Philosophical and Psychological
Foundations of Education
QUOTATIONS BY PHILOSOPHER
 

MARIA MONTESSORI

 

My Educational Philosophy
Quotations by Topic


Aristotle
Audi
Bandura
Bloom
Bruner
Csikszentmihalyi
de Bary
Dewey
Eble
Edmundson
Emerson
Frankl
Freire
Gardner
Giamatti
Gilligan
Greene
Gregory
Hirst
Hook
James
Kant
Locke
Maritain
Maslow
Matthews
Mill
Montessori
Nehring
Noddings
Pajares
Palmer
Piaget
Pinker
Plato
Roland Martin
Rorty
Rousseau
Searle
Skinner
Vygotsky
Whitehead
Woolf

If education is always to be conceived along the same antiquated lines of a mere transmission of knowledge, there is little to be hoped from it in the bettering of man's future. For what is the use of transmitting knowledge if the individual's total development lags behind? ~ Maria Montessori


We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being. ~ Maria Montessori


Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed. ~ Maria Montessori


The greatest sign of success for a teacher... is to be able to say, "The children are now working as if I did not exist." ~ Maria Montessori


If an educational act is to be efficacious, it will be only that one which tends to help toward the complete unfolding of life. To be thus helpful, it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. ~ Maria Montessori


We cannot create observers by saying 'observe,' but by giving them the power and the means for this observation and these means are procured through education of the senses. ~ Maria Montessori


We especially need imagination in science. It is not all mathematics, nor all logic, but it is somewhat beauty and poetry. ~ Maria Montessori


Passages from Gerald Gutek, "Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"

Through the power of her personality and dedication to her cause, Montessori has prevailed as a force in education. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"


[Montessori believed] that children acquired self-discipline and self-reliance by becoming aware of their mistakes and repeating a particular task until it was done correctly. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"


Montessori believed that structure enhanced the child's freedom. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"


Montessori concluded that children did not have to be forced to learn and if permitted to choose between work and play would choose the former. In such a learning climate, artificial rewards and punishments were not only unneeded but could distort the learning experience. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"


The aim of learning is to aid children in their own self-development, which provides self-empowerment or functional independence. Development is part of the drive, stemming from physiological an psychic urges, to independence. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"


Two key reference points for Montessori, then, are the individual child, with interior physiological and psychic powers and the prepared environment that allows freedom for development within a structure. ~ Gerald Gutek, Maria Montessori: Contributions to Educational Psychology"

 

Maria Montessori was no shrinking violet.

~ Professor Pajares during class discussion

 

 

 

 

 
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