Graduate School Bulletin - Spring 2005
The Department of Chemistry offers the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Plan A or B may be used to satisfy the requirements for the M.S. degree. Areas of specialization in chemistry are analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, physical, and radio-nuclear. All candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to serve as a teaching assistant for one semester.

Admission Requirements

The only specific departmental requirement for admission to the Graduate Program in Chemistry is an undergraduate degree in chemistry or its equivalent. The Chemistry Department asks applicants to submit three letters of recommendation and considerable weight in each admission decision is given to these written evaluations from the applicant's instructors and mentors. Otherwise the criteria for admission are those set by the Graduate School. For persons applying for admission to the Graduate Program in Chemistry, Teaching Assistantships are only offered to Ph.D. aspirants. While enrolled students may choose or be required to obtain a Master's Degree, this is not a normal or necessary intermediate stage on the path to a Ph. D. Entering applicants targeting a Master's Degree are generally not offered financial support. An effort is made to match applicant interests with available research programs. Applicants for whom exceptions to the above-stated policies seem warranted are subject to special consideration by the Graduate Recruitment Committee.

A satisfactory reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is recommended for the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees, but not required.

As part of the course requirements for both the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees, all students must normally take four "core" courses. The student selects one course which best meets career objectives in each of four of the five areas of chemistry (analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical) from a pair of such courses: CHE 524 or 626, CHE 550 or 552, CHE 510 or 514, CHE 535 or 538, CHE 547 or 548, respectively.

All new graduate students must take proficiency examinations in analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The results of these examinations are used as a guide in establishing the student's program of courses. Students who do very well on any particular examination may bypass the core course in that area. Students are required to take a core course in each of the two areas where their proficiency exam scores were lowest.

Master of Science
Plan A (Thesis)

All Graduate School requirements must be met. In addition to four "core" courses, advanced or specialty courses relevant to a student's career objectives are taken to total a minimum of 24 credits. Successful defense of a thesis describing original research of a caliber that could result in publication in refereed scientific journals is required of all M.S. Plan A students.

Master of Science
Plan B (Non-Thesis)

Students in the Department of Chemistry may satisfy the requirements for an M.S. degree by using Plan B, a course work M.S. Students wishing to follow this plan shall present for the approval of the Graduate Program Committee a program of courses that satisfies the Committee and meets all Graduate School requirements. This program of courses must meet distribution requirements within four of the five areas of chemistry, and include 6 or more credits of courses outside of Chemistry that are relevant to the student's career goals.

Doctor of Philosophy

Doctoral degrees are earned in the Department of Chemistry after a student has carried out productive and independent research on a problem that is of significant chemical interest. It is expected that the results of the dissertation work will be published in refereed scientific journals. All Graduate School requirements must be met. Subject to approval of the student's Advisory Committee, course work for the Ph.D. degree shall normally include four "core" courses and 8 credits of advanced or specialty courses. At least 3 credit hours must be in courses outside of the student's main area of interest.

The Qualifying Examination consists of a written and an oral part. The written component of the Qualifying Examination consists of a series of cumulative examinations designed to test the application of fundamental principles and reasoning to literature or research problems. Scores of 3, 2, 1, or 0 can be obtained on each examination. Eight examinations per year in the areas of Analytical, Inorganic, Biological, Organic, and Physical Chemistry and four examinations per year in Radio-nuclear Chemistry are given. A Ph.D. student normally must attain a minimum of eight points within two years in order to take the oral part of the Qualifying Examination.

For further information on any degree program in Chemistry, contact the Director of Graduate Studies.

GRADUATE COURSES

CHE 440G PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4)

CHE 441G PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (2)

CHE 442G PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3)

CHE 446G PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR ENGINEERS (3)

CHE 450G PRACTICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4)

CHE 510 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 514 DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 520 RADIOCHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 521 RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1-2)

CHE 522 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)

CHE 524 CHEMICAL INSTRUMENTATION (4)

CHE 526 CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS (2)

CHE 532 SPECTROMETRIC IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (2)

CHE 533 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS LABORATORY (2)

CHE 535 SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 538 PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 547 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3)

CHE 548 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3)

CHE 550 BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY I (3)

CHE 552 BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY II (3)

CHE 553 CHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY (3)

CHE 555 HOMONUCLEAR NMR (3)

CHE 558 HORMONE RECEPTORS AND CELL SIGNALS (3)

CHE 559 INTERMOLECULAR FORCES: FROM MOLECULES TO MATERIALS (3)

CHE 565 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 572 COMMUNICATION IN CHEMISTRY (1)

CHE 580 TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-3)

CHE 610 CHEMISTRY OF THE TRANSITION METALS (3)

CHE 612 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF THE NON-METALS (3)

CHE 614 ORGANOTRANSITION METAL CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 616 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 620 ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS (3)

CHE 623 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM AND DATA ANALYSIS (3)

CHE 625 OPTICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS (3)

CHE 626 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 633 PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

CHE 643 SPECTROSCOPY AND PHOTOPHYSICS (3)

CHE 646 CHEMICAL KINETICS (3)

CHE 710 TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2-4)

CHE 736 TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2-4)

CHE 746 TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (2-4)

CHE 748 MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (0)

CHE 749 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (0)

CHE 768 RESIDENCE CREDIT FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE (1-6)

CHE 769 RESIDENCE CREDIT FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE (0-12)

CHE 772 SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY INSTRUCTION (1)

CHE 776 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1)

CHE 779 MEMBRANE SCIENCES COLLOQUIUM (SAME AS CME/PHR/BCH/PHA 779) (1)

CHE 780 INDIVIDUAL WORK IN CHEMISTRY (1-5)

CHE 790 RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY (1-12)

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