Grant Development Team

The College of Nursing grant development team assists research faculty with grant development and management, starting with your proposal all the way through submission and post-award.

Meet our team

Thomas Kelly, PhD
Associate Dean for Research
thkelly@uky.edu
(859) 323-8076
As the associate dean for research (ADR), Dr. Kelly oversees the grant development team and works with College of Nursing research faculty on the identification of funding sources and the development and review of research grant applications.

Mr. Michael Miles, MPA
College Grants Officer (CGO)
michael.miles@uky.edu
(859) 323-3579
Mr. Miles works closely with College investigators on budgets and budget justifications, creating budget assumptions. He reviews grant applications to ensure they are consistent with sponsor guidelines and UK policy; assists in sponsor guideline interpretation and compliance; prepares and starts the routing process and tracks the electronic-Internal Approval Form (e-IAF); and oversees the electronic grant submission process. Additionally, she works with investigators to manage post-award accounts and regulatory requirements. He assembles and formats the proposal and provides an internal review of the application.

Ms. Angela Knapp, AA
College Grants Officer (CGO)
angela.knapp1@uky.edu
(859) 323-1226
Ms. Knapp works closely with College investigators on budgets and budget justifications, creating budget assumptions. She reviews grant applications to ensure they are consistent with sponsor guidelines and UK policy; assists in sponsor guideline interpretation and compliance; prepares and starts the routing process and tracks the electronic-Internal Approval Form (e-IAF); and oversees the electronic grant submission process. Additionally, she works with investigators to manage post-award accounts and regulatory requirements.

Mr. Brett McCourt, MPA
Project Manager
brett.mccourt@uky.edu
(859) 323-6354
Mr. McCourt is the liaison among the research faculty, the grant development team and external collaborators, ensuring that all grant application deadlines are met. He will assist and oversee the collection of grant application materials (e.g., biosketches, resources information, letter[s] of support, letter[s] of intent to collaborate), work with an investigator’s subawardees and will create an individualized timeline for the grant application cycle. He will also support post-award project initiation (e.g., support hiring of personnel, integration of requisite support services, etc.)

Grant Submission FAQs

How do I find support for my research/research training?

Please contact Dr. Kelly to discuss your research interests and to develop strategies for considering funding opportunities.

There are many external and internal funding sources available to investigators. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is the managing partner of Grants.Gov, a website dedicated to locating federal funding opportunities. As noted on the Grants.Gov website, “Grants.Gov is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual awards.” All discretionary grants by the 26 federal grant-making agencies can be accessed from this site.

In addition to federal funding, a plethora of foundations across the country offer funding opportunities (i.e., grants or fellowships). A few examples of foundations are the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Commonwealth Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation. We recommend searching a foundation’s website to learn about the organization, the type of funding/fellowship(s) it may provide and whether it accepts applications. Another source of information is the Foundation Center’s Foundation Finder tool. This tool offers basic information on grant-makers in the U.S., including private foundations, community foundations, grant-making public charities and corporate giving programs.

We suggest you visit UK Proposal Development Office’s website to complete the Funding Search Form. The Proposal Development Office will, in turn, identify potential funding sources.

With respect to internal funding, check UK’s Research Support Guide for internal research support opportunities. UK’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science also offers various funding opportunities for investigators, ranging from Pilot Grant Funding Opportunities to Junior Faculty Career Development Awards.

How do I decide if I am ready to submit a grant application?

Carefully review the funder’s grant guidelines and deadline date. Can you write the science component within the timeframe? Can you secure the necessary support, such as equipment, facilities, collaborators and letters of support? Do you have requisite skills to conduct the research? Do you have preliminary data to support the feasibility and viability of your idea?

A good first step would be to share your research idea/hypothesis with Dr. Kelly and/or your peers during the weekly College of Nursing grant development meeting. (Please contact Dr. Kelly or Mr. McCourt for additional information.) We also suggest contacting the funding organization’s program officer to obtain his/her feedback on your concept. Speaking with a past grantee may also be informative.

I have decided to submit a grant. How do I get started?

Congratulations on your decision to submit a grant! The first step is to contact Brett McCourt at (323) 6354 or brett.mccourt@uky.edu to set up a meeting with the grant development team. When contacting her, please provide the name and announcement number of the grant as well as the grant mechanism you are considering. If it is a non-federal grant, please provide the name of the foundation or organization you will be submitting to.

As noted on the NIH website, “The successful grantee allows ample time to plan, organize and write a grant application that competes well in the peer review process and ultimately earns funding.”

What will happen at the meeting with the grant research team?

During the meeting, the following will be discussed: internal (UK) and external (funder) deadline dates for the proposal; UK requirements (e.g., Conflict of Internet [COI] form, e-IAF form); components of the proposal; budget; letter(s) of support; other entities/organizations involved; and ways the grant development and biostatistics and data management teams will assist you with the proposal process. You will leave the meeting with a matrix document noting deadlines dates, actions to be taken and person(s) responsible for such action.

Grant development team staff can provide you with first drafts of select documents. For example, if you have submitted grants before, we can draft budgets, budget justifications, biosketches, resources pages, etc., based on prior submissions. If this is your first time submitting a grant application, we will work with you to guide you through the entire application process.

Can I get help writing my grant application?

This is a topic that can be addressed during your initial meeting with the team. While ultimate responsibility will rest on the individual investigator, we want to enable you to focus on writing the science. We are here to help you with other components of the application.

Do I need to submit a letter of intent (LOI)?

Certain grant applications require an LOI. While it is not mandatory, we encourage investigators to submit an LOI. The LOI deadline date, if applicable, will be discussed during the initial meeting between the PI and the grant research team.

How will I know what information should be contained in a grant submission?

Carefully review the funder’s grant guidelines. Public sponsors usually require full proposals that range from 15 to 100 pages and contain such sections as a cover letter, title page, abstract, introduction, need/problem, objectives, methods, evaluation, dissemination, budget and appendices. In contrast, private sponsors often require a letter proposal, a brief two- to five-page document in letter form that concentrates on the problem and solution, sustainability of the effort after funding ceases, and evaluation.

Are sample funded grants available to review?

Several examples of full proposals can be found on the NIH website. Additionally, we are working to post sections of funded grants on an accessible location. We will be sure to notify everyone when this resource is available. We can also share components of other PI’s grants with you to help you with your grant writing process.

If your proposal was not funded, do not take it personally. Contact the funding source to find out why and solicit advice on how to make your proposal more competitive for the next time. Share your feedback with Dr. Kelly and/or your peers during the weekly CON Grant Development Meetings held on Tuesdays. Continue to scan the environment for new funding opportunities.

Post Award

To be announced.