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A Quick Tool to Help Choose Nicotine Replacement Equivalencies

Chloé Robertson
September 4, 2019

You’ve got a busy practice, full day, and need to cover cutting out tobacco. You’ve gone through the 5As and the 5Rs and NOW your patient wants to quit. We have an evidence-based Quick Tool to help you choose nicotine replacement equivalencies in a flash! Helps the patient. Saves you time.


Need long acting monotherapy options? Varenicline and buproprion are tried and true methods. So are nicotine replacement patches. Short acting options such as gum, lozenges, and inhalers are useful tools as well. 


Wild guess! These monotherapies simply have not worked for all of your patients, right? Maybe it is time to consider combination therapy. This is a way to combine long and short acting therapies in a way that allows brain receptors and oral sensation needs to be met while the patient is quitting.

Another wild guess! Some of your patients still do not seem to have their cravings subdued. That may likely be due to the nicotine replacement not being equivalent to the amount of nicotine their tobacco use was providing them. We have used evidence-based research to determine nicotine replacement equivalencies for cigarettes, snuff, and cigars. Download the free infographic with the equivalencies here.

Remember, they want to quit and you want to help them. It may be as easy as 1) hitting the brain receptors, 2) providing oral sensation alternative, and 3) assuring equivalent nicotine replacement.