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College of Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

8

semesters

16

credit hours per semester

130

total credit hours

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Dr. Tingwen "Tim" Wu

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Department of Mechanical Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering

151 Ralph G. Anderson Building

Lexington, KY 40506-0503

Program website

(859) 257-6336

  • BS

From aerospace to manufacturing and aviation to acoustics, a degree in Mechanical Engineering can prepare you for an exciting career in a variety of industries. Examples of products and processes developed by mechanical engineers include engines and control systems for automobiles and aircraft, electric power generation, lifesaving medical devices, robots, and high-tech consumer products such as low-energy lighting, HVAC, refrigeration, and household appliances. Mechanical engineers use mathematics, computers, sophisticated modeling and analysis to solve problems associated with energy usage, propulsion, power generation, sound and vibration, machinery design, and manufacturing.  In short, mechanical engineers play a part in designing and building the mechanical devices and systems that are essential to our everyday lives. 

Careers

Build Your Future

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers ABET-accredited undergraduate programs on two campuses, the main Lexington campus and the Paducah extended campus. The Department of Mechanical Engineering prepares students for
financially lucrative, high-demand professions or for furthering their education through acceptance to prominent graduate schools. Through a challenging curriculum of undergraduate study, collaboration with renowned businesses and technology centers and research options within the college’s centers and consortia, UK delivers an education designed to produce proficient, marketable graduates adept at meeting today’s engineering needs.

Career opportunities in Mechanical Engineering 

  • Aerospace
  • Aviation
  • Automotive
  • Manufacturing
  • Industrial equipment design
  • Consulting firms
  • Government agencies
  • Energy and environmental solutions
"Conducting research has provided me valuable hands-on experience and a more in-depth understanding of the area of aeronautical engineering that I plan to pursue."

Scott

2013 Graduate, Mechanical Engineering

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Mechanical Engineering (BS) 130 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • EGR 101 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION I1

    Engineering Exploration I introduces students to the engineering and computer science professions, College of Engineering degree programs, and opportunities for career path exploration. Topics and assignments include study skills, team development, ethics, problem solving and basic engineering tools for modeling, analysis and visualization. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. Students who received credit for EGR 112 are not eligible for EGR 101.

  • EGR 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING COMPUTING2

    Fundamentals of Engineering Computing introduces students to the practice and principles of computer programming and computational problem solving. Students will engage in hands-on project-based problem solving using modern computer software and hardware, with a particular emphasis on problems and techniques commonly appearing in various domains of engineering. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • PHY 241 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well-written lab report.

  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EGR 103 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION II2

    Engineering Exploration II focuses on a semester long engineering design project with students working in teams to apply the skills and tools introduced in EGR 101 or EGR 112 for transfer students and EGR 102. Topics and assignments include more in depth exploration of engineering tools for modeling, analysis, visualization, programming, hardware interfacing, team development, documentation and communication. Students gain experience in project management, identifying constraints, iteration and technical report writing.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
    • Total16
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 242 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well written lab report.

  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • Choose CHE 107 or UK Core - Humanities3
  • ME 205 - COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING GRAPHICS3

    Combines freehand sketching techniques, both orthographic and pictorial, and the use of a solid modeling program to describe and define mechanical objects using current industrial standards. An introduction to basic dimensioning and tolerancing techniques is included.

  • EM 221 - STATICS3

    Study of forces on bodies at rest. Vector algebra; study of force systems; equivalent force systems; distributed forces; internal forces; principles of equilibrium; application to trusses, frames and beams; friction.

    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • ME 220 - ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I3

    Fundamental principles of thermodynamics.

  • ME 251 - INTRODUCTION TO MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING PROCESSES3

    A background course in the areas of materials and manufacturing processes for mechanical engineers. Includes basic microstructure of materials, material properties and processing. Also includes an overview of casting, metal forming, machining, additive processing, non- traditional manufacturing processes, and manufacturing of non-metallic components.

  • MA 214 - CALCULUS IV3

    MA 214 is a course in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on first and second order equations and applications. The course includes series solutions of second order equations and Laplace transform methods.

  • EM 313 - DYNAMICS3

    Study of the motion of bodies. Kinematics: cartesian and polar coordinate systems; normal and tangential components; translating and rotating reference frames. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies: laws of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.

  • Choose CHE 107 or UK Core - Humanities3
  • Statistical Inferential Reasoning3
    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours36

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • EM 302 - MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS3

    A study of stress and strain in deformable solids with application primarily to linear elastic materials: stress and strain transformations; simple tension and compression of axial members; torsion of shafts; bending of beams; combined loading of members; buckling of columns.

  • EE 305 - ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS AND ELECTRONICS3

    A service course covering electrical engineering principles for engineering or science students with majors outside of electrical engineering. Topics include: AC and DC circuits analysis.

  • ME 330 - FLUID MECHANICS3

    Introduction to the physical properties of fluids, fluid statics. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy for systems and control volumes. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Principles of inviscid and real fluid flows including derivation and application of the Navier-Stokes equations. Flow through pipes and around bodies. Application and design of fluid handling systems.

  • ME 340 - INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS3

    Modeling of mechanical, thermal, hydraulic, and electrical systems, and other phenomena from a system viewpoint. Analysis of continuous-time models for free and forced response. Laplace transforms and transfer functions. Introduction to numerical simulation. Analysis of higher- order systems.

  • WRD 204 - TECHNICAL WRITING3

    Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ME 310 - ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION I3

    An instrumentation lab to provide the student with an understanding of the characteristics and application of instrumentation related to basic measurements in ME. Design and planning of experiments. Uncertainty analysis. Principles and application of technical writing and information retrieval.

  • ME 321 - ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS II3

    Gas mixtures, air-water vapor mixtures. Air conditioning system design. Principles and design of energy conversion devices, power and refrigeration cycles. Principles of combustion, chemical equilibrium, one-dimensional gas dynamics. Nozzle design. Continuation of ME 220.

  • ME 325 - ELEMENTS OF HEAT TRANSFER3

    Fundamental principles of conduction, convection, radiation heat transfer. Numerical methods for heat transfer problems. Design and applications of heat transfer equipment such as fins and heat exchangers.

  • ME 344 - MECHANICAL DESIGN3

    Fundamentals of design with methods of approximation. Introduction to optimum design considerations. Synthesis and problems on the design of various mechanical elements.

  • Math Elective3
    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours30

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • ME 411 - ME CAPSTONE DESIGN I3

    The first semester of the capstone design sequence in mechanical engineering. Topics important in product design and manufacturing are included, including consideration of economics, safety, and communication. Students will develop a project plan concerned with the design of a complex system of current interest to mechanical engineers. Students will work in small groups and emphasis will be on original work. Lecture, two hours; laboratory/independent team work, three hours per week. Prerequisite Engineering Standing; prerequisite: ME 310, ME 325, ME 340, ME 344.

  • ME 311 - ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION II3

    A laboratory to instruct the student in the performance of basic mechanical engineering components and systems. Performance of experiments, application of theory and reporting. Introduction to error analysis, and design and planning of experiments.

  • ME 440 - DESIGN OF CONTROL SYSTEMS3

    Fundamentals of classical control theory. Mathematical representation of feedback control systems using block diagrams and transfer functions. Design and analysis of feedback control systems using root-locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods to ensure system stability and meet desired system response specifications. Numerical simulation of feedback control systems.

  • ME 501 - MECHANICAL DESIGN WITH FINITE ELEMENT METHODS3

    This course emphasizes mechanical design techniques based on the finite element method, using machine design background as the starting point. Techniques for modeling machine elements will be shown in relation to the basic FEM theory. Emphasis will be on quantifying loads, the resulting stress and deflection, and relating them to design allowables, leading to an acceptable design solution.

  • Technical Electives3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ME 412 - ME CAPSTONE DESIGN II3

    Second semester of the capstone design sequence in mechanical engineering. Students will complete a project concerned with the design of a complex system of current interest to mechanical engineers. Students will work in small groups and emphasis will be on original work. Topics include engineering ethics, design and communication. Lecture, 1 hour; lab 4 hours per week.

  • Technical Electives3
  • Technical Electives3
  • Supportive Elective3
  • Global Dynamics3
  • Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA3
    • Total18
    • Total Senior Hours33

Admission Requirements

Students may directly enroll as pre-engineering students; however, there are minimum admission requirements. Minimum freshman entry requirements are an ACT math score of 23 or higher or a SAT math score of 540 or higher. Additionally, students must also meet the minimum Kentucky statewide academic readiness requirements for reading and writing. If you do not meet the initial admission requirements, please refer to the University of Kentucky Bulletin for alternative routes to admission to the College of Engineering.


First-Year Engineering Program

The smartest, most talented engineers around the world are devoting themselves to tackling immense global challenges. As a First-Year Engineering (FYE) student, you get to join them!

In 2008, the National Academy of Engineering identified 14 “Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century”—opportunities to greatly increase humanity’s sustainability, health, security and joy of living. Themes include making solar energy economical, enhancing virtual reality, reverse-engineering the brain, securing cyberspace, providing access to clean water and more.

These ambitious goals demand engineers roll up their sleeves and get to work, which is why we put them front and center during your first year as an engineering student. We have designed the FYE program to inspire you. We want you to discover your passion. We want you to explore where you might make your unique contribution. We want you to get your hands dirty and make stuff that might, one day, lead to a breakthrough.

Why wait until you’re taking upper-level classes to figure out what interests you? Through real engineering classes taught by top faculty and exposure to engineering’s greatest challenges, the FYE program gets you into the game from day one.


Degree Requirements

The following curriculum meets the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, provided the student satisfies the graduation requirements of the College of Engineering.

 

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Meet the Faculty

Dr. Sean Bailey
Research Areas: coherent structures, homogeneous turbulence,
microelectromechanical systems, scaling wall-bounded flows, and more

Dr. Johné Parker
Research Areas: image-processing, imaging sensor/system modeling,
vision system hardware/software design

Dr. Michael Renfro
Research Areas: combustion, optical diagnostics

Dr. Suzanne Smith
Research Areas: aerospace, flexible and nonlinear structures, structural
analysis, system identification, vibration testing and composites

Click here to meet more faculty! 


Experiential Education

Growth and learning also happen outside the classroom. It happens in research labs working alongside professors and graduate students. It happens on student design teams in capstone design courses. It happens on cooperative education rotations and internships with companies all over the country. There are also numerous education abroad programs. A substantial number of our students undertake co-op placements or summer internships to gain valuable experience in industries that employ mechanical engineers. The Engineering Career Development Office is a valuable resource for assisting you with developing job, co-op and internship search skills, participation in education abroad programs, participation in research endeavors and building career networks so you can secure a rewarding career in your chosen field of study


Student Involvement

Student organizations are an outgrowth of student interest and serve the needs of a variety of students. Many provide programs that supplement the classroom experience and extend into areas of service for the community. All provide learning and leadership training for participating students. Student organizations that are typically of interest to Mechanical Engineering students include: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, Pi Tau Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, Society of Women Engineers, Engineers Without Borders, and many others.


Videos and Multimedia

 

 


Career Prospects in Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers work in a wide variety of industries: aerospace, automobile, manufacturing, industrial equipment design, consulting firms, and government agencies. Examples of job placement for our graduates include: GE Appliances, GE Aviation, Cummins, Toyota, Lexmark, Trane, Link-Belt, Belcan, NASA, and many more. 


Featured Career

Mechanical Engineers

Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines. Mechanical engineers design, develop, build, and test mechanical and thermal sensors and devices, including tools, engines, and machines.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$83,060

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

277,500

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

14,600

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Mechanical engineers generally work in offices. They may occasionally visit worksites where a problem or piece of equipment needs their personal attention. Mechanical engineers work mostly in engineering services, research and development, and manufacturing.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Similar Occupations

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • Architectural and Engineering Managers
  • Drafters
  • Materials Engineers
  • Mathematicians
  • Mechanical Engineering Technicians
  • Natural Sciences Managers
  • Petroleum Engineers
  • Physicists and Astronomers
  • Sales Engineers
  • Nuclear Engineers

Featured Career

Aerospace Engineers

Aerospace engineers design primarily aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and missiles. In addition, they test prototypes to make sure that they function according to design.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$105,380

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

72,500

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

-1,600

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Aerospace engineers are employed in industries whose workers design or build aircraft, missiles, systems for national defense, or spacecraft. Aerospace engineers are employed primarily in manufacturing, analysis and design, research and development, and the federal government.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Similar Occupations

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians
  • Architectural and Engineering Managers
  • Computer Hardware Engineers
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • Industrial Engineers
  • Materials Engineers
  • Mechanical Engineers

Featured Career

Industrial Engineers

Industrial engineers find ways to eliminate wastefulness in production processes. They devise efficient systems that integrate workers, machines, materials, information, and energy to make a product or provide a service.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$81,490

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

241,100

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

2,100

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Depending on their tasks, industrial engineers work either in offices or in the settings they are trying to improve. For example, when observing problems, they may watch workers assembling parts in a factory. When solving problems, they may be in an office at a computer, looking at data that they or others have collected.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Similar Occupations

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • Architectural and Engineering Managers
  • Cost Estimators
  • Health and Safety Engineers
  • Industrial Engineering Technicians
  • Industrial Production Managers
  • Logisticians
  • Management Analysts
  • Materials Engineers
  • Occupational Health and Safety Specialists
  • Quality Control Inspectors

UK Alum on a Mission at SpaceX

Jake [Ingram] recently began a job at SpaceX, where he's building rockets to send humans to Mars. He's specifically focused on the engines of Falcon 9, the world's first orbital class rocket capable of reflight.

From undergraduate research with his professors to service projects with other Wildcats, and even a stint as student body president, Jake harnessed every opportunity to learn not only about engineering, but about how to connect with people and achieve a common mission.

Click here to read the full article and find out more.

 

 


Contact

Dr. Tingwen "Tim" Wu

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Department of Mechanical Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering

151 Ralph G. Anderson Building

Lexington, KY 40506-0503

(859) 257-6336

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky