International Law, Spring 2002

Professor Rogers, Law 925-001, Spring, 2002

Mon-Wed-Thurs, 8 to 8:50 a.m., Room 240

Course Description

Public international law is, roughly, the law that applies to nations in their dealings with one another. As you will learn, it can have a strong effect on the rights and duties of individual citizens. It is something that leaders who are lawyers are expected to be familiar with. And, more and more, it is being used (and abused) by lawyers in United States courts.

This course is an introduction to public international law. The particular subjects to be covered can be found in the index to the course materials. The emphasis will be on the relation between International Law and United States law.

Your grade will be based on a 3-hour final examination. Although the exams are graded strictly anonymously, your participation in class may affect your grade. Any student may be called upon any day. I use a random and blind system for calling on students. All students must be prepared every day. Preparation involves reading the material assigned, rereading as many times as are necessary to understand, and thinking about the material: relating it to what you already know, and anticipating issues. The course materials contain most of the initial questions that I will ask in class.

Your grade will be based on a 3-hour final examination. Although the exams are graded strictly anonymously, your participation in class may affect your grade. Different curves may be applied to raw grades depending upon class participation. I will make this determination based upon my estimation of thequality (not quantity) of your class participation. An example of valuable class participation is the voluntary contribution of thoughtful and relevant comments and questions. An example of particularly poor class participation is absence from class. Class participation in the past has rarely affected grades more than two notches (e.g., "B minus" to "B plus").

The text for this course is the reproduced materials. You will also need to obtain theDocumentary Supplement to Oliver, Firmage, et al., The International Legal System (4th ed.). However, the documents that we will use in the supplement are all available on the online documentary supplement .

Syllabus: The table of contents of the reproduced materials will serve as our syllabus . We will proceed directly through the reproduced materials. Each day I will indicate how much to prepare for the following class. In the event that, by inadvertence, I do not make this announcement, please check the online current assignment page .

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