COURSES WILLIAM JAMES TAUGHT AT HARVARD

1872/73 Natural History 3: Comparative Anatomy & Physiology (with Dr. Dwight) [Natural History embraced botany, geology, zoology, etc.. In other words, those courses dealing with the development or history of nature, as distinguished from mathematics, physics, and chemistry.]

Note: Some authorities have James beginning at Harvard in Fall of 1873 (e.g., Bjork, 1997, p. 90). Nonetheless, the list obtained from Harvard shows him teaching during the 1872/73 academic year. Simon (1998, p. 132) writes that "during the 1871-72 academic year, Bowditch welcomed James into his laboratory and his home, sharing with James his responses to recent works on physiology ... It seems likely that Bowditch was trying to give James's life some positive direction when, in the summer of 1872, Bowditch asked James if he would take a vacant course on anatomy. All that was needed, he assured James, was [Harvard President's] Eliot's approval. Eliot, who remembered James as a student, voiced no objection, and in August, James was offered his first professional job.

1873/74 Absent from Cambridge (James was in ill-health and recuperating in Europe, mainly Italy)
1874/75 Natural History 3: Comparative Anatomy & Physiology of Vertebrates
1875/76 Natural History 3: Comparative Anatomy & Physiology of Vertebrates

Grad Course 18: The Relations Between Physiology and Psychology (presumably regarded as belonging to natural history) (Note also: Grad Course 73: Physiology, by Asst. Prof. Bowditch, with admission to his laboratory in botany)

1876/77 Natural History 2: Physiological Psychology. Text: Spencer's Principles of Psychology. Recitation and lectures

Natural History 3: Comparative Anatomy & Physiology of Vertebrates

Grad Course 17: The Relations Between Physiology and Psychology

1877/78 Natural History 3: Comparative Anatomy & Physiology of Vertebrates

Philosophy 4: Psychology. Text: Tain on Intelligence. Recitation and lectures

Grad Course 17: The Relations Between Physiology and Psychology

1878/79 Naural History 2: (same as Natural History 3 above)

Philosophy 4: Psychology. Texts: Bain's Senses and Intellect and Emotions and Will

Philosophy 20: Physiological Psychology (graduate course twice per week)

1879/80 Physiology and Hygiene. Lectures (open to all undergraduates). Once per week. Voluntary.

Philosophy 3: The Philosophy of Evolution. Texts: Spencer's First Principles. Lectures. Elementary.

Philosophy 5: Comparative Philosophy

Phylosophy 19: Psychological (psychology)

1880/81 Physiology and Hygiene (see above)

Philosophy 3: The Philosophy of Evolution. Texts: Spencer's First Principles. Lectures. Elementary.

Philosophy 5: Psychology. Text: Bain's Mental Science.

Philosophy 16: Physiological Psychology. Graduate course.

1881/82 Physiology and Hygiene (see above)

Philosophy 2: Psychology: The Human Intellect. Text: Tain on Intelligence. Elementary.

Philosophy 4: Contemporary Philosophy. Text: Mill's Logic.

Philosophy 6: Advanced Psychology. Graduate course.

1882/83 Absent from Cambridge. Royce takes his work. James on sabbatical in Europe. Visits European universities and colleges.
1883/84 Philosophy 2: Psychology: The Human Intellect. Text: Tain on Intelligence. Elementary.

Philosophy 3: The Philosophy of Evolution. Texts: Spencer's First Principles. Lectures. Elementary.

Philosophy 5: English Philosophy.

Philosophy 9: Psychology. Advanced course.

1884/85 Philosophy 2: Psychology: The Human Intellect. Text: Tain on Intelligence. Elementary.

Philosophy 3: The Philosophy of Evolution. Texts: Spencer's First Principles. Lectures. Elementary.

Philosophy 5: English Philosophy: Locke, Berkeley, Hume.

Philosophy 9: Psychology. Advanced course.

1885/86 Philosophy 2: Psychology and Logic. Bain and James

Philosophy 9: Special Advanced Study of Experimental Research in Psychology.

1886/87 Philosophy 2: Logic and Psychology. Texts: Jevon's "Elementary Lessons in Logic"; Bain's The Emotions and the Will.

Philosophy 5: English Empirical Philosophy. Text: Mill's Logic.

Questions in Psychology. (for special research, primarily for graduates)

1887/88 Philosophy 2: Logic and Psychology. Texts: Jevon's "Elementary Lessons in Logic"; Bain's The Emotions and the Will.

Philosophy 5: English Philosophy: Locke, Berkeley, Hume.

Questions in Psychology. (laboratory work, primarily for graduates)

1888/89 Philosophy 2: Logic and Psychology. Texts: Jevon's "Elementary Lessons in Logic"; Ladd's Physiological Psychology.

Philosophy 4: Ethics: Recent Contributions to Theistic Ethics. Texts: Martineau's "Types of Ethical Theory, Volume 2"; "Study of Religion"

Philosophy 20a: Questions in Psychology (laboratory work).

1889/90 Philosophy 2: Logic and Psychology. Texts: Jevon's "Elementary Lessons in Logic"; Ladd's Physiological Psychology.

Philosophy 20a: Questions in Psychology (laboratory work).

1890/91 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Metaphysics. Text: Lotze's Outline of Metaphysics. Undergraduate philosophy class; In other Philosophy 1 classes, Palmer taught Logic and Santayana taught Psychology.

Philosophy 3: Psychology. Text: James's Principles of Psychology

Philosophy 10: Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibnitz.

Philosophy 20a: Psychological Seminar: Pleasure and Pain. (laboratory work).

1891/92 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Psychology. Text: James's Principles of Psychology [Briefer Course]. In other Philosophy 1 classes, Palmer taught Logic and Royce taught Metaphysics.

Philosophy 2: Logic and Psychology. Texts: Jevon's "Elementary Lessons in Logic"; Ladd's Physiological Psychology.

Philosophy 20a: Psychological Seminar. (laboratory work).

Topics in Psychology of Interest to Teachers (12 lectures). Primarily for teachers.

1892/93 Away from Cambridge. Travels to Europe with wife and children. Turns lab over to Hugo Münsterberg.
1893/94 Philosophy 2: Psychology (1st half of the year). Text: James's Principles of Psychology

Philosophy 3: Cosmology. A study of the fundamental conceptions of natural science, with special reference to theories of evolution and materialism. Text: Spencer's First Principles; Lotz's Outlines of the Philosophy of Nature.

Philosophy 20b: Psychological Seminar: Questions in Mental Pathology.

1894/95 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Psychology. Text: James's Principles of Psychology [Briefer Course]. In other Philosophy 1 classes, Palmer taught Logic and Santayana taught Metaphysics.

Philosophy 3: Cosmology. A study of the fundamental conceptions of natural science, with special reference to theories of evolution and materialism. Text: Spencer's First Principles; Lotz's Outlines of the Philosophy of Nature.

Philosophy 20b: Psychological Seminar: Questions in Mental Pathology.

1895/96 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Psychology. Text: James's Principles of Psychology [Briefer Course]. In other Philosophy 1 classes, Royce taught Logic and Santayana taught History of Philosophy.

Philosophy 2a: Psychology (half course; advanced). Texts: Wundt's Lectures on Human and Animal Psychology; Hoffding's Psychology

Philosophy 2b: Physiological Psychology (half course).

Philosophy 20b: Psychological Seminar: The Feelings (1st half year). Discussion of certain theoretic problems, including consciousness, knowledge, the Self, the relation of Mind and Body, etc. (second half year). Primarily for undergraduates.

1896/97 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Psychology. Text: James's Principles of Psychology [Briefer Course]. In other Philosophy 1 classes, Palmer taught Logic History of Philosophy.

Philosophy 3: Philosophy of Nature. A study of the fundamental concepts of natural science with special reference to theories of evolution and materialism. (cf. Cosmology, 1893/94). Texs: Spencer's First Principles; Paulson's Introduction to Philosophy.

Philosophy 15: Abnormal Psychology. A study of the various types of insanity, and of recent investigations into exceptional mental phenomena. Text: Maudsley's Pathology of the Mind. Primarily for undergraduates.

Philosophy 20c: Metaphysical Seminar: Philosophy of Kant. A study of three critiques.

1898/99 Philosophy 9: Mataphysics. The fundamental problems of theoretical philosophy - the unity or plurality of the world-ground, and its knowability or unknowability; realism and idealism; hedonism, Teleology, and Theism. Texts: Bow's Philosophy of Theism; Bradley's Appearance and Reality; Royce's Conceptions of God.

Philosophy 20b: Psychological Seminar: Abnormal Psychology. A study of the various types of insanity and of exceptional mental phenomena. Primarily for graduates.

1899/00 Sabbatical and convalescence in Europe, especially Nauheim.
1900/01 Sabbatical and convalescence in Europe, especially Nauheim.
1901/02 Sabbatical and convalescence in Europe, especially Nauheim.
1902/03 Philosophy 9: Philosophy of Nature. Special reference to Man's place in Nature - the fundamental mental conceptions of Science; the relation of Mind and Body; Evolution; etc. Assisted by Dr. Miller. Texts: Parson's Grammar of Science; Ward's Naturalism and Agnosticism.
1903/04 Philosophy 20c: Metaphysical Seminar: A Pluralistic Description of the World. Full course. Primarily for graduates.
1904/05 Philosophy 9: Metaphysics. Fundamental problems of theoretical philosophy - the nature of reality; Monism and Pluralism; hedonism, Teleology and Theism. First half-year
1905/06 Philosophy 1: General Introduction to Philosophy. Logic (1st four weeks). Text: Paulso's Introduction to Philosophy. Course continued under Royce and Münsterberg after 1st four weeks).

Philosophy 9: Metaphysics. Fundamental problems of theoretical philosophy - the nature of reality; Monism and Pluralism; hedonism, Teleology and Theism. Full course, but taught only 1st half-year. James travelled to Europe in the spring of 1905, in part to attend the Fifth International Congress of Psychology in Rome.

1906/07 Philosophy 10: General Problems of Philosophy. Half course. James travelled to California and was acting professor for half term at Stanford University, where he experienced the San Francisco earthquake.
1907 Resignation from Harvard.

This documented is taken from a list compiled at Harvard University. Special thanks to Ellen Usher.

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