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Physical Well-Being Part 3: Physical Activity 

Sarret Seng
January 21, 2021

Part 3 of our Physical Well-being series is all about physical activity! 


Physical Activity 

The easiest way to consistently reach physical activity goals is to look forward to your exercise. This requires that you find something that is both physically challenging and enjoyable. Try thinking of exercise as a hobby that you want to dedicate time to do.  

  • The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 150 minutes a week (approximately 30 minutes/day for 5 days a week) of aerobic exercise which increases your heart rate. At least 2 days should include muscle-strengthening exercise. 
  • Walking (or running) – the simplest form of exercise which requires no equipment except for a pair of sturdy walking shoes and a place to walk! 
    • Try aiming for 10,000 steps (5 miles) each day. Walk at a brisk pace for an added cardiovascular benefit. If you need more motivation to go for a walk, find a park with nice scenery or multitask with a podcast or audiobook. 
  • Martial Arts is a form of exercise which utilizes the brain and muscles. Much like dancing, fighting drills require learning some basic steps and strikes, and eventually the opportunity to add personal flair to your style. Additionally, throwing strikes engages the upper body, core, and lower body for a complete full-body workout. 
  • Playing a sport offers a chance for socialization and likely motivation and accountability. Moreover, set achievable and persistent goals and maintain training intensity to improve at your sport. 
  • A benefit of weight training is seen and felt improvements in your body’s capability. Plenty of online video tutorials are available to offer routines you can follow along with, as well as instructional videos on how to perform certain exercises. For a no-charge website with numerous workout plans and health and fitness articles, visit Darebee

More physical activity can start today with a simple choice to walk! Physical wellness does not have to be a goal that we struggle and suffer to obtain. Rather, it is certainly achievable to have a healthy relationship with ourselves in which we prioritize small efforts that cumulate into enhanced physical wellness. Take the time to define your goals (write them out!) and commit to mindfully incorporating small steps throughout your daily life to reach them. Most importantly, be honest with yourself in choosing to enjoy the journey to physical wellness. 

 

Look for the rest of this series! 

Part 1: Sleep 

Part 2: Fueling Your Body  

 


Sarret Seng is a psychiatric nurse at Eastern State Hospital with degrees in both psychology and nursing. About her own physical well-being, she says, “Personally, I have found that training to get better at certain activities, specifically Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, and rock climbing, keeps me motivated to care for my body while enjoying and looking forward to the training.” 

Reference:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How much physical activity do adults need? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10 April 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/index.htm. Accessed 15 May 2020.