College of Agriculture, Food & Environment

Agriculture - Individualized Curriculum

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With an individualized program (IP) in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, you have the unique opportunity to customize your education and tailor it to a set of special interests.

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Individualized Curr-Sustain Agric (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I3
  • CHE 104 - INTRODUCTORY GENERAL CHEMISTRY3

    A study of general principles, including laws of definite and multiple proportions, stoichiometry, gases, electronic structure, chemical bonding, periodic relationships, oxidation-reduction, chemical equilibrium and acids/ bases. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 105 and CHE 107. Not recommended for students seeking careers in science, engineering, medicine, pharmacy or dentistry for which the recommended sequence is CHE 105/107

  • MA 123 or PHI 1204
  • GEN 100 - ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT3

    An introductory course requiring critical analysis of the major social, economic, political and scientific issues in agriculture and related disciplines. The historical development of agriculture will be surveyed, followed by discussions of major issues related to agriculture, food and environment. Development of skills in information gathering, critical analysis of issues, and written and oral communication will be emphasized. Satisfies the U.S. Citizenship area of UK Core. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfer students only in spring semesters.

  • SAG 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE3

    Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural components of sustainable food production and marketing. The definition, emergence, and growth of sustainable agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop, and livestock management practices. Relationships between environmental stewardship, producer profitability, and community-based food systems are emphasized.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3
  • CHE 108 - INTRODUCTION TO INORGANIC, ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY WITHOUT LABORATORY3

    Formally a continuation of CHE 104, a study of selected aspects of inorganic, organic, and biochemistry including the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, basic organic functional groups, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. Not recommended for students seeking careers in medicine, pharmacy, science, dentistry, and engineering for which the recommended sequence is CHE 105/107

  • CLD 102 or SOC 1014
  • STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING3

    The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

  • UK Core - Natural, Physical and Math3
    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I3

    BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • PLS 366 - FUNDAMENTALS OF SOIL SCIENCE4

    Study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and how these properties relate to plant nutrient availability and plant growth, land- use planning and management issues, and soil and water quality issues. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours.

  • SAG 201 - CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON SUSTAINABILITY3

    Examines cultural dimensions within the concept of sustainability through a close reading of texts addressing the relationship between people and nature. The application of cultural constructs used by individuals and societies in experiencing, interpreting and impacting the natural world are studied. Insights and observations of noted writers on environmental issues are discussed in relation to the interdependence between individuals, civilizations, and nature. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • UK Core - Humanities3
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • AEC 305 - FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL MARKETING PRINCIPLES3

    Analysis of the market's role in determining prices and coordinating productive activities in the food and agricultural systems.

  • BIO 152 - PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II3

    The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

  • DHN 212 - INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION3

    An elementary study of the principles of nutrition and the application of these principles to providing adequate nutrition to humans. The chemical and physiological approach to nutrition is emphasized.

  • Specialty Support3
  • UK Core - Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • AEC 302 - AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES4

    A comprehensive study of economic principles and management tools useful in farm and agribusiness decision making. Utilizes a systems approach to the planning, implementation and control of the agricultural business. Specific attention to application of management and decision theory, economic principles used in decision making, and risk management strategies. Emphasis on planning the future course of the business, acquiring and managing the necessary resources, and establishing physical and financial control over the business. Lab incorporates microeconomic applications of management principles developed in lectures. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

  • PLS 386 - PLANT PRODUCTION SYSTEMS4

    In-depth analysis of the underlying principles of plant production systems. Successful strategies, based on application of the principles developed by lecture and laboratory activities, will be discussed in either agronomic or horticultural contexts. Special attention will be given to minimizing the the environmental impact of the plant production techniques employed. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

  • SOC 360 - ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY3

    A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice.

  • Specialty Support3
    • Total14
Spring Semester
  • ASC 382 - ANIMAL PRODUCTION PRINCIPLES3

    A broad survey of animal agricultural management cov- ering cattle, horses, poultry, swine, sheep and goats. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of scientific disciplines including anatomy, physiology, nutrition, reproduction and genetics. For nonmajors only.

  • Ethics Course4
  • Free Elective3
  • Free Elective3
  • Free Elective3
    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours29

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SAG 397 - APPRENTICESHIP IN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE3

    Provides students with hands-on experience operating an organic community supported agriculture produce farm and marketing its harvest in the local community. Students receive training across the full range of production and marketing activities under the guidance of the Course Coordinator and the professional staff of the farm management team.

  • SOC/CLD 420 -- or -- SOC/CLD 5174
  • Specialty Support3
  • Free Elective3
  • Free Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • AEC 445G - INTRODUCTION TO RESOURCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS3

    Economic analysis of the problems of assuring resource availability and environmental quality. Theoretical concepts and empirical tools for evaluating resource and environmental policy.

  • SAG 490 - INTEGRATION OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PRINCIPLES3

    Examination of the complex scientific and social issues involving sustainable agriculture systems. Intensive experience in critical analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data will be provided, and students will consider substantive ethical issues and global themes. Students will evaluate the sustainability of different world agricultural systems and consider the potential implications.

  • Specialty Support3
  • Free Elective (5 hours)5
    • Total14
    • Total Senior Hours29

IP - Entomology

The curriculum of this program offers both a strong, diverse core of entomological courses and the flexibility to make each student's experience unique through individualized research experiences, and selection of specialized coursework from other disciplines (agriculture sciences, biology, and chemisty). Because of the small size of this program, students will have many opportunities to develop one-on-one interactions with faculty and graduate students.  All students conduct independent research under a faculty mentor.  Most students have part-time employment opportunities in laboratories that allow their entomological skills to grow. 

Possible Careers 
  • Medical Entomologist
  • Conservation Biologist
  • Extension Agent or Specialise
  • Biology/Environmental Educator
  • Forensic Entomologist
  • Pest Management Professional
  • Research Scientist
  • Crop Consultant
  • Naturalist
  • Forest Entomologist

 

IP - Modern Agronomic Crop Production

Agronomists impact lives every day.  They produce and use plants for food, fiber, forage, fuel, and to enhance the human environment.  They promote conservation of our soil and water resources and all related services.  Choosing to study agronomy is more than farming.  Whether you are interested in agriculture, pure science or even business, agronomy offers you the opportunity to pursue a career that will impact the planet. 

IP - Sustainable Agriculture

In sustainable agriculture, students have the opportunity to:

  • Work in a hands-on apprenticeship at the University's Organic Farming Research and Education Unit
  • Interact with a passionate interdisciplinary group of faculty 
  • Learn with and from fellow students in a community atmosphere
  • Prepare for a career in the exciting and growing field of Sustainable Agriculture 

 


Four Year Plans for Individualized Programs

Entomology Modern Agronomic Crop Productio Sustainable Agriculture

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