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College of Engineering

Chemical Engineering

8

semesters

17

credit hours per semester

133

total credit hours

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Barbara Knutson

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Chemical Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

177 F. Paul Anderson Tower

Lexington, KY 40506-0046

Program website

(859) 257-8028

  • BS

Chemical engineering emerged over a century ago when engineering professionals were needed to design and implement processes for large, commercial scale chemical production. Modern chemical engineering combines knowledge of chemistry and molecular interactions with the discipline of engineering to address problems at both the small scale (designing nanodevices, for example) and the large scale (bringing chemistry out of the lab to the full scale production of items that we use every day). Chemical engineers invent new processes, improve existing ones and designand operate plants and equipment to transform raw feed stocks into useful products across a wide range of industries including agricultural and food-based products, consumer products, fine chemicals, fuels and petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, plastics and electronic materials.

Chemical engineering students at UK experience an environment where faculty are readily accessible both inside and outside the classroom, and where students have the chance to grow personally and professionally through hands-on research projects, industrial cooperative education and service opportunities. You’ll study a wide range of subjects, including mathematics, chemistry and physics, as well as core engineering topics such as thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, separation processes, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactor design. Our electives address numerous specialized areas of chemical engineering and include courses in advanced materials, biochemical engineering, drug delivery, environmental engineering, fuel science, nanotechnology and polymer processing. A program is also available to fulfill pre-medical requirements simultaneously with requirements for the B.S. in chemical engineering.

Industries Looking for You 

  • Alternative energy
  • Renewable fuel technologies
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Food processing
  • Cosmetics
  • Consumer products
  • Environmental protection
Jared, Chemical Engineering student
"I chose UK over other top engineering schools across the country because of the sense of community and involvement. It was evident at all levels. Students on campus would come up and talk to prospective students. Professors would help you explore your interest as a high school student. "

Jared

Student, Chemical Engineering

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Chemical Engineering (BS) 133 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • EGR 101 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION I1

    Engineering Exploration I introduces students to the engineering and computer science professions, College of Engineering degree programs, and opportunities for career path exploration. Topics and assignments include study skills, team development, ethics, problem solving and basic engineering tools for modeling, analysis and visualization. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. Students who received credit for EGR 112 are not eligible for EGR 101.

  • EGR 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING COMPUTING2

    Fundamentals of Engineering Computing introduces students to the practice and principles of computer programming and computational problem solving. Students will engage in hands-on project-based problem solving using modern computer software and hardware, with a particular emphasis on problems and techniques commonly appearing in various domains of engineering. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EGR 103 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION II2

    Engineering Exploration II focuses on a semester long engineering design project with students working in teams to apply the skills and tools introduced in EGR 101 or EGR 112 for transfer students and EGR 102. Topics and assignments include more in depth exploration of engineering tools for modeling, analysis, visualization, programming, hardware interfacing, team development, documentation and communication. Students gain experience in project management, identifying constraints, iteration and technical report writing.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3
  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • UK Core - Social Sciences3
    • Total16
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • CME 200 - PROCESS PRINCIPLES3

    A course in material and energy balances, units, conversions, tie elements, recycle, bypass, equations of state, heat effects, phase transitions, and the first and second laws of thermodynamics applications in separation processes involving equilibrium reactions and energy exchange.

  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and compounds.

  • CHE 113 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY II2

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 107, emphasizing qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.

  • MSE 201 - MATERIALS SCIENCE3

    Microscopic and macroscopic structure as related to the properties of materials with engineering applications. Lecture and recitation, three hours.

  • UK Core - Humanities3
    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • CME 320 - ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS4

    Fundamentals of thermodynamics, review of first law, second and third laws, VL, LL and SL equilibria, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reaction equilibria.

  • CME 220 - COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING3

    An intoduction to computational tools used in chemical engineering, such as Microsoft Excel, MATLAB, and Aspen.

  • MA 214 - CALCULUS IV3

    MA 214 is a course in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on first and second order equations and applications. The course includes series solutions of second order equations and Laplace transform methods.

  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • STA 381 - ENGINEERING STATISTICS-A CONCEPTUAL APPROACH3

    Data collection, description, and factor “association” versus causal relationship; “Confidence”—statistical versus practical; and Hypothesis testing—All of these covered in a conceptual approach while relying heavily on the mathematical language of probability (e.g., population and sample distributions; sampling; regression on one variable) and use of simulated and real data.

    • Total17
    • Total Sophomore Hours35

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • CME 415 - SEPARATION PROCESSES3

    Separations based on both equilibrium stage concepts and mass transfer rate control are addressed for a range of chemical process operations, including distillation, gas absorption, extraction, adsorption, and membrane-based processes. Design problems are conceived to require computer-aided modeling and analysis.

  • CHE 446G - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR ENGINEERS3

    An introductory course in physical chemistry for engineering students. Kinetic theory, thermodynamics, phase diagrams, colligative properties, electrochemistry, transport properties, kinetics, quantum theory, spectroscopy.

  • CME 330 - FLUID MECHANICS3

    Introduction to the physical properties of fluids, fluid statics. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy for systems and control volumes. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Principles of inviscid and real fluid flows; flow through pipes and around bodies. Application and design of fluid handling systems.

  • WRD 204 - TECHNICAL WRITING3

    Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • CHE 230 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3

    Fundamental principles and theories of organic chemistry.

  • CHE 231 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I1

    Laboratory for CHE 230 or CHE 236. Laboratory, three hours per week.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • CME 006 - THE ENGINEERING PROFESSION (JUNIOR AND SENIOR)0

    Activities of the Student Chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (for junior and senior year chemical engineering students). Lecture, one hour per week.

  • CME 420 - PROCESS MODELING IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING3

    Applications of principles of material and energy balances, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, physical chemistry and numerical methods to problems in separation and transport processes and reactive systems.

  • CME 425 - HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER4

    Fundamental principles of conduction and convective heat transfer, and diffusional and convective mass transfer. Design applications to heat exchanges and packed bed absorbers.

  • CME 432 - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY I2

    A laboratory course emphasizing experimental work in fluid flow, separations, heat transfer, and mass transfer. A majority of this course will focus on lab report writing, statistics, experimental design and safety in the laboratory.

  • CHE 232 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 230.

  • UK Core - Community, Culture and Citizen3
  • Engineering/Sci Elective (Choose 3 hrs)0
    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours34

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • CME 006 - THE ENGINEERING PROFESSION (JUNIOR AND SENIOR)0

    Activities of the Student Chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (for junior and senior year chemical engineering students). Lecture, one hour per week.

  • CME 470 - PROFESSIONALISM, ETHICS AND SAFETY2

    Detailed lectures and supervised discussions on standards of ethics and safety as they relate to the chemical engineering profession. Emphasis will be on safety in plant design and process operations, laboratory safety, hazardous risk management, regulation and oversight.

  • CME 433 - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY3

    A continuation of CME 432. A laboratory course emphasizing more detailed experiments in fluid flow, separations, heat transfer, mass transfer, and chemical reaction kinetics with more extensive data collection and analysis as well as a design component based on the experimental results.

  • CME 455 - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PRODUCT AND PROCESS DESIGN I3

    A lecture and problem solving course emphasizing process economic evaluation, product design, and process synthesis as they apply to chemical units and systems. Appropriate use of software for simulation and design of chemical systems will also be emphasized.

  • CME 550 - CHEMICAL REACTOR DESIGN3

    A lecture and problem course dealing with interpretation of rate data and development of performance equations for single and multiple reactor systems. A design problem will be selected for an industrially important chemical reaction system requiring computer solution.

  • UK Core - Global Dynamics3
  • Engineering/Sci Elective (Choose 3 hrs)0
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • CME 006 - THE ENGINEERING PROFESSION (JUNIOR AND SENIOR)0

    Activities of the Student Chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (for junior and senior year chemical engineering students). Lecture, one hour per week.

  • CME 456 - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROCESS DESIGN II4

    A lecture and problem-solving course intended to combine the principles of chemical engineering with optimization as they apply to the design of chemical processes. Results of each design case studied will be presented by both oral and written reports.

  • CME 462 - PROCESS CONTROL3

    Basic theory of automatic control devices and their application in industrial chemical plants is emphasized. Identification of control objectives, appropriate measurements and manipulations, and possible loops between these, requires integration of the control system with the original process design. Interactions between process units are analyzed using well-known analytical tools and design strategies.

  • Supportive Elective3
  • Engineering/Sci Elective (Choose 3 hrs)0
  • Engineering/Sci Elective (Choose 3 hrs)0
    • Total16
    • Total Senior Hours33

Admission Requirements

Students may directly enroll as pre-engineering students; however, there are minimum admission requirements. Minimum freshman entry requirements are an ACT Math score of 23 or higher or a SAT Math score of 540 or higher. Additionally, students must also meet the minimum Kentucky statewide academic readiness requirements for reading and writing. If you do not meet the initial admission requirements, please refer to the University of Kentucky Bulletin for alternative routes to admission to the College of Engineering.


First-Year Engineering Program

The University of Kentucky College of Engineering First-Year Engineering Program is designed to remove as much guesswork from your major selection as possible. Instead of pushing through a major you don’t like, or adding time and expense by changing majors, you can make an informed choice thanks to a hands-on, team experience that exposes you to all of our engineering majors from the start.

All incoming engineering students will be admitted as undeclared engineering students. However, instead of taking only engineering prerequisites such as calculus, chemistry, and physics, you will take custom-designed engineering courses (EGR 101, 102, 103) during your first year. (Transfer students will be admitted directly to a pre-major program and enrolled in EGR 112 with other transfer students.)

The uniquely designed EGR classes are taught by engineering faculty and cover crucial study habits, fundamentals of engineering computing, and a design project.

Then, during the spring semester of your first-year, you will declare your chosen engineering major when you register for fall classes. With one solid year of fundamentals—as well as a design project—under your belt, you will be prepared to succeed in your desired major. 


Curriculum Information 

In addition to fulfilling UK Core and College of Engineering requirements, students must complete the Chemical Engineering curriculum. The following curriculum meets the requirements for the B.S. degree.

2017-18 Info Sheet 2016-17 Major Sheet 2015-16 Major Sheet 2014-15 Major Sheet 2013-14 Major Sheet 2012-13 Major Sheet 2011-12 Major Sheet 2010-11 Major Sheet 2009-10 Major Sheet 2008-09 Major Sheet

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Kim Anderson
Research Areas: biocompatible surfaces, cancer cell metastasis,
cell-based biosensors, microfluidic devices for biological applications

Dr. Brad Berron
Research Areas: biomolecular interactions with interfaces,
coatings for drug delivery, electrode modification, and more

Dr. Dibakar Bhattacharyya
Research Areas: membrane separation, nanotechnology, tunable
membranes and niocatalysis, water treatment

Dr. Isabel Escobar
Research Areas: sustainable water treatment using membrane
separations, low-fouling membranes and materials, and more

Click here to meet more faculty!


Experiential Education

Many of our students pursue undergraduate research, working side-by-side with faculty and graduate students on experimental and computational problems. Students can earn academic credit for their efforts, as well as an hourly wage or summer stipend. Many of our students undertake co-op placements or summer internships to gain valuable experience in industries that employ chemical engineers. The Engineering Career Development Office provides students valuable assistance in developing job, co-op and internship search skills, facilitates placement for education abroad programs and research opportunities and helps with career network development so you can secure a rewarding career in your chosen field of study


Student Involvement

Active professional and honorary student organizations are an integral part of the educational experience in the College of Engineering. The Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering is home to student chapters of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering and Omega Chi Epsilon honorary. Members of AIChE gather for regular meetings featuring speakers from industry and academia, participate in field trips, networking and community service opportunities and attend regional and national professional conferences. In addition, many of our undergraduates participate in student organizations that include members of all majors.


Career Prospects in Chemical Engineering

The breadth and analytical rigor of the Chemical Engineering degree makes it one of the most highly valued technical credentials and starting salaries for chemical engineering graduates are typically among the highest of all majors. Chemical engineers are in demand and work in a wide range of industries. Our Chemical Engineering alumni have been successful in traditional and alternative energy, biotechnology, consumer products, environmental engineering, fine chemicals, food technology, materials processing, pharmaceuticals and more.


Videos and Multimedia

 

 

 


Featured Career

Chemical Engineers

Chemical engineers apply the principles of chemistry, biology, physics, and math to solve problems that involve the production or use of chemicals, fuel, drugs, food, and many other products. They design processes and equipment for large-scale manufacturing, plan and test production methods and byproducts treatment, and direct facility operations.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$96,940

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

34,300

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

600

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Chemical engineers work mostly in offices or laboratories. They may spend time at industrial plants, refineries, and other locations, where they monitor or direct operations or solve onsite problems. Nearly all chemical engineers work full time.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

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Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Featured Career

Petroleum Engineers

Petroleum engineers design and develop methods for extracting oil and gas from deposits below the Earth’s surface. Petroleum engineers also find new ways to extract oil and gas from older wells.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$130,050

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

35,100

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

3,400

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Petroleum engineers generally work in offices or in research laboratories. However, they also must spend time at drilling sites, often for long periods of time.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Similar Occupations

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • Aerospace Engineers
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  • Chemists and Materials Scientists
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  • Mechanical Engineering Technicians
  • Mechanical Engineers
  • Sales Engineers

Contact

Barbara Knutson

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Chemical Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

177 F. Paul Anderson Tower

Lexington, KY 40506-0046

(859) 257-8028

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky