College of Education

Middle Level Education

120

Semester Hours

31

Credit Hours/Major Hours

30

Core Hours

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The Middle Level Teacher Education program emphasizes the development of professionally trained specialists in teaching early adolescents. As such, the program models team teaching and collaborative learning.

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The program emphasizes the development of professionally trained specialists in teaching early adolescents.

Career opportunities in Middle Level Education

  • Middle Level Classroom Teacher
Middle Level Education
“I chose to attend the University of Kentucky because of the strong reputation that the College of Education had among the surrounding counties, and with principals within the area.” - Katie (2015, Middle Level Education)

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-Engl/Comm & Math (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • ENG 230 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics indicated in the subtitle. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings with different subtitles each semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.

  • LIN 211 - INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE3

    Designed to give students a broad introduction to the field of linguistics, the scientific study of human language. The first half of the course offers a basic foundation in the study of grammar, introducing the five core components of human grammar: syntax, morphology, phonetics, phonology and semantics. The second half of the course builds upon this knowledge by surveying a number of subfields of linguistics, including historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and language and the brain.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • MA 201 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Sets, numbers and operations, problem solving and number theory. Recommended only for majors in elementary and middle school education.

  • ENG 251 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I3

    A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote?such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women?s rights?as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered may include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville?s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass? Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture or Lecture with discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 334.

  • MA 162 - FINITE MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Finite mathematics with applications to business, biology, and the social sciences. Linear functions and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability. Emphasis on setting up mathematical models from stated problems.

  • ENG 330 - TEXT AND CONTEXT: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    The core course in the English Major focusing on the close reading and analysis of a single major literary text, or a focused set of texts, in historical and critical context. Students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. ENG major and minor requirement. Repeatable for up to six hours of credit.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • ENG 252 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II3

    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of later periods in U.S. history. The course explores the changing social conditions in which American literature was produced?such as the Roaring 20?s, the Cold War, and the upheaval of the 1960?s?and several key literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Texts and authors covered may include Edith Wharton?s House of Mirth, Nella Larsen?s Quicksand, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, the poetry of Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and more. Lecture or Lecture and Discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 335.

  • MA 202 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Algebraic reasoning, introduction to statistics and probability, geometry, and measurement.

  • Take MA 261 or CS 1013
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours30

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • LIN 317 - LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication. Course may be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

  • MA 241 - GEOMETRY FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    A course in plane and solid geometry designed to give middle school mathematics teachers the knowledge needed to teach a beginning geometry course. Cannot be counted toward the mathematics minor or major.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • ENG 509 - COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS3

    A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of English composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Same as EDC 509. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • MA 308 - MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    Heuristics of problem solving. Practice in solving problems from algebra, number theory, geometry, calculus, combinatorics, and other areas. Primarily for middle school teachers. This course may not be counted towards a mathematics major or minor.

  • LIS 514 - LITERATURE AND RELATED MEDIA FOR YOUNG ADULTS3

    A study of literature and related materials for use with young people in grades 6-12. Emphasis is placed on the special characteristics and needs of young people and the evaluation of materials for this age group.

  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • SEM 345 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATHEMATICS3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching arithmetic, informal geometry, and introductory algebra at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques. Consideration will be given to addressing the individual needs of a diverse student population. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 347 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS3

    This course introduces teacher candidates to the fundamentals of theory and practice for teaching English Language Arts at the middle level (grades 5-9) as they develop an understanding of state and national standards. Course work includes current issues and recent developments in curriculum and methodology in h teaching of middle level English Language Arts with emphases on the integration of reaching, writing, listening, speaking and language use. Course includes a four-week field placement in middle school settings.

    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours34

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SEM 445 - APPS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATH3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching mathematics at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of equity issues in middle school mathematics, using manipulatives across the curriculum, and strategies for promoting adolescents' curiosity in mathematics. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 537 - ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING WRITING3

    This course promotes the thoughtful examination of writing instruction at the middle and high school levels Throughout the course, learners are introduced to strategies and skills they can use to enhance their own writing and the writing of their students. Using a process approach, students learn how to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of genres and for a multitude of purposes. Based on the most current research in the field, this course explores such topics as writers workshop, conferencing, assessment of struggling writers, reading/writing connections, writing in the disciplines, revision and editing, the use of digital media to support writers, and the management of writing instruction. This course is offered in conjunction with an eight-week clinical field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24
  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-Engl/Comm & Soc St (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 111 - INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS3

    An introduction to concepts and applications of mathematics, with examples drawn from such areas as voting methods, apportionment, consumer finance, graph theory, tilings, polyhedra, number theory, and game theory. This course is not available for credit to persons who have received credit in any mathematics course of a higher number with the exceptions of MA 112, 123, 162, 201 and 202. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any calculus course. Credit not available on the basis of special examination.

  • HIS 104 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE THROUGH THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY3

    European politics, society, and culture through the Age of Religious Conflict.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING3

    The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • HIS 105 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE FROM THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT3

    European politics, society, and culture from the Age of Absolutism to the present. It is a continuation of HIS 104.

  • ENG 230 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics indicated in the subtitle. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings with different subtitles each semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • HIS 108 - History of the United States through 18763

    This course is a survey of American history from the first British settlements c. 1585 to the end of Reconstruction in 1876 and explores the most important events, ideas, and people that created the foundations of the American nation. This course fulfills the requirements for the elementary teacher's certificate.

  • ENG 251 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I3

    A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote?such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women?s rights?as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered may include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville?s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass? Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture or Lecture with discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 334.

  • LIN 211 - INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE3

    Designed to give students a broad introduction to the field of linguistics, the scientific study of human language. The first half of the course offers a basic foundation in the study of grammar, introducing the five core components of human grammar: syntax, morphology, phonetics, phonology and semantics. The second half of the course builds upon this knowledge by surveying a number of subfields of linguistics, including historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and language and the brain.

  • ANT 160 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE MODERN WORLD3

    Directed at non-majors, this course is intended to introduce the student to the diversity of human cultural experience in the contemporary world. Goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of all cultures; to gain a sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and to understand the distinctions between "race," ethnicity and racism. The course features extended descriptions of the cultural dynamics of the culture(s) with which the instructor has worked.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • ENG 330 - TEXT AND CONTEXT: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    The core course in the English Major focusing on the close reading and analysis of a single major literary text, or a focused set of texts, in historical and critical context. Students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. ENG major and minor requirement. Repeatable for up to six hours of credit.

  • ENG 252 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II3

    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of later periods in U.S. history. The course explores the changing social conditions in which American literature was produced?such as the Roaring 20?s, the Cold War, and the upheaval of the 1960?s?and several key literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Texts and authors covered may include Edith Wharton?s House of Mirth, Nella Larsen?s Quicksand, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, the poetry of Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and more. Lecture or Lecture and Discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 335.

  • GEO 160 - LANDS AND PEOPLES OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD3

    The geographic study of the conceptual and historical definition of regions of the world as "Non-Western." Global patterns of social, cultural, economic, and political difference between the West and Non-West as well as the processes key to the making of the Non- Western world (such as colonialism and imperialism) are discussed. In addition, selected current issues of significance to peoples in the Non-Western world, such as sustainable development, environment, human rights, and gender relations, are considered. Fulfills the General Education Global Citizenship requirement.

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • HIS 230 - THE HELLENISTIC WORLD AND ROME TO THE DEATH OF CONSTANTINE3

    Covers the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the main features of the Hellenistic world, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire to the death of Constantine.

    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours33

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • LIN 317 - LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication. Course may be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • ENG 509 - COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS3

    A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of English composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Same as EDC 509. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • LIN 514 - TESL MATERIALS AND METHODS3

    An extension of ENG/EDC 513, this course will include examination and evaluation of published materials designed for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students will create individualized teaching materials and gain practical experience in applying the methods and using their own materials. Prereq: ENG/EDC 513 or consent of instructor. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Same as ENG/EDC 514.

  • HIS elective3
  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • EDC 346 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    Introduction to theory, research, purposes, methods and materials appropriate to social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate's areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 347 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS3

    This course introduces teacher candidates to the fundamentals of theory and practice for teaching English Language Arts at the middle level (grades 5-9) as they develop an understanding of state and national standards. Course work includes current issues and recent developments in curriculum and methodology in h teaching of middle level English Language Arts with emphases on the integration of reaching, writing, listening, speaking and language use. Course includes a four-week field placement in middle school settings.

    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours34

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • EDC 446 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    This course emphasizes analyzing and assessing teaching and learning appropriate to inquiry-based social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 537 - ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING WRITING3

    This course promotes the thoughtful examination of writing instruction at the middle and high school levels Throughout the course, learners are introduced to strategies and skills they can use to enhance their own writing and the writing of their students. Using a process approach, students learn how to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of genres and for a multitude of purposes. Based on the most current research in the field, this course explores such topics as writers workshop, conferencing, assessment of struggling writers, reading/writing connections, writing in the disciplines, revision and editing, the use of digital media to support writers, and the management of writing instruction. This course is offered in conjunction with an eight-week clinical field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24
  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-English/Comm & Sci (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 111 - INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS3

    An introduction to concepts and applications of mathematics, with examples drawn from such areas as voting methods, apportionment, consumer finance, graph theory, tilings, polyhedra, number theory, and game theory. This course is not available for credit to persons who have received credit in any mathematics course of a higher number with the exceptions of MA 112, 123, 162, 201 and 202. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any calculus course. Credit not available on the basis of special examination.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • BIO 103 - BASIC IDEAS OF BIOLOGY3

    Introductory biology. Discussion topics are those relevant to both plants and animals-- cell structure and function, molecules important to living things, metabolism, heredity, environment. Not for life science majors.

  • BIO 111 - GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY1

    Laboratory studies in the structure and function of cells, plants, and animals; ecology; heredity; and evolution.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING3

    The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • ENG 230 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics indicated in the subtitle. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings with different subtitles each semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.

  • PHY 120 - HOW THINGS WORK3

    The close relationship between physical science, technology and our everyday lives will be illuminated by examination of the technology we purchase and use and by observations of natural phenomena we can make using only the informed mind and eye.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • ENG 251 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I3

    A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote?such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women?s rights?as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered may include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville?s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass? Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture or Lecture with discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 334.

  • BIO 102 - HUMAN ECOLOGY3

    A study of the interrelationships of man, populations, space, energy, food, mineral resources and other life on earth. Not for life science majors.

  • EES 160 - GEOLOGY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basic principles of geologic processes, materials, and history with primary emphasis on inquiry-based laboratory and field activities. The course is designed in conjunction with PHY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, two hours per week laboratory, three hours per week. Not available for credit to students who have received credit for EES 220.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • ENG 330 - TEXT AND CONTEXT: (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    The core course in the English Major focusing on the close reading and analysis of a single major literary text, or a focused set of texts, in historical and critical context. Students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. ENG major and minor requirement. Repeatable for up to six hours of credit.

  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • EES 150 - EARTHQUAKES AND VOLCANOES3

    An introduction to earthquakes and volcanoes through theory, active learning assignments, and case studies. Using the basic principles of plate tectonics, students will learn why, where and how earthquakes and volcanoes occur. The hazards associates with earthquakes and volcanic eruptions will be discussed, as well as their societal implications in both the United States and the developing world. Earthquake and volcanic hazard mitigation techniques will be addressed. In addition, earthquake hazards in the central United States will be discussed.

  • PHY 160 - PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basics of electric circuits, magnetism, object motion, naked-eye astronomy and light behavior. The course is designed in conjunction with GLY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, five hours per week.

  • LIN 211 - INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE3

    Designed to give students a broad introduction to the field of linguistics, the scientific study of human language. The first half of the course offers a basic foundation in the study of grammar, introducing the five core components of human grammar: syntax, morphology, phonetics, phonology and semantics. The second half of the course builds upon this knowledge by surveying a number of subfields of linguistics, including historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and language and the brain.

  • ENG 252 - SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II3

    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of later periods in U.S. history. The course explores the changing social conditions in which American literature was produced?such as the Roaring 20?s, the Cold War, and the upheaval of the 1960?s?and several key literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Texts and authors covered may include Edith Wharton?s House of Mirth, Nella Larsen?s Quicksand, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, the poetry of Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and more. Lecture or Lecture and Discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 335.

    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours35

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • CHE 101 - MOLECULAR SCIENCE FOR CITIZENS3

    A conceptual introduction to the molecular nature of natural and manmade materials as well as the key molecules of biological organisms. The important classes of molecules will be discussed in terms of their properties and impact on our everyday real world experience.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • ENG 509 - COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS3

    A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of English composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Same as EDC 509. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • LIN 514 - TESL MATERIALS AND METHODS3

    An extension of ENG/EDC 513, this course will include examination and evaluation of published materials designed for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students will create individualized teaching materials and gain practical experience in applying the methods and using their own materials. Prereq: ENG/EDC 513 or consent of instructor. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Same as ENG/EDC 514.

  • LIN 317 - LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication. Course may be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • EDC 347 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS3

    This course introduces teacher candidates to the fundamentals of theory and practice for teaching English Language Arts at the middle level (grades 5-9) as they develop an understanding of state and national standards. Course work includes current issues and recent developments in curriculum and methodology in h teaching of middle level English Language Arts with emphases on the integration of reaching, writing, listening, speaking and language use. Course includes a four-week field placement in middle school settings.

  • SEM 348 - TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques for middle school science. Special needs of individuals in a diverse middle school population are emphasized. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours34

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • EDC 537 - ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING WRITING3

    This course promotes the thoughtful examination of writing instruction at the middle and high school levels Throughout the course, learners are introduced to strategies and skills they can use to enhance their own writing and the writing of their students. Using a process approach, students learn how to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of genres and for a multitude of purposes. Based on the most current research in the field, this course explores such topics as writers workshop, conferencing, assessment of struggling writers, reading/writing connections, writing in the disciplines, revision and editing, the use of digital media to support writers, and the management of writing instruction. This course is offered in conjunction with an eight-week clinical field experience.

  • SEM 448 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SCIENCE3

    A study of applied models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include applications such as project based learning, engineering design-based science, interdisciplinary science, and other innovative methods for applying national and state science standards to real-world contexts. Special emphasis will be given to lesson study and peer teaching and evaluation. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24
  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-Math & Science (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • BIO 102 - HUMAN ECOLOGY3

    A study of the interrelationships of man, populations, space, energy, food, mineral resources and other life on earth. Not for life science majors.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • BIO 103 - BASIC IDEAS OF BIOLOGY3

    Introductory biology. Discussion topics are those relevant to both plants and animals-- cell structure and function, molecules important to living things, metabolism, heredity, environment. Not for life science majors.

  • BIO 111 - GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY1

    Laboratory studies in the structure and function of cells, plants, and animals; ecology; heredity; and evolution.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • Global Dynamics3
  • PHY 120 - HOW THINGS WORK3

    The close relationship between physical science, technology and our everyday lives will be illuminated by examination of the technology we purchase and use and by observations of natural phenomena we can make using only the informed mind and eye.

    • Total16
    • Total Freshman Hours33

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • MA 201 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Sets, numbers and operations, problem solving and number theory. Recommended only for majors in elementary and middle school education.

  • EES 160 - GEOLOGY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basic principles of geologic processes, materials, and history with primary emphasis on inquiry-based laboratory and field activities. The course is designed in conjunction with PHY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, two hours per week laboratory, three hours per week. Not available for credit to students who have received credit for EES 220.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • EES 150 - EARTHQUAKES AND VOLCANOES3

    An introduction to earthquakes and volcanoes through theory, active learning assignments, and case studies. Using the basic principles of plate tectonics, students will learn why, where and how earthquakes and volcanoes occur. The hazards associates with earthquakes and volcanic eruptions will be discussed, as well as their societal implications in both the United States and the developing world. Earthquake and volcanic hazard mitigation techniques will be addressed. In addition, earthquake hazards in the central United States will be discussed.

  • PHY 160 - PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basics of electric circuits, magnetism, object motion, naked-eye astronomy and light behavior. The course is designed in conjunction with GLY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, five hours per week.

  • MA 202 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Algebraic reasoning, introduction to statistics and probability, geometry, and measurement.

  • Take MA 261 or CS 1013
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours32

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • CHE 101 - MOLECULAR SCIENCE FOR CITIZENS3

    A conceptual introduction to the molecular nature of natural and manmade materials as well as the key molecules of biological organisms. The important classes of molecules will be discussed in terms of their properties and impact on our everyday real world experience.

  • MA 241 - GEOMETRY FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    A course in plane and solid geometry designed to give middle school mathematics teachers the knowledge needed to teach a beginning geometry course. Cannot be counted toward the mathematics minor or major.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • MA 308 - MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    Heuristics of problem solving. Practice in solving problems from algebra, number theory, geometry, calculus, combinatorics, and other areas. Primarily for middle school teachers. This course may not be counted towards a mathematics major or minor.

  • MA 162 - FINITE MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Finite mathematics with applications to business, biology, and the social sciences. Linear functions and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability. Emphasis on setting up mathematical models from stated problems.

  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • SEM 345 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATHEMATICS3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching arithmetic, informal geometry, and introductory algebra at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques. Consideration will be given to addressing the individual needs of a diverse student population. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • SEM 348 - TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques for middle school science. Special needs of individuals in a diverse middle school population are emphasized. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours34

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SEM 445 - APPS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATH3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching mathematics at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of equity issues in middle school mathematics, using manipulatives across the curriculum, and strategies for promoting adolescents' curiosity in mathematics. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • SEM 448 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SCIENCE3

    A study of applied models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include applications such as project based learning, engineering design-based science, interdisciplinary science, and other innovative methods for applying national and state science standards to real-world contexts. Special emphasis will be given to lesson study and peer teaching and evaluation. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24
  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-Math & Soc Studies (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • HIS 104 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE THROUGH THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY3

    European politics, society, and culture through the Age of Religious Conflict.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • MA 162 - FINITE MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Finite mathematics with applications to business, biology, and the social sciences. Linear functions and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability. Emphasis on setting up mathematical models from stated problems.

  • HIS 105 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE FROM THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT3

    European politics, society, and culture from the Age of Absolutism to the present. It is a continuation of HIS 104.

  • ANT 160 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE MODERN WORLD3

    Directed at non-majors, this course is intended to introduce the student to the diversity of human cultural experience in the contemporary world. Goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of all cultures; to gain a sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and to understand the distinctions between "race," ethnicity and racism. The course features extended descriptions of the cultural dynamics of the culture(s) with which the instructor has worked.

  • 2-hr elective for 120 total hours2
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours34

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • MA 201 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Sets, numbers and operations, problem solving and number theory. Recommended only for majors in elementary and middle school education.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • HIS 108 - History of the United States through 18763

    This course is a survey of American history from the first British settlements c. 1585 to the end of Reconstruction in 1876 and explores the most important events, ideas, and people that created the foundations of the American nation. This course fulfills the requirements for the elementary teacher's certificate.

  • GEO 160 - LANDS AND PEOPLES OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD3

    The geographic study of the conceptual and historical definition of regions of the world as "Non-Western." Global patterns of social, cultural, economic, and political difference between the West and Non-West as well as the processes key to the making of the Non- Western world (such as colonialism and imperialism) are discussed. In addition, selected current issues of significance to peoples in the Non-Western world, such as sustainable development, environment, human rights, and gender relations, are considered. Fulfills the General Education Global Citizenship requirement.

  • 1-hr elective for 120 total hours1
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • HIS 230 - THE HELLENISTIC WORLD AND ROME TO THE DEATH OF CONSTANTINE3

    Covers the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the main features of the Hellenistic world, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire to the death of Constantine.

  • MA 202 - MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS3

    Algebraic reasoning, introduction to statistics and probability, geometry, and measurement.

  • Take MA 261 or CS 1013
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • HIS elective3
  • MA 241 - GEOMETRY FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    A course in plane and solid geometry designed to give middle school mathematics teachers the knowledge needed to teach a beginning geometry course. Cannot be counted toward the mathematics minor or major.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • MA 308 - MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3

    Heuristics of problem solving. Practice in solving problems from algebra, number theory, geometry, calculus, combinatorics, and other areas. Primarily for middle school teachers. This course may not be counted towards a mathematics major or minor.

  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • SEM 345 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATHEMATICS3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching arithmetic, informal geometry, and introductory algebra at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques. Consideration will be given to addressing the individual needs of a diverse student population. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 346 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    Introduction to theory, research, purposes, methods and materials appropriate to social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate's areas of content concentration.

    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours31

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SEM 445 - APPS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL MATH3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching mathematics at the middle school level. The course will include a critical analysis of equity issues in middle school mathematics, using manipulatives across the curriculum, and strategies for promoting adolescents' curiosity in mathematics. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 446 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    This course emphasizes analyzing and assessing teaching and learning appropriate to inquiry-based social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24
  • Mid Lvl Teach Ed-Science & Soc Stu (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 111 - INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS3

    An introduction to concepts and applications of mathematics, with examples drawn from such areas as voting methods, apportionment, consumer finance, graph theory, tilings, polyhedra, number theory, and game theory. This course is not available for credit to persons who have received credit in any mathematics course of a higher number with the exceptions of MA 112, 123, 162, 201 and 202. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any calculus course. Credit not available on the basis of special examination.

  • HIS 104 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE THROUGH THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY3

    European politics, society, and culture through the Age of Religious Conflict.

  • BIO 103 - BASIC IDEAS OF BIOLOGY3

    Introductory biology. Discussion topics are those relevant to both plants and animals-- cell structure and function, molecules important to living things, metabolism, heredity, environment. Not for life science majors.

  • BIO 111 - GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY1

    Laboratory studies in the structure and function of cells, plants, and animals; ecology; heredity; and evolution.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING3

    The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • HIS 105 - A HISTORY OF EUROPE FROM THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT3

    European politics, society, and culture from the Age of Absolutism to the present. It is a continuation of HIS 104.

  • PHY 120 - HOW THINGS WORK3

    The close relationship between physical science, technology and our everyday lives will be illuminated by examination of the technology we purchase and use and by observations of natural phenomena we can make using only the informed mind and eye.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

  • HIS 108 - History of the United States through 18763

    This course is a survey of American history from the first British settlements c. 1585 to the end of Reconstruction in 1876 and explores the most important events, ideas, and people that created the foundations of the American nation. This course fulfills the requirements for the elementary teacher's certificate.

  • BIO 102 - HUMAN ECOLOGY3

    A study of the interrelationships of man, populations, space, energy, food, mineral resources and other life on earth. Not for life science majors.

  • EES 160 - GEOLOGY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basic principles of geologic processes, materials, and history with primary emphasis on inquiry-based laboratory and field activities. The course is designed in conjunction with PHY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, two hours per week laboratory, three hours per week. Not available for credit to students who have received credit for EES 220.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • ANT 160 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE MODERN WORLD3

    Directed at non-majors, this course is intended to introduce the student to the diversity of human cultural experience in the contemporary world. Goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of all cultures; to gain a sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and to understand the distinctions between "race," ethnicity and racism. The course features extended descriptions of the cultural dynamics of the culture(s) with which the instructor has worked.

  • EDP 203 - TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN REGULAR CLASSROOMS3

    An introduction to the characteristics and instructional needs of exceptional learners is presented with an overview of principles, procedures, methods, and materials for adapting educational programs to accommodate the integration of exceptional children in regular classrooms, when appropriate. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week for a maximum of six weeks.

  • EES 150 - EARTHQUAKES AND VOLCANOES3

    An introduction to earthquakes and volcanoes through theory, active learning assignments, and case studies. Using the basic principles of plate tectonics, students will learn why, where and how earthquakes and volcanoes occur. The hazards associates with earthquakes and volcanic eruptions will be discussed, as well as their societal implications in both the United States and the developing world. Earthquake and volcanic hazard mitigation techniques will be addressed. In addition, earthquake hazards in the central United States will be discussed.

  • PHY 160 - PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY FOR TEACHERS3

    The basics of electric circuits, magnetism, object motion, naked-eye astronomy and light behavior. The course is designed in conjunction with GLY 160 to provide basic concepts of earth science, astronomy and physics appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Both courses are taught with an emphasis on inquiry-based, laboratory activities. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, five hours per week.

  • ECO 201 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I3

    The study of the allocation of scarce resources from the viewpoint of individual economic units. Topics include household and firm behavior, competitive pricing of goods and resources, and monopoly power.

  • HIS 230 - THE HELLENISTIC WORLD AND ROME TO THE DEATH OF CONSTANTINE3

    Covers the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the main features of the Hellenistic world, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire to the death of Constantine.

    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours35

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • CHE 101 - MOLECULAR SCIENCE FOR CITIZENS3

    A conceptual introduction to the molecular nature of natural and manmade materials as well as the key molecules of biological organisms. The important classes of molecules will be discussed in terms of their properties and impact on our everyday real world experience.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • EDC 327 - READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    A study of materials and techniques useful in the diagnostic teaching of reading and other language arts with students in grades 5-9. The course will emphasize materials, techniques, and procedures, which diagnose individual strengths and weaknesses, and prescriptive instruction based upon the diagnosis. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16- week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 341 - THE EARLY ADOLESCENT LEARNER AND METHODS IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    An examination of the nature of early adolescents as well as the history and characteristics of the schools designed to teach them. Focus is on responsive pedagogy, especially the rationale behind the middle school concept and the generic techniques of teaching as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. This course is in conjunction with a guest field experience to occur in a 16-week placement at one school site.

  • EDC 317 - INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA1

    An introductory instructional media experience including basic production and utilization techniques for media materials and operation of commonly used educational media equipment. Topics include graphic preservation, transparency production, audio materials, motion pictures, 35mm photographic techniques, and an introduction to video-tape television.

  • GEO 160 - LANDS AND PEOPLES OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD3

    The geographic study of the conceptual and historical definition of regions of the world as "Non-Western." Global patterns of social, cultural, economic, and political difference between the West and Non-West as well as the processes key to the making of the Non- Western world (such as colonialism and imperialism) are discussed. In addition, selected current issues of significance to peoples in the Non-Western world, such as sustainable development, environment, human rights, and gender relations, are considered. Fulfills the General Education Global Citizenship requirement.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • HIS elective3
  • EDC 330 - WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS3

    Development of competencies for the teaching of writing and other language arts, including digital texts and other 21st century platforms, to groups. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

  • EDC 343 - METHODS AND MANAGEMENT IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    A study of classroom management in theory and practice, with a focus on planning and assessment in middle level classrooms. This course is in conjunction with a four-week experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s area of content concentration.

  • EDC 346 - METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    Introduction to theory, research, purposes, methods and materials appropriate to social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate's areas of content concentration.

  • SEM 348 - TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3

    A study of theoretical models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include a critical analysis of a variety of objectives, instructional materials and strategies, and evaluation techniques for middle school science. Special needs of individuals in a diverse middle school population are emphasized. This course is in conjunction with a four-week field experience, consisting of 2 two-week placements in the candidate’s areas of content concentration.

    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours31

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • EDC 446 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES3

    This course emphasizes analyzing and assessing teaching and learning appropriate to inquiry-based social studies instruction in the middle grades. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • SEM 448 - APPLICATIONS OF TEACHING MIDDLE LEVEL SCIENCE3

    A study of applied models and methodological strategies for teaching science at the middle school level. This course will include applications such as project based learning, engineering design-based science, interdisciplinary science, and other innovative methods for applying national and state science standards to real-world contexts. Special emphasis will be given to lesson study and peer teaching and evaluation. This course is in conjunction with an eight-week field experience.

  • EDC 549 (6 hours)6
    • Total12
Spring Semester
  • EDC 549 (9 hours)9
  • EDC 520 - ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION3

    This capstone course is taken during the student teaching experience and is taught via an online modality. The purpose of the course is to investigate and document teaching effectiveness. Candidates design an integrated unit of study, pre and post test student learning, analyze learning gains drawing on formative and summative measures, and make modifications and accommodations based on the results. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours24

What You'll Study

The program emphasizes the development of professionally trained specialists in teaching early adolescents. As such, the program models team teaching and collaborative learning.


Graduation Requirements

To graduate from the College of Education, a student must: 1) complete all specific program requirements as listed in this Bulletin; and 2) meet all requirements of the College of Education admission/retention/completion policy. Because most students are pursuing both a UK degree and a state educator license (certificate), it is extremely important that advisors are consulted frequently to be sure that the best selection of courses is made to meet both requirements.


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