College of Agriculture, Food & Environment

Hospitality Management & Tourism

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The Hospitality Management and Tourism (HMT) program will prepare you for the specialized knowledge needed within the hospitality industry.  The degree will help you become a professional focused on technology and consumer needs within the service industry.   

we grow careers 

There are few industries that don’t intersect with Hospitality Management and Tourism.  Possible careers for HMT graduates include: 

  • Corporate Event Manager
  • Economic Development Director
  • Convention Manager
  • Conference/Event Manager for Hotels
  • Wedding Planner
  • Restaurant or Hotel Manager
  • Museum Director
  • Resort Operator
  • City Parks Recreation Director
  • Ecotourism Development Consultant 
  • Winery/Microbrewery Tour Director

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Hospitality Management and Tourism (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • HMT 120 - INTRODUCTION OT HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT AND TOURISM3

    A survey of the historical development and management structure of organizations that comprise the hospitality and tourism industry. The course format includes presentation by industry representatives, lectures and student led discussions.

  • ANT 160 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE MODERN WORLD3

    Directed at non-majors, this course is intended to introduce the student to the diversity of human cultural experience in the contemporary world. Goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of all cultures; to gain a sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and to understand the distinctions between "race," ethnicity and racism. The course features extended descriptions of the cultural dynamics of the culture(s) with which the instructor has worked.

  • GEN 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT3

    An introductory course requiring critical analysis of the major social, economic, political and scientific issues in agriculture and related disciplines. The historical development of agriculture will be surveyed, followed by discussions of major issues related to agriculture, food and environment. Development of skills in information gathering, critical analysis of issues, and written and oral communication will be emphasized. Satisfies the U.S. Citizenship area of UK Core. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfer students only in spring semesters.

  • 1st Foreign Language4
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS4

    An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

  • HMT 210 - HOTEL ROOMS DIVISION MANAGEMENT3

    A comprehensive study of the management principles which apply to the rooms division of a hotel property that includes front desk and housekeeper operations, reservations and billing, accounting procedures and public relations.

  • CS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING I3

    An introduction to computing and its impact on society from a user's perspective. Topics include computation using spreadsheets, beautification using text formatters and word processors, information management with database managers, and problem solving through program design and implementation using a simple programming language. Not open to students who have received credit for higher level computer science courses.

  • 2nd Foreign Language4
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours33

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • HMT 270 - PRINCIPLES OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM3

    An introduction to the structure, operation and characteristics of domestic and international tourism. Topics include transportation modes, destination planning and marketing, wholesale and retail travel agent agreements; geographic, social and cultural aspects of tourism.

  • DHN 241 - FOOD SERVICE SANITATION1

    This course covers the principles of food microbiology, important food borne diseases, standards that are enforced by regulatory agencies, and applied measures for the prevention of food borne diseases and other microbiological problems. It leads to certification from the National Restaurant Association.

    • Total13
Spring Semester
  • ECO 202 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II3

    A study of how society’s needs are satisfied with the limited resources available. Topics include contemporary issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international dependencies, and how public policy deals with them. A critical understanding of the U.S. and global economies will enhance your value as a manager or executive of a business (whether for-profit or non-profit), as a family member dealing with jobs and financial decisions, and as a voter in a democracy. The course will allow you to become knowledgeable of, and able to critically think about, the major macroeconomic issues of unemployment, jobs, recessions, economic growth, inflation, deflation, oil prices, monetary policy, the Federal Reserve, fiscal policy, budget deficits, the national debt, international trade, international finance, and the financial system.

  • ACC 201 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I3

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to financial accounting from the users' perspectives. Its primary purposes are to promote understanding of financial accounting information for decision making purposes and to focus on financial accounting's role in communicating business results.

  • Diversity Requirement3
  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • HMT 308 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD AND BEVERAGE3

    This course provides an overview of the principles of food and beverage concepts, menu development and food service operations in various segments of the hospitality and tourism industries. Food and beverage demonstrations and labs are included. A fee to cover materials and activities may be assessed from students. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours per week.

    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours28

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • HMT 350 - REVENUE MANAGEMENT3

    This course explores the skills and role of revenue managers in hospitality management as well as discussing the benefits of revenue management practices and systems.Consideration is given to concepts such as pricing, value, forecasting, inventory, distribution and evaluation as it relates to maximizing revenue in hospitality.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • ACC 202 - MANAGERIAL USES OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION3

    An introduction to the use of accounting data within an organization to analyze and solve problems and to make planning and control decisions.

  • RTM 340 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE1

    Self-assessment of student’s strengths, limitations, and career aspirations. Preparation of reference files, letters, and resumes. Identification of, application to, and acceptance by department-approved agencies for completion of internship experience.

  • MKT 300 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT3

    The literature and problems in the retail distribution of consumers' goods, wholesale distribution of consumers' goods, industrial goods, sales organizations, sales promotion and advertising, and price policies.

    • Total13
Spring Semester
  • Major Selection3
  • MGT 301 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT3

    A study of planning, organizing and controlling; an interdisciplinary approach; actual decision-making cases.

  • FIN 300 - CORPORATION FINANCE3

    An introduction to the basic principles, concepts, and analytical tools in finance. Includes an examination of the sources and uses of funds, budgeting, present value concepts and their role in the investment financing and dividend decision of the corporate enterprise.

  • RTM 345 - SERVICE MANAGEMENT3

    A survey of the special characteristics, problems, and methods for managing service-oriented organizations. Students will learn principles of services and guest services management in order to see how they can be used in managing any service organization. The course also introduces quantitative techniques associated with managing organizations in the service sector. Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to apply the concepts to their work experiences.

    • Total12
    • Total Junior Hours31

Junior Year

Summer Semester
  • RTM 499 - RETAILING AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP6

    Provides prospective HMT and MAT professionals a 320-hour, 8 week learning experience in a selected agency or organization, under the joint supervision of a qualified manager and a university internship supervisor. More specific details are available in the RTM Internship Manual.

    • Total06
Fall Semester
  • DHN 342 - QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION4

    An introduction to the production and service of food in quantity, to include the application of production techniques and controls, menu planning and service. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 4.5 hours per week.

  • Major Selection3
  • Major Selection3
  • Free Elective3
    • Total13
    • Total Senior Hours28

Senior Year

Spring Semester
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
  • Major Selection3
  • Major Selection3
  • RTM 425 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT3

    Demonstrate knowledge of human resource management and its role in retail business including: employment, training, performance management, compensation, and providing a safe, ethical and fair environment. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • Free Elective3
    • Total15

what you'll study

In HMT, you will take courses designed to match industry requirements and expectations.  The curriculum will challenge you to exercise creative thinking in marketing, communication, and facility operation settings.  Courses are intended to provide you with the knowledge and experience you’ll need to understand current trends and applications in the hospitality and tourism industries. Upon graduation, you will be able to apply your knowledge to business, management, and professional development skills.

You will be introduced to and complete hands-on projects focusing on several aspects of hospitality and tourism: Food & Beverage, Lodging, Attractions, Convention and Meeting Planning, Non-Profit Management and Special Event Coordinating.  Courses such as, HMT 308: Principles of Food & Beverage, teaches food service and menu planning concepts which you’ll  later use to complete your own restaurant critiques.  In HMT 330: Meetings and Convention Management, hospitality industry websites like STR Global are used to analyze and interpret economic impacts of tourism developments in cities like San Diego, Chicago, and Las Vegas.

At the bottom of the page, click the most recent major sheet for a complete list of required coursework.


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