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College of Engineering

Electrical Engineering

8

semesters

17

credit hours per semester

131

total credit hours

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Bill Smith, Faculty Member and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Bill Smith

Associate Department Chair

Director of Undergraduate Studies

College of Engineering

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

453 F. Paul Anderson Tower

Lexington, KY 40506-0046

Program website

(859) 257-8042

  • BS

Electrical engineers find innovative ways to use electricity, electronic materials and electrical phenomena to improve people’s lives. The field of electrical engineering encompasses a very broad spectrum of technical areas, including computers and digital systems, electronics and integrated circuits, communications, systems and control, electromagnetics and electro-optics, energy conversion and power distribution, robotics, signal processing, solid state electronics and photonics. Electrical engineers work at the frontier of high technology and are involved in research, the creation of new ideas and the design and development of new products, manufacturing and marketing activities. Electrical engineers work in a variety of industries: film and television, aerospace, automotive, business machines, professional and scientific equipment, computers and electronics, communications, medical technology. They work in public utilities, at NASA, the National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Defense. As researchers, they study everything from fuel cells to nanotechnology. If it’s got an on/off switch, these engineers have studied it, designed it or produced it.

Careers

Design Your Future

Electrical engineers learn to understand and use electrical power: make it, control it, transmit it, and tame it to design and run all kinds of traditional and advanced technologies. Students who enroll as Electrical Engineering majors at UK study at Kentucky’s flagship research institution, meaning you’ll be learning from top faculty looking to make the next big breakthrough in their field. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering faculty are readily accessible both inside and outside the classroom and students have every opportunity necessary to grow personally and professionally. Courses cover all the essentials: circuits, power and energy, semiconductors, embedded systems, computer architecture and others. The undergraduate degree culminates in the capstone design courses where seniors work in teams to handle real-world problems outside the classroom and get a taste of real world engineering work.

Undergraduate certificates are also available in power and energy as well as nanoscale engineering.

Industries Looking for You 

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Electronics
  • Communications
  • Public utilities
  • Medical technology
  • Energy
"Our goal is to make the hardware and software components of a computer system not just better, but also able to work together more effectively. That's how UK computer engineers advance the state of the art in computer systems."

Hank Dietz

Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Electrical Engineering (BS) 131 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • EGR 101 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION I1

    Engineering Exploration I introduces students to the engineering and computer science professions, College of Engineering degree programs, and opportunities for career path exploration. Topics and assignments include study skills, team development, ethics, problem solving and basic engineering tools for modeling, analysis and visualization. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. Students who received credit for EGR 112 are not eligible for EGR 101.

  • EGR 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING COMPUTING2

    Fundamentals of Engineering Computing introduces students to the practice and principles of computer programming and computational problem solving. Students will engage in hands-on project-based problem solving using modern computer software and hardware, with a particular emphasis on problems and techniques commonly appearing in various domains of engineering. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • PHY 241 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well-written lab report.

  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EGR 103 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION II2

    Engineering Exploration II focuses on a semester long engineering design project with students working in teams to apply the skills and tools introduced in EGR 101 or EGR 112 for transfer students and EGR 102. Topics and assignments include more in depth exploration of engineering tools for modeling, analysis, visualization, programming, hardware interfacing, team development, documentation and communication. Students gain experience in project management, identifying constraints, iteration and technical report writing.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • UK Core - Social Sciences --OR-- CS 2153
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours32

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 242 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well written lab report.

  • EE 211 - CIRCUITS I4

    Fundamental laws, principles and analysis techniques for DC and AC linear circuits whose elements consist of passive and active components used in modern engineering practice including the determination of steady state and transient responses. In addition to the required text book, additional materials including a portable Oscillator & Signal Generator, a digital Multimeter, an electronics-part kit, and a simulation software are required for at-home laboratory assignments.

  • EE 282 --OR-- CPE 2823
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • MA 214 - CALCULUS IV3

    MA 214 is a course in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on first and second order equations and applications. The course includes series solutions of second order equations and Laplace transform methods.

  • EE 223 - AC CIRCUITS4

    Analysis and design methods for analog linear circuits whose elements consist of passive and active components used in modern engineering practice, including transfer functions, network parameters, and a design project and laboratory experiments involving modern design practices.

  • EE 287 --OR-- CPE 2873
  • UK Core - Social Sciences --OR-- CS 2153
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours35

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • EE 415G - ELECTROMECHANICS3

    Study of electric machines and electromechanical systems.

  • EE 421G - SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS3

    An introduction to continuous and discrete signal and system models and analyses. Topics include discrete and continuous convolution, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms and Z-transforms with application examples including AM modulation and the sampling theorem.

  • EE Laboratory Elective3
  • EE 461G - INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS3

    Analysis and design of electronic circuitry incorporating nonlinear electronic elements such as transistors, FET's, and vacuum tubes. Applications to amplifiers.

  • MA/STA 320 --OR-- STA 3813
  • Technical Elective3
    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • EE 468G - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING ELECTROMAGNETICS4

    Applications of electromagnetic theory; electrostatic and magnetostatic fields; Maxwell's field equiations; plane waves; transmission lines and waveguides; antennas and radiation.

  • EE Laboratory Elective3
  • Engineering/Science Elective3
  • Technical Elective3
  • Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA3
    • Total15
    • Total Junior Hours32

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • EE 490 --OR-- CPE 4903
  • EE Technical Elective3
  • EE Technical Elective3
  • Math/Statistics Elective3
  • Global Dynamics3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • EE 491 --OR-- CPE 4913
  • EE Technical Elective3
  • EE Technical Elective3
  • Supportive Elective3
  • Engineering/Science Elective3
  • Statistical Inferential Reasoning3
    • Total18
    • Total Senior Hours33

First-Year Engineering Program

The smartest, most talented engineers around the world are devoting themselves to tackling immense global challenges. As a First-Year Engineering (FYE) student, you get to join them!

In 2008, the National Academy of Engineering identified 14 “Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century”—opportunities to greatly increase humanity’s sustainability, health, security and joy of living. Themes include making solar energy economical, enhancing virtual reality, reverse-engineering the brain, securing cyberspace, providing access to clean water and more.

These ambitious goals demand engineers roll up their sleeves and get to work, which is why we put them front and center during your first year as an engineering student. We have designed the FYE program to inspire you. We want you to discover your passion. We want you to explore where you might make your unique contribution. We want you to get your hands dirty and make stuff that might, one day, lead to a breakthrough.

Why wait until you’re taking upper-level classes to figure out what interests you? Through real engineering classes taught by top faculty and exposure to engineering’s greatest challenges, the FYE program gets you into the game from day one.


Admission Requirements

Students may directly enroll as pre-engineering students; however, there are minimum admission requirements. Minimum freshman entry requirements are an ACT math score of 23 or higher or a SAT math score of 540 or higher. Additionally, students must also meet the minimum Kentucky statewide academic readiness requirements for reading and writing. If you do not meet the initial admission requirements, please refer to the University of Kentucky Bulletin for alternative routes to admission to the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements

The following curriculum meets the requirements for a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, provided the student satisfies UK Core requirements and graduation requirements of the College of Engineering.


Meet the Faculty

Dr. Robert Adams
Research Areas: applied electromagnetics, computational
electromagnetics, theoretical electromagnetics

Dr. Laurence Hassebrook
Research Areas: 3-dimensional data acquistion, pattern
recognition, signal and image processing, stochastic systems

Dr. Todd Hastings
Research Areas: biological sensors, biotechnology, chemical
sensors, nano-fabrication, nanotechnology, photonics

Dr. YuMing Zhang
Research Areas: applied machine vision, control systems,
manufacturing processes, robotic welding

Click here to meet more faculty! 


Experiential Education

Growth and learning also happen outside the classroom. It happens in labs working alongside professors and graduate students. It happens on student design teams in the capstone design courses. It happens on cooperative education rotations and internships with companies all over the country. It happens by competing in student robot competitions. There are also numerous education abroad programs. The Engineering Career Development Office can assist you with developing job, co-op and internship search skills, participation in education abroad programs, participation in research endeavors and building career networks so you can secure a rewarding career in your chosen field of study.


Student Involvement

Learning also happens in student organizations, on industry trips and on community service projects. UK students can get involved with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi, the Society of Women Engineers, Engineers Without Borders, and others.


Career Prospects in Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineers learn to understand and use electrical energy: make it, control it, transmit it and tame it to design and run all kinds of traditional and advanced technologies. Electrical engineers also understand how to design and make the hardware that helps our newest intelligent tools, machines, houses and cars get smarter, smaller, cheaper, faster and safer. Electrical engineers work in every industry you can think of: film and television, aerospace, automotive, business machines, professional and scientific equipment, computers and electronics, communications and medical technology to name a few. They work in public utilities, for NASA, at the National Institutes of Health, at the Department of Defense, for consumer electronics companies, and much, much more. As researchers, they study everything from fuel cells to nanotechnology. If it’s got an on/off switch, these engineers have studied it, designed it or produced it.


Videos and Multimedia

 

 


Featured Career

Electrical and Electronics Engineers

Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacturing of electrical equipment, such as electric motors, radar and navigation systems, communications systems, and power generation equipment. Electronics engineers design and develop electronic equipment, such as broadcast and communications systems—from portable music players to global positioning systems (GPSs).

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$93,260

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

315,900

in 2014

Work Environment

Electrical and electronics engineers work in industries including research-and development, engineering services, manufacturing, telecommunications, and the federal government. Electrical and electronics engineers generally work indoors in offices. However, they may have to visit sites to observe a problem or a piece of complex equipment.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

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Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Contact

Bill Smith, Faculty Member and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Bill Smith

Associate Department Chair

Director of Undergraduate Studies

College of Engineering

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

453 F. Paul Anderson Tower

Lexington, KY 40506-0046

(859) 257-8042

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky