Students Showcased at Barnhart Gallery

Contact: Whitney Hale

Photo of a poster from the Bachelor of Arts Senior Group Show 2005
Images from the Bachelor of Arts Senior Group Show 2005

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A closing reception will be held in honor of the artists at 5 p.m. Friday, April 8 in the Barnhart. Admission to “Imitations, Imaginations, and Exaggerations” is free and open to the public. You can view the exhibit at the Barnhart from noon to 10 p.m.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2005) -- The University of Kentucky’s Art Department helps produce major talents of the future, and you can see for yourself what the future may hold at its Bachelor of Arts Senior Group Show 2005 titled “Imitations, Imaginations and Exaggerations.”

The exhibition, which begins today, is on display through Friday, April 8 at UK’s Barnhart Gallery in Reynolds Building Number 1.

Eight students will showcase several works of art, including pieces from Natalie Brockman, Mike Cleveland, Caleb Diederich, Sonia Karimi, Alison Hutson Mello, Amber Robertson, Jason Spencer, and Stephen Wiggins. The pieces will include a variety of media. Likewise, visitors to the exhibit will see the diversity of the students’ work as items in the show present a variety of viewpoints and perspectives.

Natalie Brockman, originally of Campbellsville and now residing in Lexington, will display pieces that can be described as a cross between surrealism and expressionism, using bizarre and imaginative symbolism revolving mainly around the figure. Her mark making is loose and expressive while her figures’ proportions remain fairly accurate.

Mike Cleveland, of Lexington, contributes artwork with an emphasis on drawing. Though he delves into other forms of art, he feels his love will always be the graphite pencil. Cleveland’s work has been showcased in the student newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel. He plans to make a career of drawing children’s books and comic strips.

Caleb Diederich, of Winchester, has been a part of many art shows in the Lexington area, while studying at UK. The work shows an emphasis on drawing and painting. Anxiety and fear pervade his hellish images, and his anti-humanist and anti-modernist sentiments are starkly apparent. Diederich’s driving obsession is to discover new means of conveying hidden energies, auras, emotions, and structures.

Sonai Karimi, of Frankfort, has shown work in the Open Studio juried Carrie Ellis Show. Her pieces display narratives that visually record her personal experiences of the world around her as she perceives it. Through various mediums, she learns new meanings of expression. Her work consists of paintings, monotype prints, silkscreen prints, and woodcut prints. She hopes to continue her art professionally, and aspires to teach art to deaf and hard of hearing children.

Alison Hutson Mello, of Lexington, discovered her artistic voice through her love of silk painting. She has been working on a series of abstract silk paintings where she expresses herself using line and color. These paintings along with a few collages experimenting with figure/ground reversal will be exhibited in the show.

Amber Robertson, of Richmond, has been active in many of the university’s Open Studio presentations and had two of her pieces selected into a juried show. Her work will feature paintings, prints, digital images, and a series of lush and textured collages.

Jason Spencer, of Louisville, is a William C. Parker scholarship winner. His work focuses on realism, and comes from photographs and life. Spencer’s preferred materials are graphite on 11”x14” Strathmore drawing paper. His pieces contain line work that is very sensitive, delicate and controlled, which lead to soft shading to complete the image.

Stephen Wiggins, of Lexington, is also a William C. Parker scholarship winner. He has participated in many art shows at local music events and as part of the Dynamic Doors project presented by the Lexington Arts and Cultural Council. Wiggins work concentrates on spiritual themes. It is faith-based artwork that includes personal touches to stories in the Bible, as well as life applications of the Bible. His pieces will include paintings, silk-screen prints, and lithography prints and staple drawings.

A closing reception will be held in honor of the artists at 5 p.m. Friday, April 8 in the Barnhart. Admission to “Imitations, Imaginations, and Exaggerations” is free and open to the public. You can view the exhibit at the Barnhart from noon to 10 p.m.

The Barnhart Gallery is housed in Reynolds Building Number 1, located at 672 South Broadway on UK’s campus. For more information, contact the Barnhart Gallery at (859) 257-4214.


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