Martin-Gatton College of Agriculture, Food & Environment

Food Biosciences

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Food Biosciences is the program where science and business meet food. Students study everything that happens to food from the farm, field or water until consumption.

Food bioscientists play a vital role in the ever-expanding global food and beverage industry by ensuring our world’s food supply is safe, delicious, healthy, plentiful and sustainable. Food biosciences applies many STEM disciplines, including chemistry, processing, biology and nutrition to create novel foods and improve food quality and safety for consumers.

As a Food Biosciences major, students can pursue specific interests by selecting one of three study options:

  • Research and Development: a rigorous program for students pursuing a career in the food industry or graduate school.
  • Distillation, Fermentation, and Beverage Sciences: a multidisciplinary approach intended for students interested in the innovation and development of beverage alcohol and fermented foods
  • Food Business Management: designed to provide an emphasis on business management, entrepreneurship, marketing, and finance of food businesses.

 

Upon completing your degree in Food Biosciences, you will have established broad expertise to be applied in a wide variety of employment opportunities and be prepared to climb the career ladder offered by food industries. You’ll find opportunities like:

 

  • Product Development Specialist
  • Quality Assurance Manager
  • Microbiology Scientist/Technician
  • Food Safety Manager/Coordinator
  • Food Policy Specialist
  • Food Engineering Specialist
  • Ingredient Formulation Specialist
  • Food Chemistry Scientist
  • Food Inspection Coordinator

 

With employers such as:

  • Kraft
  • Nestle
  • Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)
  • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Kentucky Department of Agriculture
  • Kellogg’s
  • Kroger
  • Tyson
  • Smithfield Foods
  • Unilever

 

 

Come See for Yourself 

To learn more about this program, campus life, and chat with an advisor, schedule a campus visit. Virtual visits may be necessary in some cases. 

 

In-State Tuition

Thanks to agreements through the Academic Common Market, students from the following states can enroll in the Food Biosciences program at in-state tuition rates: 

  • West Virginia
These agreements are subject to change without notice. For the most up-to-date information on the Academic Common Market, click here
 

 

Courses You Will Take

Access Major Map

source: myUK: GPS

Food Biosciences (BS) DFB Option 120 - 122 hours
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year
«
»

Total Freshman Year Credit Hours : 31 - 33

Fall Semester
15 - 17 Credit Hours
FSC 107
3
FSC 107 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD BIOSCIENCES

FSC 107

3 credit hours

A general basic food science course that deals with world food needs and available food supplies, types of food and nutritive values and use, food processing technology and distribution methods.

SAG 210
3
SAG 210 - INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS

SAG 210

3 credit hours

Introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural components of sustainable food production and distribution in local and regional food systems. The definition, emergence, and growth of sustainable agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop, and livestock management practices. Emphasis is placed on holistic analyses of current issues in agriculture and food systems from environmental, profitability, and social justice perspectives.

AFE 100
3
AFE 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT

AFE 100

**UK Core - Community, Culture and Citizen**

3 credit hours

How do farmers in Kentucky impact families in California? How can the fashion industry curb the amount of plastic in our oceans? How does fast food affect sea life in the Gulf of Mexico? Whether we realize it or not, each of us has a relationship with agriculture, food and the environment. From race and gender, diet and lifestyles, tourism and evolving technologies, this course encourages you to recognize and think critically about the interconnected systems that affect all human life. By addressing these challenges, you will develop a greater appreciation for how you can positively impact our planet.

Prereq: This course is open to students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment or those in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Residential College's Belle C. Gunn Living Learning Program. Freshman only in Fall semesters and transfer students only in Spring semesters.

MA 109
3 - 5
MA 109 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA

MA 109

**UK Core - Quantitative Foundations**

3 - 5 credit hours

MA 109 covers selected topics in algebra, such as a review of high school algebra, quadratic formula, systems of linear equations, introduction to functions and graphing. In particular, the course will cover solving equations (linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), graphing on the Cartesian coordinate system (with special emphasis on lines and their slope), solving systems of linear equations (with substitution and elimination), using technology such as graphing calculators, solving applied problems, and general functions (with emphasis on exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions). This course is not available for credit to persons who have received credit in any mathematics course of a higher number with the exceptions of MA 111, 112, 123, 162, 201 and 202. Credit not available on the basis of special examination.

Prereq: Two years of high school algebra and a Math ACT score of 21 or above, OR a Math SAT score of 510 or above or a Math SAT2016 score of 540 or above, OR grade of B or better in MA 111, OR appropriate score on math placement exam, OR consent of department.

WRD 110
3
WRD 110 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I

WRD 110

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills.

Spring Semester
16 Credit Hours
UK Core - Arts and Creativity
3
CHE 109
4
CHE 109 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1A

CHE 109

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

4 credit hours

A study of chemical principles and their applications to pure and mixed substances. The two-semester CHE 109/110 sequence covers the same material as CHE 105.

Prereq: Math ACT of 23 or above, B or better in MA 109, C or better in MA 123, or equivalent math placement score.

UK Core - Social Sciences
3
WRD 111
3
WRD 111 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II

WRD 111

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences.

Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110

UK Core - Humanities
3

Total Sophomore Year Credit Hours : 29

Fall Semester
14 Credit Hours
ECO 201
3
ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I

ECO 201

3 credit hours

This course will introduce you to the economic way of thinking and provides basic tools of economic theory used to study markets, individual consumer behavior, and the behavior of firms. It employs concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, tradeoffs, marginal thinking, and gains from trade. This course will examine how markets work and how supply and demand interact to determine prices, explore market failure such as externalities, the tragedy of the commons and public goods and the role of the government in market activity. Students will also be introduced to theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students successfully completing this course should leave with an understanding of these basic economic principles and their applicability to real world situations. Students should also be able to incorporate the tools of economic analysis into their own decision-making processes as they weigh costs and benefits to make choices.

CHE 110
4
CHE 110 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1B

CHE 110

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

4 credit hours

A continuation of CHE 109; CHE 109 and 110 are equivalent to CHE 105.

Prereq: CHE 109 with grade C or better.

CHE 111
1
CHE 111 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

CHE 111

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

1 credit hours

A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105 or CHE 110, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.

Prereq or coreq: CHE 105 or CHE 110.

UK Core - Global Dynamics
3
STA 210
3
STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING

STA 210

**UK Core - Statistical Inferential Reason**

3 credit hours

The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

Prereq: Any course in the new Quantitative Foundations area of General Education beginning Spring 2012.

Spring Semester
15 Credit Hours
DHN 212
3
DHN 212 - INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION

DHN 212

3 credit hours

This course provides students, including future healthcare professionals, with core nutrition knowledge associated with wellness, quality-of-life, and diet-related health conditions. It emphasizes the physiological relationships between nutrition and health such as nutrient metabolism, digestive disorders, chronic disease, disordered eating, meal planning, and food and nutrient insecurity.

Prereq: Past or concurrent enrollment in any CHE course (CHE 103 or CHE 104 or CHE 105 or CHE 108 or CHE 109); OR past or concurrent enrollment in any BIO course (BIO 103 or BIO 148 or BIO 152 or BIO 208); OR past or concurrent enrollment in ANA 109.

BIO 148
3
BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I

BIO 148

3 credit hours

BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

Prereq: Math ACT 25 or Math SAT 590 or HS GPA of 3.6 or MA 109 or BIO 155 grade of B or better, or permission of instructor.

HRT 335
3
HRT 335 - DISTILLATION, WINE & BREWING SCIENCE

HRT 335

3 credit hours

Broad introduction into wine, brewing, and distillation science. Information includes viticulture (growing grapes for wine), wine making (production), wine flavor chemistry, commodities for fermentation, brewing science (beer making to distribution) and distilling. This class is not based on consumption, but rather the combination of science and management strategies needed to produce quality products. A structured vocabulary is associated with production, marketing and distribution of wine, brewing and distilled products. An overarching outcome of this course is that students can describe the chemistry, biology and technology involved in fermented beverages and apply these skills in a problem solving setting. The course will focus on introductory concepts, career paths available and problem solving skills required in each element of the production chain.

WRD 203 or WRD 204 or SAG 310
3
Elective
3

Total Junior Year Credit Hours : 30

Fall Semester
16 Credit Hours
Professional Support
3
FSC 306
4
FSC 306 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD PROCESSING

FSC 306

4 credit hours

Commercial processing of foods including theory and use of heat exchangers, separators, freezers, air and vacuum dryers, evaporators, membrane separation, electrodialysis, emulsion formers, extruders, and irradators. Physico-chemical changes in osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, pH, surface tension, viscosity, emulsification, and colloidal dispersions in processed foods will be discussed. Processing of waste streams will also be discussed. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

Prereq: CHE 105.

Elective
3
Professional Support
3
BIO 152
3
BIO 152 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY II

BIO 152

3 credit hours

The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

Prereq: C or better in BIO 148 or permission of instructor, concurrent or previous enrollment in CHE 105 or CHE 110.

Spring Semester
14 Credit Hours
FSC 434G
4
FSC 434G - FOOD BIOCHEMISTRY

FSC 434G

4 credit hours

Chemical, biochemical, and physical properties of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, pigments and food additives as they relate to food quality and stability as well as human health during processing and storage. Lecture: 3 hours; lab: 2 hours.

Prereq: CHE 105 and CHE 111 or equivalent.

FSC 538
4
FSC 538 - FOOD BIOFERMENTATION

FSC 538

4 credit hours

The use of microorganisms in the preservation of raw foods and the manufacture of new foods. Manipulation and improvement of cultures to ensure production of desirable end products. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours.

Prereq: BIO 148 and BIO 152.

Professional Support
3
Elective
3

Total Senior Year Credit Hours : 28 - 30

Fall Semester
13 - 15 Credit Hours
FSC 535
4
FSC 535 - FOOD ANALYSIS

FSC 535

4 credit hours

Techniques and instrumentation used to determine the chemical composition of foods. Emphasis is placed on the principles of chemical analysis as it relates to foods and food processing. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours per week.

Prereq: FSC 434G.

FSC 530
5
FSC 530 - FOOD MICROBIOLOGY AND SAFETY

FSC 530

5 credit hours

Study of procedures for the enumeration and identification of foodborne microorganisms important in the food industry. Principles for controlling contamination and growth of microorganisms during production, processing, handling and distribution of food products. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours.

Prereq: BIO 148 and BIO 152.

FSC 395, FSC 399 or EXP 396
1 - 3
FSC 430
3
FSC 430 - SENSORY EVALUATION OF FOODS

FSC 430

3 credit hours

This course deals with the sensory evaluation methods used for food products based on flavor, odor, color, and texture. This includes techniques for measuring sensory attributes, instrumental analysis of foods, statistical analyses of data, and how sensory evaluation programs are utilized in the food industry.

Prereq: STA 210 or STA 296 and FSC 306 or FSC 304, or consent of instructor.

Spring Semester
15 Credit Hours
FSC 536
4
FSC 536 - CAPSTONE IN FOOD BIOSCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

FSC 536

4 credit hours

Concepts of developing/improving new food products or food processing including: consumer awareness, marketing, ingredient specifications and check testing, product formulation, stabilization of product, packaging to meet shelf life goals, shelf testing of products, thermal processing, challenge testing, establishment of HACCP system, consumers testing, market testing, and introduction to the market. A capstone course, where all concepts of food science are used to extend or create new food products for the marketplace. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours.

Prereq: FSC 306 and FSC 530, or consent of instructor.

FSC 540
3
FSC 540 - FOOD SANITATION & REGULATIONS

FSC 540

3 credit hours

Food processing in the United States is regulated by two Federal agencies: USDA FSIS for the meat and poultry processing businesses and FDA for all other food processing businesses. This legislation places an obligation on food business operators to ensure that all activities are carried out hygienically. This course provides the practical and technical information needed to develop, implement and manage a successful food safety system to ensure the wholesomeness of our food supply.

Prereq: FSC 530 or permission of the instructor.

Professional Support
3
Elective
3
Elective
2

Please login to http://myUK.uky.edu to access your major map and personalized degree audit via the myUK Graduation Planning System (myUK GPS).

Food Biosciences (BS) FBM Option 120 hours
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year
«
»

Total Freshman Year Credit Hours : 32

Fall Semester
16 Credit Hours
FSC 107
3
FSC 107 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD BIOSCIENCES

FSC 107

3 credit hours

A general basic food science course that deals with world food needs and available food supplies, types of food and nutritive values and use, food processing technology and distribution methods.

SAG 210
3
SAG 210 - INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS

SAG 210

3 credit hours

Introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural components of sustainable food production and distribution in local and regional food systems. The definition, emergence, and growth of sustainable agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop, and livestock management practices. Emphasis is placed on holistic analyses of current issues in agriculture and food systems from environmental, profitability, and social justice perspectives.

AFE 100
3
AFE 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT

AFE 100

**UK Core - Community, Culture and Citizen**

3 credit hours

How do farmers in Kentucky impact families in California? How can the fashion industry curb the amount of plastic in our oceans? How does fast food affect sea life in the Gulf of Mexico? Whether we realize it or not, each of us has a relationship with agriculture, food and the environment. From race and gender, diet and lifestyles, tourism and evolving technologies, this course encourages you to recognize and think critically about the interconnected systems that affect all human life. By addressing these challenges, you will develop a greater appreciation for how you can positively impact our planet.

Prereq: This course is open to students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment or those in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Residential College's Belle C. Gunn Living Learning Program. Freshman only in Fall semesters and transfer students only in Spring semesters.

MA 123
4
MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS

MA 123

**UK Core - Quantitative Foundations**

4 credit hours

An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or Math SAT2016 of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department. Note: Math placement test recommended.

WRD 110
3
WRD 110 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I

WRD 110

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills.

Spring Semester
16 Credit Hours
UK Core - Arts and Creativity
3
CHE 109
4
CHE 109 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1A

CHE 109

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

4 credit hours

A study of chemical principles and their applications to pure and mixed substances. The two-semester CHE 109/110 sequence covers the same material as CHE 105.

Prereq: Math ACT of 23 or above, B or better in MA 109, C or better in MA 123, or equivalent math placement score.

UK Core - Social Sciences
3
WRD 111
3
WRD 111 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II

WRD 111

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences.

Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110

UK Core - Humanities
3

Total Sophomore Year Credit Hours : 29

Fall Semester
14 Credit Hours
ECO 201
3
ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I

ECO 201

3 credit hours

This course will introduce you to the economic way of thinking and provides basic tools of economic theory used to study markets, individual consumer behavior, and the behavior of firms. It employs concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, tradeoffs, marginal thinking, and gains from trade. This course will examine how markets work and how supply and demand interact to determine prices, explore market failure such as externalities, the tragedy of the commons and public goods and the role of the government in market activity. Students will also be introduced to theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students successfully completing this course should leave with an understanding of these basic economic principles and their applicability to real world situations. Students should also be able to incorporate the tools of economic analysis into their own decision-making processes as they weigh costs and benefits to make choices.

CHE 110
4
CHE 110 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1B

CHE 110

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

4 credit hours

A continuation of CHE 109; CHE 109 and 110 are equivalent to CHE 105.

Prereq: CHE 109 with grade C or better.

CHE 111
1
CHE 111 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

CHE 111

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

1 credit hours

A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105 or CHE 110, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.

Prereq or coreq: CHE 105 or CHE 110.

UK Core - Global Dynamics
3
STA 296
3
STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS

STA 296

**UK Core - Statistical Inferential Reason**

3 credit hours

Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

Prereq: MA 113, MA 123, MA 137, or equivalent.

Spring Semester
15 Credit Hours
DHN 212
3
DHN 212 - INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION

DHN 212

3 credit hours

This course provides students, including future healthcare professionals, with core nutrition knowledge associated with wellness, quality-of-life, and diet-related health conditions. It emphasizes the physiological relationships between nutrition and health such as nutrient metabolism, digestive disorders, chronic disease, disordered eating, meal planning, and food and nutrient insecurity.

Prereq: Past or concurrent enrollment in any CHE course (CHE 103 or CHE 104 or CHE 105 or CHE 108 or CHE 109); OR past or concurrent enrollment in any BIO course (BIO 103 or BIO 148 or BIO 152 or BIO 208); OR past or concurrent enrollment in ANA 109.

Professional Support
3
Professional Support
3
BIO 148
3
BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I

BIO 148

3 credit hours

BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

Prereq: Math ACT 25 or Math SAT 590 or HS GPA of 3.6 or MA 109 or BIO 155 grade of B or better, or permission of instructor.

Elective
3

Total Junior Year Credit Hours : 32

Fall Semester
16 Credit Hours
BIO 152
3
BIO 152 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY II

BIO 152

3 credit hours

The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

Prereq: C or better in BIO 148 or permission of instructor, concurrent or previous enrollment in CHE 105 or CHE 110.

Elective
3
Professional Support
3
FSC 306
4
FSC 306 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD PROCESSING

FSC 306

4 credit hours

Commercial processing of foods including theory and use of heat exchangers, separators, freezers, air and vacuum dryers, evaporators, membrane separation, electrodialysis, emulsion formers, extruders, and irradators. Physico-chemical changes in osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, pH, surface tension, viscosity, emulsification, and colloidal dispersions in processed foods will be discussed. Processing of waste streams will also be discussed. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

Prereq: CHE 105.

Professional Support
3
Spring Semester
16 Credit Hours
FSC 434G
4
FSC 434G - FOOD BIOCHEMISTRY

FSC 434G

4 credit hours

Chemical, biochemical, and physical properties of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, pigments and food additives as they relate to food quality and stability as well as human health during processing and storage. Lecture: 3 hours; lab: 2 hours.

Prereq: CHE 105 and CHE 111 or equivalent.

Professional Support
3
Professional Support
3
WRD 203 or WRD 204 or SAG 310
3
Elective
3

Total Senior Year Credit Hours : 25 - 27

Fall Semester
12 - 14 Credit Hours
FSC 530
5
FSC 530 - FOOD MICROBIOLOGY AND SAFETY

FSC 530

5 credit hours

Study of procedures for the enumeration and identification of foodborne microorganisms important in the food industry. Principles for controlling contamination and growth of microorganisms during production, processing, handling and distribution of food products. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours.

Prereq: BIO 148 and BIO 152.

FSC 395, FSC 399 or EXP 396
1 - 3
Professional Support
3
FSC 430
3
FSC 430 - SENSORY EVALUATION OF FOODS

FSC 430

3 credit hours

This course deals with the sensory evaluation methods used for food products based on flavor, odor, color, and texture. This includes techniques for measuring sensory attributes, instrumental analysis of foods, statistical analyses of data, and how sensory evaluation programs are utilized in the food industry.

Prereq: STA 210 or STA 296 and FSC 306 or FSC 304, or consent of instructor.

Spring Semester
13 Credit Hours
FSC 536
4
FSC 536 - CAPSTONE IN FOOD BIOSCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

FSC 536

4 credit hours

Concepts of developing/improving new food products or food processing including: consumer awareness, marketing, ingredient specifications and check testing, product formulation, stabilization of product, packaging to meet shelf life goals, shelf testing of products, thermal processing, challenge testing, establishment of HACCP system, consumers testing, market testing, and introduction to the market. A capstone course, where all concepts of food science are used to extend or create new food products for the marketplace. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours.

Prereq: FSC 306 and FSC 530, or consent of instructor.

FSC 540
3
FSC 540 - FOOD SANITATION & REGULATIONS

FSC 540

3 credit hours

Food processing in the United States is regulated by two Federal agencies: USDA FSIS for the meat and poultry processing businesses and FDA for all other food processing businesses. This legislation places an obligation on food business operators to ensure that all activities are carried out hygienically. This course provides the practical and technical information needed to develop, implement and manage a successful food safety system to ensure the wholesomeness of our food supply.

Prereq: FSC 530 or permission of the instructor.

Elective
3
Elective
3

Please login to http://myUK.uky.edu to access your major map and personalized degree audit via the myUK Graduation Planning System (myUK GPS).

Food Biosciences (BS) RDE Option 120 hours
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year
«
»

Total Freshman Year Credit Hours : 28

Fall Semester
14 Credit Hours
FSC 107
3
FSC 107 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD BIOSCIENCES

FSC 107

3 credit hours

A general basic food science course that deals with world food needs and available food supplies, types of food and nutritive values and use, food processing technology and distribution methods.

CHE 105
4
CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I

CHE 105

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

4 credit hours

A study of chemical principles and their application to pure and mixed substances. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 109 and CHE 110.

Prereq: Math ACT of 25 or above, C or better in MA 110, or equivalent math placement scores.

CHE 111
1
CHE 111 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

CHE 111

**Applies to UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math**

1 credit hours

A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105 or CHE 110, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.

Prereq or coreq: CHE 105 or CHE 110.

WRD 110
3
WRD 110 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I

WRD 110

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills.

AFE 100
3
AFE 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT

AFE 100

**UK Core - Community, Culture and Citizen**

3 credit hours

How do farmers in Kentucky impact families in California? How can the fashion industry curb the amount of plastic in our oceans? How does fast food affect sea life in the Gulf of Mexico? Whether we realize it or not, each of us has a relationship with agriculture, food and the environment. From race and gender, diet and lifestyles, tourism and evolving technologies, this course encourages you to recognize and think critically about the interconnected systems that affect all human life. By addressing these challenges, you will develop a greater appreciation for how you can positively impact our planet.

Prereq: This course is open to students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment or those in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Residential College's Belle C. Gunn Living Learning Program. Freshman only in Fall semesters and transfer students only in Spring semesters.

Spring Semester
14 Credit Hours
CHE 107
3
CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II

CHE 107

3 credit hours

A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to elements and compounds.

Prereq: CHE 105 or CHE 110 (with a C or better).

CHE 113
2
CHE 113 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY

CHE 113

2 credit hours

A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 107, emphasizing qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.

Prereq: CHE 111. Prereq or coreq: CHE 107.

WRD 111
3
WRD 111 - COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II

WRD 111

**UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II**

3 credit hours

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences.

Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110

BIO 148
3
BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I

BIO 148

3 credit hours

BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

Prereq: Math ACT 25 or Math SAT 590 or HS GPA of 3.6 or MA 109 or BIO 155 grade of B or better, or permission of instructor.

DHN 212
3
DHN 212 - INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION

DHN 212

3 credit hours

This course provides students, including future healthcare professionals, with core nutrition knowledge associated with wellness, quality-of-life, and diet-related health conditions. It emphasizes the physiological relationships between nutrition and health such as nutrient metabolism, digestive disorders, chronic disease, disordered eating, meal planning, and food and nutrient insecurity.

Prereq: Past or concurrent enrollment in any CHE course (CHE 103 or CHE 104 or CHE 105 or CHE 108 or CHE 109); OR past or concurrent enrollment in any BIO course (BIO 103 or BIO 148 or BIO 152 or BIO 208); OR past or concurrent enrollment in ANA 109.

Total Sophomore Year Credit Hours : 32

Fall Semester
17 Credit Hours
MA 123
4
MA 123 - ELEMENTARY CALCULUS AND ITS APPLICATIONS

MA 123

**UK Core - Quantitative Foundations**

4 credit hours

An introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. Not open to students who have credit in MA 113 or MA 137. Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department.

Prereq: Math ACT score of 26 or above, or Math SAT of 600 or above, or Math SAT2016 of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109, or appropriate math placement score, or consent of department. Note: Math placement test recommended.

BIO 152
3
BIO 152 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY II

BIO 152

3 credit hours

The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

Prereq: C or better in BIO 148 or permission of instructor, concurrent or previous enrollment in CHE 105 or CHE 110.

ECO 201
3
ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I

ECO 201

3 credit hours

This course will introduce you to the economic way of thinking and provides basic tools of economic theory used to study markets, individual consumer behavior, and the behavior of firms. It employs concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, tradeoffs, marginal thinking, and gains from trade. This course will examine how markets work and how supply and demand interact to determine prices, explore market failure such as externalities, the tragedy of the commons and public goods and the role of the government in market activity. Students will also be introduced to theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students successfully completing this course should leave with an understanding of these basic economic principles and their applicability to real world situations. Students should also be able to incorporate the tools of economic analysis into their own decision-making processes as they weigh costs and benefits to make choices.

FSC 306
4
FSC 306 - INTRODUCTION TO FOOD PROCESSING

FSC 306

4 credit hours

Commercial processing of foods including theory and use of heat exchangers, separators, freezers, air and vacuum dryers, evaporators, membrane separation, electrodialysis, emulsion formers, extruders, and irradators. Physico-chemical changes in osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, pH, surface tension, viscosity, emulsification, and colloidal dispersions in processed foods will be discussed. Processing of waste streams will also be discussed. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

Prereq: CHE 105.

UK Core - Global Dynamics
3
Spring Semester
15 Credit Hours
CHE 236 or CHE 230
3
STA 296
3
STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS

STA 296

**UK Core - Statistical Inferential Reason**

3 credit hours

Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

Prereq: MA 113, MA 123, MA 137, or equivalent.

Elective
3
UK Core - Arts and Creativity
3
SAG 210
3
SAG 210 - INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS

SAG 210

3 credit hours

Introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural components of sustainable food production and distribution in local and regional food systems. The definition, emergence, and growth of sustainable agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop, and livestock management practices. Emphasis is placed on holistic analyses of current issues in agriculture and food systems from environmental, profitability, and social justice perspectives.

Total Junior Year Credit Hours : 31

Fall Semester
15 Credit Hours
WRD 203 or WRD 204 or SAG 310
3
UK Core - Social Sciences
3
ASC 300 or FSC 304
3
Professional Support
3
Elective
3
Spring Semester
16 Credit Hours
FSC 434G
4
FSC 434G - FOOD BIOCHEMISTRY

FSC 434G

4 credit hours

Chemical, biochemical, and physical properties of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, pigments and food additives as they relate to food quality and stability as well as human health during processing and storage. Lecture: 3 hours; lab: 2 hours.

Prereq: CHE 105 and CHE 111 or equivalent.

UK Core - Humanities
3
FSC 538
4
FSC 538 - FOOD BIOFERMENTATION

FSC 538

4 credit hours

The use of microorganisms in the preservation of raw foods and the manufacture of new foods. Manipulation and improvement of cultures to ensure production of desirable end products. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours.

Prereq: BIO 148 and BIO 152.

Professional Support
3
Elective
2

Total Senior Year Credit Hours : 26 - 28

Fall Semester
13 - 15 Credit Hours
FSC 535
4
FSC 535 - FOOD ANALYSIS

FSC 535

4 credit hours

Techniques and instrumentation used to determine the chemical composition of foods. Emphasis is placed on the principles of chemical analysis as it relates to foods and food processing. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours per week.

Prereq: FSC 434G.

FSC 530
5
FSC 530 - FOOD MICROBIOLOGY AND SAFETY

FSC 530

5 credit hours

Study of procedures for the enumeration and identification of foodborne microorganisms important in the food industry. Principles for controlling contamination and growth of microorganisms during production, processing, handling and distribution of food products. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours.

Prereq: BIO 148 and BIO 152.

FSC 430
3
FSC 430 - SENSORY EVALUATION OF FOODS

FSC 430

3 credit hours

This course deals with the sensory evaluation methods used for food products based on flavor, odor, color, and texture. This includes techniques for measuring sensory attributes, instrumental analysis of foods, statistical analyses of data, and how sensory evaluation programs are utilized in the food industry.

Prereq: STA 210 or STA 296 and FSC 306 or FSC 304, or consent of instructor.

FSC 395, FSC 399 or EXP 396
1 - 3
Spring Semester
13 Credit Hours
FSC 536
4
FSC 536 - CAPSTONE IN FOOD BIOSCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

FSC 536

4 credit hours

Concepts of developing/improving new food products or food processing including: consumer awareness, marketing, ingredient specifications and check testing, product formulation, stabilization of product, packaging to meet shelf life goals, shelf testing of products, thermal processing, challenge testing, establishment of HACCP system, consumers testing, market testing, and introduction to the market. A capstone course, where all concepts of food science are used to extend or create new food products for the marketplace. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours.

Prereq: FSC 306 and FSC 530, or consent of instructor.

FSC 540
3
FSC 540 - FOOD SANITATION & REGULATIONS

FSC 540

3 credit hours

Food processing in the United States is regulated by two Federal agencies: USDA FSIS for the meat and poultry processing businesses and FDA for all other food processing businesses. This legislation places an obligation on food business operators to ensure that all activities are carried out hygienically. This course provides the practical and technical information needed to develop, implement and manage a successful food safety system to ensure the wholesomeness of our food supply.

Prereq: FSC 530 or permission of the instructor.

Professional Support
3
Elective
3

Please login to http://myUK.uky.edu to access your major map and personalized degree audit via the myUK Graduation Planning System (myUK GPS).

Apply for Our Scholarships

In addition to automatic and competitive scholarships from the University of Kentucky, our students are also eligible for a variety of awards from the college. With one of the largest college-based scholarship programs, we awarded nearly $1 million to our students during the 2022-23 academic year. These awards are based on a variety of criteria such as hometown, major, career goals, high school extracurriculars, and more. 

For CAFE first-semester freshmen, the scholarship application is now open and will close on January 16, 2024.

For CAFE transfer students and current students, the scholarship application opens in January and will close on March 1.

Freshmen Housing Program

Live where you learn: 

The Martin-Gatton College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Living Learning Program (CAFE LLP) is open to all first-semester freshmen at the University of Kentucky.

Through field trips, professional development workshops and service programs, students in our LLP apply their knowledge and passion to global issues at the intersection of food, economics and environment.  All students in this program will also enroll in connected courses, share study groups and have an assigned peer mentor - all to help with the transition to college life. 

Click here for more information on the CAFE LLP. 

 

International Opportunities

Should you choose, you can gain international experience while earning credit towards your Food Biosciences degree. We offer a variety of study, research, intern, and service abroad programs for all budgets and comfort levels. Some Food Biosciences students have even earned grants and scholarships to fully fund their international experiences.

These programs are designed to broaden your mind and introduce you to unfamiliar ways of thinking and living. Ultimately, these experiences will make you a more competitive applicant in the global workforce. 

Pre-Med? Pre-Vet? Pre-Law?

Each year, many of our graduates attend professional schools in areas such as veterinary medicine, law, pharmacy, dentistry, and more. If you are interested in pursuing a similar path, we offer pre-professional advising services. 

Our pre-professional advisors will assist you with: 

  • Listing required courses for respective professional schools 
  • Scheduling pre-professional courses alongside your major requirements 
  • Suggesting supplemental coursework 
  • Connections to student organizations, volunteer work, shadowing experiences, etc.
  • Preparatory information for admission tests
  • Navigating the application process

 

Click here for more information.

Clubs & Organizations

Students can join organizations and clubs to learn outside the classroom, gain valuable work experience and develop their leadership skills. Many of our students are involved in:

Food Science Club
acquaints students with the food industry through extramural activities: outings, fundraisers and competitions

The Campus Kitchen
provides a sustainable approach to reducing food waste while providing meals to those struggling with hunger

Big Blue Pantry
students serve the along side members in a food pantry serving University of Kentucky students experiencing food insecurity

Learn more about Clubs & Organizations in our college.


Imagine Your Future

Agricultural and Food Scientists

Agricultural and food scientists research ways to improve the efficiency and safety of agricultural establishments and products.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$76,400

per year in 2023

Number of Jobs

35,400

in 2023

10 Year Job Outlook

2,100

new jobs (average)


Imagine Your Future

Microbiologists

Microbiologists study microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi, and some types of parasites.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$85,470

per year in 2023

Number of Jobs

20,900

in 2023

10 Year Job Outlook

1,100

new jobs (average)


Imagine Your Future

Chemists and Materials Scientists

Chemists and materials scientists research and analyze the chemical properties of substances to develop new materials, products, or knowledge.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$87,180

per year in 2023

Number of Jobs

95,000

in 2023

10 Year Job Outlook

5,800

new jobs (average)