College of Public Health students graduating

News

Posted: September 11, 2014

This fall, the College of Public Health is offering its first undergraduate degree.  The Bachelor of Public Health (BPH) degree is the first professional undergraduate public health program in the state and will offer students a new opportunity to contribute to work that seeks to remedy long-standing health disparities in the Commonwealth and beyond.

Posted: September 10, 2014

A five-year study, led by Dr. Ann Coker, Professor of Epidemiology in the College of Public Health, has found that UK's "Green Dot" violence-prevention program is effective in reducing incidents of sexual violence.  The study found that the program resulted in a greater than 50 percent reduction in the self-reported frequency of perpetration of sexual violence in schools where the Green Dot training was available, compared to a slight increase in these incidents in schools that did not offer the training.

Posted: September 9, 2014

A new video from the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC) aims to educate business owners on how investing in safety can both protect workers and save money.  The video from The Kentucky Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (KY FACE) Program, part of KIPRC, presents the most efficient method for lowering workers' compensation premiums: investing in a workplace safety program that helps prevent injuries from occurring in the first place. 

Posted: September 3, 2014

The Central Appalachian Regional Education and Research Center (CARERC), which is housed in the University of Kentucky College of Public Health, has been awarded a five-year, $5 Million grant to support and advance occupational health and safety in the Central Appalachian Region and Kentucky.  The grant, which is funded by the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), will help sustain the CARERC as a recognized resource for occupational safety and health research and training in the Central Appalachian region.

Posted: August 29, 2014

The UK College of Public Health sent four participants to a Cumberland Valley Area Development District coalition meeting on June 25, 2014.  Dr. Angela Carman, Clinical Assistant Professor in Health Management and Policy; Margaret McGladrey, Assistant Dean for Research; and College of Public Health students, Justine Maxwell and Olivia Whitman, attended the event, which highlighted the power of collective impact in the improvement of community health.

Posted: August 28, 2014

Department of Health Behavior Assistant Professor, Christina Studts, PhD, has written an article on the identification of behavior disorders in children that has recently been featured in local media.  Dr. Studts' piece offers advice for parents struggling to determine whether their child's problematic behavior is evidence of a more severe problem.

Posted: August 27, 2014

UK College of Public Health Professor, Julia Costich, PhD, JD, was one of an elite group of panelists at a National Press Club forum on August 25, discussing the ways Southern states have implemented and responded to the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  The Forum, including Dr. Costich's report, was broadcast live on C-SPAN and a recording of the event can be viewed here: http://www.c-span.org/video/?321125-1/discussion-health-care-implementation-south.

Posted: August 21, 2014

College of Public Health alumna, Ashton Potter Wright, has hit the ground running in her first months as Lexington's first local food coordinator.  She has met with individuals from 75 different organizations and an advisory committee to chart a path toward building the city's first farm-to-table program and build upon the area's growing interest in the promotion of growing and buying food locally.  "There's a lot of great ideas," Wright said.  "But we have to figure out which ones of those can make the most meaningful impact."

Posted: August 19, 2014

Two UK College of Public Health faculty members were part of a team that developed a new web-based program designed to provide a simple way for healthcare providers to determine whether a brain tumor case requires testing for a genetic mutation.  Dr. Li Chen and Dr. Eric Durbin, of the Biostatistics Department, worked with fellow UK Markey Cancer Center researcher, Dr. Craig Horbinski, to craft a program that uses a statistical model to predict with accuracy the likelihood a patient carries a gene, known as an IDH1 mutation. Patients who carry the IDH1 mutation tend to survive years longer than brain tumor patients who do not carry it.

Posted: August 13, 2014

On July 9, 2014, the University of Kentucky announced a $3.75 million grant from the CDC for colorectal cancer prevention in Eastern Kentucky. The grant provides free FIT kits to local health departments and supports outreach through UK's Rural Cancer Prevention Center over the next 5 years.