College of Agriculture, Food & Environment

Agricultural Economics

100

anniversary in 2014

30

average class size

8th

most employable field

based on Georgetown Center study

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Business is everywhere.  Agricultural Economics enompasses marketing, management, leadership, problem-solving and more--all the skills needed for careers in agribusiness, food industries, international trade, credit/finance, farm management and much, much more. Like much of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, you’ll see that faculty and staff in Agricultural Economics are open and accessible.  With opportunities like education abroad, unique research projects, the Agribusiness Club, monthly corporate visits and more, you’ll find a program that’s committed to helping students push their potential.

we grow careers

Faculty in Agricultural Economics believe in applied teaching and learning, hence the aforementioned focus on experiential education.

With a degree in Agricultural Economics, you’ll be prepared for positions at the crossroads of agriculture, commerce, public policy and more.  In fact, you’ll be following in footsteps of recent Agricultural Economics alumni who have secured positions such as:

  • Economist at Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center in Hawaii
  • Population Health Consultant for Humana in Louisville, KY
  • Market Research Analyst for Alltech in Nicholasville, KY
  • Director of the Kentucky Center for Agriculture and Rural Development
  • Seed and Precision Administrator at Agri-Chem, LLC in Hopkinsville, KY
  • Policy Officer at the European Centre for Development Policy Management in the Netherlands
For me, Ag Econ really transformed my life. The faculty and staff are really personal and sincere and care about their students. I found my passion through Ag Econ by studying abroad due to the exposure of opportunities that became available to me.

Johannah

Class of 2015

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Agricultural Economics (BS) - Opt. A 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • GEN 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT3

    An introductory course requiring critical analysis of the major social, economic, political and scientific issues in agriculture and related disciplines. The historical development of agriculture will be surveyed, followed by discussions of major issues related to agriculture, food and environment. Development of skills in information gathering, critical analysis of issues, and written and oral communication will be emphasized. Satisfies the U.S. Citizenship area of UK Core. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfer students only in spring semesters.

  • MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS4

    An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • Elective3
  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • ACC 201 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I3

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to financial accounting from the users' perspectives. Its primary purposes are to promote understanding of financial accounting information for decision making purposes and to focus on financial accounting's role in communicating business results.

  • ECO 202 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II3

    A study of how society’s needs are satisfied with the limited resources available. Topics include contemporary issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international dependencies, and how public policy deals with them. A critical understanding of the U.S. and global economies will enhance your value as a manager or executive of a business (whether for-profit or non-profit), as a family member dealing with jobs and financial decisions, and as a voter in a democracy. The course will allow you to become knowledgeable of, and able to critically think about, the major macroeconomic issues of unemployment, jobs, recessions, economic growth, inflation, deflation, oil prices, monetary policy, the Federal Reserve, fiscal policy, budget deficits, the national debt, international trade, international finance, and the financial system.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ACC 202 - MANAGERIAL USES OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION3

    An introduction to the use of accounting data within an organization to analyze and solve problems and to make planning and control decisions.

  • AEC 302 - AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES4

    A comprehensive study of economic principles and management tools useful in farm and agribusiness decision making. Utilizes a systems approach to the planning, implementation and control of the agricultural business. Specific attention to application of management and decision theory, economic principles used in decision making, and risk management strategies. Emphasis on planning the future course of the business, acquiring and managing the necessary resources, and establishing physical and financial control over the business. Lab incorporates microeconomic applications of management principles developed in lectures. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

  • AEC 303 - MICROECONOMIC CONCEPTS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS3

    Emphasis on the development of theoretical models of production and consumption economics and application of these models to problems. The importance of concepts of marginality to managers and consumers is emphasized. Role of risk and uncertainty in resource allocation is outlined.

  • MA 162 - FINITE MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Finite mathematics with applications to business, biology, and the social sciences. Linear functions and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability. Emphasis on setting up mathematical models from stated problems.

  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • AEC 305 - FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL MARKETING PRINCIPLES3

    Analysis of the market's role in determining prices and coordinating productive activities in the food and agricultural systems.

  • AEC 306 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION IN ECONOMICS2

    This course examines how to create and distribute original economic ideas in written and oral forms using appropriate digital technologies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • AEC Course3
  • ECO 391 - ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS STATISTICS.3

    This course provides a survey of empirical techniques relevant to modern economics and business, with a major emphasis on estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, modeling, analysis of variance, regression, forecasting, and time series analysis. Many of the upper division courses in Accounting, Agriculture Economics, Analytics, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Public Policy use and build upon the statistical techniques and analysis learned in ECO 391.

  • Specialty Support3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • AEC 301 - CAREER READINESS FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS1

    This course examines post-graduate opportunities, expectations, and strategies in agricultural economics. Students will explore information relevant to writing resumes, completing job applications, and participating in job interviews.

  • AEC Course3
  • AEC Course3
  • Specialty Support3
  • Specialty Support3
  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Junior Hours31

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • AEC 395, AEC 396 or AEC 3993
  • AEC 490 - QUANTITATIVE METHODS AND PRICE ANALYSIS3

    An integration of current issues in Agricultural Economics with oral and written communications, problem solving, and research. Major emphasis is on a senior paper and oral presentation.

  • Specialty Support3
  • Elective3
  • Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • Specialty Support3
  • Elective3
  • Elective3
  • Elective3
  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Senior Hours31
  • Agricultural Economics (BS) - Opt. B 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • GEN 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT3

    An introductory course requiring critical analysis of the major social, economic, political and scientific issues in agriculture and related disciplines. The historical development of agriculture will be surveyed, followed by discussions of major issues related to agriculture, food and environment. Development of skills in information gathering, critical analysis of issues, and written and oral communication will be emphasized. Satisfies the U.S. Citizenship area of UK Core. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfer students only in spring semesters.

  • MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS4

    An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • CS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING I3

    An introduction to computing and its impact on society from a user's perspective. Topics include computation using spreadsheets, beautification using text formatters and word processors, information management with database managers, and problem solving through program design and implementation using a simple programming language. Not open to students who have received credit for higher level computer science courses.

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • ACC 201 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I3

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to financial accounting from the users' perspectives. Its primary purposes are to promote understanding of financial accounting information for decision making purposes and to focus on financial accounting's role in communicating business results.

  • ECO 202 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II3

    A study of how society’s needs are satisfied with the limited resources available. Topics include contemporary issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international dependencies, and how public policy deals with them. A critical understanding of the U.S. and global economies will enhance your value as a manager or executive of a business (whether for-profit or non-profit), as a family member dealing with jobs and financial decisions, and as a voter in a democracy. The course will allow you to become knowledgeable of, and able to critically think about, the major macroeconomic issues of unemployment, jobs, recessions, economic growth, inflation, deflation, oil prices, monetary policy, the Federal Reserve, fiscal policy, budget deficits, the national debt, international trade, international finance, and the financial system.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ACC 202 - MANAGERIAL USES OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION3

    An introduction to the use of accounting data within an organization to analyze and solve problems and to make planning and control decisions.

  • AEC 302 - AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES4

    A comprehensive study of economic principles and management tools useful in farm and agribusiness decision making. Utilizes a systems approach to the planning, implementation and control of the agricultural business. Specific attention to application of management and decision theory, economic principles used in decision making, and risk management strategies. Emphasis on planning the future course of the business, acquiring and managing the necessary resources, and establishing physical and financial control over the business. Lab incorporates microeconomic applications of management principles developed in lectures. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

  • AEC 303 - MICROECONOMIC CONCEPTS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS3

    Emphasis on the development of theoretical models of production and consumption economics and application of these models to problems. The importance of concepts of marginality to managers and consumers is emphasized. Role of risk and uncertainty in resource allocation is outlined.

  • MA 162 - FINITE MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Finite mathematics with applications to business, biology, and the social sciences. Linear functions and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability. Emphasis on setting up mathematical models from stated problems.

  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • AEC 305 - FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL MARKETING PRINCIPLES3

    Analysis of the market's role in determining prices and coordinating productive activities in the food and agricultural systems.

  • AEC 306 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION IN ECONOMICS2

    This course examines how to create and distribute original economic ideas in written and oral forms using appropriate digital technologies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • AEC Course3
  • ECO 391 - ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS STATISTICS.3

    This course provides a survey of empirical techniques relevant to modern economics and business, with a major emphasis on estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, modeling, analysis of variance, regression, forecasting, and time series analysis. Many of the upper division courses in Accounting, Agriculture Economics, Analytics, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Public Policy use and build upon the statistical techniques and analysis learned in ECO 391.

  • Specialty Support3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • AEC 301 - CAREER READINESS FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS1

    This course examines post-graduate opportunities, expectations, and strategies in agricultural economics. Students will explore information relevant to writing resumes, completing job applications, and participating in job interviews.

  • AEC Course3
  • AEC Course3
  • MKT 300 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT3

    The literature and problems in the retail distribution of consumers' goods, wholesale distribution of consumers' goods, industrial goods, sales organizations, sales promotion and advertising, and price policies.

  • MGT 301 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT3

    A study of planning, organizing and controlling; an interdisciplinary approach; actual decision-making cases.

  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Junior Hours31

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • AEC 395, AEC 396 or AEC 3993
  • AEC Course3
  • FIN 300 - CORPORATION FINANCE3

    An introduction to the basic principles, concepts, and analytical tools in finance. Includes an examination of the sources and uses of funds, budgeting, present value concepts and their role in the investment financing and dividend decision of the corporate enterprise.

  • Elective3
  • Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • AEC 422 - AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT3

    Examines and analyzes decision-making tools and problem-solving techniques available to agribusiness managers. Provides learning experiences in addressing contemporary economic, marketing and management issues through case study analyses, selected readings and computerized business simulations.

  • AN 300 - ANALYZING BUSINESS OPERATIONS3

    To be well-prepared, a business graduate must appreciate the nature and importance of an enterprise’s operations. This core business course introduces underlying concepts and basic analytical techniques essential for managing a firm’s manufacturing and service operations. Operations decisions focus on how to plan, control, and coordinate the organizational resources and processes concerned with producing and distributing goods and/or services. This course emphasizes quantitative and technology-based analyses of real decision problems involving such operations issues as quality control, capacity planning, location analysis, layout analysis, inventory management, forecasting, and project management within a business firm.

  • Elective3
  • Elective3
  • Elective3
    • Total16
    • Total Senior Hours31
  • Agricultural Economics (BS) - Year 1 31 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • GEN 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT3

    An introductory course requiring critical analysis of the major social, economic, political and scientific issues in agriculture and related disciplines. The historical development of agriculture will be surveyed, followed by discussions of major issues related to agriculture, food and environment. Development of skills in information gathering, critical analysis of issues, and written and oral communication will be emphasized. Satisfies the U.S. Citizenship area of UK Core. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfer students only in spring semesters.

  • MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS4

    An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • CS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING I3

    An introduction to computing and its impact on society from a user's perspective. Topics include computation using spreadsheets, beautification using text formatters and word processors, information management with database managers, and problem solving through program design and implementation using a simple programming language. Not open to students who have received credit for higher level computer science courses.

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours31

what you'll study 

Agricultural Economics is much more than farm business.  You’ll study the entire “farm-to-fork” food system, environmental and natural resource issues, local and international economic development, and fulfill an experiential education requirement (i.e. structured internship, independent research, entrepreneurial activity or education abroad program).

The major offers two focus areas:

  •     Agribusiness Management and Food Marketing (must be accompanied by a business minor)
  •     Agricultural Economics

At the bottom of the page, click the most recent major sheet for a complete list of required coursework.


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