Welcome to the Patterson School of Diplomacy at the University of Kentucky
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Concentrations

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Major Concentrations

Given the enormous range of potential careers in the international arena, flexibility is key. All students are expected to select a major concentration from the six core areas: Diplomacy, International Commerce, International Security, Development, International Organizations, and Intelligence. Specific course requirements within these concentrations (detailed below) are minimal, enabling students to take a wide variety of electives as long as at least one-half of the required 30 credit hours are in 600 to 700 level courses. Students should work closely with their academic advisor to fashion a precise plan of study that provides essential skills and training, while matching personal interests and goals. Following are examples of course combinations which have been selected by Patterson School students in the last few years. A more complete listing of possible courses may be found in the Graduate School Program and University Bulletin.

The study of diplomacy prepares students for careers with the U.S. or foreign diplomatic services, international organizations, Congress, and non-governmental organizations. Our students have also found career opportunities in regional, state, provincial, or local government, as well as with research entities, private foundations and business.

This interdisciplinary concentration centers on mastering strong analytical and leadership skills, with an aim toward the formulation and implementation of policy options. A solid understanding of international political and economic statecraft is particularly important, as is the development of negotiating, conflict resolution, and cross-cultural communication skills. These skills are highly marketable in the public, private and non-profit sectors. Students concentrating in diplomacy at Patterson develop the tools necessary to succeed in their career of choice.

Required: DIP 700 Dynamics of Diplomacy, DIP 777

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • DIP 600D Mediation and Conflict Resolution
  • DIP 600I Diplomacy of Nuclear Weapons
  • AEC 626 Agriculture and Economic Development
  • DIP 720 Economic Statecraft
  • DIP 725 Geopolitical Modeling
  • DIP 730 Cross-Cultural Negotiation and Bargaining
  • DIP 750 Defense Statecraft
  • DIP 755 Politics and Diplomacy of the Middle East
  • GS 600 Media and Other Non-traditional Actors
  • HIS 575 Diplomacy and Foreign Policy of the United States Since 1919
  • LAW 925 International Law
  • PS 431G Conduct of American Foreign Relations
  • PS 437G Dynamics of International Law
  • PS 674 Theories of International Politics
  • PS 730 American Foreign Policy
  • PS 737 Transnational Organizations and Processes

Career paths for International Security graduates are expanding rapidly. In the public sector, growth in the armed forces, the Departments of Defense, and Homeland Security, and other security agencies worldwide has created a favorable environment for those interested in International Security. The private sector, in part due to increased privatization and public funding, is also rapidly expanding.

Patterson School students will probe the array of today’s global threats (traditional military, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, ethnic conflict), their political and economic implications, and the strategies best used to address them. They will also examine peace and post-conflict stability operations. Keen analytical skills top the list of core competencies in this field. Language skills – particularly in Arabic, Chinese, and several other languages – can help set top career candidates apart. Students concentrating in International Security at Patterson develop a familiarity both with the grand debates of national security strategy and the nuts and bolts of military and bureaucratic activity.

Required: DIP 600A National Security, DIP 777

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • DIP 600B East Asian Security
  • DIP 600C European Security
  • DIP 600D Mediation and Conflict Resolution
  • DIP 600I Diplomacy of Nuclear Weapons
  • DIP 700 Dynamics of Diplomacy
  • DIP 725 Geopolitical Modeling
  • DIP 750 Defense Statecraft
  • GS 600 Issues in Applied Economic Intelligence
  • PS 431G Conduct of American Foreign Relations

Courses covering specific geographic regions drawn from the following departments:
History
Political Science
Anthropology
Geography

The International Development concentration covers a wide range of issues from microfinance and sustainable development to human rights and justice. There is a strong focus on policy analysis and fundamental theory. The concentration includes the study of economic development as taught in Economics, with courses designed to focus on a particular facet of development like agricultural or social development drawn from different disciplines. Students often combine the study of development either with International Commerce (trade and economic statecraft) or International Organizations (institutions where development is practiced). Students are also encouraged to develop a geographic specialty—generally Latin America, Africa, or South or Southeast Asia—and to pursue an internship in a developing country.

Students in this concentration are frequently committed to a particular issue – poverty eradication, global public health, nutrition, gender equality, mitigating infectious diseases – and determined to make a difference. Careers options include development and humanitarian assistance work in either the public (USAID, Peace Corps), or private sector (the Open Society Institute, World Vision, Catholic Relief Services, CARE), as well as international organizations such as the World Bank, the United Nations, or the International Development Banks.

Required: PS 737, DIP 777, plus either DIP 700 or DIP 720

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • AEC 532 Agriculture and Food Policy
  • AEC 626 Agriculture and Economic Development
  • ANT 646 Global Health
  • ANT 637 Socio/Cult Dimensions of Economic Dev.
  • DIP 600H Africa Development Challenges
  • DIP 700 Dynamics of Diplomacy
  • DIP 720 Economic Statecraft
  • DIP 730 Cross Cultural Negotiation
  • ECO 473G Economic Development
  • ECO 670 International Financial Institutions
  • ECO 672 World Trade and Commercial Policy
  • GEO 542 Political Geography
  • GS 600 Media and Other Non-Traditional Actors
  • LAW 824 Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • LAW 925 International Law
  • PS 437G Dynamics of International Law
  • PS 738 Politics of Economic Development
  • SOC 640 Science, Agriculture, and Development

International Organizations includes the study of various kinds of institutions from inter-governmental and regional organizations like the United Nations and the European Union, to non-governmental organizations, including both the non-profit and for-profit sectors. Students concentrating in this area develop a solid theoretical foundation regarding how these institutions should operate and the limitations imposed on their activity by international law and politics. Students often combine the study of International Organizations with an emphasis in a substantive issue area like international development, human rights, or the environment. This focus can also be fused with elements of diplomacy and security.

Potential employers include those detailed above under development, as well as regional political institutions and the full range of UN specialized agencies.

Required: PS 737, DIP 777, plus either DIP 700 or DIP 720

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • AEC 532 Agriculture and Food Policy
  • AEC 626 Agriculture and Economic Development
  • ANT 646 Global Health
  • ANT 637 Socio/Cult Dimensions of Economic Dev.
  • DIP 600H Africa Development Challenges
  • DIP 700 Dynamics of Diplomacy
  • DIP 720 Economic Statecraft
  • DIP 730 Cross Cultural Negotiation
  • ECO 473G Economic Development
  • ECO 670 International Financial Institutions
  • ECO 672 World Trade and Commercial Policy
  • GEO 542 Political Geography
  • GS 600 Media and Other Non-Traditional Actors
  • LAW 824 Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • LAW 925 International Law
  • PS 437G Dynamics of International Law
  • PS 738 Politics of Economic Development
  • SOC 640 Science, Agriculture, and Development

In the wake of September 11th, careers opportunities in intelligence have expanded significantly in number and scope. Globally governments are investing more public resources in both human- and technology-based intelligence resources. Opportunities exist not only in the traditional intelligence community, but also in areas such as homeland security and law enforcement. At the same time, private entities engaged in political risk analysis (such as Stratfor, the Eurasia Group, or the Economist Intelligencer Unit) have expanded exponentially, offering new and exciting career paths. Outstanding language, technical, interpersonal, and analytical skills are critically important for both analytical and operational work. Regional specialization and language skill can also be a significant asset here.

Patterson School graduates become familiar with the intelligence cycle, the structure of global intelligence collection and analysis, and will develop an understanding of the technical systems utilized to tackle the challenges posed by state and non-state actors. They also learn the ways in which intelligence contributes to policymaking and foreign policy, as well as how oversight is maintained. Students will also probe ethical concerns.

Required: DIP 600 International Intelligence, DIP 777

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • DIP 600A International Security
  • DIP 600I Diplomacy of Nuclear Weapons
  • DIP 700 Dynamics of Diplomacy
  • DIP 750 Defense Statecraft
  • DIP 725 Geopolitical Modeling
  • GS 600 Issues in Applied Economic Intelligence
  • PS 430G National Security Policy
  • PS 431G Conduct of American Foreign Relations

Courses covering specific geographic regions drawn from the following departments:
History
Political Science
Anthropology
Geography

The concentration in International Commerce readies students for careers in both the public and private sectors. Public sector careers (in the US at Commerce, USTR, TDA, Ex-Im Bank, Millennium Challenge Corporation) focus on maintaining and improving the framework through which private international commercial activity takes place. This includes economic policy, economic modeling, international trade policy, trade agreement enforcement, regulatory enforcement and business promotion, and commercial advocacy. Private sector opportunities are countless and varied.

Patterson School graduates specializing in international commerce and trade learn the fundamentals of commercial activity, and develop the analytical and interpersonal skills that are sought by international companies that are engaged in global management, sales, operations, supply chain management, communications, technology, and customer service.

Required: DIP 720 Economic Statecraft, DIP 777

Other Possibilities (not limiting):

  • DIP 600E International Trade Policy and Practice
  • AEC 610 International Trade in Agricultural Products
  • AEC 645 Natural Resource Economics
  • BA 610 Global Business Management
  • DIP 725 Geopolitical Modeling
  • DIP 730 Cross Cultural Negotiation
  • DIP 740 Globalization
  • ECO 465G Comparative Economic Systems
  • ECO 473G Economic Development
  • ECO 670 International Financial Institutions
  • ECO 672 World Trade and Commercial Policy
  • GS 600 Issues in Applied Economic Intelligence
  • MGT 608 Comparative International Management
  • MKT 624 International Marketing Management
  • PS 433G Politics of International Economic Relations
  • PS 733 International Political Economy
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Minor Concentrations

9 credit hours or more are needed to establish a minor concentration.

If you minor in a major concentration area, you must take the following (plus two other courses):

  • Dynamics of Diplomacy DIP 700
  • International Commerce: either DIP 720 or DIP 740
  • International Security: DIP 600A
  • Development/International Organization PS 737
  • Intelligence: DIP 600G ational Intelligence

Students may minor in other, more specialized areas as well. In these cases, your schedule should be worked out with your advisor. Some notional suggestions are listed below:

  • AEC 532 Agriculture and Food Policy
  • AEC 626 Agriculture & Economic Development
  • AEC 610 International Trade in Agricultural Products
  • ANT 580 Topics in Anthropology
  • ANT 637 Socio/Cult Dimensions of Economic Dev.
  • ANT 640 Science, Agriculture, and Development
  • ANT 646 Global Health
  • DIP 730 Cross Cultural Negotiation
  • GS 600 Media and Other Non-Traditional Actors
  • CJT 619 Proseminar in International Communications
  • CJT 719 International/Intercultural Com
  • CJT 730 Seminar in Mass Media/Public Policy
  • DIP 730 Cross Cultural Negotiation
  • DIP 720 Economic Statecraft
  • ECO 465G Comparative Economic Systems
  • ECO 652 Public Policy Economics
  • ECO 672 World Trade and Commercial Policy
  • GEO 542 Political Geography
  • GEO 565 Topics in Geography
  • GEO 702 Concepts in Geography
  • GEO 713 Economic Geography

Courses covering specific geographic regions drawn from the following departments:

  • History
  • Political Science
  • Anthropology
  • Geography

Patterson School | 455 POT, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0027 | 859-257-4666

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