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Prerequisite Coursework

  • Determine the basic nuclear and electronic structure of atoms.
  • Describe the chemical and physical properties of the elements using the Periodic Table.
  • Describe the scientific method.
  • Describe good laboratory behavior.
  • Distinguish between mass and weight, heat and temperature.
  • Calculate metric units for mass, length and volume.
  • Define the steps in the scientific process
  • Describe cell structure and function
  • Compare and contrast different methods of energy production
  • Understand diverse life forms and compare/contrast responses to the environment, adaptation and evolution, and their behavior.
  • Explain the basic concepts and laws in physics (i.e. Newton’s Law)
  • Apply physical principles and knowledge to other disciplines
  • Develop problem solving techniques and critical thinking skills
  • Discuss psychological development throughout the lifespan
  • Explain memory in terms of information processing and distinguish between sensory, short-term and long-term memory
  • Explain the importance of meaning, imagery, and organization in the encoding process
  • Describe the importance of retrieval cues
  • Define motivation and identify several theories of motivated behavior.
  • Explain Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and motivation.
  • Proof of current CPR Certification at the level of health-care provider.
  • Proof of first aid training.
  • Define sensitivity and specificity
  • Identify the structure of a hypothesis test and explain the purpose of the null and alternative hypothesis.
  • Define significance and power
  • Explain the different between sampling variability and non-sampling variability.
  • Define sampling variability and demonstrate the Central Limit Theorem
  • Explain what happens to a confidence interval as the confidence level changes and/or the sample size changes.
  • Distinguish the concepts of correlation and causation
  • Explain how confounding variables affect inferences
  • Demonstrate an understanding of current medical terminology.
  • Demonstrate an ability to work with these terms in the context of applications in anatomy, physiology, and pathology.
  • Describe gross anatomical arrangement of the human body in a system-by-system format. These systems include: musculoskeletal, integumentary, neurological, cardiovascular, endocrine, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune and renal.
  • Describe the structure of the human body at multiple levels including cellular and tissue levels, and organ systems.
  • Relate the structure of the human body to its function.
  • Describe the basic functions of the human body across the stages of development.
  • Describe how each system of the body functions.
  • Discuss how each body system works in concert with the others to maintain stability in the body. 
  • Explain the chemical, electrical, and mechanical mechanisms that regulate each organ system.
  • List common disease states related to each organ system.

** Human Anatomy and Human Physiology can be combined. If combined courses are completed applicants must have a total of 6 total (i.e. Anatomy and Physiology I and Anatomy and Physiology II).

  • Describe the primary adaptations of the major organ systems to various forms of exercise training.
  • Describe the role of the major organ systems in the performance of various forms of exercise
  • Discuss anaerobic and aerobic energy production
  • Explain energy expenditure during exercise
  • Describe cardiovascular function and exercise
  • Describe respiration and exercise
  • Explain skeletal muscle adaptations after exercise
  • Describe the relationship between exercise and body composition, specifically explain ow to assess body composition using validated techniques.
  • Define the basic terms involved in kinematics (e.g. velocity, acceleration, etc.)
  • Explain the kinematic relationships between linear and angular motion
  • Utilize kinematics to analyze human motion
  • Define basic terms involved in the kinetics of linear motion (e.g. force, inertia, momentum, etc.)
  • Identify the important characteristics of forces (e.g. magnitude, direction, point of application, components)
  • Describe Newton's laws of motion and relate them to sports activities
  • Explain effects of significant forces encountered in biomechanical analysis
  • Explain significance of the impulse-momentum, work-energy and conservation of momentum relationships to sports activities
  • Define basic terms involved in the kinetics of angular motion (e.g. angular momentum, moment of inertia, torque)
  • Explain the kinetic relationship between linear and angular motion
  • Determine the mechanical factors basic to the performance of an observed movement, and to evaluate the performer's technique
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