College of Education

Secondary STEM Education

120

Semester Hours

42

Credit Hours/Major Hours

30

Core Hours

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photo of Dr. Margaret Mohr-Schroeder

Dr. Margaret Mohr-Schroeder

Secondary Mathematics Program Co-Chair

Associate Professor of Middle and Secondary Mathematics Education

College of Education

Secondary STEM Education

105 Taylor Education Building

Lexington, KY 40506

Program website

(859) 257-4235

  • BA

The Secondary STEM Education program emphasizes the content knowledge needed for secondary STEM teachers to be successful. Earn a double major in STEM Education and content major (i.e., mathematics, physics, chemistry, earth science, physical science, computer science) with secondary teaching certification (grades 8-12) in one or more state-certifiable STEM subjects in just 4 years (120 credit hours).

Careers

Grow Your Future

STEM PLUS: Preparing Leaders for Urban/Rural Schools is an undergraduate certification program housed within the College of Education and the STEM Education Department. It represents a unique transdisciplinary approach to teacher education and is the first STEM Education major in the United States.

Career Opportunities in STEM Education

Armed with means to capitalize on cultural and linguistic diversity as a way to make STEM knowledge and skills relevant and useful for all students, STEM PLUS graduates will champion STEM educational equity which may allow all students to use STEM productively in their daily lives to achieve personal goals, participate as active citizens, and to develop the STEM skills necessary for access to modern opportunities in their global technological society.

At UK, you will find a College of Education rich in tradition and focused on innovation. Each of our graduates has a unique story to tell and continues to Inquire, Innovate and Inspire.

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • STEM Ed, Content Area: Biology (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 137 - CALCULUS I WITH LIFE SCIENCE APPLICATION4

    A first course in one-variable calculus. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including trigonometric functions) with applications to the life sciences. Lecture, three hours; recitation, 2 hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137, Note: Math placement test recommended. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or math SAT of 620 or above, or MA 109 and MA 112, or MA 110, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 137 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of the trigonometric function.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

  • BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I3

    BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

  • BIO 155 - LABORATORY FOR INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I1

    This course is designed to provide a broad introduction into the data, results, and information associated with biological research, and into some of the analytical approaches used to test biological hypotheses. Communication of these aspects of biological research is crucial, and much of this lab course will be focused on the development of effective writing skills for the delivery of this information.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and compounds.

  • CHE 113 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY II2

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 107, emphasizing qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.

  • BIO 152 - PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II3

    The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

  • SEM 110 - INTRODUCTION TO STEM EDUCATION2

    Through campus and school-based experiences, students will learn how to engage adolescents in learning mathematics, science, computer science, and engineering. This course will introduce the foundations of STEM Education, learning environments, curriculum and instructor, standards and assessment, as well as contemporary issues related to the field. The roles, responsibilities, and daily life of teachers, schools, and students will be examined. The course includes 30 hours of experience in the field.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours33

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • BIO 303 - INTRODUCTION TO EVOLUTION4

    This course covers topics in evolution, concentrating on the Darwinian theories of evolution including descent with modification, natural selection, and sexual selection. Topics will include: patterns of evolution, the genetic source of variation, measuring evolution, adaptation, speciation, human evolution, "evo-devo", and evolutionary medicine. Taught on campus (lecture, three hours; recitation, three hours) or online. Prereq: BIO 148, BIO 152 and BIO 155 or equivalent.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • BIO 304 - PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS4

    A study of the physical and chemical aspects of the genetic material and their relationship to the expression and inheritance of the phenotype. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week.

  • CHE 236 - SURVEY OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY3

    A one-semester course in organic chemistry. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 230 and CHE 232.

  • CHE 231 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I1

    Laboratory for CHE 230 or CHE 236. Laboratory, three hours per week.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • BIO Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • BIO 315 - INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY4

    The structure and function of cells will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on the ultrastructure of cell organelles in plants and animals as a framework for understanding the compartmentalized nature of cell activity. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours/weekly.

  • BIO Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • PHY 151 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS3

    A lecture demonstration course covering the mechanics of solids, liquids, gases, heat, and sound. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHY 201, 211 or 231.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • EDS 516 - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND INSTRUCTION3

    Basic principles of applied behavior analysis and modification which employ social learning theory and operant conditioning models are taught. Emphasis is placed on designing individualized learning environments, selecting and implementing behavior management strategies, writing behavior objectives, and performing task analyses.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • SEM 421 - SURVEY OF SECONDARY MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM3

    This course is intended to help future STEM Education teachers build a theoretical background and develop the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part I of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • BIO 325 - ECOLOGY4

    This course introduces the scientific study of relationship between organisms and their environment. The course is structured around levels of organization—from physiological ecology to individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, landscapes, regions, and the biosphere. Students will be expected to develop a solid knowledge base and understanding of key concepts and issues in contemporary ecology; to become familiar with how ecological understanding is attained by researchers; and to see how ecological knowledge and methods can be used to address important societal problems. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, an average of three hours per week.

  • BIO 350 - ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY4

    An introduction to the basic principles of animal physiology. An elementary discussion of the major vertebrate organ systems including nutrition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction, peripheral and central nervous system, and endocrine function emphasizing homeostasis. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • BIO Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • EGR Requirement (3 hours)3
    • Total17
    • Total Junior Hours33

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SEM 422 - STEM ED METHODS II3

    This course, the second in a two course series, is intended to further develop the practical skills needed to develop effective STEM education teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will build upon the knowledge and experience they gained in SEM 421 by delving deeper into students’ content area(s) through field experiences, implementation of a variety of instructional materials, and development of curricula appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part II of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • BIO 425 -or- BIO 4993
  • BIO 430 -or- BIO Elective (300-599) 3 hr3
  • BIO Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • EDC 533 - TEACHING LITERACY ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES3

    This course provides an in-depth study of theories and teaching methods for integrating literacy (including digital literacy) instruction into content area classrooms at the K-12 levels. Instructional strategies, procedures, and assessments designed to increase vocabulary learning and comprehension of expository texts are emphasized.

  • Any elective3
    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • SEM 423 - ASSESSMENT IN STEM EDUCATION2

    The work in this course will help prepare future STEM teachers to create, examine, analyze, and critically utilize a variety of assessments found in K12 education. Specific focus will be given to present day assessment issues and will also include the following interconnected components in relation to assessment: equity (high expectations and strong support for all students); curriculum (coherent, focused, comprehensive, and culturally inclusive); teaching (focus on understanding what students know and need to learn); learning (active construction of new knowledge) and technology (incorporation of technological influences in the teaching-learning process).

  • SEM 435 - STEM STUD TEACHING IN SEC SCHOOL10

    SEM 435 is a ten credit hour course taken concurrently with student teaching. The purpose of student teaching is to help student teachers continue to develop their knowledge, strategies, and the skills necessary in order to become successful and productive secondary teachers capable of being a leader in the profession. With the support of cooperating teachers in area schools, the course instructor, and university field supervisors, student teachers will apply the theories, methods, and techniques they have learned in the past in addition to what they will learn during their concurrent student teaching experiences.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours30
  • STEM Ed, Content Area: Chemistry (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • CHE 111 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY I1

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 105, dealing with the properties of chemical substances and providing an introduction to quantitative chemical analysis.1

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and compounds.

  • CHE 113 - LABORATORY TO ACCOMPANY GENERAL CHEMISTRY II2

    A laboratory course, to accompany CHE 107, emphasizing qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.

  • SEM 110 - INTRODUCTION TO STEM EDUCATION2

    Through campus and school-based experiences, students will learn how to engage adolescents in learning mathematics, science, computer science, and engineering. This course will introduce the foundations of STEM Education, learning environments, curriculum and instructor, standards and assessment, as well as contemporary issues related to the field. The roles, responsibilities, and daily life of teachers, schools, and students will be examined. The course includes 30 hours of experience in the field.

  • Global Dynamics3
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours33

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • CHE 230 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3

    Fundamental principles and theories of organic chemistry.

  • CHE 231 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I1

    Laboratory for CHE 230 or CHE 236. Laboratory, three hours per week.

  • PHY 211 - GENERAL PHYSICS5

    First part of a two-semester survey of classical and modern physics, focusing on the motion of solids and fluids as governed by Newton's Laws and by the conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum. Lecture, two hours; recitation, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHY 231 and 241.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • CHE 226 - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY3

    An introduction to the theory and practice of quantitative chemical analysis. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

  • CHE 232 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 230.

  • CHE 233 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II1

    Laboratory for CHE 232. Laboratory, three hours per week.

  • PHY 213 - GENERAL PHYSICS5

    Continuation of PHY 211, covering electrostatics, de circuits, magnetism, Maxwell’s Equations, electromagnetic radiation, light and some modern physics. Lecture, two hours; recitation, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHY 232 and 242.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours30

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • CHE 440G - INTRODUCTORY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY3

    A one-semester survey of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and quantum chemistry with an elementary introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: PHY 213 or PHY 232; MA 114; CHE 226 or MA 213.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • EDS 516 - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND INSTRUCTION3

    Basic principles of applied behavior analysis and modification which employ social learning theory and operant conditioning models are taught. Emphasis is placed on designing individualized learning environments, selecting and implementing behavior management strategies, writing behavior objectives, and performing task analyses.

  • CHE Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • Outside CHE Elective (300-599) 2 hours3
  • CHE 372 - COMMUNICATION IN CHEMISTRY 11

    Reports and discussions on recent research and current chemical literature; writing and revision of scientific papers; literature searching methods; preparation of effective presentations abstracts and visual aids. CHE 372 and CHE 472 meet the A&S College Writing and Communications Requirement. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • SEM 421 - SURVEY OF SECONDARY MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM3

    This course is intended to help future STEM Education teachers build a theoretical background and develop the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part I of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • CHE 441 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY2

    Laboratory studies in physical chemistry, including quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Laboratory, six hours.

  • CHE Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • EGR Requirement (3 hours)3
  • Outside CHE Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • STEM Electives (4 hours)4
    • Total17
    • Total Junior Hours32

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • Any elective3
  • SEM 422 - STEM ED METHODS II3

    This course, the second in a two course series, is intended to further develop the practical skills needed to develop effective STEM education teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will build upon the knowledge and experience they gained in SEM 421 by delving deeper into students’ content area(s) through field experiences, implementation of a variety of instructional materials, and development of curricula appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part II of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • CHE 472 - COMMUNICATION IN CHEMISTRY 21

    Reports and discussions on recent research and current chemical literature in seminar format; literature searching methods; resume construction; preparation of effective presentations abstracts and visual aids. CHE 472 and CHE 372 meet the A&S College Writing and Communications Requirement. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • Outside CHE Elective (300-599) 3 hours3
  • Outside CHE Elective (300-599) 2 hours3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • SEM 423 - ASSESSMENT IN STEM EDUCATION2

    The work in this course will help prepare future STEM teachers to create, examine, analyze, and critically utilize a variety of assessments found in K12 education. Specific focus will be given to present day assessment issues and will also include the following interconnected components in relation to assessment: equity (high expectations and strong support for all students); curriculum (coherent, focused, comprehensive, and culturally inclusive); teaching (focus on understanding what students know and need to learn); learning (active construction of new knowledge) and technology (incorporation of technological influences in the teaching-learning process).

  • SEM 435 - STEM STUD TEACHING IN SEC SCHOOL10

    SEM 435 is a ten credit hour course taken concurrently with student teaching. The purpose of student teaching is to help student teachers continue to develop their knowledge, strategies, and the skills necessary in order to become successful and productive secondary teachers capable of being a leader in the profession. With the support of cooperating teachers in area schools, the course instructor, and university field supervisors, student teachers will apply the theories, methods, and techniques they have learned in the past in addition to what they will learn during their concurrent student teaching experiences.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours27
  • STEM Ed, Content Area: Mathematics (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • SEM 110 - INTRODUCTION TO STEM EDUCATION2

    Through campus and school-based experiences, students will learn how to engage adolescents in learning mathematics, science, computer science, and engineering. This course will introduce the foundations of STEM Education, learning environments, curriculum and instructor, standards and assessment, as well as contemporary issues related to the field. The roles, responsibilities, and daily life of teachers, schools, and students will be examined. The course includes 30 hours of experience in the field.

  • CS 115 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING3

    This course teaches introductory skills in computer programming using a high-level computer programming language. There is an emphasis on both the principles and practice of computer programming. Covers principles of problem solving by computer and requires completion of a number of programming assignments.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • MA 322 - MATRIX ALGEBRA AND ITS APPLICATIONS3

    Algebra of matrices, elementary theory of vector spaces and inner product spaces, the solution of simultaneous linear equations using Gaussian elimination and triangular factorization. Orthogonal projections, pseudo inverse and singular value decomposition, least squares approximation. Determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Natural, Physical and Mathematical Sciences3
  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
  • MA 261 - INTRODUCTION TO NUMBER THEORY3

    Topics from classical number theory, including discussions of mathematical induction, prime numbers, division algorithms, congruences, and quadratic reciprocity.

  • MA 320 - INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY3

    Set theory; fundamental concepts of probability, including conditional and marginal probability; random variables and probability distributions moments; moment-generating and characteristic functions; random experiments; distribution of random variables and functions of random variables; limit theorems.

  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • MA 361 - ELEMENTARY MODERN ALGEBRA I3

    A beginning course, with particular emphasis on groups and rings. Prereq: MA 261 or consent of instructor. Coreq: MA 322.

  • MA 341 - TOPICS IN GEOMETRY3

    Selected topics in geometry including Euclidean and some non-Euclidean geometries.

  • EDS 516 - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND INSTRUCTION3

    Basic principles of applied behavior analysis and modification which employ social learning theory and operant conditioning models are taught. Emphasis is placed on designing individualized learning environments, selecting and implementing behavior management strategies, writing behavior objectives, and performing task analyses.

  • EGR Requirement (3 hours)3
  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • MA 362 - ELEMENTARY MODERN ALGEBRA II3

    A continuation of MA 361 to include a discussion of fields and topics in linear algebra.

  • MA 310 - MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING FOR TEACHERS3

    Heuristics of problem solving. Practice in solving problems from algebra, number theory, geometry, calculus, combinatorics and other areas. Primarily for middle and secondary school teachers.

  • EDC 533 - TEACHING LITERACY ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES3

    This course provides an in-depth study of theories and teaching methods for integrating literacy (including digital literacy) instruction into content area classrooms at the K-12 levels. Instructional strategies, procedures, and assessments designed to increase vocabulary learning and comprehension of expository texts are emphasized.

  • SEM 421 - SURVEY OF SECONDARY MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM3

    This course is intended to help future STEM Education teachers build a theoretical background and develop the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part I of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • SEM 575 - SEE BLUE MATHEMATICS CLINIC3

    This course focuses on clinical techniques for working with K-12 students who are struggling and/or have disabilities in learning mathematics. It is a course designed to develop both theoretical understandings and operational skills in working with students who struggle in mathematics. Classroom applications of the techniques are discussed. This course is a combination of lecture and application with a student client.

    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours30

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
  • Any elective3
  • SEM 422 - STEM ED METHODS II3

    This course, the second in a two course series, is intended to further develop the practical skills needed to develop effective STEM education teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will build upon the knowledge and experience they gained in SEM 421 by delving deeper into students’ content area(s) through field experiences, implementation of a variety of instructional materials, and development of curricula appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part II of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • MA 330 - HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS3

    A survey of the development of mathematics. Topics may include: the Egyptians and Babylonians, mathematics of the Greek Classical Age, Euclid and the Alexandrian School, the Renaissance, Fermat and the beginning of calculus, the work of Newton and Leibnitz, nineteenth century geometry, analysis and set theory.

  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • SEM 423 - ASSESSMENT IN STEM EDUCATION2

    The work in this course will help prepare future STEM teachers to create, examine, analyze, and critically utilize a variety of assessments found in K12 education. Specific focus will be given to present day assessment issues and will also include the following interconnected components in relation to assessment: equity (high expectations and strong support for all students); curriculum (coherent, focused, comprehensive, and culturally inclusive); teaching (focus on understanding what students know and need to learn); learning (active construction of new knowledge) and technology (incorporation of technological influences in the teaching-learning process).

  • SEM 435 - STEM STUD TEACHING IN SEC SCHOOL10

    SEM 435 is a ten credit hour course taken concurrently with student teaching. The purpose of student teaching is to help student teachers continue to develop their knowledge, strategies, and the skills necessary in order to become successful and productive secondary teachers capable of being a leader in the profession. With the support of cooperating teachers in area schools, the course instructor, and university field supervisors, student teachers will apply the theories, methods, and techniques they have learned in the past in addition to what they will learn during their concurrent student teaching experiences.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours27
  • STEM Ed, Content Area: Physics (BS) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • PHY 231 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    First part of a two-semester survey of classical physics. Consequences of the principles of mechanics are developed conceptually, analytically and quantitatively. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 241 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well-written lab report.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • PHY 228 - OPTICS, RELATIVITY AND THERMAL PHYSICS3

    A lecture and problems course covering the principles of geometrical optics, special relativity, and thermal physics.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and their compounds. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 104 and 106 or CHE 104 and CHE 108, but open to students who have completed just CHE 104.

  • SEM 110 - INTRODUCTION TO STEM EDUCATION2

    Through campus and school-based experiences, students will learn how to engage adolescents in learning mathematics, science, computer science, and engineering. This course will introduce the foundations of STEM Education, learning environments, curriculum and instructor, standards and assessment, as well as contemporary issues related to the field. The roles, responsibilities, and daily life of teachers, schools, and students will be examined. The course includes 30 hours of experience in the field.

    • Total16
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 335 - DATA ANALYSIS FOR PHYSICISTS2

    A computational methods course in the theory and techniques of data analysis and error propagation, with emphasis on applications common to the physical sciences: the treatment of statistical errors, the maximum- likelihood method, the chi-square distribution, and curve fitting. Students will learn computer programming, and they will prepare a set of analysis programs for use in subsequent lab courses.

  • CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to the more important elements and compounds.

  • EDP 202 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING3

    Theories and concepts of human development, learning, and motivation are presented and applied to interpreting and explaining human behavior and interaction in relation to teaching across the developmental span from early childhood to adulthood. A field experience in a school or other educational agency is a required and basic part of the course.

    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • PHY 306 - THEORETICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS3

    A lecture and problems course on the applications in physics of vector calculus, Fourier series and transforms, special functions and asymptotic forms.

  • PHY 361 - PRINCIPLES OF MODERN PHYSICS3

    An introduction to the foundations of quantum mechanics and selected topics in atomic, nuclear, particle, solid state, and statistical physics.

  • STA 296 - STATISTICAL METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS3

    Introduction to principles of statistics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. Students will articulate results of statistical description of sample data (including bivariate), application of probability distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing to demonstrate properly contextualized analysis of real-world data.

  • Global Dynamics3
  • EPE 301 - EDUCATION IN AMERICAN CULTURE3

    Critical examination of contending views, past and present, regarding the nature and role of educational institutions in American society as well as proposed purposes and policies for schools and other educational agencies. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours31

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
  • EGR Requirement (3 hours)3
  • EDS 516 - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND INSTRUCTION3

    Basic principles of applied behavior analysis and modification which employ social learning theory and operant conditioning models are taught. Emphasis is placed on designing individualized learning environments, selecting and implementing behavior management strategies, writing behavior objectives, and performing task analyses.

  • AST 310 - TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS (SUBTITLE REQUIRED)3

    Readings, research, discussions and lectures to illuminate problems of contemporary significance in astronomy and astrophysics. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits under a different subtitle.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
  • SEM 421 - SURVEY OF SECONDARY MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM3

    This course is intended to help future STEM Education teachers build a theoretical background and develop the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part I of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • PHY 401G - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY FOR1

    Selected topics in physics and astronomy of special interest to teachers will be discussed. When the course is offered, a specific title with specific credits, the number of hours in lecture-discussion and laboratory will be announced. Lecture/discussion, two-four hours; laboratory, zero-four hours. May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.

  • PHY 460G - HANDS-ON PHYSICS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS2

    An exploration of classical and modern physics, in a laboratory setting. This course may be taken twice for credit.

  • EDC 533 - TEACHING LITERACY ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES3

    This course provides an in-depth study of theories and teaching methods for integrating literacy (including digital literacy) instruction into content area classrooms at the K-12 levels. Instructional strategies, procedures, and assessments designed to increase vocabulary learning and comprehension of expository texts are emphasized.

  • STEM Electives (2 hours)2
    • Total16
    • Total Junior Hours31

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
  • Any elective3
  • SEM 422 - STEM ED METHODS II3

    This course, the second in a two course series, is intended to further develop the practical skills needed to develop effective STEM education teachers in the secondary classroom. Students will build upon the knowledge and experience they gained in SEM 421 by delving deeper into students’ content area(s) through field experiences, implementation of a variety of instructional materials, and development of curricula appropriate for teaching STEM Education at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching STEM concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to develop an understanding of the processes of inquiry teaching, the processes of science and mathematics, as well as a deep conceptual understanding of their respective content area(s). This is part II of a two course sequence. This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of observation.

  • PHY 460G - HANDS-ON PHYSICS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS2

    An exploration of classical and modern physics, in a laboratory setting. This course may be taken twice for credit.

  • STEM Electives (3 hours)3
    • Total14
Spring Semester
  • SEM 423 - ASSESSMENT IN STEM EDUCATION2

    The work in this course will help prepare future STEM teachers to create, examine, analyze, and critically utilize a variety of assessments found in K12 education. Specific focus will be given to present day assessment issues and will also include the following interconnected components in relation to assessment: equity (high expectations and strong support for all students); curriculum (coherent, focused, comprehensive, and culturally inclusive); teaching (focus on understanding what students know and need to learn); learning (active construction of new knowledge) and technology (incorporation of technological influences in the teaching-learning process).

  • SEM 435 - STEM STUD TEACHING IN SEC SCHOOL10

    SEM 435 is a ten credit hour course taken concurrently with student teaching. The purpose of student teaching is to help student teachers continue to develop their knowledge, strategies, and the skills necessary in order to become successful and productive secondary teachers capable of being a leader in the profession. With the support of cooperating teachers in area schools, the course instructor, and university field supervisors, student teachers will apply the theories, methods, and techniques they have learned in the past in addition to what they will learn during their concurrent student teaching experiences.

    • Total12
    • Total Senior Hours26

What You'll Study

Core curriculum and teaching methods in your chosen field: Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science, or Earth Science.


Graduation Requirements

To graduate from the College of Education, a student must: 1) complete all specific program requirements as listed in this Bulletin; and 2) meet all requirements of the College of Education admission/retention/completion policy. Because most students are pursuing both a UK degree and a state educator license (certificate), it is extremely important that advisors are consulted frequently to be sure that the best selection of courses is made to meet both requirements.


Contact

photo of Dr. Margaret Mohr-Schroeder

Dr. Margaret Mohr-Schroeder

Secondary Mathematics Program Co-Chair

Associate Professor of Middle and Secondary Mathematics Education

College of Education

Secondary STEM Education

105 Taylor Education Building

Lexington, KY 40506

(859) 257-4235

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky