Current Courses

The following courses are currently included as part of the dual credit offerings of the University of Kentucky. Courses are either available in Fall or Spring. Please consult your local guidance counselor for details on when these courses are offered in the upcoming semesters. 

Dual Credit Courses

ABT 120: Genes & Society

This course is designed for science and non-science majors, giving students an understanding of how genetics influences and impacts our social fabric on a daily basis, and equipping students with a sufficient understanding to participate in the policy debates that are impacting our lives. The course will introduce students to the basic concepts of genetics and to the modern methodologies of molecular genetics.  The course will also educate students in the process of scientific discovery and empower students with the knowledge and critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate the present and future impact of genetics on society. While the course is intended for freshmen, students at all class standings are welcome to enroll. This course is offered to select high schools as a pilot and requires a lab component. 

CIS 110: Composition & Communication I

Composition and Communication I is the introductory course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and information literacy skills by exploring what it means to be engaged, twenty-first century citizens. Students will practice com posing, critiquing, and revising ideas based on personal experience, observation, and fieldwork in the community, culminating in several discrete projects using oral, written, and visual modalities. - Cannot be taken in conjunction with WRD 110. 

CIS 111: Composition & Communication II

Composition and Communication II is the advanced course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. In this course, students will work in small groups to explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation, compose conscientious and well-developed arguments, and propose viable solutions to different audiences. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in spoken, written, and visual forms; and work effectively in teams through sustained interrogation of an issue. A significant component of the class will involve learning to use visual and digital resources both to enhance written and oral presentations and to communicate with public audiences. Prereq: CIS 110. - Cannot be taken in conjunction with WRD 111. 

CLD 102: The Dynamics of Rural Social Life

Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Student may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101.

DES 100: Design in Your World

Understanding how design unfolds from and informs culture, students garner appreciation for and creatively experiment with the embedded practice of design as a basic human response for inhabitation, work, play, and worship.

EES 110: Endangered Planet: Introduction to Environmental Geology

Humans impact the environment through extraction of resources (oil, coal, gold), and pollution of water, soil, and air. Humans in turn are impacted by the environment in the form of climate change, hurricanes, floods, and other natural disasters. This course examines these impacts in the context of the relationship between humans and the planet they inhabit. 

EPE 174: Theories of College Student Success

The objective of the course is to introduce theories of student development and the organizational structure of teaching and learning in college. This course satisfies the UK Core requirement for Inquiry in Social Sciences.

FOR 100: Forests & Forestry

A brief coverage of the general fields of forestry; development and importance; tree growth; principal forest regions and important timber species; forest management practices; utilization and products; state and federal forestry programs.

HIS 109: History of the US Since 1877

This course examines American History from 1877 to the present: political, economic and social – Gilded Age, Progressive Era, New Deal, Age of Affluence and Limits, Great Society and two Great Wars. You will find out how much, how little, America has lived up to its ideals; how it grew from a nation of farms and cotton mills to an industrial giant; how it became a world power (Top Nation) and what problems this created.

IS/ICT 200: Information Literacy & Critical Thinking

Emphasizing critical inquiry and critical thinking, this course will explore the theories and definitions surrounding the term “information literacy.” Students will put this theory into practice by developing problem-solving skills that allow them to meet information needs throughout their lifetimes. Students will gain a better understanding of how information and knowledge function in society and will discover methods of finding, accessing, evaluating, and using different information sources in an effective and ethical manner. Counts for UK Core in Arts & Creativity. IS 200 is the same as ICT 200.

MA 109: College Algebra

Selected topics in algebra. Develops manipulative algebraic skills and mathematical reasoning required for further study in mathematics and use in mathematical modeling. Includes brief review of basic algebra, quadratic formula, systems of linear equations, introduction to functions and graphing. This course is not available for credit to persons who have received credit in any mathematics course of a higher number with the exceptions of MA 111, 112, 123, 162, 201 and 202. Credit not available on the basis of special examination.

MUS 100: Introduction to Music

A study of the elements of music as they apply to the listening experience; designed for the nonmusic major with no prior knowledge of music. Emphasis will be placed upon developing an awareness and understanding of musical styles from the Renaissance to the present. Music majors may not use this course to fulfill either General Studies, University Studies, or music history requirements.

PLS 103: Plants, Soils, and People: A Global Perspective

Only a few things are essential to life, and food is one of them. What people eat is about what they need to be healthy, what they want to eat (personal preference and culture), and what they have available or can afford to eat. Agriculture plays a vital role in human food security. Many experts feel the world is facing a food supply crisis. Knowledge and application of the principles of plant and soil sciences will have a dramatic effect on human food security, now and into the future, both locally and globally. However, these issues will also be impacted by future human population growth, urbanization, consumer preferences, human decisions regarding civic duties, and climate change. Students successfully completing this course will leave with an understanding of the need to sustainably expand the world’s food supply, the basic principles of plant and soil science and their application to this problem, and their own potential role in determining our ability to meet this challenge. Students may not receive credit for both this course and PLS 104. 

WRD 110: Composition & Communication 1

Composition and Communication I is a course in speaking and writing emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Throughout the course, students are encouraged students to explore their place in the broader community and take a stance on issues of public concern—that is, to begin to view themselves as engaged citizens. Students will engage in reflective thinking and analysis, conduct primary research in the community and secondary research using Library resources, and learn how to write and speak effectively about a local issue not only for their classmates but also for audiences beyond the classroom. A significant component of the class will be learning to use visuals and online resources to enhance writing and oral presentations. Over the course of the semester, class members can expect to work independently, with a partner, or with a small group of classmates to investigate, share findings, and compose presentations of their research, as well as to practice and evaluate interpersonal and team dynamics in action. Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition and Communication I - Cannot be taken in conjunction with CIS 110. 

WRD 111: Composition & Communication II

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research.  In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and ultimately propose solutions based on well-developed arguments.  Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modalities; and work effectively in groups (dyads and small groups).  To learn to analyze a public issue using rhetorical analysis, the entire class will explore together one contemporary social issue and related texts about it. A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later to communicate mass mediated messages to various public audiences.  Over the course of the semester, class members can expect to work independently, with a partner, and in a small group (team) to investigate, share findings, and compose and deliver presentations, as well as to practice and evaluate interpersonal and team dynamics in action. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication I. Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition and Communication II - Cannot be taken in conjunction with CIS 111.