Philosophical and Psychological
Foundations of Education
QUOTATIONS BY PHILOSOPHER
 

KENNETH EBLE

Kenneth Eble  

My Educational Philosophy
Quotations by Topic


Aristotle
Audi
Bandura
Bloom
Bruner
Csikszentmihalyi
de Bary
Dewey
Eble
Edmundson
Emerson
Frankl
Freire
Gardner
Giamatti
Gilligan
Greene
Gregory
Hirst
Hook
James
Kant
Locke
Maritain
Maslow
Matthews
Mill
Montessori
Nehring
Noddings
Pajares
Palmer
Piaget
Pinker
Plato
Roland Martin
Rorty
Rousseau
Searle
Skinner
Vygotsky
Whitehead
Woolf

Excerpts from The Craft of Teaching: A Guide to Mastering the Professor's Art

Whether scientific talent is sought, or simply the more general ability to profit from advanced study, evidence of self-motivation, perseverance, curiosity, initiative, strong interests, and ability to work hard and independently are as important as grades and test scores. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


Doing entails risk. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


Ranging beyond a single interest also seems to be a good sign in prospective teachers. . . . The scholar needs range. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


At the worst, [graduate education] offers the prospective teacher something to fight free from—constraining, anxiety-ridden learning that stands in the way of developing as a teacher. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


The difficulty is, in part, that scholars of modest competence—most of us—take the course most open: exacting work within a narrow range. That same degree of exacting competence applied to a broader range surely would better serve the effective undergraduate teacher. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


Whether [teaching] contexts come from richness of experience, a restless curiosity, opportunities for leisure and study, or from an education aimed at breadth, they are necessities for affecting the learning of diverse students. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


Professors gravitate to the bright, well-prepared students. They are easier to teach, and they appear to profit most from instruction, which may simple mean they are most like the professors. But in the increasing pluralism and decreasing professionalism of colleges and universities in the next decades, the master teacher is likely to be the one who can provide contexts for many kinds of students. ~ Kenneth Eble, The Craft of Teaching


 

 

 
Educational Philosophy | Quotations by Topic | Top of page