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College of Design

Architecture

15

hours per semester

8

semesters total

120

total credit hours

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Gregory Robinson

Director of Recruitment

College of Design

College of Design

College of Design School of Architecture

117 Pence Hall

Lexington, KY 40506

Program website

859-257-8870

  • BA
Other programs from the College of Design:

The undergraduate Architecture program is an intensive regimen of architecture studios and courses in the history and theory of architecture, building technology, digital technology, and professional practice. To become a licensed architect in Kentucky and other states, the graduate must complete a two-year Master of Architecture program, both of which are offered at UK.  The School of Architecture at the University of Kentucky has achieved a national reputation for excellence through the commitment of its faculty and the spirit, talent and dedication of its students. The School of Architecture is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

Careers

Design Your Future

The four-year Bachelor's degree in Architecture qualifies students for careers in architectural offices, building construction, development and public agencies. To become a licensed architect in Kentucky and other states, the graduate must complete a two-year Master of Architecture program. Both degree programs are offered at the University of Kentucky.

Career opportunities in Architecture  

  • Architect
  • Interior Design
  • Furniture Design
  • Industrial Desgin
  • Product Design
  • Graphic Design
  • Urban Design
  • Video Game Design & Programming
  • Set Design for Film, TV & Theatre
  • Development
  • Adaptive Reuse Design
  • Consultant
  • Architecture Law
  • Fashion Design
  • Business Strategic Planning & Organization
  • Building Construction
  • Public Agencies
"The School of Architecture at the University of Kentucky College of Design is the only NAAB-accredited architecture program in Kentucky. Our top-rated faculty, internationally renowned studio projects, and state-of-the-art facilities provide our students with the necessary skills to compete and excel in a global design market. We look forward to welcoming our future designers to the UK/CoD/SoA."

Jeffrey Johnson

Director, School of Architecture

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Architecture (BAARC) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • ARC 101 - DRAWING I: OBSERVATIONAL FREEHAND DRAWING3

    Focuses on the rigors of observational drawing. Structure, space, contour, line, and color are explored through study of the human body, still life, landscape, and architectural spaces with attention to their application to the architectural experience. Studio: 6 hours per week.

  • ARC 151 - DESIGN STUDIO I6

    Students investigate two-dimensional media, analyze buildings and text, and construct models as a means to explore basic environmental design principles. The studio continues with an emphasis on three- dimensional exploration and construction. Students investigate architectural design programs and materials of constructions. Studio: 12 hours per week.

  • ARC 111 - INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AND THEORY3

    Introduces enduring themes and generative forces in the history and theory of architecture by examining the cultural periods of various societies in different historical periods.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ARC 252 - DESIGN STUDIO II6

    Students gain understanding of architectural language based on modern archetypes. Projects explore aesthetic and poetic possibilities while also emphasizing cohesion among space, structure, site, program, and material assembly. A variety of assembly types are introduced for the examining of structural and materials concepts. Studio: 12 hours per week. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • UK Core course3
  • UK Core course3
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3
    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours30

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • ARC 253 - DESIGN STUDIO III6

    Extends the consideration of the issues related to the isolated object to the multiplication of that object with reference to issues of site and context, focusing attention on formal strategies for obtaining thematic unity. Studio: 12 hours per week.

  • ARC 203 - DIGITAL MEDIA WITHIN ARCHITECTURE3

    A workshop that introduces students to the creative, analytical and generative potential of computers in the design of architecture. Lecture: one hour; laboratory: four hours per week.

  • ARC 212 - HISTORY AND THEORY I: 15TH-17TH CENTURIES3

    An overview of the key themes and historical developments in architecture from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries. Emphasis on Western examples and relationships with earlier and later conditions, including contemporary problematics.

  • PHY 151 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS3

    A lecture demonstration course covering the mechanics of solids, liquids, gases, heat, and sound. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHY 201, 211 or 231.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ARC 354 - DESIGN STUDIO IV6

    Studies the formal characteristics of site and context together with laws and principles of building and nature, ecology, and the ways these forces influence architecture. The studio investigates applications of current technology and building systems. Studio: 12 hours per week.

  • ARC 231 - STRUCTURAL AND MATERIAL CONCEPTS3

    Introduces technological concepts of building and investigates the spatial and formal language of architecture with visual and physical analyses of various building structures and materials through the use of computers, field observations, etc.

  • ARC 213 - HISTORY AND THEORY II: 18TH-19TH CENTURIES3

    Continues the investigation of key themes and historical developments of architecture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

  • UK Core course3
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours30

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • ARC 355 - DESIGN STUDIO V6

    Explores the architectural problem of a large-scale interior space conditioned by social and cultural programs. Special problems in lighting and acoustics will be addressed along with long-span structure. Attention will be paid to issues of scale, life safety social interaction and public circulation. Studio: 12 hours per week.

  • ARC 314 - HISTORY AND THEORY III: 20TH CENTURY AND CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE3

    Investigates modern and late twentieth century architecture as well as current themes and issues in contemporary architecture in relation to their historical context. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • ARC 332 - ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS I3

    Design, analysis and coordination of building systems to meet basic human needs and social expectations of the built environment. Considers ecology when addressing the thermal environment, water, sanitation, concentrated energy, circulation, life- safety, and communication.

  • UK Core course3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • ARC 456 - DESIGN STUDIO VI6

    This studio explores various design topics including building technology, furniture design, digital visualization, historic preservation, and human settlement. Studio: 12 hours per week.

  • ARC 315 - WORLD ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM3

    An investigation of the factors and a consideration of the theories which have affected world urban form related to architecture.

  • ARC 333 - ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS II3

    A continuing investigation into ideas and issues raised in ARC 332, Environmental Controls I.

  • ARC 434 - STRUCTURAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS I3

    An exploration of structural concepts with an emphasis on statics, strength of materials, and the use of mathematical and computer-aided methods of analysis.

    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours30

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • Seminar Course (ARC 511 - 515)3
  • ARC 435 - MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION3

    An intensive exploration of materials and building techniques with special consideration given to the properties of materials and their uses in various methods of construction.

  • UK Core course3
  • UK Core course3
  • ARC Elective (3 hours)3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • UK Core course3
  • UK Core course3
  • ARC Elective - ARC 457 is recommended6
  • ARC Elective (3 hours)3
    • Total15
    • Total Senior Hours30

What You'll Study

 

The undergraduate architecture program consists of an intensive regimen of architecture studios and courses in the history and theory of architecture, building technology, digital technology, and professional practice.
The architecture studio is the foundation of the program. Studios provide a social and curricular framework for the architecture student. Representational skills such as drawing, model making, and computer modeling are practiced rigorously as essential skills for design. In addition to the design studio, students study building technology; materials and structural systems; digital fabrication techniques; the history, theory, and criticism of architecture; and the ethical and professional principles of a successful architecture practice.

Students also learn contemporary processes such as prototyping to solve problems, and innovate new solutions. Prototypes, three-dimensional physical models, are created with digital design and fabrication tools and technologies such as CNC milling, 3-D printing, and laser-cutting. Prototypes can be created quickly allowing students to propose solutions; examine results; redefine problems; and propose new solutions. In the School of Architecture, prototyping has come to define a new model of design research in which the focus is not so much on the creation of a final design but rather on the creation of design knowledge itself.

A study of building materials begins in first-year studio and evolves into a technical analysis of structural planning and design, materials and methods of construction, and building systems. Environmental controls for buildings are also investigated to provide an understanding of the complex visual, acoustical, and thermal aspects of designed space. Professional and legal aspects of architecture practice are addressed in a series of electives and seminars including issues relating to professional registration, ethics, and social responsibility.
 

 


Professional Practice Previews

Architecture students have the opportunity to work at design firms over spring break each year. These programs place students in firms for 1-2 weeks to garner professional experience, develop professional networks, and contribute to the firms' projects. The firms range from large, multi-national corporate offices to small, boutique design practices offering a variety of experiences in cities across the US and sometimes the world. 

The programs provides a conduit for students to engage in a variety of collaborative, design-related assignments including executing research, attending staff or client meetings, making site visits, producing drawings and models, selecting materials and/or products.  All of these tasks extend the students’ educational opportunities beyond the classroom and expose them to possible career paths.

Participating architecture firms (varies per year):

  • Barkow Leibinger, Berlin
  • Bernard Tschumi, New York
  • Brooks + Scarpa, Los Angeles
  • Bureau Spectacular, Los Angeles
  • Studio Libeskind, New York
  • Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, New York
  • Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, New Orleans
  • Future Cities Lab, San Francisco
  • Griffen Enright, Los Angeles
  • HWKN, New York
  • IwamotoScott, San Francisco
  • Kennedy + Violich, Chicago
  • LTL, New York
  • Morphosis Architects, New York + Culver City
  • NMDA (Neil Denari), Los Angeles
  • Olson Kundig, Seattle
  • OMA, New York
  • Oyler Wu Collaborative, Los Angeles
  • P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S, Los Angeles
  • RUR (Reiser + Umemeto), New York
  • Snohetta, New York + Oslo
  • SO-IL, New York
  • Studio Gang, Chicago
  • SHoP, New York
  • Urban Lab, Chicago

Resources

The UK College of Design is housed primarily in Pence Hall, Miller Hall, the Funkhouser Building, and Bowman Hall; all of which are located in the heart of UK's central campus.
Additional facilities in the College include:

  • Hunter M. Adams Design Library: located in Pence Hall, the library contains 33,000 volumes, an extensive special collection, and computer and study areas.
  • Computing: a full-service computer lab located in Pence Hall, offers large-format printing, 3D computer-generated modeling, and access to the University’s electronic resources.
  • Workshop and Digital Fabrication Lab: a teaching and making facility equipped with a fully loaded wood workshop, metal workshop, and rapid prototyping workshop.

Computing

The College of Design Computer Lab is located in the basement of Pence Hall. The lab offers large-format printing, 3D computer-generated modeling, and access to the University’s electronic resources.  The equipment available in the computer lab includes:

 

  • 25 Apple iMacss in Class Room
  • 2 Apple iMacs in Plotting Workroom
  • 6 Mac Pro Tower Computers  in Plotting Workroom
  • Letter Size Black and White Laser Printer
  • Tabloid Size Color Laser Printer
  • 2 Color Flatbed Scanners
  • 3 Color Flatbed Scanners with Multi-sheet feeders
  • HP Designjet 800PS Plotter
  • HP Designjet T1100 Plotter
  • HP Designjet T1300 Plotter
  • HP Designjet T2300 Plotter with Wide Format Scanner

Workshop and Digital Fabrication Lab

The Workshop and Digital Fabrication Lab provides a safe, well-maintained environment in which both students and faculty can explore three-dimensional construction in most medium.

The laboratory maintains equipment to handle both large and small scale constructions. Below is a short list of the digital technology equipment and some of the more traditional tools and machines for making:

Prototyping Facility
96” x 48” x 17” Precix 3axis CNC router
48” x 36” x 6” AXYZ 3axis cnc router
18” x 24” - 60 watt Universal Laser
24” x 32” - 120 watt Universal laser
Zcorp 310 plus 3d printer (starch)
Uprint Plus 3d printer (abs)
Dimension 1200es 3d printer (abs)
Soluble Station (ss)
Wax Dipping Oven
De-powdering Station
7 Stationary support computers

Wood shop and General Use
two table saws
panel saw
two chop saws
wood and metal lathes
jointer
scroll saw
mortiser
radial arm saw
stationary belt sander
3 drill press (L, m, sm)
4 band saws
3 stationary disc/belt sander
two planers

Metal shop
manual roller
vertical band saw
large drill press
polishing wheel
shear
break
oxygen and acetylene torch set
Hobart MIG welder 110 service (inter-shield)
Millermatic 252 220 service mig and spoolmatic welder
Hypertherm Powermax 45 plasma cutter
welding supports
grinders
abrasive chop saw

*supervising office and tool cage with typical hand tool support such as chisels, drill bits, heat guns, orbital sanders, cordless drills, etc…
** stationary and portable compressor
***24-7 assembly space

Accreditation

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, Master of Architecture, and Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The University of Kentucky School of Architecture offers the following NAAB accredited degree programs:

Master of Architecture (pre-professional degree + 48 graduate credits)

The University of Kentucky offers the following pre-professional degree:

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture (120 undergraduate credits)


Premajor Requirements 

The College of Design School of Architecture is a selective admissions program.  All prospective students interested in majoring in Architecture must also complete a seperate application and a series of design exercises in order to be considered for admittance into the Architecture program. The application and selective admissions exercises can be found at www.ukcod.slideroom.com

Major Requirements 

The School of Architecture in the College of Design administers the program curriculum, and the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees grants degrees. The curriculum consists of 120 credits for the undergraduate degree and 48 credits for the graduate degree for a total of 168 credits in six years.

The curriculum conforms to the following outline:

Hours

I. Undergraduate UK Core requirements .............................................................. 30

II. Core program requirements .............................................................................. 78

III. Undergraduate elective courses ..................................................................... 12

TOTAL ................................................................................................................ 120

 

The above distribution of credit assumes that the UK Core requirements in mathematics and a foreign language have already been met prior to admission to the program, an assumption supported by historical student data. It also assumes that the Humanities section is to be met by approved core program courses in the History and Theory of Architecture (ARC 212 and ARC 213). 

    

Online Architecture Application ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM

Featured Career

Architects

Architects plan and design houses, factories, office buildings, and other structures.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$74,520

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

112,600

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

7,800

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Architects spend much of their time in offices, where they develop plans, meet with clients, and consult with engineers and other architects. They also visit construction sites to prepare initial drawings and review the progress of projects to ensure that clients’ objectives are met. About 1 in 5 were self-employed in 2014.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Featured Career

Architectural and Engineering Managers

Architectural and engineering managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities in architectural and engineering companies.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$130,620

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

182,100

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

3,700

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Most architectural and engineering managers work in offices, although some may also work in laboratories and industrial production plants or at construction sites. Most work full time, and about half worked more than 40 hours a week in 2014.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

Contact

Gregory Robinson

Director of Recruitment

College of Design

College of Design

College of Design School of Architecture

117 Pence Hall

Lexington, KY 40506

859-257-8870

Other programs from the College of Design:

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky