College of Public Health students graduating

News

Posted: March 6, 2018

New research from the University of Kentucky College of Public Health indicates that social networks – especially family ties - are an effective tool for recruiting and retaining rural drug users in harm reduction interventions and programs. Investigators analyzed methods of reaching drug users in Appalachia, a region that has been hit hard by the opioid epidemic. Dr. April M.

Posted: March 5, 2018

Even as HIV infection rates in the US decline, deep disparities persist. Despite accounting for an estimated two percent of the U.S. population, gay and bisexual men also account for an estimated three-fourths of all newly diagnosed cases of HIV. Most affected are young black men who have sex with men; these men have a one-in-four chance of becoming infected with HIV before age 25, and a one-in-two chance of becoming infected in their lifetime.

 

Posted: February 27, 2018

Can standardizing processes for preventive care improve outcomes for patients and health care providers?

Posted: February 15, 2018

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, Kentucky had the third-highest drug overdose fatality rate in the nation in 2015, at 29.9 drug overdose fatalities per 100,000 individuals. Despite the frequency of drug overdose deaths in the state, until recently no comprehensive system existed to track overdose fatalities.

Posted: February 5, 2018

A new website will provide a vital link for Kentucky health care providers, court officials, families and individuals seeking options for substance abuse treatment and recovery.

Posted: January 30, 2018

Dr. F. Douglas Scutchfield, Bosomworth Professor of Health Services Research and Policy (retired), spoke with the online news outlet Buzzfeed for the story "What’s Driving The Overdose Epidemic?

Posted: January 30, 2018

A new study from the University of Kentucky College of Public Health investigates the impact of violence in creating disparities in women’s cancer-related quality of life by Southern Appalachian residence. The open access article appears in Quality of Life Research.

Posted: January 23, 2018

A study by Dr. Richard Crosby of the University of Kentucky College of Public Health compared sexually transmitted infection (STI)-associated risks between young Black cisgender men who have sex with men (YBMSM) and young Black transgender women who have sex with men (YBTWSM). Comparisons pertained to: (1) prevalence of infections; (2) sexual risk; (3) partner-related risks; and (4) socioeconomic marginalization. The resulting publication appears in the International Journal of STD & AIDS.