News & Events

Tempur Sealy announces acquisition of Sealy brand rights In Japan


Tempur Sealy
 
 
LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 8, 2014) — Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (NYSE: TPX), the world’s largest bedding provider, has signed a definitive agreement to acquire the Sealy brand rights in Japan and certain assets from its former licensee. The company anticipates closing the transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions, during its fiscal third quarter of 2014. Financial terms were not disclosed.
 
As part of the transaction, certain functions of the former licensee, including sales and marketing, will be integrated into the company’s Japanese subsidiary. In addition, the companies have executed a supply agreement, whereby the former licensee will become a contract manufacturer for certain Sealy branded products in Japan.
 
“New market expansion is one of our four key strategic growth initiatives and is also an important driver in our long-term international revenue synergies targets. The acquisition of Sealy brand rights in Japan is the first transaction whereby we have regained rights from a Sealy licensee arrangement,” said Tempur Sealy International, Inc. CEO Mark Sarvary. “Japan has been an important market for our company for a long time and we are excited at the prospects of further increasing our penetration and market share with a strengthened brand and product offering.”
 
Chief Financial Officer Dale Williams said, “As a result of this transaction, we anticipate Japan will soon be our largest market as measured by sales outside of North America. Given our current expectation for when the deal will close, we anticipate the transaction will be break-even to modestly accretive to earnings in 2014 and accretive thereafter.”

April 2014 StreamLines Newsletter


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The April 2014 StreamLines Newsletter can be found online here.

 

In This Issue:

HDI Seminar on Facilitating Access for Students with Limited Communication Skills


LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 16, 2014) — The Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky (HDI) will present a free seminar about facilitating access for students with complex communication needs. 
 
“Communication First: Facilitating Access to the General Curriculum,” will be presented from 1-3 p.m. EST (noon -2 p.m. CST) Thursday, Feb. 27,  in the Human Development Training Room at UK's Coldstream Research Campus. Video-conference sites will be available around the city and at locations throughout the state.
 
All students communicate, although sometimes in very subtle behaviors that can be easily missed or in challenging behaviors that are quite obvious but fail to communicate to their educators, peers or parents. Evidence-based practice has found that, with direct instruction and augmentative communication most suited to their needs, students can gain communicative competence at a rapid rate.
 
Presenting will be Jacqueline Kearns, principal investigator of HDI's Teaching Age Appropriate Learning Through Communication (TAALC) Project, and Judith Page, associate professor in the Division of Communication Disorders in the UK College of Health Sciences.
 
Space is limited and registration is required. Those who wish to attend may register online. Attendance site must be selected at time of registration; if a site is full, you will have the option to select another site. HDI's seminar series is open to faculty, staff and students, as well as self-advocates, parents/caregivers and professionals statewide.
 
Continuing education units (CEUs) are approved for effective instructional leaders and social work, psychology and licensed professional counselors. The seminar is affiliated with the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation for CEUs in Certified Rehabilitation Counseling. There is a $20 CEU fee for social workers, psychologists and licensed professional counselors.
 
If you wish to host a live video-conference for your community at your site, please contact Patti Naber Singleton, 859-257-4913. For general questions about the HDI Seminar Series, please contact Tina Lindon, 859-257-1714.
 
 
MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Hautala, 859-323-2396

New KNODE Portal Connects UK Researchers with Potential Collaborators


LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 9, 2013) — The University of Kentucky is partnering with KNODE Inc. to promote and connect UK researchers with colleagues and potential collaborators worldwide.
 
Through a UK-specific portal, the KNODE platform helps individual researchers, academic institutions and companies share scientific knowledge, particularly in the biomedical field.
 
Anyone can create a free login to access UK’s portal and/or search the complete database that currently includes millions of researchers worldwide. Users can search by expert name, area of expertise or affiliation, with search results linking to next-generation expertise profiles automatically generated by KNODE’s advanced semantic mining and data processing algorithms.
 
Users can dynamically search and filter an expert’s scientific content (publications, patents, grants, and clinical trials), aggregated by KNODE’s platform from publically available databases (PubMed, USPTO, NIH RePORTER, clinicaltrials.gov). Researchers with profiles in the system can also claim and edit their information, add links to university lab pages and make other enhancements.
 
"KNODE provides us a single, searchable gateway to the leading-edge biomedical research being conducted by our investigators and our collaborators in industry and academia," said UK Vice President for Research James W. Tracy. "Technology like this can spur vital scientific collaboration."
 
David Steinberg, KNODE's acting chief executive officer and partner at Boston-based PureTech Ventures, said, "There is a clear opportunity to develop exciting ways to automate and characterize researcher expertise, while also making these experts searchable and accessible in a new, powerful way. We are pleased to be working with the University of Kentucky to put their researchers and collaborators in the spotlight, highlighting their unique capabilities and scientific track record.”
 
In addition to adding the University of Kentucky to its growing list of academic partnerships, KNODE also recently announced a commercial partnership with Wiley, a leading international scientific publisher. The company also has formed partnerships with AstraZeneca and others to improve life sciences R&D efforts such as technology licensing and collaboration. KNODE is part of Enlight Biosciences LLC, created by PureTech Ventures in partnership with major pharmaceutical companies and academic supporters.
 
For more information on UK’s KNODE portal, visit http://www.research.uky.edu/knode.
 
MEDIA CONTACT:  Keith Hautala, 859-323-2396 or keith.hautala@uky.edu

CBRE Cincinnati to Represent Proposed Data Center on the Coldstream Research Campus


November 18, 2013 
         
LEXINGTON, KY– Mike McMillan of CBRE Cincinnati's Data Center Solutions Group is representing KDC Real Estate Development & Investments' data center build-to-suit site located at the University of Kentucky's Coldstream Research Campus in Lexington, Kentucky.
 
Once pre-leasing reaches 20,000 square feet, the proposed data center site will be located on the beautiful 735-acre campus that is minutes away from UK and downtown Lexington. The Coldstream Research Campus is currently home to 66 organizations with more than 2,000 employees working in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and equine health, and a variety of other industry sectors.
 
The proposed data center will not only support local businesses’ IT and computing needs but will also help the local community.
 
“Building a data center at this site will give local Lexington businesses a secure, flexible and scalable place for their computer equipment,” Mike McMillan, of the CBRE Data Center Solutions Group, said. “It will support new businesses looking to move to Lexington and also bring new jobs to the community.”
 
It will also save businesses' time and money because they won’t have to design, build and manage their own data center, McMillan said.
 
 
For more information, contact:
  
Mike McMillan | Vice President
CBRE | Data Solutions Group
T +1 513 369 1306
 
 
Joe Ludwig | Communication Specialist
CBRE | Americas Marketing
T +1 513 369 1305

Hummingbird Nano Inc. Highlighted in National Report by The Science Coalition


LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 29, 2013) — A University of Kentucky spin-off company is among those highlighted in a new national report released today by The Science Coalition.
 
Hummingbird Nano Inc., a high-tech startup based at UK's Coldstream Research Campus, is featured in “Sparking Economic Growth 2.0: Companies Created from Federally Funded Research, Fueling American Innovation and Economic Growth.” The report identifies 100 companies that trace their roots to federally funded university research. These companies, while only a tiny fraction of the new companies formed each year, are contributing to the U.S. economy in a significant way.
 
"Every dollar of federal funds that is invested in research returns many dollars more, both in terms of immediate economic activity and in long-term dividends," said James W. Tracy, UK vice president for research. "It is critical to the economic health of Kentucky, and of the United States, that our nation continues to invest strongly in the basic research that leads to innovation and job creation."
 
In fiscal year 2013, external research grants and contracts contributed $367.1 million to the Kentucky economy, including $194.4 million in personal income. Externally supported research accounted for 9,427 jobs at UK and throughout Kentucky. Each dollar of out-of-state external funding for research generates approximately $1.90 of total related expenditures.
 
The basic scientific research that gives rise to companies like Hummingbird Nano, and spurs the economy in many other ways, is jeopardized by the current funding environment, Tracy said. Federal funding for research and development has been on a downward trend for the past decade, with funding levels in 2013 at historic lows. 
 
Sequestration, which began in March 2013, is set to run through 2021 and will wring an additional $95 billion from federal research budgets over this period. This national disinvestment in science will have real consequences. As the Sparking Economic Growth 2.0 companies illustrate, research and the transformative discoveries that flow from it often require sustained funding over many years to yield results.
 
Hummingbird Nano is an example. The initial research that led to the company's founding was undertaken at UK with approximately $300,000 in funding from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Education. From 2000-2007, researchers worked to develop a new manufacturing system that maintains extreme tolerances and precision to mass produce micro-sized molded plastic and glass parts. The technology was further developed for commercialization for another five years, from 2007-2012, under the auspices of Hummingbird's predecessor company, AMT Nano LLC.
 
The September 2012 launch of Hummingbird Nano signaled a transition from research and development to a commercial enterprise centered on precision-molded components for the telecommunications, biotechnology, aerospace, energy and defense industries.
 
“The basic research into the limitations of existing machinery revealed the direction for new processes and machines," said L. Scott Stephens, chair of the UK Department of Mechanical Engineering and Hummingbird co-founder. "The result is a manufacturing system for the mass production of micro-sized parts and assemblies with unparalleled precision. Our technology enables products that could not be produced economically before to be produced in quantities exceeding 100 million annually."
 
University research and the companies born from such research are a driving force behind much of the innovation in the United States. They are bringing forward innovations with the potential to transform industries and solve some of the world’s greatest problems. Since industry conducts relatively little basic research today (about 20 percent), the “seed corn” produced at research universities is essential to U.S. industry and its ability to compete.
 
Research universities like UK play an important role in the creation and future success of spin-off companies, providing a nurturing environment and critical assistance to researcher-entrepreneurs aiming to bring research discoveries to the marketplace. 
 
"UK has successfully fostered new companies and emerging technologies through our business incubator the Advanced Science & Technology Commercialization Center, better known as ASTeCC," Tracy said.
 
Forty-three companies have "graduated" from ASTeCC since 1994. For companies that have outgrown ASTeCC, UK subleases larger laboratory and office spaces or assists with identifying available locations for lease in privately owned buildings at the Coldstream Research Campus. Hummingbird Nano is just one of 66 organizations at Coldstream, where more than 2,000 employees work in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, equine health and a variety of other industry sectors.
 
The Science Coalition is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of more than 50 of the nation’s leading public and private research universities, including UK. It is dedicated to sustaining the federal government’s investment in basic scientific research as a means to stimulate the economy, spur innovation and drive America’s global competitiveness.
 
The new Science Coalition report is available at www.sciencecoalition.org/successstories. An accompanying database provides access to company profiles and allows users to sort companies by federal funding agency, university affiliation, type of innovation and other criteria. 
 
MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Hautala, 859-323-2396; keith.hautala@uky.edu

ARPA-E Announces $608,863 Award to Phinx LLC for its Transformational Energy Research Project


Phinix LLC One of 33 Technologies in 18 States Working to Secure America’s Energy Future in Advanced Manufacturing  
 
Lexington, KY (October 9, 2013) — On September 19, 2013, Deputy Director Cheryl Martin announced that 33 breakthrough energy projects will receive approximately $66 million from the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) under two new programs that provide options for a more sustainable and secure American future.  One recipient, Lexington, KY based Phinix, LLC, has been awarded $608,863 for their project titled “Electrochemical Extraction of High Quality Magnesium from Scrap”. Phinix is located at the Coldstream Research Campus.
 
Phinix will develop a new electrochemical cell technology that can recover high-quality magnesium from aluminum-magnesium scrap.  This technology could lower costs, energy inputs, and emissions from magnesium production, expanding its use in transportation industries.  By recovering and reusing aluminum-magnesium scrap, Phinix’s technology could reduce the need for manufacturing new, expensive primary metals while developing a sustainable and low-cost advanced manufacturing process. 
 
Processing of aluminum-magnesium scarp to produce aluminum products used in beverage and transportation sectors is a key market driver for Kentucky’s economically significant aluminum industry employing over 15,000 men and women with high paying jobs.  
 
Deputy Director Martin made the project announcement during a roundtable discussion on Capitol Hill that focused on how American ingenuity and strategic public-private partnerships are driving U.S. energy innovation. 
 
Dr. Subodh Das will the Principal Investigator for this project. 
 
Contact:
Dr. Subodh Das, CEO and Founder
Phinix, LLC
859-619-8386 
 

Coldstream Laboratories Awarded 5-Year Contract With the National Cancer Institute


Marketwired - Sep 24, 2013 - Coldstream Laboratories, Inc., a provider of sterile drug product development and manufacturing services, has announced that they have been awarded a 5-year contract with the National Cancer Institute ("NCI") under solicitation number N02CM37007-11 (contract# HHSN261201300031I) entitled "Development and Production of Parenteral Dosage Forms for Clinical Studies."
 
The contract lasts for five years with the objective of developing and producing pharmaceutically acceptable parenteral dosage forms of cancer drugs for human use. Certain lead agents selected by the NCI will be assigned for development and production as parenteral products. The NCI has been a leader in field of cancer research since its establishment in 1937.
 
"The requirements for this program mesh perfectly with Coldstream's capabilities and facilities. We couldn't be more pleased to be awarded this opportunity to work with the NCI," said Eric W. Smart, Coldstream's President and Chief Executive Officer. "We work hard to ensure the highest degree of quality in everything we do and being awarded this contract indicates that we are succeeding. Being awarded this contract affords Coldstream the opportunity to continue to make an impact in the field of cancer research and help advance oncologic care for the millions of people impacted by cancer every year."
 
Coldstream Laboratories, Inc., based in Lexington, KY, is a privately held specialty pharmaceutical contract manufacturing organization. The company was formed in 2007 as a spin-off from the University of Kentucky's Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology. Coldstream operates Kentucky's only parenteral manufacturing facility.

Federal Grants Crucial in Funding Innovations that Strengthen KY


Published September 16, 2013 in the Lexington Herald-Leader
By George Ward
 
In his recent op-ed, Eli Capilouto, president of the University of Kentucky, gave a high-level explanation of the need for continued federal research funding and the impact that this funding has on research institutions and the communities where they reside.
 
In order for America to continue to play a leading role in the development of useful technologies and new products that make our lives better, the "innovation deficit" created by declining federal research funding and sequestration must be addressed.
 
In my position as executive director of the Coldstream Research Campus and working with Central Kentucky's technology-based economic development professionals, I see firsthand on a daily basis how the investment in research has changed Lexington's business mix, tax base and our community.
 
Whether UK recruits another world-class scientist (maybe with a spouse or significant other with similar advanced degree credentials) or an entrepreneurial faculty member starts a company and hires young, well-educated, well-paid employees, Lexington benefits from the "brain gain." Lexington also benefits as these folks volunteer for civic boards or take advantage of the many social and cultural opportunities in our city.
 
Of the 66 total businesses and organizations at Coldstream, more than half are in life sciences, engineering or animal health. There are an additional 19 companies growing in UK's high-tech business incubator, the Advanced Science and Technology Commercialization Center, also known as ASTeCC, creating a pipeline of companies with the opportunity to create innovative new products and grow well-paying jobs.
 
In all, ASTeCC has produced 43 companies that have graduated from the incubator facility and were either purchased by larger companies, or continue to grow, many in the Lexington area.
 
The typical evolution of these high-tech companies starts with millions of federal research dollars on basic research to advance science in a particular area. As an idea develops, innovative faculty members patent their ideas and then license them to a company, some started by entrepreneurial faculty members those who have received doctorates. Many of these companies are then funded by federal small business innovation research grants. Using these grants, companies develop working prototypes of new products and then go on to seek private investment to commercialize their ideas.
 
Since March 2007, the federal government has awarded 33 small businesses in Fayette County over $28 million from this program with an additional $18 million from a Kentucky matching program. Twelve of these companies were attracted to Central Kentucky from out of state to qualify for state matching grants and to be close to UK researchers and resources.
 
Much of this money is then spent in our community on salaries, building rents and other operating expenses. These salaries then turn over in our community at retail stores, restaurants, housing, entertainment or arts venues, etc.
 
The May 2013 McKinsey Global Institute report, "Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy," said technologies including advanced robotics, next-generation genomics, 3-D printing, energy storage and advanced materials are among the top 12 technologies that have the greatest economic potential in the next 12 years.
 
New products being developed in Central Kentucky include treatments for cancer, methods of drug delivery, business solutions using 3-D imaging, longer-life and less expensive batteries for mobile devices and electric vehicles, cost-effective manufacturing of prototype products, advanced materials including lighter weight metals used in automobile and aerospace manufacturing, and many others.
 
All this and more is happening every day at UK, the Coldstream Research Campus, ASTeCC and other areas of our city. It all started with basic research investment by the federal government. It has led to brain gain, innovative new products and a growing, well-educated community. The need to fund innovation is very apparent in Lexington and it is important that Congress helps prevent an innovation deficit from occurring.
 
With appropriate funding, UK researchers and private companies founded by entrepreneurial faculty will create new technologies that will lead to a more sustainable way of life, well-paying jobs and economic prosperity for our community and country.
 
At issue: Aug. 25 commentary by Eli Capilouto, "Research investment drives progress; cuts in public grants threaten growth"
 
George Ward is executive director of Coldstream Research Campus.
 

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Held for New Eastern State Hospital


Eastern State HospitalLEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 4, 2013) – Governor Steve Beshear joined local leaders, state officials and representatives from University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare for a ribbon-cutting at the new Eastern State Hospital facility. The new hospital is located at UK’s Coldstream Research Campus in Lexington and will open this month. 
 
The 239-bed, approximately 300,000-square-foot replacement facility will provide a modern setting for inpatient psychiatric treatment, along with specialized services for individuals with acquired brain injuries, and individuals with psychiatric disabilities requiring nursing facility level of care and forensic mental health services.
 
In addition to the inpatient hospital, the new Eastern State Hospital campus will include three 11,000-square-foot personal care homes, each with 16 beds, offering a less restrictive level of care that promotes patients’ return to a community setting. These personal care homes will provide residential psychiatric services and serve as a step down from the acute care setting.
 
“To see this project come to fruition is truly rewarding,” said Gov. Beshear. “The improvements in how Kentucky cares for individuals with mental health needs as a result of the new hospital should make us all proud.”
 
The $129 million facility replaces the 185-year-old Eastern State Hospital, the second oldest psychiatric hospital in the country. It will be managed and operated by UK HealthCare, through an agreement with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS). This new partnership will not only maintain and improve quality patient care, but also allows UK to leverage its considerable expertise in research and clinical therapies to modernize treatment options while training the next generation of behavioral health providers.
 
Gov. Beshear was joined at today’s ceremony by Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, State Representative Jimmie Lee, of Elizabethtown, University of Kentucky President Dr. Eli Capilouto, Executive Vice President for Health Affairs for UK Dr. Michael Karpf and CHFS Secretary Audrey Tayse Haynes.
 
“Today we take a giant step forward,” Mayor Gray said. “From facilities built before the Civil War and into a modern, state-of-the-art facility; from the nation’s second oldest psychiatric hospital to one of its most advanced. It is a big step of progress for all Kentuckians, but especially for those who suffer from mental disabilities. Many of these patients and their families have been waiting for decades for this day. Gratitude and thanks and blessings to everyone involved.”
 
“This is a real happening for me,” said Rep. Lee. “I cannot put into words what this facility means to me and what the support services offered here will mean for literally thousands of our citizens needing mental health care.”
 
“Today is a day to celebrate a partnership in care for many of Kentucky’s most vulnerable citizens," said President Capilouto. “With a state-of-the-art facility financed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the best in high-quality, high-touch expertise and care from UK HealthCare, we begin a new day in providing the best mental health care for the region we serve.”
 
“UK HealthCare recognizes the critical role mental health services plays in providing for the overall health care needs of Kentuckians,” said Dr. Karpf. “This new state-of-the-art facility will enable us to provide the highest level of care as well recruit and retain researchers who will advance our knowledge of the prevention, early detection and treatment of behavioral health disorders.”
 
The Eastern State Hospital project involves a unique agreement between UK, Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC), the state and the city of Lexington. Under the agreement, Eastern State moves from its campus on Newtown Pike to the Coldstream Research Campus location; BCTC moves from UK’s Lexington campus to the current Eastern State location; and UK takes over BCTC’s location on Cooper Drive, which provides the university with additional parking.
 
Construction on the facility began in late 2010 and was overseen by D.W. Wilburn, construction manager for the replacement project. The facility is Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified, meaning it meets the highest green building and performance measures.
 
“This facility will offer us the ability to provide improved and expanded services to better meet patient needs,” said CHFS Secretary Haynes. “The advances we’ll be making in patient treatment simply cannot be overstated. I would like to extend my gratitude to everyone who has worked so tirelessly to make the new Eastern State Hospital a reality, and to our new partners UK HealthCare, who I know will continue to work hard every day to provide the best patient care possible.”
 
Eastern State Hospital serves an average of 2,000 patients per year from 80 Kentucky counties. The primary counties served include Boyle, Fayette, Franklin, Kenton and Madison, ranging from 65 to 279 patients annually.
 
Media Contacts:  
Kerri Richardson, Governor's Office, 502-564-2611 or 502-330-6633
or Kristi Lopez, UK, 850-806-0445
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