Campus News

UK Receives $19.8 Million Clinical and Translational Science Award

Tue, 10/25/2016 - 21:00
 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) announced today that it received a four-year, $19.8 million Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Center for Advancing Clinical and Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. CTSA grants support innovative solutions to improve the efficiency, quality, and impact of translating scientific discoveries into interventions or applications that improve the health of individuals and communities.

 

UK officials were joined by U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Congressman Andy Barr for the announcement.

 

This is the second CTSA grant that the UK CCTS has competed for and received. In 2011, the CCTS received a five-year, $20 million award. These grants are extremely competitive and place UK in elite company. Other institutions funded in this round include Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, Yale University, Rockefeller University and UCLA.

 

Additionally, UK is one of only 21 institutions in the country with federally-designated research centers in translational science, aging and cancer.

 

“While this trifecta of competitive grants positions us to recruit the brightest scientific minds of our generation and host potentially transformational clinical trials, it is the impact on community that is the heart of the CTSA and, indeed, our work as a University for Kentucky,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “Our capacity to engage at the intersection of research disciplines – which we translate from the cellular-level, to the community, and to the Commonwealth – will be emboldened by this highly competitive award.”

 

The mission of UK CCTS is to accelerate the process of translating scientific discoveries into tangible applications for individual and community health, with particular focus on health disparities in Kentucky and Appalachia. A "disease agnostic" center, the CCTS does not focus on one particular disease but supports research on an array of diseases across the lifespan in order to quicken the process of moving new science, treatments and tools to the patient bedside or into communities.

 

"The CCTS has focused our work over the last five years to create a robust spectrum of resources and expertise that enhances translational research at UK, within communities, and through a network of regional research collaborations. We are also committed to training the upcoming generation of physician scientists and researchers who will make the scientific discoveries of the future " said Dr. Philip A. Kern, director of the UK CCTS.

 

Senator McConnell, who contacted NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on behalf of the University, said, “I was pleased to work with University of Kentucky President Dr. Capilouto and faculty and staff to help secure this federal assistance. The competitive grant we are celebrating today is not only great news for UK and its students and researchers, but it is great news for the entire Commonwealth which benefits from the critical health research undertaken by UK and the healthcare provided by the University and its partners. 

 

“UK’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science administers multi-level, proactive training which equips health care providers to not only address current health issues facing my constituents, but also to create innovative ways to improve the lives and health of Kentuckians. UK has long made it a priority to undertake important research specific to Kentucky and the Appalachian region’s population, which has resulted in better health care access and outcomes for my rural constituents in Eastern Kentucky.”

 

Since receiving its first CTSA grant in 2011, the CCTS has made significant investments to transform the research enterprise at UK and has established itself as the CTSA hub for Central Appalachia.

 

“The awarding of this competitive grant is a testament to UK’s national leadership in training the next generation of researchers and engaging the community in collaborative efforts to improve public health,” said Barr. “I am proud to support and to have voted for increased funding for the National Institutes of Health because programs such as the Center for Clinical and Translational Science have a tremendous return on investment in terms of improving outcomes for patients, lowering costs, and expanding access to care."

 

The CCTS provides critical research infrastructure, funding and support services; facilitates team science and a regional research network; engages with communities for research and training to address health needs; and prepares the upcoming generation of clinical and translational researchers. These efforts integrate UK's tripartite mission to provide the best clinical care, conduct innovative research to improve health and educate the health care and research workforce.

 

“In order to provide the most advanced care for Kentuckians, we need to be active in developing new treatments and diagnostics, as well as training top-notch physicians and researchers who can carry on the processes of discovery," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. "Our focused efforts and investment in translational team science mean we have more clinical trials available to our patients, and we’re able to bring the best and most innovative science to their care."

 

UK's research enterprise has benefited from a multitude of CCTS efforts. The CCTS pilot funding program, which supports innovative, early-stage research, has provided $4 million in awards which have yielded $38.5 million in competitive extramural research funding at UK — a return on investment of more than 8 to 1. These pilot awards support diverse research studies, from new treatments for Parkinson's disease to increasing lung cancer screening in Appalachia.

 

In order to catalyze team science, CCTS has funded 100 multidisciplinary team sciences projects and recently partnered with the College of Medicine and the UK vice president for research to establish the new Multidisciplinary Value Program, which creates multidisciplinary research teams and new clinical trials at UK.

 

The CCTS has also created a significant infrastructure of research support services to assist investigators across the spectrum research, with targeted investments in specific research capacities. It has invested $1.2 million to enhance UK's imaging infrastructure and research through career development, pilot awards, and equipment. These investments resulted in patents for optical imaging equipment for breast cancer diagnosis, and novel MRI techniques to assess ACL and hip joint repair and to measure cardiac scar tissue in patients with kidney failure.

 

The CCTS also created UK's first biospecimen bank, which makes biological samples available to researchers. More than 18,000 patients have consented to participate.

 

A new Drug Discovery and Development core through the UK Center for Pharmaceutical Research and Innovation was also funded in part by the CCTS. This investment led to an exclusive UK Natural Products Repository, composed of pure natural products deriving from unique environments in Appalachian Kentucky. Collection site areas included active and abandoned coal mines and reclamation sites, thermal vents from longstanding underground coal mine fires and deep well drilling.  Compounds from these unprecedented collection sites are purified and tested for novel metabolic potential as new drugs. 

 

CCTS efforts and investments in biomedical informatics have greatly enhanced UK's research enterprise as well. A robust, cutting-edge research warehouse of clinical data from UK and state partners, called the Enterprise Data Trust, enables the use of health data for discovery and improved patient care. The CCTS was also active in recruiting UK's new, expert biomedical informatics team, and facilitated the development of the new Institute for Biomedical Informatics.

 

"The UK Strategic Plan for Research focuses on support of outstanding research that improves the lives of those in the Commonwealth.  We couldn’t achieve these important goals without the support of programs like the CCTS. To bridge the gap between basic and clinical research, we need a specialized infrastructure that facilitates translational research,” said Lisa Cassis, Ph.D., UK vice president for research. “This program provides that infrastructure. This grant is also vitally important to the new multidisciplinary research building, currently under construction, that will focus on health disparities facing Kentuckians."

 

Through partnerships with Kentucky communities and through its role as the CTSA hub for Central Appalachia, the impact of the CCTS also extends far beyond UK's campus. The CCTS is the founding member of the Appalachian Translational Research Network (ATRN), which facilitates research collaborations with East Tennessee State University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, the University of Cincinnati, and West Virginia University. Marshall University, also an ATRN member, receives sub-award of UK's CTSA grant to bolster research capacity and support pilot research.

 

Another key initiative from the UK CCTS is the Community Leadership of Kentucky, which provides training and funding to enhance the capacity of community leaders and organizations to address health challenges. A series of pilot and mini-grants also support community-based research and health interventions.

 

Preparing the next generation of translational researchers and physician scientists is another pillar of the CCTS mission. Through its career development program, 15 junior faculty have received research funding and mentored research training; nine have since earned independent research awards, and six are current awardees. The CCTS additionally supports students in doctoral clinical and translational science training programs.

 

Over its next four years of funding, the CCTS will building upon its work to build infrastructure, enhance translational team science, engage with communities, and confront regional health disparities.

 

"Addressing the serious and complex health challenges in Kentucky and Appalachia requires multipronged, interdisciplinary approaches that leverage the strengths of our collective efforts," said Kern. "As we look to our work in the coming years, we will build upon our infrastructure and continue to stimulate innovative team science across a broad spectrum of disciplines with focus on the important health needs of communities. We look forward to continued participation with national CTSA consortium, in partnership with many other outstanding institutions, to represent Central Appalachia in the quest to help solve the many health problems faced by our nation."

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, mallory.powell@uky.edu

Applications Open for UK Libraries 2017 Alternative Textbook Grant Program

Tue, 10/25/2016 - 19:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2016)  University of Kentucky Libraries is launching a second round of the Alternative Textbook Grant Program to encourage UK faculty to adopt peer-reviewed open access alternative textbooks or to create original learning materials for their courses. Faculty may apply for one of 10 grants of up to $1,500 each to implement any curriculum change required for the use of alternative textbooks. 

 

“The favorable feedback to the first round of the program demonstrates that faculty realize the benefits and opportunities alternative textbooks bring to teaching and learning,” said Mary Beth Thomson, UK Libraries senior associate dean. “We are delighted to continue our support for faculty’s adoption and creation of alternative textbooks.” 

 

Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that prices for college textbooks increased by 88 percent between 2006 and 2016. Studies indicate that the financial burden of textbooks negatively impacts student success by limiting students’ access to essential learning resources. Alternative textbooks present a proven solution to the prohibitive prices of traditional textbooks and allow faculty to customize course content in a timely and innovative manner. 

 

Current UK faculty teaching a course in academic year 2017-18 using a commercial textbook are eligible to apply for one of the 10 grants. UK Libraries’ academic liaisons can provide faculty with assistance in identifying existing alternative textbooks and UK Libraries’ licensed information resources that are appropriate substitutes for traditional textbooks. 

 

Proposals must be submitted via the program’s online form. Selection criteria include the strength of a statement of concern, estimated potential savings by students in the course, ability to use the alternative textbook in academic year 2017-18, and reusability beyond the initial semester. Successful applicants will be notified in the spring of 2017.  

 

Each grant recipient is required to submit a report describing the alternative textbook, the number of students impacted, estimated student savings, and an evaluation of the experience with the program. Outcomes of the program will be shared with the UK community. 

 

The proposal submission deadline is Dec. 23, 2016. For more information about the Alternative Textbook Grant Program, contact Adrian Ho, UK Libraries director of digital scholarship, at adrian.ho@uky.edu, or Mary Beth Thomson, UK Libraries senior associate dean, at mbthomson@uky.edu.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Díaz to Direct International Studies

Tue, 10/25/2016 - 16:50

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2016)  University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Dean Mark Kornbluh recently announced that Associate Professor nica Díaz will serve as director of a new program in international studies in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 

Díaz has a joint doctorate in Hispanic literature and Latin American history from Indiana University. She came to UK in 2014 as an associate professor in Hispanic studies, with a secondary appointment in the Department of History. She has served as director of the Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies Program since 2014. An active scholar, Díaz is author of “Indigenous Writings from the Convent: Negotiating Ethnic Autonomy in Colonial Mexico,” published by University of Arizona Press in 2010.

 

Díaz is deeply committed to international studies and to working with colleagues in building a strong faculty steering committee composed of individuals who are committed to international studies and willing to serve as ambassadors from the program to departments. She is eager to explore opportunities to develop the program through connections with the International Center and other units on campus, and to continue to build community amongst students in the program.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Great Scott! See What UK Men's Chorus Has Up its Sleeve for Fall Extravaganza

Tue, 10/25/2016 - 15:01

 

UK Men's Chorus, under the direction of Jefferson Johnson, perform R. Vaughan Williams' "Epitaph on John Jayberd of Diss" at 2015 ACDA National Convention in Salt Lake City.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2016) — Male vocal talents fill the fall air again at the 2016 University of Kentucky Men’s Chorus Fall Extravaganza. This year the acclaimed chorus will perform alongside the acoUstiKats and for the first time ever, the men of the Scott County High School choral program, including the Men’s Choir, Mastersingers and Great Scott! The concert will begin 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Concert Hall.

 

The UK Men’s Chorus is an 80-voice ensemble composed of students who range from freshmen to graduate students conducted by Jefferson Johnson, director of UK Choral Activities. These young men represent a variety of musical backgrounds and academic disciplines. Founded in the fall of 2002, the Men’s Chorus has grown in size and popularity each semester. The choir’s challenging and diverse repertoire includes literature that spans from Gregorian chant to music of the 21st century. Rehearsing only twice a week, the UK Men’s Chorus maintains an active performing schedule throughout the state of Kentucky, touring each semester. The chorus has achieved several distinguished honors in recent years. Most recently, the UK Men's Chorus was selected to perform at the prestigious 2015 American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) National Conference and at the 2016 Intercollegiate Men’s Choruses National Seminar.

 

The acoUstiKats, founded in 1993 by Johnson as a subsection of the UK Men’s Chorus, are the premier all-male a cappella ensemble in the state of Kentucky. This group of men has been featured on national television as a part of NBC’s “The Sing-Off” season four and has performed in countless venues across the United States from the shores of Hawaii to Graceland in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

The Scott County High School Choral Department is directed by UK alumni Brent E. Merritt and James F. Wright.

 

Merritt earned his bachelor's degree in music education at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, where he studied with David Nott. In 1999, he completed his master's degree in music education at UK, where he studied conducting with Johnson. Merritt began his teaching career at Olympia Middle School and High School in 1989 before moving in 1995 to teach at Franklin County High School in Kentucky. In 2002, he joined the Scott County faculty where he teaches chorus, singers, piano and voice and serves as the chair of the music department. He has served as president of the Kentucky chapter of the ACDA and is currently serving as vice president.

 

Wright has been teaching at Scott County for three years as the assistant choir director, piano instructor and a music theory scholar. He holds a bachelor's degree in music education from UK, where he studied voice.

 

Tickets for the UK Men's Chorus Fall Extravaganza are $15 for general admission and $5 for students. Tickets can be purchased from the Singletary Center ticket office by phone at 859-257-4929, online at www.scfatickets.com, and in person at the venue. Free advance tickets for UK students with a valid ID are available at the Singletar Center ticket office up to the day before the concert during operating hours. 

 

For more information on the Men's Chorus Fall Extravaganza or the UK Men’s Chorus, contact William White, administrative assistant to UK Choirs, at william.white@uky.edu.

 

UK's Men's Chorus and acoUstiKats are part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Alumna Lands Second TV Series With 'Pure Genius'

Tue, 10/25/2016 - 11:01

 

Promotional video for CBS TV show "Pure Genius."

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2016) University of Kentucky Opera Theatre alumna Reshma Shetty will take her medical TV skills honed on USA Network's "Royal Pains" to the new drama "Pure Genius" premiering 10 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday), Oct. 27, on CBS.

 

The series is centered on a state-of-the-art hospital built by young Silicon Valley tech-titan James Bell, played by Augustus Prew. Bell and his carefully assembled team of medical mavericks and tech vanguards, including Shetty's character, Dr. Talaikha Channaraypatra, treat only the most rare and seemingly inpossible medical mysteries — at no cost to patients. In his mission to remove bureaucracy from medicine and use the most forward thinkers in technology, Bell discovers that his life might need saving too. Click here for more information about the series.

 

Shetty holds a bachelor's degree from James Madison University, a master's degree in music from UK, and an artist diploma from the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. Upon graduation from the conservatory, Shetty nabbed the lead role of Priya in A.R. Rahman and Andrew Lloyd Webber's first national tour of "Bombay Dreams" and was asked to appear as Ayah in Broadway's World AIDS day benefit "The Secret Garden."

 

Additional theatre credits for Shetty includes roles and readings with the Contemporary American Theatre Festival, the New Dramatists and the Lark Theatre Company.

 

Shetty has also appeared in NBC's "30 Rock" and CBS's "CSI: Miami." In 2008, she made her big screen debut opposite Ally Sheedy and Ruby Dee in "Steam." Additionally, Shetty, who resides in New York City, was featured in "Characters Unite," USA's award-winning public service campaign created to address social injustices and cultural divides in America. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Chadian Student Senator Strives to Leave a Lasting Impact on Campus

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 17:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2016)  Esias Bedingar can be described in many ways. University of Kentucky College of Arts and Science senator, a fellow with the UK Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, multilingual neuroscience student, and significantly involved individual are only a few of the descriptions that apply. Born in Mali, Bedingar has lived in Chad, Cote D’Ivoire and Tunisia, making the United States his fourth home. He is a native French speaker, but boasts proficiency in Chadian, Spanish and Arabic, as well as English.

 

Bedingar first became interested in the Student Government Association (SGA) when he was accepted into the Leadership Development Program as a freshman. This program enabled him to meet a lot of faculty, leaders and SGA alumni.

 

“I was able to make connections and meet a lot of influential people,” Bedingar said. “I was encouraged to run, and even though I barely understood English then, I did.” Although the language barrier made it difficult at the time, by his sophomore year, Bedingar had overcome all the hurdles and was elected into office as a senator for the College of Art and Sciences.

 

SGA President Rowan Reid said she is also glad to have Bedingar on board. “SGA wants our membership to represent the diverse backgrounds of students on our campus,” Rowan said. “It's great to have Esias bring an international student perspective to the table.”

 

As senator, Bedingar’s biggest hope is to see more international students getting involved on campus. His advice to international students is to “be more intentional about the things you get involved with on campus so that you can develop your career.”

 

“I see a lot of international students taking on leadership roles, joining the International Student Council, becoming RAs,” he added. “That’s exciting.”

 

In addition to his position as a senator, Bedingar founded a chapter of the American Mock World Health Organization on campus; as well as an NGO, Motocross for Malaria (MFM), which provides anti-malarial treatments to people in rural areas of Chad.

 

Bedingar said that his skill for languages enables him to make friends easily with people from different cultures. Last year, he served as public relations chair of the African Students Association and is currently an international student ambassador with the UK International Center, selected for his merit and willingness to promote diversity at UK.

 

"Esias is a world-changer,” said Ghana-native and UK student Bill Aboagye, who works on the international student ambassador team alongside Bedingar. “He has great potential and I have seen him become a better individual and leader since the first time we met.”

 

Bedingar hopes to further his education by pursuing combined doctor of medicine and doctor of philosophy degrees after completing his undergraduate studies in neuroscience. He is currently conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia to further his knowledge in the medical field.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Grab Coffee With a Cop

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 16:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) — From 10 a.m.–noon tomorrow the University of Kentucky Police Department (UKPD) together with the Student Government Association (SGA) invite the UK community to Coffee with a Cop in the Starbucks in William T. Young Library.

 

This opportunity will allow students, faculty and staff to engage with Chief of Police Joe Monroe as well as other UKPD officers in a small group discussion related to campus safety. Coffee and refreshments will be provided.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SGA CONTACT: Blair Johnson, SGA director of communications, uksgacommunications@gmail.com

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

Kernel Awarded 'Pulitzer Prize of College Journalism'

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 16:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) The Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) has awarded the Kentucky Kernel with the Pacemaker, one of the most prestigious awards in the country for student newspapers. This is the third time the paper has received the award in 10 years.

 

Laura Widmer, executive director of ACP, said the award ranks the student paper in the top 1 percent in the country and that it is considered the "Pulitzer Prize of college journalism."

 

“An exciting part of getting this award was seeing all of the other student newspapers from around the country, and the great work they are doing,” said Will Wright, last year’s editor-in-chief. “It is cool to know there are so many talented and excited young reporters out there, just like those at the Kernel.”

 

Wright also took 10th place in the national feature writing competition for his piece on a former UK employee turned bank robber Crystal Little.

 

For their entries, student newspapers must submit five issues, two of their own choosing and three from dates selected by ACP. In addition, there are individual categories for writers, photographers and designers to submit their pieces.

 

The newspapers that were submitted included stories such as “The woman behind the mask,” “Driving under the radar,” “Observing UK’s gender pay gap” and “Local Congolese community welcomes refugee.”

 

“It is easy to forget, in the haze of sleepless nights spent working on the paper in this dusty basement, just why we pursue these stories,” said current Editor-in-Chief Marjorie Kirk. “We are reminded of our sense of purpose in this community when we can put disagreements and difficulties aside to celebrate this amazing recognition of our students’ efforts.”

 

Chris Poore, the Kernel's adviser, said the award was a testament to hard work.

 

“I have seen up close how hard these students have worked these past few years,” Poore said. “And I have great pride in them. But it’s thrilling to have a group of professionals recognize their work as some of the best in the country. I can’t wait to see what this staff does next.”

 

In addition to accepting the award in Washington, D.C. with fellow Kernel staffers Wright and Michael Reaves, Kirk spoke on a panel about how to report on and investigate sexual assault on college campuses.

 

Kirk was invited by Amy Herdy, a producer for the documentary about university cover-ups of sexual assault on college campuses “The Hunting Ground,” after she heard of the newspaper’s efforts to tackle the issue at UK. 

 

“This is evidence that The Kentucky Kernel is a professionally run newspaper that tries to do right for the many audiences it serves," said Al Cross, a UK journalism faculty member and director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues. "In the face of unjustified criticism of the paper, this award is useful to its cause at hand: accountability through transparency.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Whitney Harder, 859-323-2963

VIDEO: Providing a Place for Students to Help Other Students at UK

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 15:50

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) — Sometimes, college can be tough. Exams, term papers, research projects and even homework can pile on students this time of year. 

 

Fortunately for University of Kentucky students, there is plenty of help. Student and Academic Life's new Student and Academic Services unit offers academic support for undergraduates in all colleges.

 

A popular offering is the Peer Tutoring Program (PTP), which provides free drop-in peer tutoring for students at The Study.

 

Last year alone, peer tutors assisted other students in more than 25,000 tutoring sessions!  Watch the video above to discover who leads the effort in helping over 120 peer tutors help their fellow students succeed. 

 

This video feature is part of our new UKNow series, “Kentucky’s Heartbeat — the pulse of our institution.” The goal is to highlight the people who are working every day to help each and every student succeed inside and outside of the classroom. 

 

If you know of someone who you think should be featured because of his or her dedication to the student experience, please email us. Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature on UKNow!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

Sign Up Deadline for Minority and Women Construction Training Program is Nov. 18

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 15:25

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 26, 2016)  The Bluegrass Small Business Development Center will host a 10-week program offering instruction to women and minority business owners who wish to compete in the construction industry. Registration is open until Nov. 18, and classes will begin on Jan. 10, 2017.

 

The Minority and Women Training Program began in 2001 as a way to increase construction opportunities for women and minority business owners and has graduated more than 150 entrepreneurs statewide.

 

The program will cover topics that include business planning, contract law, insurance and performance bonds, accounting and financial statements, drawings and specifications, bidding and estimating, and cash flow analysis. Participants will acquire the necessary tools to grow their businesses and have an opportunity to network with one another, building relationships they can draw upon in the future.

 

The program is sponsored by the Kentucky Small Business Development Center (KSBDC), Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Fifth Third Bank, Blue Grass Airport, Messer Construction Company, Fayette County Public Schools, University of Kentucky Facilities Management, Commerce Lexington, BEX Construction and Lextran.

 

Coordinated by LFUCG and KSBDC, classes will be held weekly from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. EST Tuesdays. Minorities or women with a 51 percent ownership in a company in the construction or construction-related industry are eligible for the program. The cost is $100 for companies accepted into the program. A boxed dinner is provided each night.

 

For more information on the Minority and Women’s Construction Training Program, contact Shirie Hawkins at shirie.hawkins@ksbdc.org or register online at www.ksbdc.org/lexington-minority-and-women-contract.

 

KSBDC, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, www.ksbdc.org/.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Roberta Meisel, 859-257-7668

UK Heating Up in Preparation for 23rd Iron Pour

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 15:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) The heat is rising on campus again this October as the University of Kentucky School for Art and Visual Studies hosts its 23rd Iron Pour. UK's weeklong celebration of the metal arts will culminate with the Iron Pour on Oct. 29.

 

In this week leading up to the Iron Pour, several festivities are being presented, including mold-making workshops and a pair of lectures by visiting artist Bryan Massey Sr., of University of Central Arkansas. The mold-making workshops are being presented daily from 6-11 p.m. Oct. 24-28, at the Metal Arts Building. Massey will deliver two lectures as part of his visit. The first lecture will be 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Metal Arts Research Room in the Metal Arts Building. His final artist talk will be held at noon Friday, Oct. 28, in the Bolivar Art Gallery at the School of Arts and Visual Studies Building. Both Massey lectures are free and open to the public. The festivities will culminate with the Iron Pour running 1 p.m. until dark Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Metal Arts Building.

 

In addition to the workshops and lectures, Massey will also participate in classes and give critiques on student work as part of his residency at UK.

 

Massey is currently a professor of art and a sculptor at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway. He is primarily a stone carver, but does work with iron and aluminum as well. He was selected for the state's Governor’s Award for the Individual Artist of the Year in 2006.

 

Demonstrating the most dramatic part of the metal-casting process, historically UK's iron pours attract a national audience of artists, students and art enthusiasts alike, with past attendees coming from as far as New Mexico to take part in the event. During this year's iron pour, art students from other disciplines and art enthusiasts from the community can purchase a scratch block and leave with their own pieces of art. The pour provides an opportunity for individuals to test their talents by etching an image in the resin tablets, having graphite applied and processed in the iron pour.

 

For artists looking to finish work, it is $40 to produce a mold up to 100 lbs. in sand and 30 lbs. in metal. Another $20 covers each additional 100 pounds of sand or 30 pounds of metal. Additionally, $20 covers a 6” x 6” scratch block relief sculpture, $15 dollars with a valid student ID, and $80 covers a 16” x 16” scratch block relief sculpture. Proceeds from the Iron Pour benefit the SCRAP Student Sculpture Club, who helps organize the festivities.

 

"We host this national caliber event to share the experience of an iron pour so audience members may take the practice and experience back home and apply it for themselves in their schools or communities," said Garry Bibbs, associate professor of sculpture.

 

To find out more about any of the events presented in conjunction UK's 23rd Iron Pour, contact Garry Bibbs by phone at 859-257-3719 or email to garry.bibb@uky.edu.

 

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies, at the UK College of Fine Arts, is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies and art education.


 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK CAFE Empowering Women Event is Tomorrow

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 15:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016)   The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFE) will be hosting its second annual Intercultural Awareness Day tomorrow (Wednesday, Oct. 26), at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

 

The event will honor the top 25 students, faculty, staff and alumni of the college who have helped educate women on overcoming gender barriers and who champion diversity and inclusion across the UK campus community.

 

Titled "Women in CAFE — Empowering Our Future Awards Luncheon," the celebration runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and features keynote speaker Cathy Bristow, the first woman and African-American chief union negotiator in the wine industry. Bristow currently serves as director of global quality for the Celanese Chemical Company.

 

Awards also will be presented for excellence in research, instruction and extension, and will include students, graduates of the college, and members of the community.

 

“I hope that this event will make people aware that we are all diverse, all unique,” said Natasha Saunders, extension associate in the Office of Diversity, Recruitment and Retention and co-advisor for the UK chapter of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) in CAFE. “I am proud to work in this college where we put emphasis on inclusivity and collaboration. When we say we are a college that supports intercultural awareness, we stand behind those words in action.”

 

Nominees, nominators and special guests will be attending the luncheon event.

 

Later on that same day (Oct. 26), the college is sponsoring a roundtable discussion with Bristow, “Women at UK — Inviting in Your Voice.” The roundtable begins at 6:30 p.m. in the E.S. Good Barn’s Gorham Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

  

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu

UK Professor Accelerates STEM Education With NASCAR

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 14:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) Molly Fisher is a University of Kentucky College of Education professor with a passion for NASCAR racing. Her interests converge in classrooms when she delivers NASCAR-inspired lessons in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (collectively known as STEM).

 

For those who think of NASCAR as a “good ol’ boys” sport where men drive in circles around a track, STEM lessons based on racing may seem a stretch. Others may be especially perplexed by a female with a Ph.D. spending her weekends unabashedly cheering for her favorite NASCAR drivers. But things are not as incongruous as they may seem.

 

“The teams (including the driver) are constantly calculating, building, programming and engineering in order to find the safest and fastest race car that will meet the required NASCAR specifications,” Fisher said. “The drivers are consistently the face of the NASCAR sport, but the rest of those teams are made up of engineers and scientists, many with graduate degrees in those fields. The team members behind the drivers deserve just as much credit as the drivers. My goal is to emphasize these ideas to children at an earlier age in efforts to get them interested and engaged in the STEM concepts embedded in this sport.”


Fisher grew up in North Carolina where she and her father watched races on Sunday, and would sometimes stop by NASCAR drivers’ local garages to say hello (a common practice at the time).

 

When Fisher was a graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Diandra Leslie-Pelecky, a physicist who has written a book on the science that makes cars win, approached her advisor (David Royster, who is now also on faculty at UK), about developing an education component related to the sport. Soon, she and Royster were delivering NASCAR-themed workshops for teachers in Charlotte, North Carolina, and have done a few in Kentucky. 

 

At UK, Fisher recently connected with UK graduate student Kyle Curry, a former high school physics teacher. He got her involved in the Kentucky Speedway’s Racing to Excellence school program. She has worked to raise awareness of the program and helped judge this year’s STEM essay contest. The eight students selected as winners in the competition had the opportunity to gain hands-on experience as honorary pit crew members during the Kentucky Speedway’s NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race. Fisher attended the event with the high school students, where they spent the entire race day in the pits and garages with their designated teams.

 

Earlier this summer, Fisher was called upon by the Kentucky Speedway to conduct a camp session with driver Ben Rhodes, a NASCAR Camping World Truck Series driver, at Ludlow Middle School in Kenton County. There, they talked about safety, such as the Steal and Foam Energy Reduction (SAFER) barriers around the walls of tracks and head and neck support (HANS) devices attached to drivers’ helmets.

 

“The middle school students even got to build SAFER walls and crash model cars into them, measuring which walls absorbed the force of the car the best,” Fisher said, “What the students didn’t know at first was that part of the materials they were working with were actual pieces of a SAFER barrier that the Kentucky Speedway donated to my materials collection prior to the camp session.”

 

During the time Fisher has spent breaking barriers as a woman in STEM, females have also been making inroads with careers in NASCAR.

 

“I’d like to see an increase of women in this field and this is being helped by more women drivers, like Danica Patrick and Jennifer Jo Cobb, being introduced in the sport,” Fisher said. “During my time in the garage and pit areas at the speedway this summer, I had the opportunity to speak with several female engineers and race team directors that were involved in the building and engineering of the cars. As a female in STEM and a NASCAR fan, this is a promising step for women in the field, but I would like to see continuous increases of female involvement in the sport.”

 

Her next race-related involvement may originate from the UK campus. During the session at the middle school in Kenton County, Rhodes interviewed Fisher live for his Facebook followers. Kentucky Racing Group took notice. The group is comprised of student teams that build and race UK’s formula and solar cars. The students reached out to Fisher, and she hopes to collaborate with them on projects.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Feast on Equality Dinner Will Benefit Office of LGBTQ* Resources

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 13:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) — The Office of LGBTQ* Resources, in partnership with Feast On Equality, will be hosting an inaugural Feast on Equality dinner benefiting the University of Kentucky Office of LGBTQ* Resources.

 

Feast On Equality is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that raises funds for at-risk LGBT youth by hosting signature fundraising events to engage the community and create awareness surrounding the issues that our LGBT youth face.

 

Feast on Equality will be held 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at The Carrick House in Lexington. The evening will consist of a cocktail hour, a three-course meal and an engaging program to learn more about the work that is taking place on UK's campus to improve the lives of LGBTQ* students.

 

To purchase tickets, visit the event page. All proceeds from ticket purchases will directly benefit the Office of LGBTQ* Resources in various efforts including:

  • Expanding scholarship opportunities to LGBTQ* students who would not otherwise be able to meet the financial demands of higher education.
  • Augmenting regular programming that includes an October LGBTQ* History Month speaker, November Transgender Week of Awareness activities, and Spring UK Pride Week activities.
  • Supporting a statewide conference for LGBT student leaders and introducing them to resources and support that will make a difference at college campuses across Kentucky for years to come.
  • Launching a study abroad program that specifically focuses on LGBTQ* experiences and providing substantial scholarship funds to offset the cost of attendance for the first student participants.
  • Hiring a graduate assistant to provide additional hands-on support for our five LGBTQ* focused student groups, allowing their membership to grow and flourish with additional structured support and advising.
  • Promote specific faculty development that continues to increase LGBTQ* related conversations in our classrooms.

"This exciting new partnership between LGBTQ* Resources and Feast On Equality provides a new way for us to tell our stories as students, faculty, staff and alumni," said Lance Poston, director of the Office of LGBTQ* Resources. "The event will highlight many of our inclusion focused campus accomplishments from the past year as well as highlight ways that we hope to grow in the future."

 

For additional information or questions, contact info@FeastOnEquality.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Participants in UK Dementia Study Display 'Inspiring Attempts' at Art

Mon, 10/24/2016 - 12:29
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016) "Inspiring Attempts: Artworks from the Fall 2016 Visual Arts Study" gives art patrons a chance to see how the visual arts can benefit individuals with dementia with a new exhibition of work by participants in a second study at the University of Kentucky. The exhibit, running through Oct. 29, on the second floor of UK's new Art and Visual Studies Building, is free and open to the public.

 

“The exhibit is truly beautiful and shows the talent and effort of all of the participants in the study," said researcher Allan Richards, an associate professor of art education at UK School of Art and Visual Studies.

 

His research partner, Ann Christianson-Tietyen, agreed wholeheartedly. “We had a wonderful time this fall and the participants seemed to enjoy all of the art activities and the challenges involved. They produced beautiful works of art.”

 

Dementia is a decline of cognitive health that interferes with everyday life. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most recognizable form of dementia, but many other conditions can also affect cognitive health. There is no cure for AD, and almost all patients with dementia eventually require constant care from a caregiver or loved one. In 2015, there were 5.3 million Americans suffering from this devastating disease.

 

Beginning this past February, Christianson-Tietyen and Richards have been looking at how the visual arts can have a positive effect on people who suffer from mild to moderate dementia. The study also includes caregivers.

 

In the creation of art, multiple aspects of learning take place and multiple domains related to learning are engaged, including focus and concentration, problem-solving skills, tolerance to ambiguity, image and concept formation, imagination and visual-spatial thinking. In addition, feelings and emotional sensitivities are involved in producing a work of art, as well as important motor skills like hand-eye coordination.

  

By having study participants create art — painting, sculpture or collage — the researchers hope to enhance problem solving skills, focus/concentration and hand-eye coordination for individuals with dementia. They also hope to see an improvement in mood and in overall thinking, which would contribute significantly to quality of life.

 

The UK study was made possible through a grant from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Center. To date the grant has funded the implementation of two eight-week programs for groups of individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Christianson-Tietyen and Richards' team also includes test administrators Derek Cryer, Elizabeth Jerrell, Olivia Lussi and Sarah N. Smith. 

  

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studio, art history and visual studies and art education.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Good Eats and Spooky Treats

Sat, 10/22/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 25, 2016)  It’s the best time of the year. It’s time for Halloween, but leave the scary clowns at home. Join the University of Kentucky Student Activities Board’s Campus Life Committee for their second Pinterest Party of the semester today from 6 to 9 p.m. in The Hub of the William T. Young Library.

 

Pinterest Parties are designed to give the campus community the chance to create do-it-yourself crafts seen on the social media site, Pinterest. The Campus Life Committee takes the site’s tagline, “Less Pinning. More Doing.” and turns it into a reality for UK students, staff and faculty. This party’s themes are Halloween and Thanksgiving. Students just have to bring ideas while SAB will provide the supplies.

 

“I’m super excited for the Halloween Pinterest Party,” said Miranda Scott, director of Campus Life. “It’s the second one of the semester and since the first one went so well we’ll be having lots more crafts this time!”

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff, and the greater Lexington community.

Connect with SAB at http://www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB, or like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Kaelin Massey, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

 

No Differences Noted Over Time for Children of Gay, Lesbian Adoptive Parents

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 16:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016)  As more and more lesbian and gay adults adopt children, controversies continue regarding comparative parenting skills and the impact on the children.

 

For nearly a decade, University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Psychology Rachel H. Farr has studied different aspects of family life among heterosexual, gay and lesbian parents and their adopted children. Her newest findings were published by the Developmental Psychology journal last week online.

 

Farr’s most recent research results published in the journal Developmental Psychology provides further support that children adopted by lesbian and gay parents are well-adjusted, not only in early childhood, but across time into middle childhood. Her study focused on a longitudinal follow-up of nearly 100 adoptive families with school-age children as they matured from early to middle childhood. Parents appeared to be capable in their parenting roles and satisfied in their couple relationships over time, with no differences by family type.

 

“To the best of my knowledge,” Farr said, “this is the first study that has followed children adopted by lesbian, gay and heterosexual parents over time from early to middle childhood. Longitudinal research (like this) offers insight into what factors may be the best or strongest predictors of children's development, over and above information that can be gathered at only one time point."

 

“Regardless of parental sexual orientation, children (in the study) had fewer behavior problems over time when their adoptive parents indicated experiencing less parenting stress. Higher family functioning when children were school-age was predicted by lower parenting stress and fewer child behavior problems when children were preschool-age. Thus, in these adoptive families diverse in parental sexual orientation, as has been found in many other family types, family processes emerged as more important than family structure to longitudinal child outcomes and family functioning.”

 

Repeatedly, her research noted “no differences among (heterosexual and same-sex parent) family types” in myriad characteristics like behavior problems, stress levels, couple relationships, family functionality, relationship adjustments over time, and other factors.

 

“These results, which support many positive outcomes among adoptive families headed by lesbian, gay or heterosexual parents over time, may be informative to legal, policy and practice realms,” Farr said.

 

Since research indicates that at least 65,500 adopted children, over 4 percent of all adopted children in the United States, have sexual minority parents, “the findings may also help to move public debate forward about parenting and child outcomes across a diversity of family forms,” she added.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

UK Body Project to Teach Acceptance

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 16:18

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 25, 2016)  In American society, thin can equal beauty. In no other demographic is the pressure to be skinny felt more than in women in their late teens and early 20s. In response, University of Kentucky students will lead a workshop for fellow students to discuss how they are more than just a number on a scale or a pretty face.

 

The Body Project workshop will be from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, in room 209 of UK’s Funkhouser Building on campus.

 

During the workshop, participants will complete several different activities that will help them discuss ways to resist cultural pressures and reduce the pursuit of unhealthy thinness and the achievement of a certain look. As they go through the activities, students will explore their attitudes and feelings toward their bodies.

 

“We work to point out unrealistic expectations that are placed on us and how we can reject that mentality,” said Teresa Lee, workshop organizer and graduate student in the UK Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We also practice confronting ‘fat talk’ — when we or other people put our bodies down.”

 

To register for the workshop, email Lee at teresalee@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

 

Elizabethtown SBDC Director Recognized as One of the Best

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 25, 2016) — The Office of Veterans Business Development recognized Patricia Krausman, director of the Elizabethtown Small Business Development Center (SBDC), part of the Kentucky Small Business Development Center (KSBDC) within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, as one of the six most outstanding instructors for the 2016 Boots 2 Business program.

 

Boots 2 Business is an entrepreneurial education and training program offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration. It is a training track within the U.S. Department of Defense’s Transition Assistance Program. The curriculum provides valuable assistance for transitioning service members who are exploring business ownership or other self-employment opportunities. The program leads them through the key steps for evaluating business concepts and providing the foundation required to develop a business plan. In addition, participants are introduced to Small Business Administration partners and resources.

 

The recognition was based on the instructors’ contributions and dedication to the program and to service members, veterans and spouses in their business ownership endeavors. Nominations for this achievement came from Small Business Administration offices across the country.

 

Krausman has provided business management consulting and training for more than 20 years. In 2009, she developed and served as the director of the Kentucky Small Business Development Center’s Veterans Assistance Program, the resource for veteran business support and advocacy. Additionally, she was chosen as a Veteran’s Small Business Advocate of the Year in 2013 by the Kentucky Small Business Administration. She takes an active role in her work and advocacy, serving as a member of the Kentucky Commission on Small Business Advocacy, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board and the Governor’s Veterans Interagency Task Force. She was awarded the prestigious Kentucky Association for Economic Development Allied Professional of the Year in 2014.

 

“The Kentucky Small Business Development Center has a long-standing commitment to veterans and veteran-owned businesses. Boots 2 Business is a program specifically designed by the Small Business Administration and its resource partners to ensure that veterans have expert guidance and direction in their path to entrepreneurship,” Krausman said. “It’s an honor to be included in the recognition of outstanding instructors for the national SBA Boots 2 Business program. Veterans are exceptional entrepreneurs, and it is rewarding to have the opportunity to support them in their successful transition to small-business ownership.”

 

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, www.ksbdc.org/.

 

 

UK is the  University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTRoberta Meisel, 859-257-7668.

Benefit UK School of Music With 'Brews and Bites'

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 15:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2016) The University of Kentucky Friends of Music invites the public to enjoy “Brews and Bites” with their fellow music lovers while benefiting UK music students, faculty and staff. “Brews and Bites” will run 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, at Ethereal Brewing Company, located at 1224 Manchester St.

 

“Brews and Bites” is free and open to the public, however 10 percent of the proceeds of food and drink sales from the event will go to UK Friends of Music.

 

Friends of Music is an organization of music lovers and supporters dedicated to assisting the UK School of Music in the enrichment of its mission. The group works to provide resources to the school in its pursuit of excellence in both the performance and study of music. The organization contributes to the UK School of Music's scholarships as well as provides funds to its students and faculty to participate in musical conferences, festivals and performances across the U.S. and around the world.

 

Friends Music hosts several events each year in private homes, coffee shops and restaurants. These events usually feature a variety of music from faculty and students. All proceeds from events are donated to the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts.

 

The UK School of Music has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

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