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Office for Institutional Diversity Announces Inclusive Excellence Program Grants

Wed, 10/19/2016 - 10:52

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 20, 2016) — As part of an effort to increase diversity and sense of belonging across the University of Kentucky campus, the Office for Institutional Diversity (OID) is creating a grant program that will fund creative proposals for diversity programming.

 

The Inclusive Excellence Program will fund grants of up to $25,000 for creative diversity programming ideas, said Terry Allen, UK’s interim vice president for Institutional Diversity. The new program, which is funded by student fees, was announced Thursday during the UK Board of Trustees annual retreat.

 

"Inclusive excellence calls for us to increase our awareness of others and to work collectively to challenge our way of thinking and doing. It requires us to engage, teach, listen, and learn," Allen said.

 

The office will offer grants for inclusive excellence programs that are student-centric and foster collaborative programming and partnerships among groups, centers, programs, registered student organizations and/or initiatives that are looking to address the importance of diverse views and cultures, Allen said.

 

These programs should also educate others on issues of social justice and diversity, increase belonging and engagement of marginalized groups and increase opportunities for collaborative learning around issues of inclusive excellence.

 

"These grants are specifically designed for inclusive excellence in student programming or faculty/staff programming that has direct benefits for our students," Allen added.

 

Details about the timing of the program include:

  • The call for proposals for Inclusive Excellence Program grants will be made available to the campus Tuesday, Nov. 1. The call for proposals will include specific criteria to apply for various levels of funding.
  • Completed proposals and applications must be submitted electronically to tammy.arnold@uky.edu by Thursday, Dec. 1.
  • Notice of funding will be given to applicants by Wednesday, Jan. 11.

For questions regarding the proposal process, call the Office for Institutional Diversity at 859-257-9293.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK HDI and Southeast ADA Center Renew Partnership to Provide ADA Guidance

Tue, 10/18/2016 - 15:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2016) The University of Kentucky Human Development Institute (HDI) and the Southeast ADA Center, a project of the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, have renewed their partnership to provide information and guidance on Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to employers, people with disabilities, federal contractors, families and service providers throughout the southeast United States.

 

In the past year, HDI’s Barry Whaley, the project director, has provided training and guidance for over 1,000 people on topics including: rights and responsibilities of employers and employees under Title I, disclosure of disability, and seeking reasonable accommodation for essential job functions.

 

Additionally, the project has developed a partnership with America’s Job Exchange (a subsidiary of Time Warner Cable) and is developing partnerships with the Louisville Urban League and the Urban League of Atlanta to provide ADA guidance to people with disabilities served by those organizations.

 

“The ADA is sweeping civil rights legislation. Often, employers and people with disabilities do not understand their rights and responsibilities under Title I of the ADA," Whaley said. "My role is to provide clear and concise guidance in order to 'de-mystify' the law for all employees and employers.”

 

The Southeast ADA Center answers questions and provides training and information about the Americans with Disabilities Act. The center, based in Atlanta, serves an eight-state geographic region (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee) and has a network of partners in each state that includes centers for independent living, individuals with and without disabilities, small and large employers and businesses, nonprofit organizations and universities, and state and local government agencies. The center is one of 10 regional ADA centers in the ADA National Network.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 958-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Judy Linn, Photographer of Arts Icons, to Open May Lecture Series

Tue, 10/18/2016 - 15:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2016) The University of Kentucky Art Museum will bring celebrated photographer Judy Linn to campus for a talk about her popular portraits of her artistic circle of friends and other images she has created throughout her career. Her lecture will begin 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, in the Kincaid Auditorium in the Gatton College of Business and Economics Building. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Judy Linn is probably best known for the photographs she made between 1969 and 1976 of the soon-to-be-famous Patti Smith and her noted friends, including artist Robert Mapplethorpe and actor and playwright Sam Shepard. Long before Smith became known for her music and Mapplethorpe became infamous for the homoerotic photography that set off a national debate on morals and arts funding — Linn recorded their bohemian existence in New York City. Smith loved to model and collaborate in image making. Linn photographed her, her lovers and their mutual friends in the largely underground arts community.
 

Since then, Linn has built a body of work rooted in wry observation and subtle juxtapositions. Major institutions, including The Getty Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography, have collected her work.

 

The May Lecture Series explores photography's roots in the 19th century and its reinvention in the digital world. The lecture series is made possible through the Robert C. May Photography Endowment, a museum fund established in 1994 for the support of acquisitions and programs relating to photography. Other speakers coming to town as part of the 2016-17 series include Nicholas Nixon, Nov. 11; Andrea Modica, Feb. 10; and Graciela Iturbide, April 14.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Jacobs Science Building Makes Active-Learning a Reality

Tue, 10/18/2016 - 14:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2016) — Tomorrow, University of Kentucky officials will formally dedicate the new Don and Cathy Jacobs Science Building, but the state-of-the-art facility has already begun making an impact on students and faculty since it opened this August.

 

The Jacobs Science Building (JSB) is the epicenter of the university’s scientific community, offering 21st century science education with 21st century laboratories and instrumentation. Every science student on campus, and the vast majority of all undergraduates at UK, will at one point experience the building’s active-learning laboratories and classrooms.

 

Allison Soult, a lecturer of chemistry in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, says the design of the classrooms makes large lecture courses much more personal.

 

“Having two rows of desks per tier with movable chairs makes small group work a convenient option, even in a large class of 200+ students,” Soult said. “The arrangement makes it easy for students to work together in groups of four or five, and the aisles are wide enough so that I can get to students in the middle of the room. To me, a great day in class is one where I see students working together and helping each other while I move among the groups. I stop and listen to their discussions to see where they might be struggling, to give kudos to those who give a great explanation, and to answer their questions. The layout makes this possible.”

 

Meredith Aker, a pre-nursing sophomore, is assisting Soult as a "learning intern" this semester in the new building. Having taken Soult's chemistry course last year in the Chemistry-Physics Building, Aker is observing the differences in the two spaces. 

 

"When taking exams in Chem-Phys there simply wasn't room to spread out - you had your laptop in front of you and to the right of your laptop was any scratch paper and exam materials stacked right up against it, and your neighbor's papers were up against your laptop on the left side," said Aker. "During class (in the new building), I see the students moving around in their rolling chairs to get closer to a fellow classmate to work on a problem together and I just think how in Chem-Phys we would have already been on top of each other."

 

The active-learning layouts of the JSB’s classrooms are having a positive impact on students and faculty outside of the sciences as well. A course titled “America through the Lens of the 2016 Election,” taught by UK Associate Professor of History Kathi Kern, UK College of Arts of Sciences Dean Mark Kornbluh, and graduate student Ashley Sorrell, includes 175 first-year students.

 

“We offered a very similar course in 2012, but what a difference an innovative, flexible, technology-enhanced space can make,” Kern said. “Our students are assembled in six-person ‘caucuses.’ Every class involves at least some collaboration. Instead of climbing over fixed theatre seats or twisting to make eye contact with their peers, students in the JSB simply swivel around in their chairs and meet their caucus colleagues eye-to-eye; they can share a laptop or huddle around a document. The difference in this 21st century classroom is that it has enabled us to ‘scale up’ the discussion-based, interactive teaching we all long for as professors, even with a class of 175.”

 

Built with the latest green technology, the state-of-the-art Jacobs Science Building houses centrally-scheduled classrooms, numerous chemistry and biology teaching laboratories, and office space for the Department of Chemistry, biology lecturers and the College of Arts and Sciences Business Center. On the first floor of the building, there is a 300-seat lecture hall, several biology teaching laboratories for physiology, general biology and microbiology; and multiple technology enabled active learning (TEAL) classrooms, as well as a Shared Imaging Suite and Biology Learning Center. The second floor houses eight general chemistry teaching laboratories, a 132-seat TEAL room, the General Chemistry Learning Center and multiple small TEAL rooms. On the 3rd floor, there is a 200-seat lecture hall and multiple upper-level chemistry laboratories, including four organic and one each of synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry and physical chemistry/instrumental analysis. The third floor also houses the Organic Chemistry Learning Center, a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Shared Instrumentation Suite to support all the upper-division laboratories, and a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teaching laboratory.  

 

The exterior courtyard has two outdoor classrooms with natural slate chalkboards with geological features built into the walls. All interior and exterior landscaping contains only native Kentucky plants.

 

“I am very grateful for the opportunity to work and teach in this building and greatly appreciate all the work done at every level to make this building a reality,” Soult said. “I also appreciate that input from faculty and staff helped guide the design, which resulted in a building that is both beautiful and functional.”

 

“For several years we have experimented with teaching a large class using active-learning strategies,” Kern said. “The problem is, the structure of the space always worked against us. Suddenly, I find myself teaching in the Jacobs Science Building and a world of opportunity has opened.”

 

The university will formally dedicate the Don and Cathy Jacobs Building 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 20. The campus community is invited to attend. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

Power Restored to South Campus Buildings

Tue, 10/18/2016 - 14:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) — A power outage affecting a number of buildings on South Campus at the University of Kentucky today is over. UK Facilities Management crews restored power to the buildings after about 45 minutes. Buildings affected include Kentucky Clinic, Sanders-Brown, Agronomy, Research 3 and old Pharmacy buildings.

 

The outage,caused by a failed power cable, ocurred around 1:45 p.m. today.  Crews are still investigating the cause of the failure.

 

UK Student Gives Children With Disabilities a Chance to Dance

Tue, 10/18/2016 - 10:20

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2016)  At first, Anna Juett would sit down in the middle of practice, or stand back and watch the other kids dance. Now, several years later, she's front and center in her sparkly costume, more confident in her moves and on stage.

 

"It's purple and it's my favorite color and it's just pretty," she said proudly about her recital costume.

 

Anna is one of 22 students in a local dance program that holds weekly classes for children and teenagers with disabilities. The program, called "A Chance to Dance," is led by University of Kentucky College of Education student Jenna Lyon. And while it's true that students are getting a chance to dance and perform, they're gaining so much more.

 

"Overall I think it gives them confidence," said Sara Robeson, who is mom to dance students Anna and Will Robeson. "And it just really helps with their motor skills, especially for Will. You know it helps with the memory; helps with learning to follow directions which is so very important."

 

Lyon is constantly amazed by her students and how they master the routines together, but never surprised.

 

"I think sometimes when kids are labeled with special needs some people just feel like they don't have the abilities and capabilities that other kids do, but really they just have all the same capabilities and it might just take them a little extra time and practice," Lyon said.

 

She makes a point of teaching the class just as any other dance class — same terminology, type of moves and challenge — but often with a personalized touch, helping students with positioning and even adding in their favorite song or dance move for motivation.  

 

That compassion and dedication has had a significant impact on Lucy Harding, who has been a dancer since she was a toddler.

 

"You know lots of people throughout my life like in school have told me you can't, that I can’t do things or that I'm not good enough," she said. "Jenna makes me feel like I can do those things and that I am, you know, worth something."

 

A longtime dancer herself, Lyon said she "rarely saw students with special needs in the dance world." But one year at competition, a studio composed of students with disabilities performed on stage, "and it was just amazing."

 

She went back to her hometown of Georgetown, Kentucky, and with the help of her parents, school district, a local studio and generous donations, she began her own program while in high school, free of charge.

 

"I wanted to start the program where the families wouldn't have any expense by doing it because I didn't want to keep the kids from participating," Lyon said.

 

The class started with four kids meeting every Sunday night, and it continued for two years until Lyon left for college. When she came to UK, she brought the program with her. Local studio Barbara Ann's School of Dance opened its doors to Lyon and her students. Now in its third year in Lexington, the class grew from four students to 22 — including those first four — and one class to two.

 

"She started this when she was a junior in high school. Can you imagine?" Robeson said. "And now keeping that up through being in college and with everything she has on her plate, but yet every Sunday she is there teaching them …"

 

Thankfully, Lyon said, she not only has the support of other dancers and family members helping, but she has also made friends in the UK College of Education who now assist with the classes.

 

"I never really thought that I would come to UK and meet friends, you know, that would want to help out in the program and everything," she said. "So that’s been really neat and special to me."

 

After seeing Lyon in the studio with her students, a lot of those friends have asked the elementary education junior, "why aren’t you going into special education?" She's thought about it, but her goal is to have an open classroom for all children.

 

"And just work on mainstreaming them and really teaching all kids to be accepting of everyone," she said. "So I feel like instead of being a special education teacher, if I'm in the traditional classroom setting then the kids could benefit a lot more by coming into my classroom."

 

And while the studio is not quite the same as the classroom, Lyon is already drawing on lessons learned for her teaching career.

 

"You know, never knowing what to expect and going in and having a lesson plan and then just getting into class and completely doing something different based on what the kids are wanting to do and how the class is flowing and everything," she said.

 

From planning lessons to communicating with parents, she's taking what she learns in her own College of Education classes to her dance students, and vice versa — an incredibly valuable, real-world experience for an education major.

 

"She's going to know how to deal with those type students and get them involved and love them and not be afraid and I'm just excited for her," said Karen Juett, who is Anna Juett's mom and a special education teacher herself.  

 

In her four years of teaching children with disabilities to dance, Lyon said she's also experienced something else invaluable — friendship.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Fire Marshal Warns of Hazards Identified With Galaxy Note7 Smartphones

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 16:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016)  The UK Fire Marshal has been monitoring the recent fire incidents regarding the Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphones. The lithium-ion battery in the Galaxy Note7 smartphones can overheat and catch fire, posing serious fire and burn hazards to consumers. Nearly 100 incidents have been reported in the United States of batteries in the Note7 phones overheating, including more than 20 new reports since the initial Sept. 15 recall announcement. This includes 13 reports of burns and 47 reports of property damage associated with Note7 phones.

 

The UK Fire Marshal, in the interest of fire prevention and safety of UK campus stakeholders, strongly recommends that consumers follow the recommendations of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (recall number 17-011) advising consumers to immediately discontinue use and power down all Galaxy Note7 devices. 

 

Contact the wireless carrier, retail outlet or www.samsung.com where you purchased your device to receive a refund or free exchange for a new replacement device plus incentives. Consumers who purchased their phones from other sources should contact Samsung directly to receive a free remedy.

 

Go to www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2016/samsung-expands-recall-of-galaxy-note7-smartphones-based-on-additional-incidents-with for more details.

 

The University of Kentucky Fire Marshal advocates for fire prevention and life safety for the University of Kentucky. Its mission is to reduce and prevent fires in all UK facilities and to protect students, staff and faculty, physical and intellectual property and research initiatives, as well as secure the fire safety of the campus community and stakeholders. A facet of the UK Fire Marshal's fire prevention program is to identify and attempt to mitigate any potential issues that could lead to a fire situation.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155 or kathy.johnson@uky.edu

"see blue." #selfie: Katie Sterling and Alex Isler

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 16:17

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie  a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, 2016-17 Students Today, Alumni Tomorrow (STAT) and TEAM WILDCAT Co-chairs Katie Sterling and Alex Isler.

 

Katie Sterling and Alex Isler are this year's STAT/TEAM WILDCAT co-chairs! Although Isler plans unique athletic opportunities for students and Sterling works with the UK Alumni Association to reap the benefits of the association while being a student, they work cohesively to help grow STAT/TEAM WILDCAT, build friendships and enhance members' opportunities during their time at the university. Learn more about these leaders, their UK experiences and their positions in STAT/TEAM WILDCAT in their "see blue." #selfie!

 

UKNow: What are your majors and where are you two from?

Alex Isler: Nursing major from Union, Kentucky. I'm a senior.

Katie Sterling: I'm from Independence. I'm an integrated strategic communication major. I'm a junior.

 

UK: Tell me about your positions on STAT/TEAM WILDCAT.

KS: So, I handle the STAT side of things. I work in the alumni house and I coordinate with them and various others. I bring light to reaping the benefits to being part of the Alumni Association while being a student.

AI: I'm on the TEAM WILDCAT side, which is the official student organization with UK Athletics. I work with them to give benefits to students they usually wouldn't get. We have about 2,000 members.

KS: And we are continuing to grow!

 

UK: When did you first become involved in STAT/TEAM WILDCAT?

KS: I joined at my freshman orientation and I became a leader my sophomore year. Now, I'm a junior and I'm a co-chair.

AI: Same with me. I joined at freshman orientation, met the leaders, was on leadership committee sophomore year and now I'm a co-chair.

 

UK: Why are you so passionate about these organizations?

AI: I think it's the friendships.

KS: We can both say some of our best friendships were built within these organizations. I always dreamed to go to UK, so this is really exciting for me; my college experience has been enhanced because of this organization.

 

UK: What's your favorite part? 

AI: For me, it's getting to plan unique athletic opportunities and giving students opportunities that they wouldn't otherwise have.

KS: I like hearing students at Big Blue Madness and how they are enjoying it and they are telling their friends they got to do this because of STAT/TEAM WILDCAT.

 

UK: What are some things you do to get ready for football games?

KS: Our student section committee will send us a report on the Monday before the game with ideas and we run those through UK Athletics and talk about what we can do on game day.

AI: We get there three to four hours early, hand out shakers, take the UK flag and get people hyped!

 

UK: What made you want to apply for these positions? 

KS: I took over for Kyle Richardson and he did such a great job, so I wanted to build upon what he had already done. I think this year it's a lot different because it's the first time we have had two female chairs and Alex is the first ever TEAM WILDCAT female chair.

AI: We've been involved in STAT/TEAM WILDCAT so much prior to this year, so this was taking the next step forward.

 

UK: Last year, Nick and Kyle really enjoyed having these positions. What are some initiatives they started that you are building on this year?

AI: They have given us a lot of advice! Nick is still here to help us.

KS: He's giving us advice and guiding our public relations and marketing committee right now since that's such a big role.

AI: They helped with BBN Rewards and so we have been working on making BBN Rewards and Team Wildcat more seamless.  

 

UK: What is your favorite UK tradition?

KS: Mine is "My Old Kentucky Home." Anywhere you go, I've been to different cities for March Madness games and all the Kentucky fans still stay and sway for "My Old Kentucky Home."

AI: I would probably say the same!

 

UK: What is your most used emoji?

KS: Mine is the laughing/crying emoji.

AI: I think mine is the heart eyes emoji.

 

UK: What is your favorite part about being a leader on campus?

KS: Mine is interacting with Leadership Committee. I also like getting to know new leaders and returning leaders. It has been really rewarding.

AI: I would also say interacting with leaders and students, planning events and even starting new traditions.

 

UK: What made you decide to come to UK? 

KS: There was no other option for me.

AI: I didn't apply anywhere else.

KS: I've wanted to come since I was little!

AI: Nursing was really good here and I grew up watching UK basketball. I have a picture of me in a UK cheerleading outfit when I was three.

 

UK: Who's your biggest role model?

AI: This is going to sound cheesy, but probably my mom.

KS: I know! I don't want to be cheesy, but I would say both of my parents. We are both raised in really great homes and have great families!

AI: I tell my mom everything, I talk to her like 50 times a day.

 

UK: Alex, what made you decide to work with TEAM WILDCAT and be more involved with the athletics side?

AI: I was applying to leadership and this summer I worked with UK Athletics, so now I feel like I have people I can go to if I need help with anything, like an event. I feel comfortable with people there.

 

UK: Katie, what do you like most about working with the Alumni Association?

KS: I have always been infatuated with the university and I have met really great people at the Alumni Association. I wanted to help build upon the UK family for other people.

 

UK: Aside from school and your involvements, what do you all do for fun?

KS: We love "Grey's Anatomy," so when we have free time … well Alex is really far behind … but we like Netflix. I'm a movie buff so when I have free time I'm at a movie theater.

 

UK: Would you say that being co-chairs together has deepened your friendship? 

KS: For sure. We are always texting each other about unrelated stuff.

AI: … having Starbucks dates.

KS: …. eating Mexican food.

 

UK: So, did you two meet through STAT/TEAM WILDCAT? 

KS: Yup!  

 

UK: What advice would you give to an incoming freshman?

AI: I’d say school does come first, go to class, but have fun because college is a once in a lifetime experience you won’t get again. Meet a lot of people, go to events and just be involved.

K: I would agree with Alex. College truly is the best four years of your life and enjoy it because it really does fly by.

 

UK: Why are you thankful for the University of Kentucky?

KS: Besides my education, UK has given me a home away from home even though my home isn't far away. I can connect with anyone through the university if I decide to go outside of Kentucky.

AI: For me, mine is clinical and what I want to do with my life. I can have references with my instructors — I feel prepared to go into the real world.

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

"see blue." Spirit Races to Keeneland

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 15:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) — The University of Kentucky and Keeneland have teamed up to bring Big Blue fans the best way to enjoy a day at the track. Join UK students, faculty, staff, alumni and the rest of Big Blue Nation for “see blue.” Day at Keeneland Friday, Oct. 21, as Keeneland turns blue!

 

The fun begins with live racing at 1:05 p.m. Students, faculty, staff and alumni with campus identification cards or UK Alumni Association membership cards will be admitted free on Friday and have access to reserved grandstand seating. General admission usually is $5. There will be appearances by UK cheerleaders, UK Wildcat Marching Band, DanceBlue and the UK Dance Team, plus a special recognition of Tom Hammond.

 

Wear UK blue to show your Wildcat pride at “see blue.” Day at Keeneland! There will be fun activities for all Wildcat fans!

 

Patrons can ride with LexTran by bus or trolley to Keeneland for $1 each way. Pick up location will be the downtown transit center.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, 859-323-2395; rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

Freshii Arrives at University of Kentucky

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 15:02

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) — At 10 a.m. today, Oct. 18, the University of Kentucky and Freshii will celebrate the grand opening of the restaurant's new location in the Don & Cathy Jacobs Science Building.

 

The new eatery aims to provide fresh and nutritious meal choices that energize people on the go. The menu includes custom-made green wraps, salads, quinoa bowls and fresh pressed juices.

 

Freshii is open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday. The restaurant is closed Saturday and Sunday.

 

“We are excited to bring this fresh and unique concept to the campus community. Providing healthy dining options is an important factor of the dining experience," said Jonathan Parker, UK Dining resident manager. "With each dining location we bring to campus we hope to increase the sense of community on campus.” 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Forensics Victorious at Berea College Tournament

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 11:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016)  For the third time in a row, the University of Kentucky Forensics Team won the title of Grand Champion at the John G. Fee Memorial Speech and Debate Tournament hosted by Berea College.

 

The tournament, which featured competition in 13 public speaking events and two forms of debate, was attended by 21 schools from as far away as Georgia, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. To earn the title of Grand Champion, a school needed to participate in both public speaking events and debate, and earn more points than any other school from the competition.

 

In the public speaking events, UK Forensics earned first place as a team in the large school division of individual events competition. At this tournament, schools are divided into divisions based on the size of the student body. This first place finish included three individual event champions: junior Kaylon Kennedy and sophomore Matt Karijolic in duo interpretation, junior Megan Wagner in impromptu counseling, and freshman Laura McAllister in poetry interpretation. Including these first place finishes, the team earned another 13 qualifications to the National Forensic Association national tournament. UK also placed third in the large school division of debate sweepstakes.

 

In addition to the team sweepstakes successes, competitors could earn individual sweepstakes awards in what is known as the pentathlon competition. To be eligible, a student had to enter a minimum of five public speaking events. The top six competitors with the most points from all of their events combined were recognized at the awards ceremony. Students from UK earned three of these six awards. Junior Kaylon Kennedy place third, sophomore Veronica Scott placed fourth, and sophomore Matt Karijolic placed fifth. This showing is UK’s strongest ever performance in the pentathlon competition.

 

Students from UK achieved the following successes at the tournament:

 

Team

Grand Champions – Combined Sweepstakes

1st Place – Large School Individual Events Sweepstakes

3rd Place – Large School Debate Sweepstakes

 

Pentathlon

3rd Place – Kaylon Kennedy

4th Place – Veronica Scott

5th Place – Matt Karijolic

 

After Dinner Speaking

2nd Place – Matt Karijolic

5th Place – Sam Northrup

 

Communication Analysis

2nd Place – Matt Karijolic

3rd Place – Rachel Brase

 

Drama Interpretation

5th Place – Veronica Scott

 

Duo Interpretation

1st Place – Kaylon Kennedy and Matt Karijolic

2nd Place – Kaylon Kennedy and Rachel Brase

 

Extemporaneous Speaking

2nd Place – Matt Karijolic

3rd Place – Kaylon Kennedy

6th Place – Will Brennan

 

Impromptu Counseling

1st Place – Megan Wagner

6th Place – Rachel Brase

 

Impromptu Speaking

3rd Place – Veronica Scott

Semifinalist – Rachel Brase

 

Informative Speaking

3rd Place – Sam Northrup

 

Persuasive Speaking

5th Place – Veronica Scott

6th Place – Josh Finley

Top Novice – Josh Finley

 

Poetry Interpretation

1st Place – Laura McAllister

2nd Place – Kaylon Kennedy

Top Novice – Laura McAllister

 

Program Oral Interpretation

2nd Place – Kaylon Kennedy

4th Place – Laura McAllister

 

Prose Interpretation

5th Place – Megan Wagner

 

Public Debate

Quarterfinalist – Megan Wagner

5th Place Speaker – Megan Wagner

 

Radio Broadcasting

3rd Place – Veronica Scott

 

The University of Kentucky Forensics Team’s next competition will be the Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament held at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, on Oct. 29-30. UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit www.ukforensics.com.   

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

PTS, SGA Partner to Give Students Free, Safe Ride Home

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 11:21

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) — Student safety is a top priority at the University of Kentucky. Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) and the Student Government Association (SGA) recently joined together to introduce a new transportation option that provides students with a safe ride home. Kentucky Wildcab is a free, late night, on-demand transportation option for UK students, provided by SGA and operated by PTS using 4-, 6- and 14-passenger vehicles.

 

"This service allows students to make an informed, responsible transportation decision late at night when there are a number of different options. We want to make sure they are choosing one that is safe for them," said Lance Broeking, director of Parking and Transportation Services.

 

In its eight weekends of operation, Kentucky Wildcab has provided 1,313 rides to 3,556 passengers and traveled more than 4,000 miles.

 

"The service has been really popular with the students so far. Our numbers have increased almost every weekend since we started. On our peak days, we've been giving about 230 rides per night," said Sandra Broadus, PTS alternative transportation coordinator.

 

The on-demand service operates from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights and serves the entire campus area as well as some surrounding areas frequented by students.

 

"During our initial discussions with Student Government, we spent a lot of time talking about the service area to make sure that whatever we offered this fall was going to meet the needs of the students," Broeking said. "So we're serving all the areas in the surrounding campus vicinity that are frequented by students — including the downtown area, the Red Mile area and the eastern part of campus as well."

 

Ross Boggess, SGA Kentucky Wildcab coordinator, says the service differs in many ways from other on-demand transportation services like Uber and Lyft.

 

"Our service is different from Uber and Lyft because it's free, you're riding in a university vehicle and that vehicle is operated by a UK student just like you," Boggess said.

 

To request a ride, students can download the Transloc Rider mobile app on their smartphone from the App Store or Google Play. From the app, students can request a ride by clicking the on-demand icon (as shown below) in the bottom left corner of the screen (the icon will be blue when the service is in operation and will be gray when Kentucky Wildcab is not in operation).

 

The first time a user requests a ride, they must log on using their Link Blue credentials. From there, the user should select their pick-up location by moving the green pointer on the map or entering the address then press the green "Select Pickup Location" button. The user should then select a drop-off location by moving the red pointer on the map or entering the address then press the red "Select Drop Off Location" button. The user should then select the number of passengers and confirm their ride request. They will then receive text confirmation of their request with an estimate pick-up time.

 

For more information about Kentucky Wildcab, visit www.uky.edu/KentuckyWildcab. If you are a student and wish to apply to become a Kentucky Wildcab driver, you may fill out the application here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Theatre to Open Season With 'She Kills Monsters'

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) The University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance will return to the stage this fall with what many feel is a fitting production for Halloween weekend, "She Kills Monsters." The production will storm the stage Oct. 27-30, at the Guignol Theatre.

 

"She Kills Monsters" by Qui Nguyen, is the story of Agnes, an average young woman, who when her sister, Tilly, dies in a tragic accident, discovers the teen's "Dungeons and Dragons" notebook and sets off on an extraordinary adventure into the fantasy world of RPGs (role-playing games). "She Kills Monsters" will captivate audiences looking for a witty epic with trolls, dragons, wizards and a powerful “girl-nerd.”

 

"She Kills Monsters" will be presented 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 27-29, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 29 and 30. Tickets for the production are $15 for general admission and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

In celebration of the opening production, UK Theatre cast members will present a fight demo of some of their moves from the show on campus 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, in the Patterson Office Tower plaza. The demonstration is free and open to the public.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

State Lung Cancer Experts Convened at UK for Symposium

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 10:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) – Researchers and clinicians from the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, the University of Louisville Brown Cancer Center and collaborating cancer programs from across the Commonwealth attended this year’s Kentucky Lung Cancer Symposium at UK’s William T. Young Library on Oct. 15.

 

The symposium, which was sponsored by the Kentucky Lung Cancer Research Program (KLCRP), featured research talks given by faculty of both institutions as well as a networking poster session. Dr. John Minna, an internationally renowned professor at the University of Texas Southwestern, was the keynote speaker. In addition, an award was presented to former Kentucky Senator Tim Shaughnessy for his longstanding support of research and health care initiatives in the state. This support is exemplified by Shaughnessy’s integral role in establishing the KLCRP, which has been instrumental in helping the Markey and Brown cancer centers build their strong lung cancer research programs.

 

“The Kentucky Lung Cancer Symposium provides an opportunity to share our progress in understanding the complexities of lung cancer,” said Nathan Vanderford, Markey’s assistant director for research. “It inspires us to establish new collaborations that will further our efforts to reduce the burden of the disease in the Commonwealth.”

Cincinnati Children’s and UK HealthCare Name Chief of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery at Kentucky Children’s Hospital

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 09:49

CINCINNATI (Oct. 17, 2016)  ̶  Cincinnati Children’s and UK HealthCare have named James Quintessenza, MD, chief of pediatric cardiothoracic surgery at Kentucky Children’s Hospital effective Dec. 1, 2016.  His primary appointment will be at Cincinnati Children’s, but he will be based in Lexington.

 

In January 2016, Cincinnati Children’s and UK HealthCare, the hospitals and clinics of the University of Kentucky, finalized an agreement to jointly provide pediatric heart care and other services at Kentucky Children’s Hospital. A critical piece of that agreement was to jointly recruit and hire a top-notch cardiothoracic surgeon to lead the program. 

 

“Dr. Quintessenza is an exceptional talent and leader with a long track record of success,” said James Tweddell, MD, professor of surgery and executive co-director of the Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children’s. “His commitment to quality improvement makes him the right choice to build this program into one that provides Kentucky families top-ranked cardiology care closer to home.”

 

Over many years, Dr. Quintessenza built a reputation as one of the leading cardiothoracic surgeons in the U.S.  He served All Children’s Hospital (later named All Children’s Hospital John Hopkins) in St. Petersburg, FL, for 26 years – 19 of those years as medical director and chief of pediatric cardiac surgery.

 

“The ability to recruit a surgeon of Dr. Quintessenza’s experience and expertise speaks to the quality of the program being built through this innovative partnership with Cincinnati Children’s,” said Michael Karpf, MD, executive vice president for health affairs at the University of Kentucky. “We are more confident than ever that together we will be offering the highest quality surgical and clinical care, education and research in pediatric cardiovascular services for Kentucky patients and their families.”

 

Dr. Quintessenza has authored nearly 50 peer reviewed articles and contributed numerous book chapters to various academic publications. Additionally, he has been a mentor to junior faculty and taught advanced surgical techniques to established faculty.

 

He received his undergraduate degree in Medical Science and his Doctor of Medicine at the University of Florida in Gainesville.  He also did his general surgery internship and residency there.  He completed his cardiothoracic surgery residency at the University of California in San Diego. 

 

Media Contacts:

Terry Loftus, Cincinnati Children’s, 513-636-9682 or 513-503-7281

Kristi Lopez, UK HealthCare, 859-323-6363 or 859-806-0445

Seven Tips for Tackling Midterm Stress

Mon, 10/17/2016 - 08:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2016) – Major life changes can cause stress and that stress can come at different times such as the first day of class, midterms, finals or graduation. Not only can stress cause minor issues like headaches, trouble sleeping or jaw pain it can have long term impacts on the body. Stress can contribute to weakening of the immune system and worsening symptoms of mental illness like depression.

 

There are many ways to manage stress and finding the strategy that works best for you is important. The seven strategies recommended are: anticipation, affiliation, altruism, humor, sublimation, self-assertiveness and being self-observant.

 

1.    Anticipation is taking action to prepare for a stressful event. If you’re worried about a test, study in the weeks leading up to the exam, not just the night before. This would also include reading class assignments and creating study guides.

 

2.    Affiliation is connecting with someone about an issue. By the end of the semester, there’s little a professor can do about a low grade. It’s best to speak with your professor as soon as an issue arises and discuss what can be done.  

 

3.    Altruism means giving back. It feels good when we volunteer or do good for our community. Those positive feelings are a great way to manage stress.

 

4.    Humor, the saying is true, “laughter is the best medicine.” Take time to watch funny shows or have a laugh with friends.

 

5.    Sublimation happens when you channel negative feelings into something positive, like a workout. It gives the mind a break from focusing on the problem and exercise releases endorphins.

 

6.    Self-assertiveness means speaking up when you feel you’re being unfairly treated. If you feel you’re being unfairly graded or treated in a class speak with your professor or administration in your department.

 

7.    Self-observance occurs when you take the time to connect with what’s going on in your body. Meditation is a great way to reflect inward and think about how you’re feeling mentally and physically.

 

Another strategy, is the Mediterranean diet. While the food itself is delicious, a central part of the culture is sharing a meal. Eating alone can be stressful, so suggest cooking and eating together as roommates or floor mates or call family on Facetime.

 

While some stress can be good, as it can encourage personal growth, constant long-term stress can be detrimental to health. Find the strategies that work best for you and share them with a friend.   

 

Dr. Matthew Neltner is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in UK’s Department of Psychiatry

UK Biology Celebrates Thomas Hunt Morgan's Birthday With Panel Discussion

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 16:44

LEXINGTON, Ky (Oct. 18, 2016) — This Wednesday, Oct. 19, the University of Kentucky Department of Biology will celebrate Thomas Hunt Morgan's 150th birthday with a panel discussion titled "Frontiers in Genetics & Genomics."

 

The panel will explore the famous biologist's (and UK alumnus') pioneering work in genetics, his Nobel Prize, and what he might be working on if he were alive today (such as assembling genomes, gene editing and gene drives, gene therapy in medicine, bioethics and big unanswered questions).

 

The celebration will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., in the Farish Theater in the Lexington Public Library on the corner of Main and Limestone. The event is open to the public and admission is free.

 

Born in Lexington in 1866, Morgan received his bachelor's degree (1886) and master's degree (1888) from the State College of Kentucky (now the University of Kentucky). He then received a doctoral degree in biology from the Johns Hopkins University. Originally interested in development, regeneration and embryology, Morgan is most famous for his discovery of sex-linked inheritance and the identity of the chromosome as the location for our genes. He and his students at Columbia University and then the California Institute of Technology went on to discover many details of inheritance, establishing the fruit fly as the premier model organism for the study of modern genetics. He received the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for this line of research in 1933. 

 

For more information, visit https://bio.as.uky.edu/month-th-morgan or follow @THMorgan1886 on Twitter.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

It's 'see boo!' Time in the Boo-grass

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) — The University of Kentucky's favorite Halloween tradition, "see boo!" is happening 3:30 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at the Hilary J. Boone Center. This is a great opportunity for students to unwind in the middle of midterm.

 

Students, faculty, staff — the entire campus community is invited!

 

With treats, pumpkins, hot cider and free T-shirts (while supplies last), students, friends and families will have a spooktacular time!

 

We want to find the best pumpkin carver on campus. Wildcats, join the fun by carving pumpkins provided by Ryan Quarles, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner, and a local Kentucky Proud farm!

 

Children are welcome to attend and are encouraged to come in costume.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

UK Athletics Teams Up With Coats for a Cause

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 14:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016)  – The University of Kentucky Athletic Department graduate assistants and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee are teaming up with the Lexington Rescue Mission and the “One Warm Coat” foundation to collect coats for the Lexington community. Coats for a Cause invites area residents to make a difference in their neighbors’ lives by donating coats and dollars.

 

Coats for a Cause is collecting clean, gently used warm coats. All donations will be given to the Lexington Rescue Mission for distribution to local children and adults in need. The process is simple: drop off your extra coat(s) and Coats for a Cause takes care of the rest.

 

If you would like to help spread the warmth throughout the months of October, November and December, Coats for a Cause will have coat collection bins located all around campus. The specific locations include: Commonwealth Stadium Office Lobby, Joe Craft Center/Memorial Coliseum, Shively Training Facility, and the Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex. Donations will be accepted at any of these locations from now to Dec. 2.

 

In addition to having bins set out at these locations, Coats for a Cause also has targeted specific dates they will have collection sites set up for UK sporting events. These dates are listed below:

  • Oct. 18: Men’s Soccer v. Bowling Green (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Oct. 21: Volleyball v. South Carolina (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Oct. 27: Women’s Soccer v. Georgia (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Oct. 30: Men’s Soccer v. Marshall (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Nov. 3: Women’s Basketball v. Union (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 6: Volleyball v. Missouri (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 11-13: Women’s Basketball KY Classic (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 17: Women’s Basketball v. New Hampshire (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 18: Volleyball v. LSU (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 20: Volleyball v. Texas A&M (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 20: Men’s Basketball v. Duquesne (Rupp Arena)
  • Dec. 3: Men’s Basketball v. UCLA (Rupp Arena)

 

Potential Dates for NCAA Men’s Soccer:

  • Nov. 17 (1st Round)
  • Nov. 20 (2nd Round)
  • Nov. 26/27 (3rd Round)
  • Dec. 2/3 (4th Round)

 

In addition to coats, monetary donations also will be accepted at the above listed men’s basketball games outside Rupp Arena. If you do not have a coat to donate, you can help provide a warmer winter by making a financial donation. You can donate by cash or check during the coat drive. Every dollar helps.

 

UK Athletics hopes you will support this drive to help collect coats to warm our local neighbors in need.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Lindsey Oettle, lindsey.oettle@uky.edu, 859-257-4482; Cameron Langfels, cam.langfels@uky.edu, 859-257-4482; Tony Neely, tneely@uky.edu, 859-257-8411

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Empowers Women

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:27

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016)  The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFÉ) will be hosting its second annual Intercultural Awareness Day on Wednesday, Oct. 26 at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

The event will honor the top 25 students, faculty, staff and alumni of the college who have helped educate women on overcoming gender barriers and who champion diversity and inclusion across the UK campus community.

 

Titled "Women in CAFÉ — Empowering Our Future Awards Luncheon," the celebration runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and features keynote speaker Cathy Bristow, the first woman and African-American chief union negotiator in the wine industry. Bristow currently serves as director of global quality for the Celanese Chemical Company.

 

Awards also will be presented for excellence in research, instruction and extension, and will include students, graduates of the college, and members of the community.

 

“I hope that this event will make people aware that we are all diverse, all unique,” said Natasha Saunders, extension associate in the Office of Diversity, Recruitment and Retention and co-advisor for the UK chapter of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) in CAFÉ. “I am proud to work in this college where we put emphasis on inclusivity and collaboration. When we say we are a college that supports intercultural awareness, we stand behind those words in action.”

 

Nominees, nominators and special guests will be attending the luncheon event.

 

Later on that same day (Oct. 26), the college is sponsoring a roundtable discussion with Bristow, “Women at UK — Inviting in Your Voice.” The roundtable begins at 6:30 p.m. in the E.S. Good Barn’s Gorham Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

 

  

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu

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