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Motivational Interviewing

Lovoria Williams
January 12, 2021

Motivational interviewing is a way for the clinician and client to talk about the clients reasons for change. The clinician helps the client understand reasons for change and helps elicit the clients desire for change. It has been effectively used for addiction behaviors, tobacco treatment, weight loss interventions, and other situations where an individual wants to change their negative health behaviors. The approach expresses empathy, avoids arguing, develops discrepancy, and supports self-efficacy. It is useful in clinical situations where ambivalence is high, desire is low, motivation is low, and confidence is low. The main takeaway of motivational interviewing is to understand that there is no information that is new to the client (I.e. they know the substance is harmful) and the doctor gently helps the client understand that they are an expert in their own health and any previous experience trying to quit. The approach is a team effort of both the clinician and client. For more in depth information on Motivational Interviewing, check out the book Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change by Miller & Rollnick. ISBN 9781609182274

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