College of Public Health students graduating

News

Posted: July 19, 2017

Do fatalistic cultural attitudes toward health contribute to low rates of cancer screening in Appalachian? Investigators from the University of Kentucky College of Public Health set out to find answers to this under-researched question. Their findings are reported in the Journal of Rural Health.

The purpose of the study was to identify correlates of ever having endoscopy screenings for CRC and to determine whether fatalism plays a unique role. Because evidence suggests that cancer-associated fatalistic beliefs may be particularly common among rural Americans, the study was conducted in a medically underserved area of rural Appalachia. 

Posted: July 12, 2017

With the summer heat predicted to peak this week, issues like overexertion, heat stroke and dehydration have become important public health concerns.

“When temperatures rise to the 90s or even higher, there are some real risks of heat-related illness or ailments,” said Hiram Polk, M.D., Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) commissioner. Following some simple precautions can help keep you safe in the heat.”

According to DPH, following these precautions can make the difference between just being hot or being seriously ill:

Posted: July 6, 2017

As part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health campaign, the Kentucky Department for Public Health, within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, along with local health departments across the state, is reminding the public about the potential for rabies exposure from contact with infected wildlife.

Wildlife rabies cases, primarily in bats, raccoons, skunks and foxes, have been identified in the U.S., and these result in human and animal exposures requiring thousands of human rabies post-exposure treatments and animal euthanasia or quarantines.

Posted: July 5, 2017

As part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health campaign, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH), within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), along with local health departments across the state, is reminding the public about the potential for rabies exposure from contact with infected wildlife.

Wildlife rabies cases, primarily in bats, raccoons, skunks and foxes, have been identified in the U.S., and these result in human and animal exposures requiring thousands of human rabies post-exposure treatments and animal euthanasia or quarantines.

Posted: July 3, 2017

Dr. Tomi Akinyemiju joins the UK College of Public Health as of July 1, 2017. Her faculty appointment is in the Department of Epidemiology as an associate professor. 

Posted: June 19, 2017

UK College of Public Health Dean Donna Arnett will speak to members of U.S. Congress on the importance of using quality surveillance data to monitor, evaluate and plan interventions in communities impacted by the opioid epidemic on June 19.

Posted: June 19, 2017

June is Scoliosis Awareness Month

Scoliosis is a musculoskeletal disorder in which there is a sideways curvature of the spine, or back. People of all ages can have scoliosis, but adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (scoliosis of unknown cause) is the most common type and typically occurs after the age of 10. Girls are more likely than boys to have this type of scoliosis. Because scoliosis can run in families, a child who has a parent, brother, or sister with idiopathic scoliosis should be checked regularly for scoliosis by the family doctor. An xray of the spine can confirm the diagnosis of scoliosis.

Posted: June 12, 2017
National Plan Released for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
52 Weeks of Public Health Campaign Spotlight: Reducing the Burden of COPD

FRANKFORT, Ky. (June 12, 2017) – As part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health campaign, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) within the Cabinet of Health and Family Services (CHFS) highlights the first ever COPD National Action Plan.

Posted: June 5, 2017
June is Men’s Health Month
52 Weeks of Health Campaign Spotlight: Make Father’s Day Men’s Health Day

FRANKFORT, Ky. (June 5, 2017) – As Part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health campaign, the Kentucky Department of Public Health (DPH) within the Cabinet of Health and Family Services (CHFS) is encouraging men to make their health a priority while celebrating Father’s Day. Here are recommended tools to start.

Get Good Sleep

Adults need between 7-9 hours of sleep. Insufficient sleep is associated with a number of chronic diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and depression. Also, poor sleep is responsible for motor vehicle and machinery-related accidents.

Posted: June 1, 2017
Philip Westgate, PhD​ - promotion with tenure