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New UK Course Prepares PhDs for the Realities of a Crowded Job Market

Fri, 01/08/2016 - 15:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 11, 2016) — In a recent article in the journal Nature Biotechnology, University of Kentucky Assistant Professor Nathan Vanderford and doctoral candidate Heather Norman-Burgdolf describe a course developed to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows be prepared for the realities of the job market.

 

Every year, doctoral graduates enter the job market in search of tenure-track professorship positions at universities throughout the world. Unfortunately, the number of new Ph.D. recipients increases each year while openings for current and new professors fail to keep pace.

 

As a result, it often takes years for many doctoral graduates to land a tenure-track position at a college or university or before deciding to look for work outside of a university setting. When they finally do decide to look for work outside of academia, they often find their graduate training has not adequately prepared them for the demands of the job market.

 

With support from the UK Graduate School and the Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, the course titled, “Preparing Future Professionals,” is open to all students regardless of their training stage and offers instruction on basic skill sets needed on a competitive job market, such as how to leverage transferable skills obtained in doctoral training for any number of career paths and how to prepare for job applications and interviews.

 

Vanderford hopes this course will fill the gaps in current doctoral training.

 

“Many institutions are not providing basic work readiness training to their PhDs and finally this issue is gaining international attention from top academic scientists. I believe that it is important to disseminate what UK is doing to address the issue,” Vanderford said.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

UK Employees 'Stepping Up' Their Physical Activity With Fitbit Promotion

Fri, 01/08/2016 - 15:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 11, 2016) — As a part of the University of Kentucky's LiveWell initiative, UK employees were eligible to purchase a Fitbit device for as low as $19 if they committed to participate in the UK LiveWell Step Up physical activity challenge.

 

The response to the promotion was outstanding. More than 8,500 UK employees signed up for the challenge and purchased a Fitbit at a reduced price through a subsidy from UK Health and Wellness.

 

Joey Payne, UK Human Resources chief benefits officer believes this investment in employees will provide mutual benefits both now and in the future.

 

"Employees who are engaged with their personal fitness will be in a better position to maintain or improve their personal health status," Payne said.

 

"Providing a Fitbit subsidy is just one way that UK has been able to invest in our employees' health and well-being," said UK Health and Wellness Program Manager Jody Ensman. "We want employees to increase their level of physical activity, but we also want to improve the culture of health here at UK by letting them know we support them in their efforts in improving their health and well-being."

 

The Step Up challenge gives employees the opportunity to earn UK gear by tracking their steps. Anyone with a fitness tracking device such as a Fitbit, Jawbone, Misfit, Garmin, etc. can participate in the challenge.

 

Ensman hopes employees get excited about being physically active.


"Through the Step Up Challenge, I hope to see that employees are increasing their daily physical activity and have fun along the way by competing against themselves and fellow colleagues," Ensman said.

 

Participants can unlock their choice of UK gear based on the daily average of how many steps they take. Each participant earns one prize. Those whose daily step average exceeds 8,000 may choose their single prize from the 6,000 or 8,000 prize tiers and those who reach 10,000 may choose their single prize from any of the three prize categories.

 

The prizes include the following:

·      6,000 step teir: water bottle, Dri-Fit short sleeve, Bluetooth earbuds

·      8,000 step teir: shorts, water bottle, Dri-Fit short sleeve

·      10,000 step teir: pullover, Dri-Fit long sleeve, Dri-Fit short sleeve

 

The six-week Step Up challenge begins today, Monday, Jan. 11, and ends Monday, Feb. 21.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Chemistry Researchers Develop Metal Complexes To Study Cancer

Fri, 01/08/2016 - 09:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 11, 2015) — University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry researchers Edith Glazer, Sean Parkin and students Erin Wachter and Diego Moyá recently published a study showing that specialized compounds containing the metal ruthenium may be able to visualize or damage specific DNA structures relevant for cancer.

 

Published in "Chemistry - A European Journal," the work was named a "Hot Paper" for its importance in a rapidly evolving field of high interest, and was highlighted with the back cover.

 

The ends of chromosomes and some genes associated with cancer have regions where DNA can form unusual structures known as G-quadruplexes, of which there are several subtypes. For cancer cells to continue growing and dividing, they need to untangle these G-quadruplex structures. Researchers have long thought it would be possible to halt tumor growth if there was a way to lock these G-quadruplex structures in place.

 

Graduate students Erin Wachter and Diego Moyá synthesized ruthenium-containing compounds they thought might bind and stabilize G-quadruplex structures. They designed these potential drugs to act as “light switches” so they would only give a response when bound to G-quadruplex structures. Using a rapid screening approach, they found two compounds that were exquisitely specific for distinct G-quadruplex structure subtypes. Out of 32 biomolecules they tested, two different G-quadruplexes  showed the greatest response to the ruthenium compounds.

 

In collaboration with Parkin, they used X-ray crystallography — a technique that allows researchers to determine the chemical structure of molecules — to investigate the structural differences in the two complexes that could relate to the differences in selectivity.

 

"It's pretty rare to have molecules that recognize or damage specific DNA structures," Glazer said. "Most molecules prefer [the more common] double helix DNA and the selectivity within different subclasses of molecules is really unusual."

 

In the future, derivatives of these compounds may be used to visualize or damage cancer cells.

 

This research was funded by the American Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

K2 Kicks Off the New Semester

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 15:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan 8, 2016)  On Tuesday, the University of Kentucky will kick off the spring semester with K2.  K2 is designed to welcome hundreds of new students starting at UK in the spring as well as welcome back the entire university community for a new semester.

 

The Office of New Student and Family Programs will again be coordinating K2 to kick off the spring semester. It will include a K2 Kick-off for new first-year and transfer students Tuesday, Jan. 12.  K2 will continue with events, workshops, open houses, seminars and activities for all new and returning students starting Wednesday, Jan. 13, and lasting until Sunday, Jan. 31. For more information, visit www.uky.edu/K2.

 

Whether the student be a first-time freshman or transfer, new undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend the K2 Kick-off Tuesday in The 90. Check-in begins at 10:45 a.m. and the event ends at 4:30 p.m. The K2 Kick-off is a half day of presentations, activities and a resource fair designed to ease the transition to UK. The K2 Kick-off highlights include a welcome and induction by Provost Tim Tracy as well as presentations on academic and student life. Students will receive tips from a UK faculty member, learn how to attain tickets to UK sporting events in addition to hearing about UK parking, campus safety, wellness and more!

 

After the conclusion of the program, students will have the chance to tour campus to find their classrooms. New Wildcats will also have the option of joining a K2 team, a small orientation group led by an upperclass student leader, for a free dinner. Great prizes and free long-sleeve K2 T-shirts will be given out throughout the day. Pre-registration for the K2 Kick-off is encouraged but not required; online registration is available at www.uky.edu/K2 along with a more detailed schedule of events.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, (859) 257-1909/(859) 323-2395 

New Year, New Lease on Life for Two Louisville Transplant Patients

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 15:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 8, 2016) – While Friday the 13th is traditionally associated with bad luck, it now represents an important anniversary for 64-year-old Louisville resident Stan Burch.

 

Stan, who had been waiting on a heart transplant in Kentucky since 2012, received a phone call late in the day last Friday, Nov. 13 from UK HealthCare Heart Transplant Coordinator Donna Dennis with good news – an appropriate donor heart had just become available.  

 

He and his wife, Patti, came immediately to the University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital, where Burch received his new heart in the early morning hours of Nov. 14.

 

"I will never be afraid of Friday the 13th again," Stan said. After the successful surgery, it was just a matter of weeks before Stan was cleared to return home.

 

The new heart was a long time coming – after dealing with a heart murmur as a child and more recent episodes as an adult, Stan went to local doctors and underwent a variety of procedures to help his failing heart: an implantable defibrillator, a cardiac ablation procedure, medications. Nothing was working.

 

"I couldn't even breathe well," Stan said. "The old heart just wouldn't let me do anything."

 

After being told by a local doctor he would never qualify for a heart transplant, Stan sought a second opinion at a medical center out of state, who advised him to go back to Kentucky, find the closest transplant center, and get listed. Though he was initially listed for a transplant in Louisville, he and his wife made the decision to transfer his care to UK in July 2014.

 

"I had my days of feeling hopeless," Patti said. "But when you went to UK, everyone was so positive."

 

That positivity didn't just come from the staff, but through other patients as well. While walking through the cardiovascular intensive care unit for his post-transplant exercise, Stan came upon another patient making the same rounds: 58-year-old Dennis Hamilton, who had received a heart just five days prior to Stan. They represent two of the 43 heart transplants UK performed in 2015, a state record.

 

"I saw him walking around like me, and I said, 'Hey, did you just have a transplant, too?'" Stan said. "And he had!"

 

Dennis, who has a strong family history of heart disease, is the fifth person in his family to have needed a heart transplant. He had been seeing a cardiologist pre-emptively for 15 years, and he exercised regularly and ate a healthy diet, determined to do anything in his power to prevent needing a transplant.

 

However, his genetics eventually caught up with him, and his congestive heart failure became too severe to be managed with less invasive treatments.

 

"Last winter, it really started to catch up with me," Dennis said.

 

Norton HealthCare cardiologist Dr. Janet Smith referred him to UK to see Dr. Navin Rajagopalan, medical director of heart transplantation at UK HealthCare. Though it was a longer trip for the Mount Washington resident, he didn't hesitate to heed his doctor's recommendation.

 

"I didn't question it at all," Dennis said. "If that's where I need to be, that's where I'm going."

 

Because of the similar trajectory in their surgery and treatment, the Burches and Hamiltons bonded during their recovery, frequently meeting up to chat at appointments, offering each other post-transplant advice, and meeting for lunch at local Lexington restaurants after their follow-up visits. Being able to talk with another person who knew exactly what each was going through has been hugely beneficial to their recovery process, they say -- and both plan to keep in touch now that they're back home.

 

"I'm just tickled to death that we met the Burches," Dennis said.

 

Meanwhile, both men are looking forward to returning to their regular daily lives this year. Dennis is ready to get back to his grandchildren and spend as much time as he can with them. Stan, who owns a home in Naples, Fla., has been too sick to travel there for many years, and is ready to go back down to warm weather and sunny skies. These days, his outlook on life is nothing but bright.

 

"Everything is beautiful," Stan said. "Everything is positive."

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

 

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Explores UK's Strategic Plan

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 12:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 8, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  On today's show, UK Provost Tim Tracy discusses the impact of the university’s new strategic plan on undergraduate education. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/planning-future-uk-undergraduate-education.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

Free Health Workshops for Individuals With Development Disabilities

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 10:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 11, 2016) – A new program at the University of Kentucky is helping individuals with developmental disabilities take control of their health. Participants will learn about making healthy choices across all areas of health and wellness, including physical, emotional, social and spiritual health.

 

The free program, part of the health and wellness initiative at the UK Human Development Institute, is called Health Partners. Interested individuals complete the program with a health partner, which can be a friend, family member, or other support.

 

The deadline to register is Friday, Jan. 15.

 

"Research shows that individuals attempting to make positive health changes are much more likely to experience success if they have support and are being held accountable," said Megan Jaspersen, Health Partners program facilitator.

 

Throughout the program, participants reflect upon their current health habits and identify areas in which they would like to improve. Individual goals are chosen and specific steps are identified. Goals can include losing weight, improving friendships, obtaining a specific job, exercising more, eating healthier, and more.

 

A pilot program was completed in November 2015 and was well received with participants reporting positive results. According to feedback from their first follow-up meeting, participants increased water consumption, decreased food portions and are choosing healthier methods to prepare food since beginning the pilot program. Weight loss was also reported and participants noted they are more conscious of their daily health and wellness decisions.

 

Over several sessions, participants will receive the tools and information needed to be successful in reaching their goals. The program also includes six monthly follow-up meetings.   

 

Sessions will take place from 1-4:30 p.m. in the Human Development Training Room at the Coldstream Research Campus, 1525 Bull Lea Road in Lexington.

 

Session schedule:

Monday, Jan. 25

Wednesday, Jan. 27

Monday, Feb. 1

Wednesday, Feb. 3

 

For more information visit http://www.wellness4ky.org/health-partners/. To register, contact Megan Jaspersen at 859-257-2304 or megan.jaspersen@uky.edu.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Art Museum Hosts 'Open House'

Wed, 01/06/2016 - 15:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 7, 2016) — Not long after students return to the University of Kentucky campus, their home away from home, the UK Art Museum will open two new exhibitions examining the impact of houses on life and an artist's madness for blue, something members of Big Blue Nation know all too well. "Open House: Selections from the Sue and John Wieland Collection" and "Bill Adams: Blue Madness," on display Jan. 23 through April 3, at the UK Art Museum, are free and open to the public.

 

UK Art Museum Throws Out the Welcome Mat for "Open House"

 

Houses, and what they mean, have been the focus of Atlanta patrons Sue and John Wieland for decades. Successful homebuilders in the South, they have amassed a diverse collection of works by an international roster of artists, including Vito Acconci, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louise Bourgeois, Tony Cragg, Roy Lichtenstein, Cindy Sherman and Ai Weiwei.

 

The works presented in "Open House: Selections from the Sue and John Wieland Collection" include examples of painting, sculpture, photography, drawing and printmaking. They explore how structures and surroundings can establish physical and psychological conditions that affect individuals, families and communities.

 

For example, "Walking House," a large silver gelatin photograph by Laurie Simmons, is a surrealistic pairing of a woman’s shapely legs with a detailed model of an expensive suburban home. Is Simmons telling us that femininity and domesticity are both idealized "constructions?" How do we reconcile such a seemingly nostalgic image with the realities of American homelessness and economic disparity today?

 

In a university setting where subjects such as art, architecture, history, gender studies, psychology and urban planning are taught, as well as in a city where historic homes are cherished and maintained for future generations, "Open House" affords viewers an opportunity for analysis and discussion about how houses help to make us who we are.

 

"The 'Open House' exhibition serves a few purposes that are important to the museum. We desire to have content that is usable by the campus and community," said UK Art Museum Director Stuart Horodner. "In this case, works of art by a range of contemporary artists that explore the physicality and psychology of house/home, means that faculty and students in areas of urban planning, architecture, gender studies, engineering and literature for example, can use the exhibit to connect to syllabi and course work. In Lexington, where historic homes and issues of preservation are important, the exhibit offers opportunities for thinking about safety, security and tradition."

 

The show also champions the significance of art collectors. "Since the 'Open House' exhibition features works from the collection of Sue and John Wieland, it also reminds visitors of the importance of ambitious collecting, and the role that patrons play in helping institutions present and acquire significant art," Horodner said.

 

It's Not Easy Being Blue

Bill Adams is known for his obsessive drawings in ballpoint pen that offer a roster of furry creatures in simple perspectival landscapes. While they are not anatomically aligned with known animals, they possess a surprising power to solicit our interest and empathy. What is their condition exactly? Like staring sentinels, they express a cartoon version of existential anxiety — watchful, hopeful, sad, stoic and bewildered.

 

In "Bill Adams: Blue Madness," the intimate scale of the artist's works and their accumulation of short pen strokes are reminiscent of the dense vision of Leonardo Da Vinci’s "deluge drawings," and their compositions owe something to the surreal elegance of Salvador Dali’s imagery. The unmistakable blue palette brings to mind bored students with Bic pens, filling the pages of their notebooks with fantastic beings.

 

"Adams is a unique artist whose intense ballpoint pen drawings feature imagery that combines fantasy and reality, often using animals that are cute, fierce and existentially conflicted," Horodner said.

  

Here at UK, Adams’s color choice will seem like a school edict, and presenting this New Yorker’s recent drawings and sculptures in Lexington during basketball season is to effectively turn his bestiary into a Kentucky Wildcat mascot convention.

 

"In the UK context, they will seem like versions of our Wildcat mascot. We are excited to see a possible overlap of visitors who appreciate art and sports, and we will be having a special voting process where we encourage people to pick their favorite amongst Bill’s 'cat' drawings, in order to produce a limited edition T-shirt design for basketball fans."

 

Several free educational programs will be presented in conjunction with these exhibitions, including two already on the books for January and February. An exhibition conversation will be held between Horodner and the collectors behind "Open House," Sue and John Wieland, as well as exhibiting solo artist Bill Adams and curator Rebecca Dimling Cochran. This event will begin noon Saturday, Jan. 23.

 

The following month the museum will host a panel discussion on historic homes with representatives from Lexington sites including Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate; Bodley-Bullock House; Hunt-Morgan House; and Mary Todd Lincoln House. The discussion, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, will talk about the joys and challenges of preserving and sharing historic architecture, artworks and domestic items with the public.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the Art Museum at UK presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection. 

 

The UK Art Museum, located in the Singletary Center for the Arts at Rose Street and Euclid Avenue, will return to its regular hours Tuesday, Jan. 12, after the winter break. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. For more information on membership, contact Lyndi VanDeursen at 859-257-8164 or lyndi.vandeursen@uky.edu

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Gatton Hosts Seminar to Prepare Business Students for Workforce

Wed, 01/06/2016 - 14:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 7, 2016) — On Jan. 30-31, the University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will host Wall Street Prep’s Financial & Valuation Modeling Seminar for the second time. In October, the college welcomed more than 60 registered students to the first seminar, led by former investment banker and native Kentuckian, Brad Barlow.

 

“The Wall Street Prep Valuation and Excel Modeling Seminar provides top-notch practical training for people who are interested in investment banking, equity research, portfolio management, business development, capital markets, and corporate finance careers,” said Wendy Liu, senior lecturer in Gatton’s Department of Finance and Quantitative Methods, and coordinator of the events. “The two-day seminar mimics the process that takes place at today’s leading financial institutions by using real case studies to build financial models from scratch. It offers hands-on training in advanced Excel modeling techniques, financial statement analysis, and valuation. The seminar provides an excellent way to learn valuation and modeling in a short time.”

 

“Wall Street Prep’s Financial & Valuation Modeling Seminar is a must for those interested in a career in investment banking,” said student and attendee Wade Bailey. “In college you are taught the theoretical, the basics of valuation, and this course helps to transition you from the classroom to the real world. I chose to attend this course because I wanted to learn how to take what I have learned here at the University of Kentucky and apply it to what I will be doing once I join the workforce.”

 

Barlow said that the inaugural course at UK had one of the highest attendance rates he has seen in his six years of teaching financial modeling and valuation skills at universities.

 

“It was inspiring to see the high level of interest, the enthusiasm, and the desire of our students to succeed in an increasingly competitive world,” Liu said.

 

The registration cost for the Jan. 30-31 seminar is $179. In addition, a popular seminar on mergers and acquistions and leveraged buyout modeling will be offered (for $150) for the first time at UK Feb. 20-21. Details of the events and links to registration can be found at: https://www.wallstreetprep.com/seminars/kentucky-013016-financial-modeling-university-boot-camp-series/

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750.

PTS Offering Saturday Office Hours Jan. 9, Jan. 16

Wed, 01/06/2016 - 14:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 7, 2016) — As the start of the spring semester approaches and students return to Lexington, Parking and Transportation Services will be open Saturday, Jan. 9 and Saturday, Jan. 16. The office will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on these days to accommodate students who wish to obtain a bicycle permit, purchase a motor vehicle parking permit or ask questions.

 

The PTS office is located in the Press Avenue Garage (PS #6), found at 721 Press Avenue.

 

For more information, call the PTS office at 859-257-5757 or email UKParking@lsv.uky.edu.

 

As a reminder, permits are required in the K areas beginning Wednesday, Jan. 13.

Financial Wellness Center Cultivates Student Financial Literacy

Wed, 01/06/2016 - 11:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2016) — The University of Kentucky recently launched the UK Student Financial Wellness Center—a program designed to impart financial knowledge upon undergraduate, graduate and prospective students. The center responds to a rising issue within higher education.

 

The center’s efforts to help improve student financial wellness will include strategies such as peer coaching, financial wellness seminars, online education programs, and purposeful collaboration with academic departments.

 

In the 2013 Health Behavior Study, 16 percent of UK students reported that their academic performance was negatively impacted by finances. Additionally, of the 41.7 percent of students who reported stress, 49.5 percent reported that money and finances were the cause.

 

“Financial knowledge and financial literacy are crucial issues at institutions nationally,” said Eric N. Monday, executive vice president for finance and administration. “We know that whether students return to the university for a new semester, and whether they ultimately graduate, often depends a great deal on successfully navigating financial issues. Therefore, it is incumbent upon us to prepare them for success — for both while they are on our campus and after they graduate.”

 

Drew Smith, director of the Office of Wellness Initiatives for Student Empowerment (WISE), said that site visits, conferences, and training workshops highlighted the fact that the subject of financial wellness among college students is a relatively new area of health promotion.

 

“Therefore, we are taking a deliberate and pragmatic approach to the issue,” Smith said.

 

Recognizing these concerns, the staff of WISE spent the 2014-2015 academic year broadening its scope of health promotion and prevention to include various areas of wellness. The office established its foundation upon the nine dimensions of wellness, of which finance is included (emotional, career, social, spiritual, physical, financial, intellectual, creative, and environmental).

 

While some individual offices and programs have provided financial literacy or education for their respective student populations, Smith said that the WISE office identified a need for a centralized program, which provides consistent messaging to a larger population of students.

 

“The needs of the typical freshman may include a greater understanding of student loans, interest, and basic budgeting.” Smith said. “Sophomores are typically moving to off-campus locations, so a spending plan may be more necessary as they will likely be paying for rent, utilities, Internet, transportation and groceries for the first time. As they get closer to entering the job market, upperclassmen and graduate students will see benefit in learning more about retirement, investing, and big-ticket item purchasing such as cars and home-buying.”

 

Smith also hopes to utilize peer financial educators to serve as financial coaches to provide one-on-one consultation for students. This would not serve as financial advising for investment purposes, but rather for a more specific emphasis on individual needs such as income-based budgeting and goal-setting savings plans.

 

Throughout the fall 2015 semester, under the leadership of the new financial wellness specialist, Tiffany Hornberger, the office focused on determining financial wellness trends and knowledge deficits among UK students. The staff utilized pre-existing programs, such as UK101 and UK201’s financial wellness lesson plan, to build upon current best practices while identifying student leaders to serve as the inaugural group of peer financial wellness educators.

 

In the spring 2016 semester, the staff will focus on training peer financial wellness educators and providing pilot educational programs to UK students. The office also plans to collaborate with Jennifer Hunter in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment to develop consistent and sustained educational programs, including a Financial Wellness Week, which will also serve as the official “kick-off” for the Student Financial Wellness Center.

 

The Office of Wellness Initiatives for Student Empowerment also created the Financial Wellness Advisory Board in the spring of 2015. This committee consists of campus leaders from areas including Student Government, EVPFA, Enrollment Management, Undergraduate Education and members of the faculty.

 

“We look forward to continuing our commitment to student success through this important initiative,” Monday said. “Students are, after all, at the center of everything we do at the University of Kentucky.”

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

UK College of Public Health Occupational Safety Expert Appointed to NIOSH Board

Tue, 01/05/2016 - 16:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 6, 2016)The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has appointed Terry Bunn, a University of Kentucky preventive and environmental medicine expert and director of the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC), as a member of an independent advisory committee to the director of NIOSH.

 

Bunn, an associate professor in the UK College of Public Health, will serve as one of the 15 occupational health experts on the NIOSH Board of Scientific Counselors. Experts on the board represent the fields of occupational medicine, occupational nursing, industrial hygiene, toxicology, occupational health and safety engineering, ergonomics, epidemiology, biostatistics and psychology. Her term will last as long as four years.

 

Bunn’s research interests span from injury prevention to drug abuse in both workplace environments and the general population. She serves as the principal investigator for the Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health Surveillance, Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation, Core Violence and Injury Prevention, and other state injury prevention programs. In addition, a research team she leads at KIPRC recently acquired a $4 million Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant to combat drug abuse, including heroin abuse, in the state.

 

Established from the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, NIOSH is the branch of the CDC dedicated to preventing illness and injuries in the workplace. NIOSH promotes safe and healthy workplaces through research, interventions, recommendations and global collaborations.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

UK Issues Temporary Ban on Hoverboards Due to Safety Risks

Tue, 01/05/2016 - 15:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 6, 2016) — Based upon University of Kentucky safety standards and recent instances of batteries from electronic skateboards and self-balancing devices bursting into flames, all hoverboards and similar devices are temporarily banned on campus, effective immediately.

 

All students, faculty and staff must leave these devices at an off-campus location.

 

This ban prohibits the use, possession, or storage at residence halls, university apartments, Greek houses, academic buildings, all other campus buildings, campus grounds, and other off-campus properties controlled by the university effective immediately.

 

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a strong warning and also highlighted the fact that an investigation into burning hoverboards is ongoing.  Major U.S. airlines have also banned hoverboards on flights due to safety concerns. On Dec. 14, 2015, Amazon.com stopped selling hoverboards due to emerging safety concerns. Several SEC schools — including Arkansas, LSU, and Vanderbilt — have banned the devices.  Numerous other campuses and organizations have also banned these devices.

 

"We are temporarily banning hoverboards and similar devices due to the fact that these devices have caused numerous fires throughout the nation and the potential fire risk that they pose to people and property.  We are not willing to risk your safety and our community’s safety,” said UK Fire Marshal Greg Williamson.

 

Batteries within these devices have been reported to burst into flames — especially while being charged — resulting in a metal fire that can burn with intense heat. To date, a number of shipping companies, airlines, and colleges and universities have temporarily banned these devices.  

 

The ban will remain in effect until more information and better safety standards for all models of the equipment are in place to protect UK students, faculty, staff, patients and visitors from the potential threat of fire.   

 

As students, faculty and staff return to campus after the holiday season, they are encouraged to remember that campus safety is a community responsibility. Everyone is asked be aware of the fire risks — and be mindful of life safety of others — by not introducing potential hazards to our community.

 

For students who already have hoverboards on campus and cannot get them home safely, UK has made arrangements to provide temporary storage. If you live on campus and have such a device and need assistance with temporary storage, please contact the UK Fire Marshal's office at ‪(859) 257-6326 or speak with your residence hall staff. 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

New Year, New Home Page

Tue, 01/05/2016 - 15:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 6, 2016) — The University of Kentucky recently unveiled a newly designed home page that utilizes responsive design to tell the stories of students, faculty, staff and alumni in a more compelling way.

 

The website — www.uky.edu — has a number of new innovations that, together, advance the university’s web presence in significant ways, especially when it comes to students.

 

“At the University of Kentucky, we put students first in everything that we do,” said Don Witt, UK’s associate provost for enrollment management. “One of the most important ways we can and do communicate with our current students, and those who will soon join our special community, is through the university’s home page and our entire digital presence.

 

 

"Our re-designed home page has students first and foremost in mind — through the compelling narrative, video and photo stories on the site to the increased access to majors, academic interests and other tools and programs that they can use to ensure their success at UK. This site is a portal for current and prospective students to visit a university — with a faculty and staff — steadfastly devoted to their success."

 

“For so many people, our home page is the front porch to the University of Kentucky,” Jay Blanton, executive director of UK Public Relations and Marketing, said. “It’s important that our front porch — this new home page — tell our stories in a compelling, clear and easily accessible way.”

 

New features or innovations of the website include:

  • The new site uses responsive web design techniques to have a full-featured home page for desktop, mobile and tablets.
  • Utility and primary navigation is fixed to header for improved user experience.
  • It allows for profile/feature stories to be easily updated.
  • A new “Explore” feature under "Find your Program" in the middle of the page allows prospective students to preview and briefly compare colleges directly from the home page. 
  • The site includes the addition of a "mini app" on the home page for prospective students to easily request more information. 
  • It features a spotlight story as well as the latest news from UKNow, the university's official news website.
  • The site aggregates topical social media campaigns by hashtag (instead of by channel) to help users get a quick overview of conversation before further engaging via their social media handles/profile.

Along with the innovations to the new site, users will continue to find familiar elements. Many frequently visited internal sites used by on-campus audiences have been conveniently located together under the Resources tab. The header and site footer also remain virtually identical to the previous iteration of www.uky.edu, and the university's popular "see blue." campaign elements are also part of the site's design.

 

The old site will still be available here for a limited time while users make the transition to the new site.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 6, 1912

Tue, 01/05/2016 - 15:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 6, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 147th diary entry from Jan. 6, 1912, remembers a fun snow day with a friend and feeling apprehensive about being nominated for one of the school's officers for its honor system, which would be led by the university's Student Government Organization.

 

Jan. 6th. Clean the room, finish "Barbara", which was splendid, and go by for William to go to town. We have a good time in the snow, buy a popper, visit the library, etc.

Inserted next to her Jan. 6, 1912, diary entry, McClure includes an article detailing the nominations for honor system officers and a clipping for an Edwardian musical comedy composed by Ivan Caryll, "The Pink Lady."

I get nominated, but withdraw — not that I'm afraid of being elected, but because there are so much better talents than mine required to run the thing properly. I chaperone a crowd, and have a fine time. Part of us get left.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.  

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.


The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.


McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.


The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots. 

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

New Year, New Home Page

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 17:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2016) - The University of Kentucky today unveiled a newly designed home page that utilizes responsive design to tell the stories of students, faculty, staff and alumni in a more compelling way.

 

The website - www.uky.edu - has a number of new innovations that, together, advance the university’s web presence in significant ways. The old site will still be available here for a limited time while users make the transition to the new site.

 

“For so many people, our home page is the front porch to the University of Kentucky,” Jay Blanton, executive director of UK Public Relations and Marketing, said. “It’s important that our front porch - this new home page - tell our stories in a compelling, clear and easily accessible way.”

 

New features or innovations to the website include:

  • The new site uses responsive web design techniques to have a full-featured home page for desktop, mobile and tablets.
  • Utility and primary navigation is fixed to header for improved user experience.
  • It allows for profile/feature stories to be easily updated.
  • A new “Explore” feature under "Find your Program" in the middle of the page allows prospective students to preview and briefly compare colleges directly from the home page. 
  • The site includes the addition of a "mini app" on the home page for prospective students to easily request more information. 
  • It features a spotlight story as well as the latest news from UKNow, the university's official news website.
  • The site aggregates topical social media campaigns by hashtag (instead of by channel) to help users get a quick overview of conversation before further engaging via their social media handles/profile.

Along with the innovations to the new site, users will continue to find familiar elements. Many frequently visited internal sites used by on-campus audiences have been conveniently located together under the Resources tab. The header and site footer also remain virtually identical to the previous iteration of www.uky.edu and the university's popular "see blue." campaign elements are also part of the site's design.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

Thrill of Research Results in Funding to Study Prevention of Stem Cell Damage During Cancer Treatment

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 16:22

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2016) – Five days before Christmas, University of Kentucky researcher Ying Liang, MD, PhD, received what she described as the best gift ever: a letter of notification that she received a prestigious R01 grant, totaling $1.88 million over five years, from the National Institutes of Health. Not only was it her first such award, she scored at the second percentile, an uncommonly high score indicating that her proposal was nearly flawless.

 

A glimpse of her CV and her obvious passion for research render the award somewhat less surprising. Liang, assistant professor of toxicology and cancer biology, describes research as “thrilling," and she's dedicated her career to studying a gene that affects stem cell damage from chemotherapy and radiation. She actually helped to discover the gene, called Latexin, about 10 years ago while she was a PhD candidate at UK and member of Dr. Gary van Zant’s lab. When they published their findings in 2007 in the journal Nature Genetics, she was listed as first author.

 

“It was the first time this gene’s known function in the stem cell was published,” she said. 

 

The Latexin gene, as it turns out, could hold a key to protecting healthy blood and stem cells during cancer treatments, the ultimate aim of Liang’s work. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy target cells that multiply rapidly, as do cancer cells, but healthy cells that rapidly multiply are also damaged in the process. This includes not only hair cells (which is why many cancer patients temporarily lose their hair during treatment), but also blood cells and stem cells in the bone marrow. The damage to these blood and stem cells causes serious short-term consequences, such as bleeding problems and elevated risk of infection, that can drastically increase mortality for cancer patients. Long-term problems loom, too, as cancer therapy-induced stem cell damage can lead to cell toxicity and secondary cancers years later. 

 

Liang hopes that understanding the molecular mechanisms of the gene that affects stem cell vulnerability to cancer therapies could eventually lead to methods to protect these cells during treatment. 

 

 “No matter what you study, you have to understand what’s going inside the cell and underlying mechanisms before you can have any kind of drugs or treatments for patients. That’s something I feel really excited about,” she said. 

 

It was this excitement for understanding the why that lead Liang away from clinical practice and into the research world 15 years ago. Before moving to the U.S. to pursue her PhD, Liang completed medical training in China at Beijing Medical University and treated patients for three years as a physician. The whole time, though, she couldn’t shake the excitement she’d felt during her limited research experience as a student.

 

“I had a chance to work in a lab a little bit in the last year of medical school and I really, really liked it. I was kind of thrilled by doing research,” she said. “And when I worked in a hospital for three years I always wanted to be doing research. I was trying to find opportunities to do any kind of research.”

 

She decided to pursue such opportunities in the U.S., and in 2000 came to UK for a PhD in physiology. She was among the inaugural class of the Integrated Biomedical Sciences program.The following year she joined Van Zant’s lab, which focused on stem cell biology, genetics and aging. After helping to discover the Latexin gene, publish their findings, and apply for several related patents, she continued to study the gene’s function as a postdoctoral fellow. She then served as a research assistant professor at the University of Illinois from 2009 to 2011 before returning to UK as an assistant professor in the UK College of Medicine.

 

Coming back to UK “felt like coming home” and quickly presented a significant boost to her research efforts. In 2012, she received a KL2 Career Development Award, from the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, which offers robust support to foster junior investigators in obtaining independent awards. The program provides salary support for protected research time, didactic coursework, interdisciplinary engagement, and mentored research training. Liang credits the program as crucial in catalyzing her research towards a top-scoring R01 application. She has also received substantial support from the Markey Cancer Center, the departments of internal medicine and toxicology and cancer biology, and the Office of Grant Development.

 

“I feel so lucky to be supported by this KL2 program because it gave me protected time to really focus on the research project,” she said.

 

She describes the multidisciplinary mentorship of the program as especially helpful in navigating the challenges of clinical and translational research. Her KL2 mentors included Van Zant; Charlotte Peterson, PhD, Daret St. Clair, Phd; Subbarao Bondada, PhD, Kathleen O’Connor, MD, PhD; Susan Symth, MD, Phd; and Mary Vore, PhD, served as her designated KL2 mentors.

 

“They put in a lot of time and effort, and provided whatever help I ask. Not just about research — whenever I have any kind of problem, I can always go to them. They always help us figure out a problem or who to contact”

 

Her KL2-supported research focused on identifying the function of the Latexin gene in bone marrow stem cells in both normal and diseased conditions. Specifically, she examined the impact of the gene on human leukemia stem cells that were transferred to mice. 

 

“This is the unique thing about this model – it allows human cells to be grafted into mouse models to observe in vivo changes.”

 

She found that 80 percent of mice exposed to radiation after the gene was down-regulated survived without stem cells problems and didn’t die from secondary illnesses, compared with only 20 percent that received radiation without inhibiting the gene.

 

Over the next five years, her R01 grant will build on this research to determine if deleting the Latexin gene makes stem cells more resistant to damange during cancer treatments and to understand the mechanism of the effect. She will also employ human models as well as state-of-the-art molecular and genomic technqiues. Vital to the research proejct are interdisciplinary collaborations with Dr. Gerhard Hildebrant, chief of the Division of Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and Chi Wang, PhD, assistant professor of cancer biostastics. 

 

“We want to understand why. Why is that if you inhibit this gene’s activity, you can protect the stem cell from cancer therapy-induced damage?”

 

Liang hopes that understanding the mechanism of the gene could allow the development of a treatment, before or after radiation, to protect against radiation-induced damage to bone marrow. Such a treatment could benefit the many patients who receive cancer therapy or bone marrow transplants. She’s aware that this pursuit could be a lifelong process, or could even extend beyond her own career, but she’s comfortable seeing herself in the lineage of accumulated research knowledge. In the context of helping to discover the Latexin gene she now studies, she quickly acknowledges the years of preliminary work conducted by other researchers before she even joined the lab. 

 

“I’m the first author (on the paper about the gene’s discovery), but there was years and years of work by people before me. My mentor, Dr. Gary Van Zant, put his whole career into this project. Knowledge and models get passed own, and I’m lucky to be able to continue it. Maybe in my life I’ll just identify part to this gene’s function, and then pass it to someone else. But somehow we have to figure out what’s going on,” she said. 

 

Now as a mentor and professor herself, she’s already working to further the lineage of her research, and knows that cultivating curious and self-motivated students is essential.

 

“I always ask my students, ‘Why do you want to do this?’ The answer I want is that they’re interested. I always emphasize interest first. Motivation will come. When you have interest, when you have motivation, then it doesn’t matter how hard the work is. Everything has to come from the inside,” she said. “If you’re really interested or want to know whether your stuff works, no matter how hard or how much effort, it doesn’t feel that way. You have to be interested in what you’re doing. Otherwise you’ll suffer.”

 

Her first mentor, Van Zant, asked her a similar question when he first met her:  What do you want to do in the future? She told him that she wanted to continue doing science with good publications. If she wanted a near-perfect score on an R01, she didn’t ask for it directly.

 

In her fastidiously uncluttered office, only one paper is visible, adhered to the wall just beside her computer. It’s a half-sheet of regular printer paper that Van Zant gave her 15 years ago, and it’s the only thing she’s displayed in each of her offices over the years. The visible holes from pushpins suggest that she’s had about 12 distinct workplaces; otherwise, the page is in surprising good condition for its age. 

 

The paper reads:

 

Van Zant’s Six Cardinal Questions of Scientific Investigation

 

1.     What is the burning question?

2.     Why is it important?

3.     How are you going to answer the question?

4.     What are the results?

5.     What are the conclusions? Can you formulate a model?

6.     What do you do next?

 

 

She generously passes the gift of this wisdom to the upcoming generation of researchers she works with.

 

“When I have students in my lab, I give them this. I think it’s really important.” 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, mallory.powell@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 5, 1912

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 15:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 146th diary entry from Jan. 5, 1912, recounts a new book the student is reading by author Harold Bell Wright.

 

Jan. 5th. Addie is engaged in prying into Emerson's past history, and I am fortunate enough to have gotten "The Winning of Barbara Worth" to read.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.  

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.


The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.


McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.


The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots. 

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Employees Can Sign-up to Receive W-2 Forms Online Now

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 13:38

 

 

Video prouduced Jan. 2014 by Amy Jones-Timoney and Jenny Wells/UK Public Relations and Marketing. 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2016) — University of Kentucky employees have the option of accessing their W-2 statements online. UK's 'Safe, Swift, Sustainable' W-2 program allows currently employed faculty, staff and students to receive their W-2 forms through the 'Employee Self Service' portion of password protected myUK.

 

Employees who enroll in the Safe, Swift, Sustainable W-2 program give the university consent to only provide their W-2s online. Enrolled employees will no longer receive a paper W-2 in the mail but will be able to view and print their W-2 at an earlier date. The enrollment period is now through Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016. Employees who consented last year to receive their 2014 W-2 online will continue to receive their future W-2s online.

 

The benefits of this online W-2 statements program are:

•  Earlier access to your W-2 statement than the traditional mail process;

•  Email notification when online W-2 statement is available;

•  Eliminate the possibility of your W-2 statement being delayed or lost in the mail;

•  Access to your W-2 statement at any time;

•  Ability to print W-2 at your convenience;

•  Contribute to UK’s sustainability initiative; and

•  Once enrolled future W-2s will remain online for multiple years.

 

"Safe, swift and sustainable really are key aspects of this program," said Ronda Beck, UK controller. "Electronic versions of W-2 statements are expected to be available for viewing as early as Jan. 19, 2016, whereas extra time is needed for printing and mailing paper versions, which are required to be mailed no later than Feb. 1, 2016. Also, employees have the added security of knowing their salary and social security number aren't on paper in the mail system."

 

The program fits well into UK's overall sustainability efforts by reducing the use of paper, and promoting cost savings. Beck estimates UK will see approximately $20,000 in annual savings in paper and postage costs.

 

For instructions on how to enroll in the Safe, Swift, Sustainable W-2 program, visit http://www.uky.edu/hr/hr-home/myuk-online-guide/myuk-ess-guide/w-2-choosing-online-delivery-option-irs-disclosure.

  

Employees who do not want to enroll in the program do not have to take any action. They will have a paper W-2 form printed and mailed by the University of Kentucky no later than Jan. 31, 2016, to the employee’s permanent address on file in the SAP HR/Payroll system. Employees who have separated employment from the University of Kentucky will have a W-2 paper form printed and mailed.  

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Rutgers Cancer Center Director Named Dean of the UK College of Medicine

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 11:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 4, 2016) — University of Kentucky Provost Tim Tracy and Executive Vice President for Health Affairs Dr. Michael Karpf announced Monday that Dr. Robert DiPaola, director of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Vice Chancellor for Cancer Programs, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, has been named dean of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

 

Dr. DiPaola is expected to assume the dean's position in the early spring, pending approval from the UK Board of Trustees.

 

DiPaola was selected following a national search, which was co-chaired by Linda Van Eldik, director of UK's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, and John Walz, dean of the College of Engineering.

 

“We are thrilled to welcome someone of Dr. DiPaola’s caliber, who is nationally renowned for excellence in clinical, research and leadership settings, to the UK family,” Tracy said. "His accomplishments in translational research and his exemplary leadership experience make him the ideal person to build upon the College of Medicine’s legacy of academic excellence.”

 

Dr. DiPaola has extensive experience in translational research, clinical operations, education and leadership. At Rutgers, he was responsible for all research, clinical and administrative activities of a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and led the successful renewal of NCI designation in 2011. Under his leadership, external research funding increased to more than $100 million annually.

 

He also has held multiple local and national leadership positions including leader of the Prostate Cancer Center at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (1996-2008); chief of Medical Oncology at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (2006-2015); national chairman of the GU Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group; and a member of multiple National Cancer Institute review and steering committees. He has served as director of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey since 2008.

 

“Dr. Robert DiPaola is a national leader in all the areas where we excel or where we are growing,” Karpf said. “He understands the critical nexus between scientific research and community impact and he has been at the forefront in leading a cancer center toward national prominence. He is an outstanding choice to lead our growing academic and research efforts in the College of Medicine, where he will find an excellent cohort of clinicians, researchers, staff and students eager to expand our efforts on behalf of the Commonwealth."

 

“I am excited and energized by a great opportunity to work with such a distinguished team of leaders to further enhance and engage the academic strengths in research, education and clinical care, including opportunities for more personalized or precision medicine to best benefit community health and wellness,” said DiPaola.

 

He earned a bachelor's of science degree and his medical degree at the University of Utah; completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Duke University Medical Center; and completed a Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia.

 

In addition, Dr. DiPaola has maintained continuous funding to support a laboratory focused on Drug Resistance in Cancer Therapy, working on preclinical studies that support translational clinical trials and investigations into prostate cancer drug resistance. His research efforts including phase I, II and III clinical trials have had impact on national standards of care.

 

His accomplishments in the area of translational research are underscored by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense and private foundations, as well as his publications in prominent journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Cell, Clinical Cancer Research and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

###

 

Media Contact: Kristi Lopez, kristi.lopez@uky.edu or 859-323-6363

 

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