director of the Office of Technology Commercialization (OTC), and UK Senior Associate General Counsel Katherine Adams; and will conclude with an “open mic” showcase.

 

The program, with continental breakfast and lunch provided, will take place from 8:30 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Nov. 15, in Woodward Hall, room 307 of the Gatton College building. Researchers will have the opportunity to deliver their pitches during a 45-minute competition period beginning at 11 a.m. Each competitor will give a 2-minute presentation to a panel of judges on current research or novel work being done in the lab. Pitches will be judged on the following criteria:

· stage of technology and/or idea; 

· market potential; and 

· clarity of presentation.

 

"The Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship is very excited to be partnering with OTC to organize and sponsor this event which will provide UK faculty, researchers and students with information on the intellectual property (IP) landscape and processes at UK, as well as an opportunity to present their research and technology,” said Warren Nash, executive director of the Von Allmen Center (VACE). “This workshop also will enable participants to learn more about the resources available to them to potentially assist in their commercialization efforts."  


A $500 cash prize will be awarded by VACE to the winner and all other participants will receive a $25 gift card. Space is limited to the first 10 people that sign up and there are just a few spots remaining. To register email Mariam Gorjian, commercialization specialist and director of the UK Venture Studio at mariamgorjian@uky.edu, with full name and research title on one slide by midnight Wednesday, Nov. 9.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Kathryn Macon, kathryn.macon@uky.edu, 859-257-8716; or Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200.

 

UK Collegians Day Invites Top Scholars to UK

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 14:22
Campus NewsBy Rebecca Stratton Monday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — Top high school seniors from across the Commonwealth and around the country can now call themselves "Kentucky Collegians."

Today, one of the University of Kentucky's premiere recruitment events, UK Collegians Day, will honor top prospective students who have applied to UK and earned at least a 31+ on the ACT and/or equivalent SAT. A record number of just over 280 outstanding student scholars representing 17 states along with an additional 450+ guests will be in attendance. 

Not only are these scholars being recognized, they are given the opportunity to explore and experience all that UK has to offer. Students begin their day with tours of campus followed by sessions with each academic college. A reception will take place at the Lexington Center/Bluegrass Ballroom along with dinner and a formal recognition ceremony later in the evening.

“Collegians Day is a wonderful opportunity to showcase the incredible UK faculty, resources and opportunities to outstanding prospective students and their families," said Associate Provost for Enrollment Management Don Witt. "Students really appreciate the interaction with the UK faculty from across all of the colleges and disciplines.”

UK faculty speakers at the recognition include Lewis Honors College Interim Dean Phil Harling, University Senate Chair Katherine McCormick and top current students Emily Appel, Joshua Musalia and Dealla Samadi. Guests will be entertained with several groups from the College of Fine Arts including Paws-n-Listen and acoUstiKats. In addition, nearly 100 UK faculty and staff will be hosting individual tables providing the opportunity for students and family members to learn more about the many academic and extracurricular opportunities at UK.

Organizational Unit: Student and Academic Life

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Rebecca Stratton
rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
859-323-2395 Summary: Today, UK Collegians Day will honor top prospective students who have applied to UK and earned at least a 31+ on the ACT and/or equivalent SAT. A record number of just over 280 will be in attendance. Section Feature: Section Feature

Day of Decision Approaches; What Will Tomorrow Bring?

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 14:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — One would have to be isolated to the point of sequestered to escape the tumultuous presidential campaign between Democratic candidate Hilary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump.

 

Tomorrow, finally, the nation chooses.

 

Before the results are recorded for posterity, three University of Kentucky political scientists and one historian agreed to comment upon the 2016 battle for the White House. Many Americans believe this campaign has been unlike any that has come before. Is this merely our limited perception of political history in America?

 

The experts agree. It is real.

 

As points of comparison, Associate Professor of Political Science Stephen Voss remembered the 1860 presidential election, which displayed “some of the same fictionalization” and the 1968 election “which had some of the same issues and the same high jinks.” But nothing in our history compares to the present, said the department’s publicity director.

 

“I think we are so far off the map now that I can’t give you a single parallel above the city council level to what’s going on in this presidential election,” said Voss, who is an expert in voting behavior, political methodology and racial/ethnic politics.

 

“Look, we’re making history,” he said. “We’re either going to get a candidate who hasn’t held office before, a female president, or — slight possibility — a third party victor. For sure, we’re making history; we just don’t know what it’s going to be yet.”

 

And a great deal of what Americans internally define as democracy could shift. If the election outcome is in dispute, constitutional law could be vitally relevant. In 2000, the Supreme Court felt compelled to determine if and how the Constitution applied. It is unclear if the court would take that role again, said Michael Zilis, assistant professor of political science and an expert in constitutional law.

 

Keeping in mind that many presidential elections help determine the future membership of the Supreme Court, the outcome of this election could influence how the Constitution is interpreted for decades to come.

 

“In some years this is a hypothetical concern,” Zilis said. “This year, however, the future of the court's membership has been frequently discussed, since there is currently an open seat on the court. The next president will very likely place one, if not multiple, new justices on the bench. We can safely assume that Trump and Clinton would like to choose individuals with very different legal philosophies for the court, which can affect case outcomes in the future.”

 

The nastiness many perceive in this election isn’t “as unprecedented as you would think,” Voss said. “We’ve had presidential candidates who were accused, probably rightly, of having illegitimate children, affairs, all sorts of corruption.

 

“Thomas Jefferson was accused of … not being a devil worshiper, per se, but being part of a secret society that was linked to the devil,” he said. “So, almost any nastiness has happened before, but wow, we decided to get it all in (during this campaign). We’re almost at a scandal a day!”

 

David Hamilton, associate professor for the UK College of Arts and Sciences Department of History, said, “It's not easy to put this campaign into historical perspective — at least not any kind of perspective for our recent political history. All presidential campaigns seem exceptional — and exceptionally nasty — before an election, but this one is highly unusual.

 

“We have two rather non-ideological candidates leading parties that are now intensely ideological,” explained Hamilton. “The efforts to demonize the other candidate seem to know no bounds."

 

Hamilton attributes much of the personal attacks “to the partisan divide” that has shaped American politics since the early 1990s and to “the anger and resentment” generated by the financial meltdown of 2008-09.

 

“What we won't know for a while yet is whether this campaign is unique … or does it mark a turning point in how campaigns are waged, the role of the parties in selecting candidates, and the issues that dominate American politics,” Hamilton said.

 

The award-winning author of 20th century political history could only add, “Stay tuned.”

 

It seems that “staying tuned” has kept many Americans obsessively checking the latest news accounts for months, trying to stay aware of the day’s shocking remarks or behavior. This has created, what many experts believe, is one of history’s best-informed electorate.

 

“The first question to ask about high information voters,” said Associate Professor in Comparative Politics Emily Beaulieu, “is how do they make up their mind about a candidate, because … we’ve come to a point where those who have selected a candidate are pretty settled in their choice.”

 

A voter’s preferred candidate many not change at this stage, but their actions on Election Day might.

 

“The thing that is interesting that we know from research is that — given the scandal-laden nature of this election — even for people who have made their choice, negative information late in the campaign can be de-mobilizing. In fact, that is one of the only places where we see negative information having any meaningful effect. When (negative political ads) come late in the campaigns after people have already selected (their candidate) — and if (the remarks) are against your selected candidate, that can work to have a demobilizing effect, (making the voter) less inclined to actually vote. They choose not to vote.”

 

Voss agreed immediately, “You know, we talk about those undecided voters, or undecided poll respondents, as if they are swing voters because they are undecided, and we think they could go either way. But the large numbers of those undecided voters aren’t actually voters,” he said. “They are undecided people who are going to stay home.”

 

But there appears to be another block of undecided voters with unusual traits — the undecided, but well-informed voter.

 

“I do think we have larger than usual number of people who are undecided and yet who are fairly well informed,” Voss said. “We have some people who are seriously cross-pressured; they have pressures pushing them in two different directions. 

 

“I’m especially thinking of college-educated Republicans, especially female college-educated Republicans for whom Trump’s legacy of sexism pushes them very hard one way. But Hilary Clinton’s liberalism, which doesn’t give them the policies they want, pushes them very hard in the other direction.”

 

This is the group of voters that some analysts believe could swing the election one way or the other.

 

“We really don’t know what they’ll do in a presidential contest where they are being pushed so hard in opposite directions,” Voss said. “Staying home is a possibility, or they could decide to go with one or the other in large numbers.”

 

What has so many experts shaking their heads is that the old political science axioms are trembling. 

 

“Politicians used to want to be near where the median voter is,” Voss said, “and that means being more moderate, more reasonable, more like a typical American and less like a hard-core Republican or Democrat.

 

“That logic has fallen apart.”

 

“What we’ve had is this pendulum effect as the election has favored first Democrats, then Republicans, all those middle of the road, bridge-building compromise people who can negotiate are being pummeled. It’s broken the political scientists," Voss said. "Half the things we used to tell our students … most of the research we’ve done had assumptions in the background. We’ve never had a presidential election where one of the candidates had never run for office, never run a serious political campaign before so all that research that included two experienced candidates, doesn’t apply here.”

 

Beaulieu, however, has spent a great deal of time in a different political atmosphere, California, “where we send actors to public office. I don’t see Trump’s profile as a candidate as an anomaly.

 

“When this is all said and done,” she said, “does the Republican Party survive? What I see is that Trump is a real sign of the times. In terms of discontent among segments of our population — particularly over issues like the shifting demographics in this country — I don’t think Trump is anomalous; I think he’s a mirror for where we’re at as a country.”

 

“What destroys a party is internal splits,” Voss reminded. “To me it is not impossible that between Donald Trump representing one distinct faction of the Republican Party and most of the people who are currently serving in Congress who represent a different Republican Party … well, it is not clear they could coexist within the same institution for very long.”

 

For a podcast of a lengthier conversation with Voss and Beaulieu for "Behind the Blue," visit www.as.uky.edu/podcasts/behind-blue-what-does-presidential-election-really-mean.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Info Sessions for Students to Focus on STEM, Environment and Other Research Opportunities

Fri, 11/04/2016 - 13:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) Join University of Kentucky’s Office of Nationally Competitive Awards in November for three information sessions on a selection of local, national and international scholarships, grants and awards for those students looking for opportunities in STEM, the environment and various forms of research.

 

The first info session is for scholarships for undergraduate students in STEM fields and will take place at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Room 307B of the Funkhouser Building. This session will focus on the Astronaut Scholarship and the Goldwater Scholarship. The Astronaut Scholarship is awarded to sophomores and juniors in engineering, natural or applied science, or mathematics fields who intend to pursue research or advance their field upon completion of their final degrees. The Goldwater Scholarship covers eligible expenses for undergraduate tuition for sophomores and juniors who intend to pursue research careers in engineering, natural or applied science, or mathematics fields. Note that students intending to pursue a practice in professional medicine are not eligible for these awards. Space is limited for this session, so individuals should register here to attend.

 

The next info session will explore three different funding opportunities to pursue research during the summer and will take place at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 16, in Room 200 of the Funkhouser Building. This session will discuss National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experiences for Undergraduates, which fund student research at sites across the U.S. For this award, each student applies for a specific research project in an area funded by the NSF where he/she will work closely with faculty and other researchers at that site. The session will also look at the Amgen Scholars Program, which provides financial support and a hands-on research experience at a participating university for undergraduates in science and biotechnology. In addition, the session will look at options on campus through the UK Office of Undergraduate Research Summer Research Grants, which enable students in any discipline to conduct research at the lab of their choice during the summer. Note that applicants for the UK grant must return as full-time students in fall of 2017. Again, space is limited for this session, so participants are asked to register here to attend.

 

The last info session will examine an opportunity for those interested in working with the environment and it will take place at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, in Room 307B of the Funkhouser Building. This session will be strictly about the Udall Scholarship, a merit-based award offered to outstanding students who intend to pursue careers related to the environment. Students in all fields are eligible to apply, but should have environmental career goals. Space for the Udall session is also limited, so interested students are asked to register here to attend.

 

Part of the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Student and Academic Life at UK, the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with the office's director, Pat Whitlow, well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Ag Engineering Chair Named Fellow of National Association

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 16:34

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Nov. 4, 2016) – Sue Nokes is the chair of the University of Kentucky Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, but she’s also an acclaimed researcher and teacher. Recently, the American Society of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineers named Nokes a Fellow at their annual meeting in Orlando, Florida.

 

Nokes has been a department chair in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment since 2011. She was recently the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, multi-institution project funded by a U.S. Department of Agriculture Biomass Research Development grant. The project, On-Farm Biomass Processing: Towards an Integrated High-Solids Transporting/Storing/Processing System, was the first to successfully produce butanol from a culture of anaerobic bacteria on dry plant material. She has collaborated with industry on solid substrate cultivation and the production of industrial enzymes for animal feed supplements. Nokes served as a technical coordinator and steering committee member on the Kentucky Rural Energy Consortium, a partnership organization comprising several universities, research centers and government organizations with interests in promoting energy research and deployment for the benefit of Kentucky citizens.

 

Under her leadership, student enrollment in Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering has grown from 75 to 200. She also added a technical systems management minor. She has served as an advisor for many graduate students as well as a frequent mentor to high school and undergraduate students. Many of her advisees have been women, and she has continually worked to promote the role of women in agricultural and biological engineering. Her grant writing efforts have secured millions of dollars in funding to support UK research labs, graduate fellowships and research programs.

 

Nokes is also a decorated educator, having won the UK Provost’s Outstanding Teaching Award, the USDA National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges Excellence in Teaching Award, the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Teaching and the Henry Lutes College of Engineering Excellence in Teaching award, as well as many other departmental teaching honors.

 

A 29-year member of ASABE, Nokes has served on the ASABE board of trustees as treasurer, and on the engineering and technology accreditation committee, the finance committee and the Stewart Engineering Humanities Award committee, among many others. She has volunteered for the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology as a program reviewer and has been heavily involved with developing online training for engineers preparing for the Professional Engineer licensure exam.

 

Nokes is the author or co-author of more than 60 refereed journal articles and book chapters. She is an American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow, a member of the American Society for Engineering Education and a member of the Society of Women Engineers.

 

To be considered for the grade of ASABE Fellow, an individual must demonstrate unusual professional distinction with outstanding qualifications and experience in the field of agricultural engineering. Twenty years' membership in ASABE is also required. Only about 2 percent of the active members of ASABE have achieved the grade of Fellow.

 

The ASABE is an international scientific and educational organization dedicated to the advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food and biological systems.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Aimee Nielson, 859-257-7707

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Highlights Election Analysis Blog

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 16:10
Campus NewsBy Kathy Johnson Nov. 4, 2016

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  Sitting in for Godell today is Josh James with WUKY News. His guest is Joshua Douglas, Robert G. Lawson & William H. Fortune Associate Professor of Law, who talks about the Election Law Society's Election Analysis Blog planned for the evening of Nov. 8.

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-law-students-live-blog-election#stream/0.

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

Organizational Unit: Law

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Summary: "UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

UK Researcher Highlighted by National Cancer Institute

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 15:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016)  University of Kentucky Researcher Nancy Schoenberg is currently a featured partner on the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) website for her work with Faith Moves Mountains.

 

Schoenberg, associate dean of research for the UK College of Public Health and professor in the UK College of Medicine, founded Faith Moves Mountains in 2004. The program is a community-based intervention to help decrease cervical cancer rates for women in the Appalachian region by building relationships with local churches within Appalachian communities.

 

Schoenberg's accomplishments include interventions at over 30 churches. Health advocates have conducted follow-up contact with more than 400 women, and about 35 percent of the target group has received the recommended cancer screenings.

 

In addition, Faith Moves Mountains is continuing to grow by adding new faith-based projects, such as "Quittin' and Preventin,'" which is designed to help smokers quit and provide cancer screenings. 

 

Media Contact: Allison Perry, allison.perry@uky.edu

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Highlights Election Analysis Blog

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 15:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  Sitting in for Godell today is Josh James with WUKY News. His guest is Joshua Douglas, Robert G. Lawson & William H. Fortune Associate Professor of Law, who talks about the Election Law Society's Election Analysis Blog planned for the evening of Nov. 8.

  

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-law-students-live-blog-election#stream/0.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

UK Arts Administration Grad Student Embarks on 'Legend of Zelda' Journey

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016) Gamers and symphony aficionados may not be a natural pairing, but a tour based on one of the most popular and beloved video game series of all time, "Legend of Zelda," aims to prove naysayers wrong. Next week, as the North American tour comes to the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts, University of Kentucky arts administration graduate student Nathan Williams will lend his musical talents to the journey.

 

“The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses” features live orchestral performances of theme music from Nintendo’s "The Legend of Zelda" franchise accompanied by a giant screen showing the most memorable moments of the series. Concertgoers will hear their favorite game music timed with an orchestral score approved by franchise composer Koji Kondo. The four-movement symphony recounts over 30 years of music and classic storylines from "Ocarina of Time," "The Wind Waker," "Twilight Princess," "A Link to the Past," "Link's Awakening" and more.

 

"The symphony consists of a full orchestra and choir. This will be a symphonic experience like no other," said Williams, who has been practicing for the Nov. 10 performance in Louisville for three months now.

 

"Legend of Zelda: Symphony of Goddesses" promotional video. 

 

The opportunity to play in this high profile multimedia concert tour came to Williams based on a strong resume of experience he has built over his years at UK, where he earned his bachelor's degrees in arts administration and music performance in 2015.

 

"The Zelda Symphony actually came to me. The contractor for the Louisville Ballet and the Broadway touring shows that come through Louisville contacted me asking if I was interested. Since soundtrack music is some of the best repertoire, I couldn’t say no," said Williams, who has played with the Louisville Orchestra.

 

Because of the size of a symphony and the cost of travel, there are only a few musicians who travel as a part of the tour. It also gives professional musicians in the cities the tour visits an amazing opportunity to play. Williams will only perform with the tour on its Louisville stop. The symphony and choir for that particular concert will come together the morning of the show and have one rehearsal as a group before staging the program.
 

"That’s the life of a professional musician. The music directors hope and trust that you prepare your own music and can come into the first and only rehearsal ready to perform. The rehearsal will serve as an opportunity to combine the orchestra, choir and film to make it one cohesive experience for the audience," noted Williams, who will play the French horn for the symphony.

 

In addition to his experience playing for Louisville's orchestra, Williams is no stranger to Lexington music venues playing with the UK Wind Symphony, UK Symphony Orchestra (UKSO), Wildcat Marching Band and the Lexington Chamber Orchestra. He also played in UKSO's smaller pit orchestra for UK Opera Theatre's productions of "Les Miserables," "The Phantom of the Opera," "The Tales of Hoffman, "Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" and more at Singletary Center for the Arts and Lexington Opera House.

 

Not surprisingly Williams' love of music began at an early age. He started playing the cello in first grade. Once his brother started taking piano lessons, he got jealous and wanted to take them as well. In fifth grade, Williams joined the fifth grade band as a trumpet player. He even sang and rang handbells in the church growing up. However, once Williams' teacher found out he already had such a musical background, she encouraged the young musician to switch to the French horn. A choice Williams has never regretted.

 

Williams' performance with "Legend of Zelda" in his hometown of Louisville next week is yet another great opportunity this talented graduate student will get to add to his resume, not only musically but also as an arts administrator.

 

"This show will allow me to have an informal experience related to the process of bringing to fruition a concert that has so many little parts to it. The Zelda Symphony has to coordinate with dozens of concert halls, contract hundreds of musicians, supply all of the musicians with sheet music and MP3 recordings, create the various programs, and create schedules for everyone involved. Although I’m not a part of the administration for this tour, I get to see what goes on behind the scenes and be surrounded by amazing administrators and musicians for an entire day."

 

Williams hopes "Legend of Zelda" will be rewarding for concertgoers too and maybe introduce some to a form of entertainment they haven't tried yet. "I hope this experience brings in audience members that wouldn’t normally attend a symphony performance. With this unique experience, it allows audience members to relive their childhood as well as get a glimpse at what it’s like to attend a formal symphony concert in an amazing hall."

 

What's next on the horizon for this graduate student? The 4k for Cancer, where Williams will help raise money for the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults biking across America next June. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Leaders Converge on UK Campus to Discuss Early Childhood Services

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:03
Campus NewsBy Whitney Harder Monday

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2016) — More than 50 leaders across the Commonwealth and the University of Kentucky — including former Gov. Martha Layne Collins, former Gov. Paul Patton and UK President Eli Capilouto — will meet on campus this week to discuss the university's commitment to young children.

The gathering, being held Thursday, Nov. 10, is the inaugural meeting of a new advisory council for the Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services at the UK Human Development Institute. Various state leaders will participate, including Health and Family Services Cabinet Secretary Vickie Yates Brown Glisson, Commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Community Based Services Adria Johnson, and Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky Inc. President Wilbert W. James.

The meeting will include presentations from Collins, Patton and an exemplary child care provider from the Lexington area who will share her experience. The council will also recognize the history of child care in Kentucky and honor Patton for his early childhood initiative, KIDS NOW, which was enacted in 2000.

The Kentucky Partnership for Early Childhood Services enhances high quality services for children and families through active engagement in collaborative research and professional development. It provides programs to support child care providers across the state and works collaboratively with the Kentucky Early Childhood Data System, Online Learning for Child Care teachers, School Ready Libraries, Stars Plus, and National Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative.

Sponsoring agencies of the partnership include Kentucky Division of Child Care, Kentucky Department of Public Health, Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives, Child Care Aware of America, Frank Porter Graham Institute of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Human Development Institute and the UK College of Education.

To find out more information about programs and services for Kentucky parents and providers, visit www.kentuckypartnership.org/.

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Contact Whitney Harder
whitney.harder@uky.edu
859-323-2396 Summary: More than 50 leaders across the Commonwealth and UK — including former Gov. Martha Layne Collins, former Gov. Paul Patton and UK President Eli Capilouto — will meet on campus this week to discuss the university's commitment to young children.

December Graduates: Monday is Last Day to Submit Student Speaker Applications

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 13:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016) — Custom to the University of Kentucky, a student will be selected to speak at the undergraduate December 2016 Commencement ceremony, which will occur 3 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16, at Rupp Arena.

 

Students interested in speaking must submit their application by Monday, Nov. 7.

The student designated to address their fellow graduates will be chosen by the Commencement Speaker Selection Committee. Applications are available online atwww.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

 

Students applying for the position must be receiving an undergraduate degree from UK at the December 2016 Commencement ceremony. Also, students must have contributed to the university through campus or community activities and within their field of study. Applicants must demonstrate strong public speaking skills.

 

Students who wish to apply must submit a resumé, information sheet and a copy of their intended speech no longer than three typed, double-spaced pages. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the committee.

 

Applicants may be contacted by the committee to conduct a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

 

All graduating students must register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

Ethnomusicologist to Lecture on Diverse Realms of Indian Dance

Thu, 11/03/2016 - 13:21
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2016) As part of the Year of South Asia, the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences will host guest speaker Anna Morcom, professor of ethnomusicology at Royal Holloway University of London, for a lecture related to her book, “Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance: Cultures of Exclusion,” which was awarded the 2014 Alan Merriam Prize. The free public talk will take place from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7, in the Niles Gallery of Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

 

Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance: Cultures of Exclusion,” looks at the evolution of the arts in India from the 1930s when no woman could perform in public and still be respected in India, to today's Bollywood dance craze. In the early years, professional female dancers were courtesans, but were powerful figures in social and cultural life. Today, upper-class women have taken control of the classical performing arts and also entered the film industry. At the same time, a Bollywood dance and fitness craze has recently swept middle-class India.

 

In her talk at UK, called “Courtesans, Bar Girls and Dancing Boys: Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance,” Morcom will cover these multiple worlds of Indian dance from courtesans to the present. In particular, she will also examine male, female and transgender dancers and detail the forces of inclusion/exclusion that have shaped these worlds of Indian performing arts.

 

For the seventh academic year, the UK College of Arts and Sciences has celebrated other regions of the globe in its Passport to the World program. Through seminars and classes, events and lectures, the College of Arts and Sciences has introduced the UK campus to South Africa, China, Russia, Mexico, the Middle East and Europe. This year, South Asia is the center of attention in a series of events and activities called the "Year of South Asia: Its People, Societies, Sciences, Arts and Life."

 

Anna Morcom’s talk at the university is being made possible with support from sponsors UK College of Arts and Sciences, the UK School of Music and the Rey M. Longyear Endowment.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Getchell Memorial Award Honors Graduate Scientist's Persistence in Seeking National Funding

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 16:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) —The second annual Thomas V. Getchell, Ph.D., Memorial Award for excellence in grant writing was presented to Jenna Gollihue, a graduate student in the University of Kentucky Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, on Nov. 2.  

  

The award honors the memory of Getchell, a former professor of physiology in the UK Department of Physiology who encouraged researchers to improve grant writing skills to acquire research funding. The award supports a travel stipend for a student participating in the annual Grant Writing Workshop. Getchell founded the Grant Writing Workshop in 2005 with a vision to provide proactive, individualized mentoring to medical, doctoral and post-doctoral trainees to further their skills in grantsmanship, increase their success rate in obtaining fellowship grants and enhance their research careers.

 

Gollihue studies the therapeutic potential of mitochondrial transplantation in a rodent model of spinal cord injury.  After she completed a previous workshop, she wrote and submitted a pre-doctoral fellowship application to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Although the study was not funded on first submission, she persevered, resubmitting a revised application, and as a result was awarded a competitive fellowship from the National Institute on Neurological Disorders and Stroke in 2015.  Gollihue has returned as an alumna to workshop to share her grant writing experiences with students and postdoctoral scholars in the workshop. 

 

Getchell was a professor in the Department of Physiology and a member of the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and served as associate dean for research and basic sciences for the UK College of Medicine from 1989 to 1998. Workshop trainees have earned more than $2.4 million in fellowship funding as a result of Getchell’s efforts.    

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

'UK at the Half' Features UPK Director Leila Salisbury

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 15:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) — Leila Salisbury, new director of the University Press of Kentucky (UPK) that is housed at the University of Kentucky, was featured during "UK at the Half," which aired during the UK vs. Clarion basketball game, broadcast on radio Oct. 30.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing all the state universities, five private colleges and two historical societies. Salisbury, who worked for UPK previously, returned as its director this year after serving as director of the University Press of Mississippi.

 

To hear the Oct. 30 "UK at the Half," click on the play button. To view a transcript of the show, click here.

 

"UK at the Half" airs during the halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast and is hosted by Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Election Day Bus Schedule Changes

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 15:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) Due to the Election Day holiday and the decreased campus population on that day, some campus buses will operate on a modified schedule on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

 

The Blue and White Routes (Lextran 14) and the Green Route Connector (Lextran 26) will only operate from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8. The Yellow Night Route will not be in service on Election Day.

 

The Pink Route (Kentucky Clinic Shuttle) will run as normal. The Orange Route (UK HealthCare) will be in operation. However, due to the availability of other parking options and anticipated reduced traffic congestion, Parking and Transportation Services anticipates less demand for the shuttle. As a result, the shuttle will operate on a reduced service level, with two buses running until 9 p.m., and one bus from 9 p.m. until midnight.

 

The On-Demand Night Bus will operate on its normal schedule on both Monday, Nov. 7, and Tuesday, Nov. 8. Call 859-221-7433 to schedule a ride.

 

All campus buses will resume regular service on Wednesday, Nov. 9. For route and schedule details, visit www.uky.edu/pts/buses-and-shuttles_campus-shuttles.

 

As a reminder, all campus routes — as well as Red Mile (Lextran 15) service frequently used by the campus community — are viewable in real time on TransLoc Rider, UK’s GPS-based bus locating system. TransLoc Rider can be accessed at uky.transloc.com and via the free Transloc Rider Android and iPhone apps.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Women in Medicine and Science Hold Annual Visiting Professor Program

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 14:18

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) – Women in Medicine and Science (WIMS) at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine will hold its second annual Visiting Professor Program on Thursday, Nov. 3 at UK Albert B. Chandler Hospital, Pavilion A. Dr. Claire Pomeroy is the featured speaker.

 

“A Day with Claire Pomeroy” will begin at 7 a.m. with a continental breakfast. Symposium I, “Creating a Healthier World by Addressing Social Determinants of Health,” will begin at 7:30 a.m.  During the rest of the morning, there will be two breakout sessions: “Diversity and Inclusivity, Unconscious Bias” and “Your Digital Presence.”

 

Symposium II, “Women and Medicine in Science: Building an Inclusive Culture,” will begin at Noon.  The afternoon breakout sessions will focus on: “How to Give and Receive Back” and “Negotiating on the Job.”

 

The Symposia are open to the entire medical community. The breakout sessions are open to the WIMS membership. 

 

Pomeroy is president of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. She serves as chief executive officer of the Foundation and is responsible for advancing the Foundation's mission to "improve health by accelerating support for medical research through recognition of research excellence, public education and advocacy.” 

 

An expert in infectious diseases, Dr. Pomeroy is a long-time advocate for patients, especially those with HIV/AIDS, and public health. She passionately supports ongoing investment in the full range of research. She has a special interest in health care policy, with a focus on the importance of the social determinants of health. She has published more than 100 articles and book chapters and edited three books.

 

Pomeroy serves on the Board of Trustees for the Morehouse School of Medicine and on the Board of Directors for the Sierra Health Foundation, the Foundation for Biomedical Research, iBiology Inc., and New York Academy of Medicine.  She is also a member of the board of directors for Expanesthetics, Inc. and for Becton Dickinson & Company.  Pomeroy was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine in 2011.

 

WIMS formed in 2015 at the request of former College of Medicine Dean Frederick C. de Beer.

 

“WIMS is a vibrant organization led by female faculty, trainees and students across the College of Medicine,” said Dr. M. Elizabeth Oates, professor and chair in the Department of Radiology at the UK College of Medicine. “Its missions are grounded in networking and mentorship, and supported by relevant, focused program planning. A primary goal is facilitating opportunities for career advancement. The major annual event in November features a nationally-renown Visiting Professor who delivers lectures and hosts workshops throughout the day.”

 

WIMS Executive Committee members are appointed, however all female students, trainees and faculty at the College of Medicine are WIMS members.  More about WIMS.

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

 

BluPass: 1 Million Free Rides and Counting

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 14:00

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) — On July 1, 2015, the University of Kentucky and Lextran began a partnership that would allow UK students, faculty and staff to ride any Lextran bus route free of charge simply by showing their valid Wildcard ID. The partnership — dubbed BluPass — has grown tremendously in its first 15 months of service, recently surpassing 1 million rides.

 

The program — funded by Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) — was implemented in an effort to decrease single occupancy vehicle use, give students and employees more choices in transportation options and to ultimately reduce campus parking demand.

 

"One of the major goals of the Transportation Master Plan was to mitigate parking demand through the use of alternative transportation and transportation demand management," said Lance Broeking, director of Parking and Transportation Services. "We're trying to provide university employees and students with opportunities to shift their mode of transportation using a variety of alternative transportation options from bicycling to walking to campus. Mass transit is just another one of the tools in the toolbox."

 

Lextran travels throughout 24 different city routes extending throughout and beyond the UK campus into the Lexington community. The program includes all Lextran routes, both on- and off-campus, allowing UK students, faculty and staff to travel to, from, and around campus while also accessing the city.

 

"BluPass has saved me a lot of money and time. I don't have to pay for parking. Timewise, it's just much easier to hop on, get to where you need to be instead of spending half an hour walking to class," said Ryan Hoover, sophomore special education major.

 

BluPass has proven to have a number of benefits for its users. Students and employees who were already riding Lextran prior to the introduction of BluPass experienced an immediate cost savings with a fare-free commute. Students and employees who switched to mass transit after the introduction of BluPass also saw reduced vehicle operating and parking costs, along with a lowered carbon footprint.

 

Chemistry senior lecturer Kim Woodrum says by using BluPass she has saved time and money and is grateful for the opportunity to take the bus to work with BluePass.

 

"I really appreciate UK making this available," said Woodrum.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Vermeulen Joins UK Center for Health Services Research

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 11:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Center for Health Services Research welcomes Lee Vermeulen Jr., as director of the Office for Value & Innovation in Healthcare Delivery (OVIHD) and professor in the Division of Biomedical Informatics within the UK Department of Internal Medicine. Vermeulen will hold a joint appointment between the UK College of Medicine and the UK College of Pharmacy.

 

“We are thrilled to recruit someone of Lee Vermeulen’s caliber to lead our Office of Value & Innovation in Healthcare Delivery, and guide UK HealthCare in implementing cutting edge evidence-based care,” said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs.

 

In addition to serving as director of OVIHD, he will help lead UK HealthCare’s OptimalCare efforts to deliver evidence-based practices across the health system. An internationally recognized expert in pharmacy and informatics, Vermeulen will facilitate the implementation of evidence-based clinical decision support and knowledge management tools in electronic health records.

 

“As an addition to the Center for Health Services Research, Lee Vermeulen’s extensive experience and expertise allows UK HealthCare to take a major step toward advancing our efforts in applying research to optimize care,” said Dr. Mark V. Williams, professor and director for the UK Center for Health Services Research.

 

Vermeulen's research focuses on measuring the value of medical care interventions, clinical practice tools that improve patient outcomes, and the efficient application of health care technology. His research also evaluates technology development and diffusion, and he publishes annual forecasts of the medication development pipeline and forecasts of the rising cost of medications. His previous scholarly work has focused on measuring the impact of various health-system medication use policies and programs.

 

Previously, Vermeulen served as director of the Center for Clinical Knowledge Management with the University of Wisconsin Health System (comprised of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and UW Medical Foundation). He received his undergraduate degree in pharmacy from the University of Buffalo in New York and a master’s degree in pharmacy administration from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He completed a residency in pharmacy practice and pharmacy administration at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and a fellowship in medical technology assessment at the University Healthsystem Consortium (now known as Vizient).

 

“Lee brings great expertise to UK, helping further leverage our academic strengths with evidence based discovery and implementation for healthcare,” said Dr. Robert DiPaola, dean of the UK College of Medicine.

 

"We are overjoyed to have Dr. Vermeulen joining the College of Pharmacy," said Kip Guy, dean of the UK College of Pharmacy. "His strong expertise in decision support adds immensely to or programs aimed at improving medication choice at point of care."

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

UPK Authors in Spotlight at Kentucky Book Fair

Wed, 11/02/2016 - 11:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2016) Now in its 35th year, the Kentucky Book Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Frankfort Convention Center. This year’s fair will feature more than 150 authors and editors showcasing their most recent books including several writers from University Press of Kentucky (UPK), including many with University of Kentucky ties.

 

Presented by the Kentucky Humanities Council, and co-sponsored by Lindsey Wilson College, Joseph-Beth Booksellers and UPK, the Kentucky Book Fair attracts thousands of avid readers and patrons from across the country. With many books ranging from children's books and regional cookbooks to wartime histories and poetry collections, the fair has a book for everyone with a passion for reading.

 

Founded in 1981, the Kentucky Book Fair is the state's leading literary event and the largest and oldest event of its kind in the state. Since its inception, the fair has recognized outstanding Kentucky authors and editors.

  

University of Kentucky authors published by UPK participating in the Kentucky Book Fair include:

Other authors, editors and contributors to publications from UPK participating in the fair and their corresponding books are:

To hear University Press of Kentucky Director Leila Salisbury talk about the press' offerings at the Kentucky Book Fair on "UK At the Half" with Carl Nathe, click play on the audio player below. To see a transcript of this interview, visit here

 

For a full listing of authors participating in the Kentucky Book Fair as well as on-site events, visit http://kyhumanities.org/kentuckybookfair.html.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue
 

 MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, whitney.hale@uky.edu, 859-257-8716

'UK at the Half' Features Social Work Assistant Professor Jay Miller

Tue, 11/01/2016 - 17:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 2, 2016) — Justin "Jay" Miller, an assistant professor in the University of Kentucky College of Social Work, was featured during "UK at the Half," which aired during the UK vs. University of Missouri football game, broadcast on radio Oct. 29.

 

Miller, who experienced the foster care system firsthand as a child, is now conducting research in the area of foster care in addition to teaching in the College of Social Work.

 

"UK at the Half" airs during the halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast and is hosted by Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing.

 

To hear the Oct. 29 "UK at the Half," click on the play button below. To view a transcript of the show, click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

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