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Graduate Student Workshop: Teaching Information Literacy (UK Libraries)

Event Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Event concludes at 4:15.

The type of research that students are expected to do in college is different from high school. Research exists that shows that there is a gap to be bridged between instructor expectations and student research abilities and experiences. 
First year students report being fearful, anxious, and confused about research assignments. They find the research process difficult and frustrating. We often see research assignments that assume a level of sophistication that first year students do not have. This workshop will offer some recommendations that will help them design a more effective research assignment.

Register at https://uky.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3LeJPLvBdUfy3Rz

Humanities Without Walls: Academic Careers Beyond the Tenure Track

Event Location: 
245 Patterson Office Tower

Event concludes at 6:00.

How do we best prepare Humanities graduate students for diverse careers? Graduate students, faculty, and staff are invited to join a panel of alumni and U.K. employees using their Humanities training both inside and outside the academy.

Click here to register.

What’s New in UDL & Accessibility with Deb, Andy, and Buddy

Event Location: 
TBD

Event concludes at 11:00 AM.

Deb, Andy, and Buddy are attending the Accessing Higher Ground (AHG) conference: an accessible media, web, and technology conference held each year in November. Hear what we learned about the latest in UDL and accessibility and discuss application and potential uses for this knowledge.

Click here to register. Contact Deb Castiglione (deb.castiglione@uky.edu) with questions.

Integrating Meaningful Writing Assignments

Event Location: 
Presentation U! in the Hub, basement of W.T. Young Library

Presented by: Dr. Michael Sinowitz, Department of English, DePauw University

The purpose of this hour long workshop is to focus on imagining the various pieces of your class—its content, its formal writing assignments, and its informal writing—as working in relation to one another. We will consider the relative strengths and weaknesses of mastering a particular writing task, developing escalating tasks, as well as sequencing by way of shifting writing tasks. Although there are many ways to have one’s writing and one’s content interconnect and multiple ways to think about your assignments as a sequence, the way to give one’s course a sense of unity is about being intentional in overall course design. I will talk through some various ways of inter-relating these ideas, and I will also give participants a chance to brainstorm about these components for an upcoming class they will be teaching.

More on Dr. Sinowitz at http://www.depauw.edu/news-media/latest-news/details/31117/.

Click here to register.

Light refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching and the Department of Gender & Women’s Studies.

Cultural Responsiveness and Inclusion: An International Student Perspective

Event Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Event concludes at 3:00

Teaching for student success begins by understanding more fully who our students are. Although faculty, staff and administrators strive to create diverse and inclusive instructional environments, many students still find it challenging to engage socially and academically in a different cultural setting. In partnership with the International Center, CELT is hosting this panel as the first in a series of conversations that aims to better address the needs of international students on UK’s campus. Join us for a conversation with undergraduate and graduate student speakers as they share their perspectives on classroom climate and how culturally responsive instructional practices can have a positive effect on academic achievement.

Click here to register. For questions or to receive more information, please contact Nicole Martin (nicolemartin@uky.edu) or Seth Hall (seth.hall@uky.edu).

Public Speaking in the Profession: How to Deliver Conference Papers and Job Talks (for Grad Students and Postdocs)

Event Location: 
W. T. Young Library, Alumni Gallery

The event concludes at 1:00 PM. Light lunch will be provided.

Next Monday and Tuesday, UK graduate students and postdocs will have a rare opportunity to learn techniques of audience engagement with one of the country’s leading academic performance specialists, Dr. Daniel Pollack-Pelzner. A former public speaking coach, Dr. Pelzner is the Ronnie Lacroute Chair in Shakespeare Studies at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon. He will be on campus to lead two workshops, a two-hour session focused on teaching and communicating research to public audiences, and a three-hour session on presenting at academic conferences and job talks. Preregistration is required (preferably by Oct. 5th for refreshment and lunch count purposes).

You've written a wonderful paper, but how do you turn it into a compelling presentation? There is a wide gap between composing your ideas on the page and sharing them with a live audience at a conference or job talk--and that gap makes the difference between enchantment and boredom. This participatory workshop will allow you to practice the most effective strategies for presentation: how to use your voice and body, how to revise your prose for oral delivery, how to engage your audience in the intellectual excitement of your argument, and how to respond to challenging questions. Please bring the first page of a paper that you would like to give as a talk. Note: This session is designed for graduate students and postdocs in English, History, and other humanities and social sciences, but students in other disciplines are welcome.

Click here to register.

Performance Techniques to Enhance Teaching and Communicate Research (for Grad Students and Postdocs)

Event Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Note: this workshop will be held twice, once from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and again from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM.

Next Monday and Tuesday, UK graduate students and postdocs will have a rare opportunity to learn techniques of audience engagement with one of the country’s leading academic performance specialists, Dr. Daniel Pollack-Pelzner. A former public speaking coach, Dr. Pelzner is the Ronnie Lacroute Chair in Shakespeare Studies at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon. He will be on campus to lead two workshops, a two-hour session focused on teaching and communicating research to public audiences, and a three-hour session on presenting at academic conferences and job talks. Preregistration is required (preferably by Oct. 5th for refreshment and lunch count purposes).

Whenever you teach a class or present your scholarship, you're a performer: you want to capture the audience's attention and transform its stance toward your topic. How can you make your audience lean forward, eager to follow the intellectual journey you're leading--even when they know nothing about your field? This interactive workshop will offer accessible strategies from theater, voice training, and improv to help you engage your students and colleagues. Whether you're teaching your first section or entering the 3MT competition, you can learn to use your voice, body, and environment more effectively to make your performance click. Please bring a short description of a topic that you anticipate needing to teach or present. Note: This session is designed for graduate students and postdocs in ALL disciplines.

Click here to register.

Performance Techniques to Enhance Teaching and Communicate Research (for Grad Students and Postdocs)

Event Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Note: this workshop will be held twice, once from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and again from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM.

Next Monday and Tuesday, UK graduate students and postdocs will have a rare opportunity to learn techniques of audience engagement with one of the country’s leading academic performance specialists, Dr. Daniel Pollack-Pelzner. A former public speaking coach, Dr. Pelzner is the Ronnie Lacroute Chair in Shakespeare Studies at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon. He will be on campus to lead two workshops, a two-hour session focused on teaching and communicating research to public audiences, and a three-hour session on presenting at academic conferences and job talks. Preregistration is required (preferably by Oct. 5th for refreshment and lunch count purposes).

Whenever you teach a class or present your scholarship, you're a performer: you want to capture the audience's attention and transform its stance toward your topic. How can you make your audience lean forward, eager to follow the intellectual journey you're leading--even when they know nothing about your field? This interactive workshop will offer accessible strategies from theater, voice training, and improv to help you engage your students and colleagues. Whether you're teaching your first section or entering the 3MT competition, you can learn to use your voice, body, and environment more effectively to make your performance click. Please bring a short description of a topic that you anticipate needing to teach or present. Note: This session is designed for graduate students and postdocs in ALL disciplines.

Click here to register.

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