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e-learning

UK Transitioning from Blackboard to Canvas

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One June 25th, 2015, it was officially announced that UK was switching from our current Learning Management System (LMS) system, Blackboard, to Canvas. During the 2015-2016 academic year, both systems will be available for faculty to use, with 2016-2017 marking the official transition. Below is the full text of the press release, but we at CELT are excited for the opportunity to work with faculty during this transition on re-thinking how they use the LMS in their pedagogical practice.

Expanding Course Video Possibilities with the Lightboard

a clear glass plate with green writing on it and a camera focused onto it

A new, innovative teaching option available to faculty: a Lightboard. Housed in the Faculty Media Depot in the M.I. King Library, the Lightboard enables faculty to present to their audience in a frontward facing manner, demonstrated in the video below, in contrast to the back and forth of a traditional whiteboard or blackboard. Integrating this tool with the existing set of multi-media production tools enables the creation of inventive and engaging lectures in a recorded format.

Coming Together for Innovative Learning - The CELT Innovation+Design Lab

a man gestures at a cereal box diagram with post-it notes as two women look on to the side

At the 2015 Innovation + Design Lab, 28 faculty learned about innovative, technology-enhanced teaching and learning techniques. The pedagogy workshops looked at such issues as digital pedagogy, multimedia learning, formative assessments, hybrid and online course design, and Universal Design. The I+D Lab is just the start for these faculty. When the Fall Semester starts, they will be grouped into Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) to further learn and discuss, as well as sharing how the implementation process is progressing throughout the academic year.

Innovative Faculty + Innovative Support = 21st Century Student Success

street sign on stoplights at an intersection reading "Innovation"

One in every four students in the US were taking at least one course online during the 2013 fall semester. So-called Millennials are increasingly clamoring for flipped and hybrid classroom environments, which have been proven to be effective if done properly. But how, then, does the university rise to meet the challenges and expectations of the current students, but doing so while maintaining quality and sustainability? This post explores some of the challenges and opportunities of developing online and hybrid courses, using as context the collaborations between CELT, the e-Learning Innovation Initiative, and the Analytics and Technology office here at the University of Kentucky.