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Suicide Task Force

Marc Woods
April 7, 2020

Today on the vlog we have with us Marc Woods, Assistant Chief Nurse Executive for Behavioral Health at UK Healthcare. We are in the midst of a national health crisis in regards to suicide. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death among adults and 2nd cause of death among college students. This is in part due to the many stressors surrounding young people and the few tools they have to handle stress. It is so important to eliminate the stigma with discussing suicide. Stepping out to ask about concerning behavior could save lives. Those with mental health illnesses and certain groups such as the LGTBQIA+ group and young males are at higher risk for committing suicide. Many people that commit suicide have seen a healthcare provider in the past 1-3 months but the physician is not a mental health provider. The Columbia Suicide Severity Screen is a helpful 3-6 question screening tool to help physicians connect the patient to interventions based on their level of risk. Simply asking someone if they are contemplating suicide is extremely important, and the most effective way of protecting our loved ones. Visit the Columbia Lighthouse Project for more information. 

If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, please visit suicide prevention lifeline or call 1-800-273-8255

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