Chinese Earthquake Researchers to Visit

Contact: Ralph Derickson

 

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“As part of the exchange agreement, we anticipate sending several of our seismic researchers to China this summer to provide the Lanzhou Institute with information on our research and earthquake experiences.”

-- Jim Cobb,
director,
Kentucky Geological Survey

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2005) -- Earthquakes and their potential for devastating damages have been in the news recently. While the recent earthquake disasters have focused on the Indonesian island of Sumatra and the Indian Ocean basin, many other parts of the world, including China and the central United States, are threatened by earthquakes.

That’s why the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kentucky and UK’s Department of Geological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences late last year agreed to exchange seismic researchers and information with the Peoples Republic of China. The first events resulting from the agreement will take place in early May. Three researchers from China’s Lanzhou Institute of Seismology will be in Kentucky, visiting the UK campus and sites where seismic instruments monitor earthquake activity in Kentucky and the central United States.

“We welcome our Chinese visitors and look forward to hearing first-hand about their research and their earthquake experiences,” said UK Executive Vice President for Research Wendy Baldwin.

On Wednesday, May 4, the trio will visit the geological sciences department and the KGS, conducting several seminars on earthquake disasters and related issues in China, including a large 8.1 magnitude event in 2001.

KGS director Jim Cobb added, “As part of the exchange agreement, we anticipate sending several of our seismic researchers to China this summer to provide the Lanzhou Institute with information on our research and earthquake experiences.”

On Thursday and Friday, May 5 and 6, the Chinese delegation will be taken to several sites in western Kentucky where the KGS and Department of Geological Sciences have placed seismic instruments in the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network.

The Chinese and American researchers plan to seek funding for joint research projects in the future.


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