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Participants in UK Dementia Study Display 'Inspiring Attempts' at Art

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 12:29
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) "Inspiring Attempts: Artworks from the Fall 2016 Visual Arts Study" gives art patrons a chance to see how the visual arts can benefit individuals with dementia with a new exhibition of work by participants in a second study at the University of Kentucky. The exhibit, running through Oct. 29, on the second floor of UK's new Art and Visual Studies Building, is free and open to the public.

 

“The exhibit is truly beautiful and shows the talent and effort of all of the participants in the study," said researcher Allan Richards, an associate professor of art education at UK School of Art and Visual Studies.

 

His research partner, Ann Christianson-Tietyen, agreed wholeheartedly. “We had a wonderful time this fall and the participants seemed to enjoy all of the art activities and the challenges involved. They produced beautiful works of art.”

 

Dementia is a decline of cognitive health that interferes with everyday life. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most recognizable form of dementia, but many other conditions can also affect cognitive health. There is no cure for AD, and almost all patients with dementia eventually require constant care from a caregiver or loved one. In 2015, there were 5.3 million Americans suffering from this devastating disease.

 

Beginning this past February, Christianson-Tietyen and Richards have been looking at how the visual arts can have a positive effect on people who suffer from mild to moderate dementia. The study also includes caregivers.

 

In the creation of art, multiple aspects of learning take place and multiple domains related to learning are engaged, including focus and concentration, problem-solving skills, tolerance to ambiguity, image and concept formation, imagination and visual-spatial thinking. In addition, feelings and emotional sensitivities are involved in producing a work of art, as well as important motor skills like hand-eye coordination.

  

By having study participants create art — painting, sculpture or collage — the researchers hope to enhance problem solving skills, focus/concentration and hand-eye coordination for individuals with dementia. They also hope to see an improvement in mood and in overall thinking, which would contribute significantly to quality of life.

 

The UK study was made possible through a grant from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Center. To date the grant has funded the implementation of two eight-week programs for groups of individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Christianson-Tietyen and Richards' team also includes test administrators Derek Cryer, Elizabeth Jerrell, Olivia Lussi and Sarah N. Smith. 

  

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studio, art history and visual studies and art education.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Good Eats and Spooky Treats

Sat, 10/22/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016)  It’s the best time of the year. It’s time for Halloween, but leave the scary clowns at home. Join the University of Kentucky Student Activities Board’s Campus Life Committee for their second Pinterest Party of the semester today from 6 to 9 p.m. in The Hub of the William T. Young Library.

 

Pinterest Parties are designed to give the campus community the chance to create do-it-yourself crafts seen on the social media site, Pinterest. The Campus Life Committee takes the site’s tagline, “Less Pinning. More Doing.” and turns it into a reality for UK students, staff and faculty. This party’s themes are Halloween and Thanksgiving. Students just have to bring ideas while SAB will provide the supplies.

 

“I’m super excited for the Halloween Pinterest Party,” said Miranda Scott, director of Campus Life. “It’s the second one of the semester and since the first one went so well we’ll be having lots more crafts this time!”

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff, and the greater Lexington community.

Connect with SAB at http://www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB, or like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Kaelin Massey, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

 

No Differences Noted Over Time for Children of Gay, Lesbian Adoptive Parents

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 16:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016)  As more and more lesbian and gay adults adopt children, controversies continue regarding comparative parenting skills and the impact on the children.

 

For nearly a decade, University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Psychology Rachel H. Farr has studied different aspects of family life among heterosexual, gay and lesbian parents and their adopted children. Her newest findings were published by the Developmental Psychology journal last week online.

 

Farr’s most recent research results published in the journal Developmental Psychology provides further support that children adopted by lesbian and gay parents are well-adjusted, not only in early childhood, but across time into middle childhood. Her study focused on a longitudinal follow-up of nearly 100 adoptive families with school-age children as they matured from early to middle childhood. Parents appeared to be capable in their parenting roles and satisfied in their couple relationships over time, with no differences by family type.

 

“To the best of my knowledge,” Farr said, “this is the first study that has followed children adopted by lesbian, gay and heterosexual parents over time from early to middle childhood. Longitudinal research (like this) offers insight into what factors may be the best or strongest predictors of children's development, over and above information that can be gathered at only one time point."

 

“Regardless of parental sexual orientation, children (in the study) had fewer behavior problems over time when their adoptive parents indicated experiencing less parenting stress. Higher family functioning when children were school-age was predicted by lower parenting stress and fewer child behavior problems when children were preschool-age. Thus, in these adoptive families diverse in parental sexual orientation, as has been found in many other family types, family processes emerged as more important than family structure to longitudinal child outcomes and family functioning.”

 

Repeatedly, her research noted “no differences among (heterosexual and same-sex parent) family types” in myriad characteristics like behavior problems, stress levels, couple relationships, family functionality, relationship adjustments over time, and other factors.

 

“These results, which support many positive outcomes among adoptive families headed by lesbian, gay or heterosexual parents over time, may be informative to legal, policy and practice realms,” Farr said.

 

Since research indicates that at least 65,500 adopted children, over 4 percent of all adopted children in the United States, have sexual minority parents, “the findings may also help to move public debate forward about parenting and child outcomes across a diversity of family forms,” she added.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

UK Body Project to Teach Acceptance

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 16:18

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 25, 2016)  In American society, thin can equal beauty. In no other demographic is the pressure to be skinny felt more than in women in their late teens and early 20s. In response, University of Kentucky students will lead a workshop for fellow students to discuss how they are more than just a number on a scale or a pretty face.

 

The Body Project workshop will be from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, in room 209 of UK’s Funkhouser Building on campus.

 

During the workshop, participants will complete several different activities that will help them discuss ways to resist cultural pressures and reduce the pursuit of unhealthy thinness and the achievement of a certain look. As they go through the activities, students will explore their attitudes and feelings toward their bodies.

 

“We work to point out unrealistic expectations that are placed on us and how we can reject that mentality,” said Teresa Lee, workshop organizer and graduate student in the UK Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We also practice confronting ‘fat talk’ — when we or other people put our bodies down.”

 

To register for the workshop, email Lee at teresalee@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

 

Elizabethtown SBDC Director Recognized as One of the Best

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 25, 2016) — The Office of Veterans Business Development recognized Patricia Krausman, director of the Elizabethtown Small Business Development Center (SBDC), part of the Kentucky Small Business Development Center (KSBDC) within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, as one of the six most outstanding instructors for the 2016 Boots 2 Business program.

 

Boots 2 Business is an entrepreneurial education and training program offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration. It is a training track within the U.S. Department of Defense’s Transition Assistance Program. The curriculum provides valuable assistance for transitioning service members who are exploring business ownership or other self-employment opportunities. The program leads them through the key steps for evaluating business concepts and providing the foundation required to develop a business plan. In addition, participants are introduced to Small Business Administration partners and resources.

 

The recognition was based on the instructors’ contributions and dedication to the program and to service members, veterans and spouses in their business ownership endeavors. Nominations for this achievement came from Small Business Administration offices across the country.

 

Krausman has provided business management consulting and training for more than 20 years. In 2009, she developed and served as the director of the Kentucky Small Business Development Center’s Veterans Assistance Program, the resource for veteran business support and advocacy. Additionally, she was chosen as a Veteran’s Small Business Advocate of the Year in 2013 by the Kentucky Small Business Administration. She takes an active role in her work and advocacy, serving as a member of the Kentucky Commission on Small Business Advocacy, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board and the Governor’s Veterans Interagency Task Force. She was awarded the prestigious Kentucky Association for Economic Development Allied Professional of the Year in 2014.

 

“The Kentucky Small Business Development Center has a long-standing commitment to veterans and veteran-owned businesses. Boots 2 Business is a program specifically designed by the Small Business Administration and its resource partners to ensure that veterans have expert guidance and direction in their path to entrepreneurship,” Krausman said. “It’s an honor to be included in the recognition of outstanding instructors for the national SBA Boots 2 Business program. Veterans are exceptional entrepreneurs, and it is rewarding to have the opportunity to support them in their successful transition to small-business ownership.”

 

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, www.ksbdc.org/.

 

 

UK is the  University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTRoberta Meisel, 859-257-7668.

Benefit UK School of Music With 'Brews and Bites'

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 15:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016) The University of Kentucky Friends of Music invites the public to enjoy “Brews and Bites” with their fellow music lovers while benefiting UK music students, faculty and staff. “Brews and Bites” will run 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, at Ethereal Brewing Company, located at 1224 Manchester St.

 

“Brews and Bites” is free and open to the public, however 10 percent of the proceeds of food and drink sales from the event will go to UK Friends of Music.

 

Friends of Music is an organization of music lovers and supporters dedicated to assisting the UK School of Music in the enrichment of its mission. The group works to provide resources to the school in its pursuit of excellence in both the performance and study of music. The organization contributes to the UK School of Music's scholarships as well as provides funds to its students and faculty to participate in musical conferences, festivals and performances across the U.S. and around the world.

 

Friends Music hosts several events each year in private homes, coffee shops and restaurants. These events usually feature a variety of music from faculty and students. All proceeds from events are donated to the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts.

 

The UK School of Music has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

UK Ag Econ Students Bring Home National Honors

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 13:13

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 24, 2016) The University of Kentucky Department of Agricultural Economics came home from the Food Distribution Research Society’s recent annual conference with two national recognitions, thanks to former graduate student Graham Soley and seniors Misty Bean, Renaldo Karajic, Mallie Myers, Lauren Nickell and Joseph Pochinskas.

 

Soley, who earned his master’s degree in May, won the Richardson-Applebaum Award for Outstanding Master’s Thesis for his paper, "Farmed and Wild-Caught Shrimp in Kentucky and South Carolina: Consumer Preference for Homegrown by Heroes, Community Supported Fishery, and Other Quality Attributes."

 

Soley followed the Farmer Veteran Coalition, among other marketing institutions that dealt with food, on Twitter. The groups often talked about new food labels that people weren’t familiar with or didn’t understand. That sparked an idea. Soley decided to study labeling, focusing on consumers in Kentucky and South Carolina. He particularly concentrated on the Homegrown by Heroes designation, which the Kentucky Department of Agriculture created in 2013. Administered by the Farmer Veteran Coalition, the program has grown and is now in 48 states. He used shrimp as his baseline because of its versatility; it can be a farm-raised product inland or a wild-caught product on the coast.

 

“We wanted to see if preferences differed between coastal residents who had greater access to the ocean and residents who were more inland and didn’t have much access,” he said. “We really wanted to focus on what could have a lot of implications for both Kentucky and the South as far as new occupations in agriculture that veterans could take on.”

 

Soley said it was an interesting study to design and implement. His professor, Wuyang Hu, said it was the first study that tackled the consumer side to find out how much people are willing to support the Homegrown by Heroes idea with their food dollars. The study proved that consumers put a higher value on this product — just as much as the value they place on local products.

 

“The thesis is a big deal,” Hu said. “It’s a big document that not only targeted this question. He had other ideas, such as wild versus farm-raised, local versus nonlocal, previously frozen versus not — all these different characteristics. He’s a great writer, a good storyteller.”

 

Soley has accepted a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

 

The team of undergraduates, coached by UK Extension Professor Tim Woods, placed second in the 17th annual Food Marketing Challenge.

 

“I am extremely proud of our team. These competitions very closely simulate real consulting interactions, and our students presented great ideas building on foundations they are getting from their ag economics training,” Wood said. “Our students clearly are able to stand with the very best. The co-op manager had so many questions about their ideas, he didn’t want to let them go.”

 

Hu described this year’s challenge as particularly competitive, with eight strong university teams from around the country competing on a case study about branding and distribution for the LaMontanita Cooperative in New Mexico.

 

After hearing a presentation from the cooperative itself, teams had to devise a solution to the challenges the cooperative faces. The team addressed branding and distribution issues for the cooperative. They were judged on the content and the manner of their presentations.

“This year the competition was pretty tight,” Hu said. “They all did very good work.”

 

The Department of Agricultural Economics is part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu

UK Elder Care Senior Resource Fair Eases Search for Caregiving Resources

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 12:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016)  The University of Kentucky Elder Care Office, within UK Human Resources, would like to make your search for caregiving resources a little easier.

 

Save the date of Friday, November 18, for the UK Elder Care Senior Resource Fair. The fair will be held from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the Hilary J. Boone Center, and is open to all faculty, staff, retirees and students. Spouses and partners are also welcome and encouraged to attend. The Senior Resource Fair is an opportunity to meet with community agencies and businesses that provide valuable caregiving resources. Early registration is available here.

 

“UK Elder Care is hosting this event because we recognize that caregivers want to provide the best care possible for their loved one,” said Terri Weber, UK Elder Care coordinator. “For most of us, caring for an elderly parent or loved one is unfamiliar territory. It comes with new responsibilities and tasks we are not prepared for. We want to do what’s best for our loved one, but we need to keep in mind the responsibilities and obligations we have to our self, our family and our job. Finding out what tools, help and support are available is an important caregiving step.”

 

As part of the Senior Resource Fair, Dr. Gregory Jicha, professor of neurology at UK College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, will lead an informal talk on Alzheimer's disease, dementia and caregiving. Participation and questions are encouraged at this event.

 

More than 40 community agencies and businesses from the Lexington and surrounding area will be on hand. Many are offering UK employee discounts for those who attend. The Office of Work-Life and Elder Care hopes this event will help members of the UK community find resources to meet their caregiving needs, whether for an immediate need or for future reference.

 

Visit the UK Elder Care Senior Resource fair website at www.uky.edu/hr/work-life/elder-care/uk-senior-resource-fair for more information and to view descriptions of participating exhibitors. Contact the Office of Work-Life at worklife@uky.edu with any questions.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Empowering Victims through Research

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 11:49

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016) — “If we're going to remedy a problem, we need to know all the different facets of it.” 

 

That’s how Claire Renzetti, the Judi Conway Patton Endowed Chair in the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women, and professor and chair of UK Department of Sociology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, approaches her research.

 

“I've just always focused on people who are on the margins,” Renzetti said. “So I always felt like in order to fully understand a project, you need to study groups that are understudied, or that maybe don't have a common experience because one size doesn't fit all.”

 

Renzetti’s research focuses on violence against women, particularly violent victimization experiences of socially and economically marginalized groups of women, including women living in poverty and women in same-sex intimate partnerships. Her current research focuses on human trafficking, and services for trafficking victims. She also examines the effects of religiosity and religious self-regulation on intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization. Additionally, she is evaluating the potential benefits of a therapeutic horticulture program for residents of a battered women's shelter.

 

“I think the most challenging part [of doing research on intimate violence] is to build trust, and I always feel like the way to do that is to sort of develop some reciprocity in the relationship — to let them get to know me,” Renzetti said. “I'm asking somebody to tell me really horrible things that happened to them and I'm a total stranger to them. And so they really have a right to know who I am and to ask me questions and to feel comfortable with me.”

 

Renzetti encourages her students to take this personal approach to their research as well.

 

“When I talk to students who want to study violence against women, or some aspect of violent behavior, and they want to collect data, I always tell them that the research project is both subjective and objective,” she said. “I try to tell them to talk about research ‘participants’ and not ‘subjects.’ And I try to emphasize not to do what we call ‘drive-by’ research: go in, get your information, leave. And then you publish it and you get the accolades, but you've left the people who gave you this — your livelihood — with nothing. You should always contribute something, and not assume it will trickle down.”

 

Renzetti has become an internationally recognized scholar on gender and crime issues, and her research and community engagement have received regional and national recognition. This includes the Saltzman Award for Contributions to Practice from the Women and Crime Division of the American Society of Criminology. The award recognizes a criminologist whose professional accomplishments have increased the quality of justice and the level of safety for women.

 

“When I go to an organization of practitioners, or a nonprofit that serves survivors, someone comes up to me and says ‘I read this book that you wrote, and it had a tremendous impact on me. I suddenly recognized what was going on in my life and I sought help.’ And that's really important to me because, ultimately, I want to produce knowledge that's useable to people in their everyday lives and improve their quality of life,” Renzetti said.

 

This video feature is part of a monthly series called ‘“see discovery:” The People Behind Our Research.’ The videos, produced by UKNow and REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

International Center’s Andrea Gils Speaks at PRSA Event

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 11:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016)  A Uruguay native, Andrea Gils knew she wanted to pursue a career in public relations when she joined the pre-professional organization, Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) at Southeast Missouri State University. She believed the industry touched on a variety of aspects she was interested in, “social media, media relations, event planning, just the ability to influence behavior in people and the hope to do it for good, is what attracted me the most to the public relations field,” Gils said.

 

Gils earned her bachelor’s degrees in journalism and public relations and is currently the marketing and communications manager at the University of Kentucky International Center. She has been able to mentor and manage interns and new hires, which have provided the experience for her session, “The Management Chain: What New Professionals and Supervisors Need to Know,” which she will be co-presenting with two of her PRSA (Public Relations Society of America) New Professionals colleagues at the 2016 PRSA National Conference in Indianapolis on Oct. 25.

 

Gils believes that “to be successful in any internship, you have to really immerse yourself in the company and the brand that you are working for, so you can understand not only the industry in which you are moving yourself in, but also understand your audience and how they really think and feel.” She added that “networking is very important,” as she recalled her own experiences as a young professional and how she developed relationships and built connections.

 

Gils will present with two of her colleagues from PRSA New Professionals, where Gils holds a national leadership role. The session will touch on different aspects of management and new professionals — how to manage up (or help supervisors manage you), how to manage your first hire, and how to manage your first account or project.

 

“Many graduates today have great technical skills and industry knowledge that they gain through classes, internships and other experiences,” Gils said. “But unfortunately, many aren’t getting exposure to two aspects of the business side of PR — management and human resources. Students today also need to learn how to identify talent, how to manage people and motivate them, how they can help their managers understand them as young pros and millennials, etc., because soon after their first entry-level position, and even in their first jobs, they will be managing new hires or interns.”

 

Gils described the role of a manager as “crucial” and called managers mentors, because “they should be role models, invested in you and interested in your personal and professional growth.” “Great managers are those who set you up for success and push you to be your very best,” Gils said. Aside from this, Gils mentioned the importance of students seeking to challenge themselves in the workplace to be able to “maximize their experience.”

 

Gils will have the platform to speak about the importance of managing interns and direct reports at the PRSA 2016 National Conference, and she is very excited to have the opportunity. “[I] am excited because we are talking about engaging new professionals and what the future generation’s needs are,” Gils said. “We are talking about millennials and Gen Z, how they are wired and how they think. You can’t manage a millennial or a Gen Z the same way you manage a Gen X or a baby boomer,” Gils said.

 

Gils added, “[I’m] also excited to be representing UK at the largest PRSA event of the year.” Gils will be presenting with Development Counsellors International’s Hanna Porterfield and CareerSource’s Ruthann Campbell. For more information about the 2016 PRSA Conference and Gils’ session, click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK Board Affirms Establishing Schnatter Institute of Free Enterprise

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 10:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Friday affirmed its approval last year to establish the John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

 

In 2015, the board unanimously voted to accept a grant commitment of $6 million from the John H. Schnatter Family Foundation and a $4 million grant commitment from the Charles Koch Foundation to establish the institute.

 

Schnatter is the founder of global pizza chain, Papa John’s, based in Louisville, Kentucky. The Koch Foundation has awarded grants to hundreds of universities across the country toward the study of capitalism and free enterprise.

 

The institute will expand upon the work begun by the Gatton College’s BB&T Program for the Study of Capitalism, established and funded by BB&T in 2003. John Garen, BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism and director of the BB&T program, will serve as the Schnatter Institute’s first director.

 

The new funding commitment from Schnatter and Koch will enable the Gatton College to hire additional tenured and tenure-track faculty, along with research associates and administrative support. A number of Ph.D. fellowships also will be offered as part of the program.

 

“This gift – and this institute – will lead us to a deeper and better understanding of free enterprise and its effects on society as well as inspiring University of Kentucky graduates to start their own businesses and create employment opportunities,” said David Blackwell, dean of the Gatton College of Business and Economics. “The formation of the Schnatter Institute affirms the academic freedom of the Gatton faculty and students to explore how market and regulatory forces interact and the impact of those interactions on societal well-being.”

 

In addition to the institute, the gift provides for the naming of the John H. Schnatter Atrium, a community study and gathering space in the Gatton College. University officials recently dedicated the newly renovated Gatton College, a $65 million project that represented the first ever completely privately funded academic building project at UK.

 

“This gift represents a significant investment in our college – and particularly the Gatton faculty and their capacity – to serve as an intellectual hub for the study of capitalism and free enterprise and how we as a society wrestle with the policy issues we face in our economy,” said Trustee Angela Edwards, who chairs the board’s Academic and Student Affairs Committee. “The generosity of these donors will allow the college to expand its capacity for scholarship in these areas while also creating new learning and scholarly opportunities for students.”

 

Earlier this year, the Senate Committee on Academic Organization and Structure recommended and the University Senate approved the proposal for the Schnatter Institute based on academic merits. The University Senate approved the academic content of the program, but declined to endorse its organizational structure.

 

In other board action:

 

The board was asked to approve the naming of the recently opened Football Training Facility as the Joe Craft Football Training Facility. As part of the naming, the board accepted $4,790,000 in gifts from Craft, a UK alum in accounting and graduate of the College of Law.

 

Craft, a native of Hazard, Kentucky, is the president, chief executive officer and a director since 1999 of Alliance Resource Partners, LP, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Alliance is the eastern United States’ third-largest coal producer. Craft has been a long-time generous donor to the university, supporting academic and athletic projects such as Kentucky Children’s Hospital, the colleges of Engineering, Medicine and Law, and the Athletics Department.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605

Campus Transformation Continues: South Campus

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 09:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) — By Fall 2017, more than 5,700 students – the most ever – will live either on central or south campus at the University of Kentucky.

 

As part of an effort to support those students and continue the dramatic transformation of the campus, the UK Board of Trustees Friday approved a $49 million proposal to relocate and build a new baseball stadium that will make available to students more green and recreational space, additional parking, and will help complete a modern sports complex on the southern edge of campus.

 

“We have more students than at any time in our history living in this part of our campus,” said Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration. “We need to provide appropriate support for students, faculty and staff and address the identified need for both increased recreational space and transportation options. We have a unique opportunity through the continued revitalization of – and investment in – our athletics facilities to continue the progress the university has made to create an incomparable living and learning environment for students at UK.”

 

“We are proud to continue to play a role in supporting the growth of this university — this time with the proposed move and construction of our baseball facility, as well as the relocation of our soccer practice field,” said UK Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart. “We appreciate the partnership of President (Eli) Capilouto and look forward to the continued transformation of our campus and our athletic facilities.”

 

"I am gratified by the fact that Athletics plays such an integral role in the advancement of our total campus as exemplified by the $65 million contribution to the Jacobs Science Building. This is just an initial investment in the continued commitment of Athletics to the broader campus," said Dr. C. B. Akins, Sr., chair of the board’s University Athletics Ccommittee.  “As the campus transformation continues before our very eyes, so our athletics facilities must continue to be restructured to be competitive in our  ability to attract the best of the best and compete with the same. Our mission as a part is congruent with that of the whole, namely to educate, conduct research, and serve the Commonwealth.”

 

Specifically, board members approved:

 

-- A project scope of $49 million to relocate Cliff Hagan Baseball Stadium from near the track and field complex to the southern edge of campus, off Alumni Drive, by the existing soccer and softball complexes.

 

-- $2 million to relocate and upgrade the soccer practice field for UK’s Soccer Program. The project, also approved during the 2016 legislative session, will relocate the practice field and include lighting and natural turf upgrades. It will be paid for by the Athletics Department, using private funds.

 

-- With facility moves and construction, UK will begin making other upgrades to green spaces, recreational areas, and parking. The series of moves – which would include relocation of the existing tennis facility, located off University Drive, to the current Cliff Hagan Baseball Stadium location – creates space to build a recreation and parking zone in the heart of south campus.

 

-- A south campus recreation and parking zone could include enhanced and expanded recreation facilities and outdoor fields as well as a substantial increase in parking capacity.

 

“We are continuing the physical transformation of our campus in ways that will support student life and learning,” Monday said. “At the same time, our campus master plan is taking a strategic look at how we can maximize the space we have for parking and other amenities that facilitate better transportation around our campus as we strive to become one of the premier public, residential research campuses in the country. This is another step forward in that process.”

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

UK Board Approves Honorary Degrees for Don and Mira Ball

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 09:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016)  A couple with a long history of service to the greater Lexington community and to the University of Kentucky will receive honorary doctorates of humane letters at December 2016’s UK Commencement ceremony.

 

Nominated by the University Joint Committee on Honorary Degrees and approved by the University Senate, Donald R. Ball and Mira S. Ball are the honorees approved by the UK Board of Trustees today. An honorary doctorate of humane letters recognizes extraordinary contributions to philanthropy, human development, education, or societal well-being.

 

This husband and wife team cofounded Ball Homes, LLC in 1959, developing their business into one of the top 100 builders of single-family homes in the nation. Don Ball was an organizer and later board chair of the Hope Center, where he helped develop programs and services addressing the underlying causes of homelessness. He also served as co-chair of the Recovery Kentucky Task Force, a program that helps Kentuckians recover from chronic substance abuse. Don Ball has been honored many times on the national, state and local levels, including the Hearthstone Builder Humanitarian Award for making his community a better place to work and live; the Sullivan Medallion from UK; and co-recipient with Mira of both the Happy Chandler Kentuckian Award and the William T. Young Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

A proud UK graduate, Mira Ball taught in the Fayette County Public Schools before cofounding Ball Homes and serving as chief financial officer and secretary-treasurer of the company. Her love for education has never wavered as she became the first woman to chair the UK Board of Trustees, as well as being the first woman chair of the Midway University Board of Trustees. Along with her husband, Mira Ball has generously given her time, talent and treasure in support of Kentucky Educational Television. She is a past chair and board member of the Children’s Advocacy Center and has also carried out leadership responsibilities for Commerce Lexington, Inc., the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, the United Way of the Bluegrass, the Kentucky Historical Society, the Henry Clay Center for Statesmanship and the Kentucky Horse Park, to name just a few.

 

The University of Kentucky December Commencement ceremonies will take place Friday, Dec. 16.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200

Shift to Need-based Aid Important Move to Improve Student Success

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 08:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) – As part of a bold move to improve graduation rates and meet the needs of the state, the University of Kentucky announced plans Friday to shift the balance of institutional scholarships to be more aware of – and focused on – need-based aid.

 

Specifically, over the next several years, under the UK LEADS initiative (Leveraging Economic Affordability for Developing Success), the university will move from awarding about 90 percent of its aid based on academic merit to a majority of aid being awarded based on financial need, officials told members of the Board of Trustees Friday.

 

The shift in focus will begin with the fall 2017 entering class and will not impact scholarships awarded to current students. The shift, though, directly aligns with UK’s recently adopted Strategic Plan, which contemplates aggressive moves in improving graduation rates to 70 percent and retention rates to 90 percent between now and 2020. The Board of Trustees unanimously adopted the Strategic Plan last October.

 

“We have made tremendous strides in the last five years in improving academic quality and diversity while growing the number of students we educate to meet the needs of our state and region,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “But that’s not enough. We must move more quickly and more dramatically to impact student success. Unmet financial need is one of the – if not the – biggest obstacle to graduation and to being debt free.

 

"We know that moving graduation and retention rates is good for Kentucky’s economy and it is good for Kentucky’s families. We must and we will lead.”

 

For example, using scholarship and institutional awards at UK from 2015, more than $22 million of the $25 million in financial aid awarded to first-year students was based on academic merit. Under the UK LEADS initiative, more than $17 million would have been distributed based upon financial need; about $8 million would have been awarded based upon academic merit or other factors.

 

“President Capilouto and the Board of Trustees have made clear that we will make important strides in the coming years in retaining and graduating more students,” said Britt Brockman, chair of the university’s board. “That progress is a critical component of our overarching goal of becoming one of the premier public research universities in this country. It is also what our state is calling us to do as its flagship, land-grant university.”

 

Importantly, UK officials said, the shift doesn’t necessarily mean that if a student was eligible for aid under a system where merit aid is the predominant award that they won’t be eligible for scholarships where need-based aid represents the majority of assistance offered.

 

“We know that students awarded merit scholarships often have financial need,” said UK Provost Tim Tracy. “Academic merit and financial need is not mutually exclusive.”

 

At the same time, the university will adopt an even more holistic approach to evaluating student readiness, officials said. UK’s High School Readiness Index uses a formula that examines a student’s high school GPA and ACT scores to determine college readiness. In examining student performance in recent years, UK officials believe high school GPA is actually a better predictor of student success than ACT scores. The new readiness formula is weighted more heavily toward GPA, while still taking into account test scores.

 

The moves were discussed during the UK board’s annual two-day retreat. The retreat focused largely on the progress being made on the university’s five-year strategic plan, which was endorsed last year by the board at its retreat. The plan focuses on making major strides between now and 2020 in research and graduation education, diversity and community engagement, and undergraduate education.

 

Cornerstones of the undergraduate education initiative of the plan include improving the six-year graduation rate and first-to-second-year retention rates to 70 percent and 90 percent, respectively. UK currently has its highest ever graduation rate of 63.4 percent, but retention rates have remained stubbornly flat at about 82 percent.

 

Moreover, in recent years, UK has grown its first-year class size to more than 5,100, its percentage of underrepresented students to an all-time high of more than 18 percent, and increased academic quality with annual totals of more than 100 National Merit finalist students, placing the university among the top 10 public institutions in the country.

 

But Capilouto and Tracy, who is leading strategic plan efforts in undergraduate education, believe a more dramatic and bold step is necessary to make progress more quickly in student success at all levels.

 

“We have made much progress. That is undeniable, but there is still much to do,” Tracy said. “From our analysis, we know that unmet financial need may be the single most important factor still remaining in determining whether a student is successful. In addressing that issue, with this shift in a strategic way, we are laying the foundation for our next ascent.”

 

Tracy cited the fact, from UK’s analysis of retention, that a steep decline in success occurs when a student’s unmet financial need exceeds $5,000.

 

“We will still be providing significant aid based upon academic performance, but beginning in Fall 2017 we will shift more of our efforts in a strategic fashion toward financial need,” Tracy said. “This is part of a holistic effort to focus intentionally and comprehensively on student success at all levels.”

 

Tracy said the university has been examining its scholarship program for more than a year as part of what has become a realignment of the provost’s areas that focus on student success. Within the last several months, Tracy has merged student affairs and undergraduate education as part of an effort to invest more resources in student success efforts.

 

The goal is to key in on what Tracy says are the four pillars – or most important elements – undergirding student success: academic success, financial stability, belonging and engagement and wellness. With those pillars anchoring the realignment of the academic enterprise, Tracy has recently announced plans to add eight licensed clinicians to the 13 already in place and an additional 30 academic advisors on top of about 54 currently at UK. Career counselors, case managers and personnel at the university’s Violence Intervention and Prevention Center also are being added.

 

Tracy now is also examining other areas of his office, such as Enrollment Management and the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT), to focus even more intently on student success and teaching innovation. That part of the realignment will take place over the next 12 to 18 months.

 

To view Tracy's presentation to the UK Board of Trustees on student success measures click here, or on the attachment below.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jay Blanton, 859-257-6605, jay.blanton@uky.edu

UK Board Appoints New College of Pharmacy Dean

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 08:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees today accepted the appointment of R. Kiplin Guy as the new dean of the UK College of Pharmacy. Guy is a renowned researcher who specializes in the development of drugs to combat pediatric diseases and previously served as chairman of the Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

 

At St. Jude's, Guy created the Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, where he held the Robert J. Ulrich Endowed Chair. He also has held secondary appointments as adjunct professor of pharmaceutical chemistry for the University of California San Francisco; adjunct professor of biochemistry for Vanderbilt University in Nashville; and adjunct professor of pharmaceutical sciences and pathology for the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

 

Guy's research focus is chemical biology and preclinical drug discovery and development for neglected diseases, especially those that affect children. Much of his work has focused on pediatric cancers and malaria. In recent years, he has led the team that discovered and developed a new drug candidate for malaria that is currently in Phase 1 trials. The Chemical Biology and Therapeutics group, built and led by Guy, has collaboratively repurposed drugs for clinical trials for ependymoma, leukemias, medulloblastoma, and other pediatric cancers.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Allison Perry, 859-323-2399, allison.perry@uky.edu

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Explores CAFE's Intercultural Awareness Day

Thu, 10/20/2016 - 19:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  This week guest host Alan Lytle talks with Quentin Tyler, assistant dean and director for diversity in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. Tyler and Lytle, WUKY's news director, discuss the college's upcoming Intercultural Awareness Day. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-cafe-intercultural-awareness-day#stream/0.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Faculty and Administrators Chosen for SEC Academic Leadership Development Program

Thu, 10/20/2016 - 18:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) – Four University of Kentucky faculty members and administrators have been selected by UK to participate in the 2016-17 SEC Academic Leadership Development Program. The the Southeastern Conference announced earlier this week that 14 universities of the SEC selected a total of 52 faculty members and administrators to participate.

 

The SEC Academic Leadership Development Program (SEC ALDP) is a professional growth initiative that seeks to identify, prepare and advance academic leaders for roles within SEC institutions and beyond. It has two components: a university-level development program designed by each institution for its own participants and two, three-day, SEC-wide workshops held on specified campuses for all program participants.

 

UK's 2016-17 SEC Academic Leadership Development Program fellows are:

 

 

To view a full list of all SEC ALDP fellows, visit http://www.thesecu.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/SEC-ALDP-Fellows-2016-17-Bios.pdf.

 

“It is our strong belief that helping to prepare administrators for the next phase of their careers has the potential to impact all of higher education, both now and in the future,” said SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey. “Our universities make a significant investment in these individuals, and we are proud to work with them through this program.”

 

Since its creation in 2008, more than 300 faculty and academic administrators have completed the SEC ALDP, and program alumni have taken leadership roles as deans and provosts, among other senior-level positions, at universities around the SEC and country.

 

 

The SEC Academic Leadership Development Program is part of SECU, the academic initiative of the Southeastern Conference. The SEC supports and promotes the endeavors and achievements of the students and faculty at its 14 member universities.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Bryant Welbourne, SECU, bwelbourne@sec.org or 205-949-8960)

 

 

 

New Agreement Opens Up Dual Enrollment for High School Students With Disabilities

Thu, 10/20/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016) The University of Kentucky Human Development Institute and the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation have entered into a new agreement to pilot a dual/concurrent enrollment project for students receiving free and appropriate education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. 

 

The Dual Enrollment Pilot Project (DEPP) will develop dual enrollment projects for students on five college campuses in Kentucky. These projects will represent, to the greatest extent possible, both geographic and institutional diversity.

 

“Many high school students in Kentucky take advantage of opportunities to enroll in college classes while still enrolled in high school," said Project Director Barry Whaley. "These dual enrollment programs offer students the chance to earn college credit as part of their high school curriculum. Until now, this opportunity has not been offered for students with disabilities who are eligible for free and appropriate education (FAPE) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.”

 

This project has one major goal: to expand access to create a statewide dual enrollment system through which students with disabilities can have the same opportunities as any other student in secondary schools in Kentucky. In order to achieve this goal, two classifications of student eligibility will be established:

 

1. Diploma track students will include degree or certificate seeking students with disabilities. Acceptance criteria will include academics, family support, and student motivation to pursue college as a viable transition path to employment.

 

2. Alternate diploma students with disabilities who are interested in Comprehensive Transition Programs (CTPs) or non-degree or certificate seeking and who demonstrate motivation and family support to pursue a viable transition path to employment. DEPP seeks the full inclusion of young adults with disabilities in all aspects of college life, integrating academics, socialization, and meaningful work experiences within student centered plans. As true participants in campus life, students will be able to meaningfully engage in the college culture, ranging from attending classes in an integrated classroom environment, taking part in study groups, rallies and student clubs. Whenever possible, natural supports through peer mentors and classroom accommodations will be used, changing the college culture to one of inclusiveness where diversity is valued.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Passing Out: Not for the Faint of Heart

Thu, 10/20/2016 - 15:27

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016) — With the arrival of fall, children and teens become fully immersed in school and club sports. Although athletics are healthy and beneficial activities for youth, a cardiovascular event on the playing field can occur without warning and at any age.

 

Before any child or teen participates in varsity athletics, they should have a pre-participation physical. Your pediatrician, family practitioner or nurse practitioner can perform a routine physical exam. Unfortunately, despite the thorough job done by primary care practitioners screening for medical problems, a child might still experience an adverse health event on the field during intense play. 

 

Syncope, a medical term for passing out, is a temporary loss of consciousness after collapse known as “fainting.” If this occurs during athletic activity, the child should be taken out of play and evaluated by a physician before being cleared to return to activity. Up to 50 percent of people will experience syncope at some point in their lifetime, with the first episode often during the teenage years. 

 

Many of us have experienced a feeling of “lightheadedness” when we stand up quickly or have not eaten in a long time. This is different than true syncope when a person completely loses consciousness and collapses to the ground. If there is concern for possible serious problems by the primary physician, a child with syncope may be referred to a pediatric cardiologist, who can perform specialized testing including an electrocardiogram or echocardiogram, which is an ultrasound picture of the heart or a stress test.

 

Only 1.5 to 5 percent of cases of syncope will have a cause related to the heart, but the consequence of not making the diagnosis in these cases are tragic. The most common cause of “fainting” is dehydration and not taking in enough fluids or skipping meals and with proper eating habits and hydration. In children with recurrent episodes or those which raise concern for the primary physician, the pediatric cardiology team at Kentucky Children’s Hospital can evaluate their condition and guide them and their family through a diagnosis, possibly allowing them to return to play.

 

In the past year, the pediatric cardiology team at Kentucky Children’s Hospital entered into a partnership with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to create the Joint Pediatric Heart Care Program. Under this program, children born with a heart condition and children and youth with heart-related concerns across Kentucky can receive advanced specialty care. For more information about pediatric heart health, visit http://ukhealthcare.uky.edu/peds-cardiology.

 

Dr. Shaun Mohan is a pediatric cardiologist at UK Health/UK Children’s Hospital. Dr. Tim Knilans is the director of cardiac electrophysiology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

 

Media Contact:  Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

National Pharmacogenomics Expert Joins Markey, College of Pharmacy Faculty

Thu, 10/20/2016 - 14:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and UK College of Pharmacy welcome clinical pharmacologist Dr. Jill Kolesar to their respective teams.

 

Kolesar has extensive experience in oncology pharmacogenomics and the implementation of clinical trials, and she will serve several roles at UK with a focus on enhancing the UK Markey Cancer Center's precision medicine initiatives.

 

Alongside Markey oncologist Dr. Rachel Miller, Kolesar will co-lead the cancer center's Molecular Tumor Board, a new initiative that allows for truly personalized cancer treatment through advanced genomic diagnostic tests and discussion of individual cancer patient cases among a multidisciplinary team of experts. This program will provide direct clinical benefit to patients with cancer and help direct the development of new therapies that target the types of cancers found in Markey's patient population.

 

Kolesar will also direct the Early Phase Clinical Trials Center, which will focus on developing these new therapies by providing patients with better access to phase I and II clinical trials.  

 

"Dr. Kolesar brings a wealth of experience and expertise in this type of personalized cancer care," said Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center. "This new phase in Markey's commitment to precision medicine will have a direct impact on the patients we treat from across the state and beyond."

 

Additionally, Kolesar will co-lead the Drug Discovery, Delivery and Translational Therapeutics Program and serve as a professor in the UK Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science.

 

Previously, Kolesar served as co-chair of the Precision Medicine Molecular Tumor Board and co-leader of the Cancer Therapy Discovery and Development Disease Oriented Working Group at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center. Prior to joining UW-Madison, she completed a specialty practice residency in hematology/oncology and a two-year fellowship in molecular oncology pharmacotherapy for the Division of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio.

 

Kolesar's research involves the clinical pharmacology of anticancer and chemoprevention compounds. She holds two patents for developing novel technologies for evaluating gene expression and point mutations and is a co-founder of Helix Diagnostics. She is a member of the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention and Control Central IRB and is the president-elect of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

 

"Jill Kolesar is a tremendous researcher and educator that will be an outstanding addition to the College of Pharmacy and Markey Cancer Center," said David Burgess, chair of the UK Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. "She has established a national reputation as a leader in the area of pharmacogenomics, oncology, and precision medicine.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

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