College of Public Health students graduating

Courses

Course Number Course Title Description Credit Hours
GRN 250 Aging in Today’s World

This class explores the processes and meanings of “growing old,” focusing on influences from childhood through adolescence and adulthood, with constant attention to how these processes and meanings are situated in time and space and eventually inform individual and societal conceptions of and actions concerning old age. The many faces of aging are examined from an array of disciplinary perspectives using selected readings, film documentaries, consideration of personal/family histories, and a series of exercises that allow students to place one’s own life experience and thoughts of growing old in broader societal context. 

3
GRN 513 Geriatric Pharmacy

A course designed to educate students in the basic knowledge of attitudes and skills required to meet the pharmaceutical needs of the elderly. Topics include discussions of the aging process, physiological and psychological changes in the elderly, how these changes influence patient compliance and the responses to drug and nondrug treatments, monitoring drug use in long-term care facilities, and special community services available to the elderly. Prereq: PHR 849, 852, 853, 854 and 856 or permission of instructor. (Same as PPS 813.) 

3
GRN 585 Aging and Environment

Explores the elderly person’s changing experience of environment. Physiological, psychological and social changes are related to adjustment within urban and rural community environments, special housing for the elderly, and long-term care environments. Prereq: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing and consent of instructor. (Same as FAM/GEO 585.) 

3
GRN 600 A Study of the Older Person

This didactic/experiential course is designed to give the student an overview of the experience of growing old by focusing on the individual older person. Framed from a cell to society perspective, didactic lectures will focus on historical, demographic, biological, psychological, social, environmental, life course and humanistic dimensions of growing old. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between individual experience and societal context. The experiential component will consist of having each student interact with a healthy elder mentor who will provide insight from the perspective of lived experience. Prereq: Admission to the Ph.D. Program in Gerontology. 

3
GRN 602 Certificate Practicum in Gerontology

The course is a field experience of approximately 220 hours focused on aging. Content, site, and supervisor may vary; but the student must have an objective-based proposal approved prior to beginning the practicum. Prereq: Acceptance into the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology.

3
GRN 610 Psychology of Aging

This is a graduate level seminar on the psychology of aging. The course will focus on many of the major topics and theories relevant to understanding the aging process. It focuses on health behaviors, sensation and perception, cognitive abilities, personality, social interactions, motivation and emotion, psychological disorders, end of life issues, and successful aging. The course examines the topics above from a normal aging perspective, atypical aging, successful aging, and demonstrates the interrelationships between the topics to address the aging individual. The course will also focus on the methods used to conduct psychological research with an aging population. 

3
GRN 612 Biology of Aging

A multidisciplinary discussion of how the process of aging affects biological systems. Coverage will be quite broad and includes topics such as subcellular and cellular aging, genetics, immunology, anatomy and physiology, animal model of aging, etc. Prereq: Enrollment in the doctoral program in Gerontology or a biomedical science department or consent of instructor. (Same as ANA/BIO/PGY 612.) 

3
GRN 615 Seminar in Teaching Medical Science (Med Schience Teaching I)

A two (2) credit seminar course in which issues related to the theory and practice of life science education are discussed in a Socratic manner. May be repeated to a maximum of three credits. Prereq: Current enrollment in a life science graduate program. (Same as PGY 615.) 

2
GRN 616 Teaching Seminar in Gerontology

The purpose of this seminar is to prepare doctoral students as classroom instructors, and to enhance instructional skills of those students with teaching experience. Emphasis is placed on developing the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to survive and excel in the classroom. Topics covered include: course development strategies; lecture preparation and delivery; interactive and group learning; writing for learning; student evaluation; student advising; and instructional ethics and responsibilities. Seminar activities include development of instructional materials, thematic discussion, and demonstrations/simulations of classroom experiences. Prereq: GRN 600 and GRN 620, or consent of instructor. 

2
GRN 617 Teaching Practicum in Gerontology

This practicum provides a forum for continued development of teaching skills by concurrently combining classroom instruction experience with formal instructor debriefing sessions. Problematic and successful experiences will be discussed, and specific instructional concepts and issues will be addressed in depth. Prereq: GRN 616 and concurrent classroom teaching. 

3
GRN 618 Epidemiology of Aging

This course introduces the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of older persons. Prereq: Enrollment in a Public Health degree and SPH 605/PM 620 Intro to Epidemiology and GRN 650, or consent of instructor. (Same as SPH 618.) 

3
GRN 620 Human Aging and Adjustment

The intent of GRN 620 is to provide continued development (from GRN 600) of critical interdisciplinary skills in studies of the aging process. Students will, as a group, identify a single central issue associated with aging and conduct comprehensive literature reviews and appropriate research to thoroughly address that issue. Prereq: GRN 600 and admission to the Ph.D. program in gerontology. 

3
GRN 644 Demography and Aging

This course examines the dynamics of human population distributions, densities, and growth patterns as they relate to population aging. The essential demographic processes of fertility, mortality, and mobility are addressed from multiple disciplinary perspectives, and topical coverage includes the environmental, social, political, economic, and cultural impacts on personal demographic behavior and population change. Emphasis is placed on historic and contemporary meanings and influences of population diversity, and how this diversity affects the patterns and consequences of aging across space and time. 

3
GRN 650 Research Design in Gerontology

This course will provide training in research design appropriate for the study of aging and the aged and will critically assess special considerations involved in studying this population. Topics to be covered will include: philosophy of science; data sources for research on aging (including medical informatics and clinical epidemiology sources); the use of animal models in aging research; special design considerations for the study of aging [reconciling age, period, and cohort effects]: longitudinal research; measurement tools for assessing the elderly [functional assessment, ADLs, life satisfaction scales, etc.] issues in interviewing older people; qualitative methods in aging research; the ethics of research on aging and the aged. Prereq: Admission to Gerontology Ph.D. Program. 

4
GRN 651 Qualitative Gerontology

This course (1) critically evaluates different qualitative epistemologies including biography, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and the case study; (2) assesses the value of alternative qualitative methodologies for gaining deeper understanding of the experience of elders; (3) explores practical issues in employing such methodologies; and (4) provides opportunities for participants to engage in different styles of qualitative research. Prereq: Graduate standing. 

3
GRN 653 Laboratory Research in Gerontology

Students will be exposed to current biomedical techniques by conducting supervised research in a laboratory setting. Prereq: Permission of instructor. 

3
GRN 656 Integrative Studies in Gerontology

This seminar is designed to provide gerontology doctoral students the opportunity to place individual dissertation topics within the broader field of gerontology, and to broaden the authority with which the students engage in their dissertation work. Although work will largely be independently driven, frequent class meetings provide ongoing feedback from the group on progress and allow all participants to learn from each others work. Prereq: Completion of gerontology core requirements. 

3
GRN 660 Aging Issues and Family Relations

The study of dynamics of family interactions and issues when some family members are elderly. Emphasis is placed on perspectives from multiple generations and across various kin categories. (Same as FAM 660.) 

3
GRN 704 Mental Health and Aging

The aim of this class is to provide some breadth and selected depth in the area of Mental Health and Aging, aimed at research perspectives. Various psychiatric syndromes will be evaluated in lectures and throughout the readings in relation to prevalence, assessment, etiology, and treatment in reference to research in older adults. Prereq: Graduate student status. 

3
GRN 705 Cognitive Aging

This is a graduate level seminar on cognitive aging. Topics to be addressed include theories of aging, memory, sensation, and perception, attention, language, social cognition, intelligence, decision-making, and dementia. 

3
GRN 710 Aging of the Nervous System

This course will examine the alterations in the brain that occur with aging and in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. The emphasis will be on human aging although the relevance of animal models to studies of human aging will be a recurrent theme. The course will examine aging at several levels, including molecular, cellular, organismic, and behavioral. A strong background in the basic sciences in encouraged. (Same as ANA/PGY/PHA 710.) 

3
GRN 715 Health Policy and Aging

This course will present an overview of health policy in the United States as it affects the older population. It will provide an overview of the health care system, allocation of health services across the population and projected impact of the increase in the aging population on health care delivery. Various health policy proposals will be analyzed with a focus on their impact on the older population. (Same as HA 715.) 

3
GRN 720 Gerontology / Geriatric Dentistry

This course is designed to help students gain an appreciation for the significant opportunities as well as challenges the aging population will bring to their oral health practice. This course will provide students basic knowledge and information in gerontology/geriatric dentistry. Lecture, 17 hours. May be repeated to a maximum of two credits. Prereq: Permission of course director. 

1
GRN 731 Elder Mistreatment

This course reviews major issues and trends related to elder mistreatment. The course emphasizes individual and systemic issues related to elder abuse, neglect, exploitation, and self-neglect on individual, local, state, and federal levels. Special consideration is given to dynamics that shape past, current, and future issues related to elder mistreatment. Prereq: Graduate student status and/or permission of instructor. 

3
GRN 749 Dissertation Research

Half-time to full-time work on dissertation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters. Prereq: Registration for two full-time semesters of 769 residence credit following the successful completion of the qualifying exams. 

0
GRN 767 Dissertation Research Credit

Residency credit for dissertation research after the qualifying examination. Students may register for this course in the semester of the qualifying examination. A minimum of two semesters are required as well as continuous enrollment (Fall and Spring) until the dissertation is completed and defended. 

2
GRN 769 Residence Credit for the Doctor's Degree

May be repeated indefinitely. 

12
GRN 770 Special Topics in Gerontology

This course is designed to present contemporary topics in gerontology in either a lecture or seminar format. It is intended to provide students with opportunities to be informed of current issues in gerontology as well as to explore in-depth studies of particular gerontological topics. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve credits. 

3
GRN 771 Aging in Rural Environments

In the context of a changing rural environment, this seminar explores the life circumstances and life experience of rural elders in relation to the health and well-being of this population. 

3
GRN 772 Aging and the Life Course

This seminar will establish a common foundation of knowledge through examinations of traditional “life courses” influencing individuals as they age through time, including household and family, education and work, and housing. This foundation will be built upon using critical examinations of such themes as gender roles, spatial experience, cognitive change and memory, and structural effects on life trajectories. Emphasis will be placed on surveys of existing literature and on integrating various life course elements within social and behavioral theory. 

3
GRN 773 Ethics and Aging

The focus of this class is on applied ethics and aging. We will address the following topics: mid/late life reproduction; research with older adults; spirituality/selfhood; legal issues; cultural issues; vulnerable older people; caregiving and community-based care; specific issues related to Alzheimer’s Disease; issues at the end of life, and other timely ethical issues that may arise during the course. The course will make use of provocative readings, case studies, supplementary professional articles, a presentation and paper, lively class discussion, and outside speakers who will share their expertise with you on a variety of ethical issues related to aging. 

3
GRN 774 Public Policy and Aging

This course reviews major issues and trends in the economics of aging and social policy and aging. The course emphasizes health, economic, and welfare policies and considers their implications on federal, state, and local levels. Special consideration is given to dynamics that shape past, current, and future policy in the area of aging. Prereq: Graduate standing. 

3
GRN 775 Clinical Geriatrics

This course provides a perspective of clinical geriatrics. Basic concepts of geriatric care are presented, along with concepts of gerontology as it applies to geriatric medicine. This course is designed for both clinicians and non-clinicians. 

3
GRN 778 Current Topics in Brain Aging

Students will learn cellular and molecular changes that occur in the brain through AD progression in addition to the impact of these changes on individual lifestyle and on society. 

3
GRN 780 Applied Gerontology Practicum

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to experience the practical application of gerontology in such domains as government, administration and clinical environments. In addition, the student will gain in-depth experience with the organization and an introduction to problems in applied research. Students will work under the supervision of a gerontology faculty member to coordinate efforts, establish timelines for completion, and determine grading criteria. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Approval of the Director of Graduate Studies required. 

3
GRN 781 Student Development

This practicum provides an opportunity for students to present and discuss their research findings in a venue that promotes skill development in the areas of preparation and delivery of research presentations. Students are required to enroll in GRN 781 during each of the first five semesters in residence. Prereq: Admission to Gerontology Ph.D. program. 

1
GRN 782 Women's Health and Aging

This class explores the issues related to health and well-being among older women. Using a multidisciplinary approach that blends humanities, social and medical science and public policy, the course examines social, economic and cultural contexts of chronic physical and mental health. Prereq: Upper level/graduate class in social science. (Same as BSC 782.) 

3
GRN 783 Public Health and Aging

Public Health and Aging is an elective course in the Graduate Center for Gerontology and Department of Health Behavior and is offered to students on the graduate level. The focus of the course is to help students identify a public health framework and a paradigm for addressing the issues of social, emotional, physical, and mental health in older adults, as well as a keen understanding and awareness of chronic disease prevention, mortality, and quality of life issues that are germane to aging in the United States. Prereq: Graduate standing. 

3
GRN 785 Independent Research in Gerontology

Open to doctoral students who have the necessary training and ability to conduct research at an advanced level. Students will work under the supervision of a gerontology faculty member to coordinate research efforts, establish timelines for completion, and determine grading criteria. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Approval of the Director of Graduate Studies required. 

6
GRN 786 Independent Readings in Gerontology

Open to doctoral students who have the necessary training and ability to work independently at an advanced level. Students will work under the supervision of a gerontology faculty member to identify readings appropriate for the student’s chosen topic, establish timelines for completion, and determine grading criteria. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. Approval of the Director of Graduate Studies required. 

6
GRN 790 Professional Development in Gerontology

This seminar will cover elements of professional development in the areas of research, teaching and service as students are prepared for obtaining positions and developing careers in gerontology. Emphasis will be placed on means of documenting progress and accomplishment (e.g., CV building, teaching portfolio development, evaluation), effective strategies for searching for and securing jobs (e.g., interview skills), and strategies for promoting quality performance and professional success in gerontology-related professions. Prereq: Admission to the Gerontology Ph.D. program. 

1
GRN 791 Integrative Research Seminar II

This seminar is the second in a two-course sequence involving students and gerontology program faculty in in-depth exploration of major health and aging-related issues. Course details are the same for GRN 790. Prereq: GRN 790. 

1