Philosophical and Psychological
Foundations of Education
QUOTATIONS BY PHILOSOPHER
 

SIDNEY HOOK

Sidney Hook  

My Educational Philosophy
Quotations by Topic


Aristotle
Audi
Bandura
Bloom
Bruner
Csikszentmihalyi
de Bary
Dewey
Eble
Edmundson
Emerson
Frankl
Freire
Gardner
Giamatti
Gilligan
Greene
Gregory
Hirst
Hook
James
Kant
Locke
Maritain
Maslow
Matthews
Mill
Montessori
Nehring
Noddings
Pajares
Palmer
Piaget
Pinker
Plato
Roland Martin
Rorty
Rousseau
Searle
Skinner
Vygotsky
Whitehead
Woolf

Excerpts from "Education for Modern Man"

The liberally educated person should be intellectually at home in the world of physical nature. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


The best experience indicates that instruction should be interdepartmental. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


The models of correct thinking in each field must be the best illustrations of thinking in that field, not the pattern of another field. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


Philosophy is best taught when the issues of moral choice arise naturally out of the problems of social life. The effective integration of concrete materials from history, literature, and social studies can easily be achieved within a philosophical perspective. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


It is appreciated that among the essentials of clear thought are good language habits and that, except in the higher strata of philosophic discourse, tortuous obscurities of expression are more likely to be an indication of plain confusion than of stuttering profundity. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


To write interestingly may sometimes be just as important as to write soundly because getting a hearing and keeping attention may depend upon it. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


No one who has not translated prose or poetry from one language to another can appreciate both the unique richness and the unique limitations of his own language. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


The appreciation of emotions, perhaps even their recognition in certain cases, depends upon their linguistic identification. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


Knowledge of different languages, and the attempts made to communicate back and forth between them in our own minds, broaden and diversify our own feelings.They multiply points of view, and liberate us from the prejudice that words—our words—are the natural signs of things and events. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


To read great literature is to read men—their fears and motives, their needs and hopes. Every great novelist is a Menschenkenner who opens the hearts of others to us and help us to read our own hearts as well. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


The intelligent study of literature should never directly aim to strengthen morals and improve manners. For its natural consequences are a delicacy of perception and an emotional tact that are defeated by preaching and didactic teaching. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


Literature in all its forms is the great humanizing medium of life. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


The key-stress in courses in art and music should be discrimination and interpretation, rather than appreciation and cultivation. ~ Sidney Hook, "Education for Modern Man"


 

 
Educational Philosophy | Quotations by Topic | Top of page