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UK Athletics Teams Up With Coats for a Cause

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 14:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016)  – The University of Kentucky Athletic Department graduate assistants and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee are teaming up with the Lexington Rescue Mission and the “One Warm Coat” foundation to collect coats for the Lexington community. Coats for a Cause invites area residents to make a difference in their neighbors’ lives by donating coats and dollars.

 

Coats for a Cause is collecting clean, gently used warm coats. All donations will be given to the Lexington Rescue Mission for distribution to local children and adults in need. The process is simple: drop off your extra coat(s) and Coats for a Cause takes care of the rest.

 

If you would like to help spread the warmth throughout the months of October, November and December, Coats for a Cause will have coat collection bins located all around campus. The specific locations include: Commonwealth Stadium Office Lobby, Joe Craft Center/Memorial Coliseum, Shively Training Facility, and the Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex. Donations will be accepted at any of these locations from now to Dec. 2.

 

In addition to having bins set out at these locations, Coats for a Cause also has targeted specific dates they will have collection sites set up for UK sporting events. These dates are listed below:

  • Oct. 18: Men’s Soccer v. Bowling Green (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Oct. 21: Volleyball v. South Carolina (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Oct. 27: Women’s Soccer v. Georgia (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Oct. 30: Men’s Soccer v. Marshall (Wendell and Vickie Bell Soccer Complex)
  • Nov. 3: Women’s Basketball v. Union (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 6: Volleyball v. Missouri (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 11-13: Women’s Basketball KY Classic (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 17: Women’s Basketball v. New Hampshire (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 18: Volleyball v. LSU (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 20: Volleyball v. Texas A&M (Memorial Coliseum)
  • Nov. 20: Men’s Basketball v. Duquesne (Rupp Arena)
  • Dec. 3: Men’s Basketball v. UCLA (Rupp Arena)

 

Potential Dates for NCAA Men’s Soccer:

  • Nov. 17 (1st Round)
  • Nov. 20 (2nd Round)
  • Nov. 26/27 (3rd Round)
  • Dec. 2/3 (4th Round)

 

In addition to coats, monetary donations also will be accepted at the above listed men’s basketball games outside Rupp Arena. If you do not have a coat to donate, you can help provide a warmer winter by making a financial donation. You can donate by cash or check during the coat drive. Every dollar helps.

 

UK Athletics hopes you will support this drive to help collect coats to warm our local neighbors in need.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Lindsey Oettle, lindsey.oettle@uky.edu, 859-257-4482; Cameron Langfels, cam.langfels@uky.edu, 859-257-4482; Tony Neely, tneely@uky.edu, 859-257-8411

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Empowers Women

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:27

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016)  The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFÉ) will be hosting its second annual Intercultural Awareness Day on Wednesday, Oct. 26 at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

The event will honor the top 25 students, faculty, staff and alumni of the college who have helped educate women on overcoming gender barriers and who champion diversity and inclusion across the UK campus community.

 

Titled "Women in CAFÉ — Empowering Our Future Awards Luncheon," the celebration runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and features keynote speaker Cathy Bristow, the first woman and African-American chief union negotiator in the wine industry. Bristow currently serves as director of global quality for the Celanese Chemical Company.

 

Awards also will be presented for excellence in research, instruction and extension, and will include students, graduates of the college, and members of the community.

 

“I hope that this event will make people aware that we are all diverse, all unique,” said Natasha Saunders, extension associate in the Office of Diversity, Recruitment and Retention and co-advisor for the UK chapter of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) in CAFÉ. “I am proud to work in this college where we put emphasis on inclusivity and collaboration. When we say we are a college that supports intercultural awareness, we stand behind those words in action.”

 

Nominees, nominators and special guests will be attending the luncheon event.

 

Later on that same day (Oct. 26), the college is sponsoring a roundtable discussion with Bristow, “Women at UK — Inviting in Your Voice.” The roundtable begins at 6:30 p.m. in the E.S. Good Barn’s Gorham Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

 

  

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu

Mick Peterson Named UK Ag Equine Programs Director

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) — Mick Peterson has been named director of the University of Kentucky’s Ag Equine Programs, the multidisciplinary program that serves as a gateway to all equine activities in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, and Dickson Professor of Equine Science and Management. He will start in January of 2017.

 

In addition to leading UK Ag Equine Programs, Peterson will also conduct research on the biomechanics and mechanical properties of living tissues as they relate to musculoskeletal disease detection and prevention. His teaching responsibilities will include undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of biomechanics, instrumentation and/or mechanics of materials related to equine athletes in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

 

“Since its founding, the equine programs at UK has become one of the premier equine programs in the world. The potential for future growth in teaching, research and outreach is tremendous, which can greatly benefit the equine industry and the university,” Peterson said. “I am thrilled to be a part of this exciting program and look forward to working with a broad range of stakeholders.” 

 

Peterson comes to UK from the University of Maine, where he served as a mechanical engineering professor. His research has linked traditional understanding of engineering mechanics and materials to the biomechanics of animals. His research emphasis has been on the manner in which dynamic response can be used to characterize materials.

 

During the course of his career, Peterson has worked on a range of equine and animal biomechanics topics, including the impact of exercise on bone density, the development of biomechanical models, durability of cetacean epidermis, the measurement of inertial properties of the equine forelimb, biomechanics of whale interaction with fishing gear, cetacean acoustic response, marine hydroacoustics and the kinematics of equine gait on treadmills and tracks.  

 

According to Peterson, his greatest passion is for the understanding of racing and equestrian surfaces. Originating in work 20 years ago on a new medical imaging technique, this work has gradually grown from an interest in the effect of exercise on bone remodeling to a focus on applying concepts from manufacturing quality control to improved racing surface consistency for the protection of horses and riders.

 

“The fact that we are hiring our first full-time director reflects how the program has grown and evolved. We are privileged to attract such a prominent leader to this position; Mick’s passion for the equine industry and this program is genuine and is matched by our faculty, staff and students,” said Nancy Cox, dean of the college. “We will be able to take our service to this signature industry to another level under his leadership and couldn’t be more thrilled by what the future holds for this program.”

 

Peterson collaborated with C. Wayne McIlwraith, a professor at Colorado State University, to found the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, a nonprofit organization led by Peterson that is supported by the horse racing industry and which provides research, testing and materials characterization services for the industry. 

 

Prior to joining the University of Maine as a faculty member in 1999, Peterson was an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Colorado State University and before that a post-doctoral research associate and instructor at Northwestern University.

 

Peterson earned his doctoral and master’s degrees from Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute. He also completed additional graduate work at Yale University, Cornell University and the University of Connecticut in material science, mathematics, mechanics and signal processing.

 

He has had additional academic appointments and affiliations with the Swedish University of Agriculture, in Upsalla, Sweden; the University of Central Lancashire, in Preston, United Kingdom; and the University of Colorado Boulder.

 

He currently serves on the Jockey Club Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Surfaces Committee and as executive director of the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory.

 

Peterson has published 80 journal articles, three book chapters and 81 conference proceedings, presented 67 additional papers at conferences and has received six patents. 

 

 

UK is the  University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Holly Wiemers, 859-257-8774

UK Extension Agent is President-Elect of National Association

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 13:06

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 17, 2016)  Lora Lee Howard has been working to help Kentuckians lead fuller, healthier lives since 1981 as a University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension agent for family and consumer sciences education in Clay County. Recently, members of the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences elected Howard to serve as president-elect. She will become president of the organization in October 2017.

 

“I have been active on several committees at the national level for 20 years,” Howard said. “I felt it was time for me to give back to the association as it has given me so many opportunities.”

 

Through the years, Howard has spearheaded many programs and services from her Clay County base, and she has held many officer positions in professional development organizations. She’s also won numerous awards throughout her tenure in Cooperative Extension.

 

“I believe in extension and the services extension can provide to the families we serve in our counties and states,” she said. “I also believe in the commitment of family and consumer sciences professionals to provide research-based educational programs to help improve the well-being of the families we serve.”  

 

Howard has a long list of county programs she has initiated, many supporting women’s health and nutrition. She has encouraged women to take part in cancer screenings, exercise programs and financial health programs, and she played a key role in creating a leader’s guide for Green Gardening.

 

“We are often told to find a job that we love and we will not work a day in our life; that happened to me,” she said. “My career as a family and consumer sciences agent has allowed me to work with many different individuals in a variety of roles to impact my community. I like to think that the work I am doing today will live on in the lives of the families and women impacting our community tomorrow and for years to come.”

 

The National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences educates and recognizes extension professionals who improve the quality of life for individuals, families and communities. The organization provides education in food preparation, food safety and nutrition, financial management, healthy lifestyles, home and work environment and safety, relationship and parenting skills, and more.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Aimee Nielson, 859-257-7707.

UK College of Health Sciences Celebrates its 50th Anniversary

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 12:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences celebrated its 50th anniversary with a formal gala, including honors for people who have made a difference in the college's growth in both size and reputation.

 

"For 50 years, the UK College of Health Sciences has educated nearly 8,000 health care professionals who provide outstanding service. Our faculty and alumni are recognized by their peers as top-notch clinicians, educators, researchers, and leaders. Our students make us proud with their service, research and academic success. And our staff and supporters provide the essential framework to make these successes possible," said Dr. Scott M. Lephart, dean of the UK College of Health Sciences. "We're proud of these achievements, and this was an appropriate opportunity to honor them."

 

The college also acknowledged two men whose contributions helped grow the college in both size and stature. 

 

The first honoree was Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs, who received the Dean’s Distinguished Service Award in recognition of his leadership in collaborations with the college and others for the benefit of all Kentuckians.

 

 

 

Lephart said Karpf's leadership in establishing the Kentucky Health Collaborative was a huge factor in his selection for the award. The KHC was launched earlier this year by 10 major healthcare systems in Kentucky to combat the state's poor health outcomes by sharing best practices and reducing the costs of care.

 

Second to the podium was Michael P. Thornton, JD, who was honored, along with his family, with the Philanthropic Appreciation Award for creating the Paul A. Thornton Distinguished Professorship and Fellowship 

 

 

Dr. Paul A. Thornton was the first director of the Clinical Nutrition program at UK, which became a part of the College of Health Sciences in 1968.  His teaching had a profound effect on many of his students, including Dr. Geza Bruckner, clinical nutrition director and professor and the first Dr. Paul A. Thornton Distinguished Professor recipient.

 

"It's a great honor to be awarded this professorship," said Bruckner. "His influence on his students – including me – was exemplary."

 

"Dr. Thornton was truly an educator of the first class, and I'm thrilled to carry on the message he instilled in me as a young student."

 

In 1966, Congress passed The Allied Health Professions Personnel Training Act to foster the development of "dynamic educational programs…. that will attract able students and prepare them for satisfying careers" in the wide array of healthcare professions beyond medicine, dentistry and nursing. The UK College of Health Sciences, originally called the College of Allied Health Professions, was one of the first 13 colleges formed as a result of that legislation, with the late Joseph Hamburg serving as its first dean. The college currently enrolls more than 1,100 students in nine different disciplines such as athletic training, communication sciences and disorders, physical therapy and physician assistant studies.

 

The UK College of Health Sciences continues to innovate in key areas of education, research and service. The college was one of the first at UK to offer a complete distance learning degree program, educating physical therapy students at the Center of Excellence in Rural Health in Hazard in 1992 and physician assistant students in Morehead in 1996. More recently, the Medical Laboratory Science Program was re-established to educate students at the Center of Excellence in Rural Health in Hazard.

 

Research is also a fundamental part of the educational experience at the college, as students have the opportunity to be involved in ongoing research projects. The college also maintains a thriving undergraduate research program, which nurtures student curiosity by offering opportunities for mentored, self-directed work.

 

“The common thread among our programs and our people is our mission,” Lephart said. “We are driven by the desire to help people attain the highest level of health possible."

 

"The key is to help unlock the potential for optimal health in each individual we affect, indirectly or directly, through providing patient care, educating future health sciences professionals, and engaging in research aimed at the prevention of injury and disability.”

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

McClure Named Director of UK Office of Technology Commercialization

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 11:22

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) — Ian McClure, a former attorney and vice president of intellectual property strategy, was recently named director of the University of Kentucky Office of Technology Commercialization (OTC). The OTC was formerly known as the UK Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer Office.

 

McClure became director of OTC on Oct. 1. Originally from Kentucky, he began his career as a mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and intellectual property (IP) transactions attorney in Louisville. Following private practice, he helped raise over $20 million and built a start-up company in Chicago focused on technology and IP licensing. Most recently, he was vice president of IP strategy for an investment bank headquartered in San Francisco focused on IP-rich M&A and technology-driven transactions.

 

In parallel, McClure has taught Global IP Management and Maximizing IP Value as an adjunct professor at Chicago-Kent College of Law, and has published extensively in law and business journals related to the intersection of IP, business process and corporate governance. For his work as an academic, entrepreneur and IP transactions specialist, McClure has been named by Intellectual Asset Management Magazine to the "IP Strategy 300 — The World’s Leading IP Strategists" (2012-2015).

 

“I am excited to return to my home state and work with the University of Kentucky research community,” McClure said.

 

The addition of McClure, along with the name change, signals a transformation of commercialization activities at UK that will be based on a partnership culture focused on stronger relationships with stakeholders, greater transparency and increased customer service.

 

The new mission of the OTC is to facilitate the commercialization of UK innovations and discoveries for the benefit of the university community, the Commonwealth of Kentucky and global society.

 

Over the next few months, through information sessions, presentations and Q&A roundtables, the OTC will have ongoing dialogue with faculty and administration of UK colleges, students and the entrepreneurial community, to discuss its vision for the office and listen to questions and ideas from the community. In order to be the best commercialization partner it can be, the OTC is also conducting a UK Inventor Satisfaction Survey so it may continuously improve services.

 

An OTC Fellows program has also been launched to employ students who can assist in commercializing UK technologies. An application can be accessed at https://ukjobs.uky.edu/postings/126206

 

For more information about the OTC, visit www.research.uky.edu/otc/.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@gmail.com

Still Time to Donate to UK's United Way Campaign

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 10:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) Once again this year, University of Kentucky faculty and staff have the opportunity to improve lives and strengthen communities throughout Central Kentucky through the United Way Campaign in the Bluegrass. 

 

UK's United Way Campaign runs until Oct. 31.

 

Last year, members of the UK community contributed more than $249,179.81. Those contributions are now being put to work by United Way agencies throughout the Bluegrass. This fall, the campus-wide goal is $260,000.

 

Employees can make a pledge through payroll deduction or cash, check or credit card donations.

 

To enroll in payroll deduction, visit "Benefits and Payment" under "Employee Self Service" on myUK. Payroll deductions run Jan.1-Dec. 31, 2017.

 

For cash, check or credit card donations, print a pledge form and return it to room 213 in the Main Building.

 

To find out more information, visit www.uky.edu/uw/ or call 859-257-2529.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UPK Book on Kentucky Art and Culture Wins Alice Award

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 10:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) University Press of Kentucky’s "Kentucky by Design: The Decorative Arts and American Culture," edited by Andrew Kelly and sponsored by the Frazier History Museum, has been named the winner of the Alice Award given by Furthermore Grants in Publishing. Furthermore is a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund and is concerned with nonfiction book publishing related to art, architecture and design; cultural history; conservation and preservation; the city; and public issues of the day.

 

“It is a privilege to be in the company of the other distinguished publications shortlisted for the Alice Award,” Kelly said. “I am delighted that 'Kentucky by Design' has been recognized by the Furthermore Foundation, and honored to accept the Alice Award on behalf of all the outstanding scholars, experts and museum professionals nationwide who made this book possible.”

 

The Alice Award was established in 2013 by Joan Davidson, president of Furthermore, in honor of her mother Alice Kaplan. Kaplan, vice president of the Kaplan Fund, was a well-known patron, scholar and activist in the arts, who urged the foundation to support music, dance, libraries and the visual arts. She loved and collected illustrated books as works of art and considered them essential documents in a civilized society. The Alice Award is dedicated to recognizing and cherishing the lasting values of the well-made illustrated book, and the special sense of intimacy it affords. Each year a jury of distinguished leaders in publishing and the arts selects the winning Alice book from the hundreds of eligible titles that have been supported by Furthermore.

 

"Kentucky by Design" celebrates the 80th anniversary of the Federal Art Project’s (FAP) Index of American Design. The FAP was established at the height of the Great Depression under Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration. One of the aims of this project was to collect and record the history of American material culture, and it culminated in the creation of the Index of American Design. This work, while intended for a wide audience, was never published.

 

Now, after 80 years, Kentucky’s contributions to the Index of American Design have at last been compiled in "Kentucky by Design." Kelly has gathered the contributions of experts to catalog prime examples of the state’s decorative arts that were featured in the index, pairing the original FAP watercolors with contemporary photographs of the same or similar artifacts. He provides information surrounding the history and current location (and, often, the journey in-between) of each piece, as well as local or familial lore surrounding the object. In addition to a wealth of Shaker material, the objects featured include a number of quilts and rugs as well as a wide assortment of everyday items, from powder horns and candle lanterns to glass flasks and hand-crafted instruments.

 

The winner of the Alice Award will receive a $25,000 cash prize, which will be presented at a reception in the Rare Book Room at Strand Books on Oct. 25. The Alice Award “provides important and deserved confirmation of the press’ achievement,” noted Jerrold Hirsch, a contributor to the volume and author of "Portrait of America: A Cultural History of the Federal Writers’ Project." “I am proud to be part of such a beautiful and important book.”

 

Andrew Kelly, trained at Sotheby’s New York, is a Helena Rubinstein Fellow of the Whitney Museum of American Art and has authored and edited numerous monographs and catalogs on the fine and decorative arts. He has worked in association with many institutions, including the American Academy of Arts and Letters, McNay Art Museum, Harry Ransom Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Lisbon Ajuda National Palace Museum, Pilar and Joan Miró Foundation Palma de Mallorca, Russian State Museum at the Marble Palace, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum and the Tate Gallery London.

 

University Press of Kentucky (UPK) is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

UK Alumnus Named Director of Governor's School for the Arts

Fri, 10/14/2016 - 09:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) The Kentucky Center has appointed University of Kentucky music performance and arts administration alumnus Nick Covault to the position of director of its Governor's School for the Arts (GSA) program.

 

As director of GSA, Covault will be responsible for supervision of the program, which for nearly 30 years, in partnership with the state, has enabled Kentucky high school students to engage in the arts during a three week, immersive residential summer program, providing instruction in nine disciplines: architecture and design, creative writing, dance, drama, instrumental music, musical theatre, new media, visual art and vocal music. The program also works to engage high school students across the state interested in the arts through its fall ArtShops program.

 

Covault is a 2002 graduate of GSA, where he studied vocal music. At UK, he earned bachelor's degrees in vocal music performance and arts administration. After graduating, he worked for LexArts in Lexington, before relocating to Louisville to join the staff of GSA as program coordinator and registrar. He transitioned into the role of programming and community engagement manager for The Kentucky Center for four years before accepting the position of director of GSA. He is the first GSA alumnus to serve as director of the program.

 

"The Kentucky Center Governor's School for the Arts is proud to have one of its own graduates now at the helm," said Kim Baker, president of The Kentucky Center. "Nick brings a wealth of experience in the arts and an unparalleled background specific to GSA. His unique perspective will support his vision of creating a life-changing experience for today's Kentucky high school students, much in the same way it was for him."

 

Covault's accolades have included participation in SouthArts' groundbreaking Dance Touring Initiative, the Emerging Leader Institute of the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, and the Global Fellowship Program of the International Society for the Performing Arts. He was recently listed as one of Business First of Louisville's 2016 Forty Under 40 Honorees and has been named a compassion laureate by Compassionate Louisville.

 

Active in the local and statewide community beyond his role at The Kentucky Center, Covault currently volunteers for Kentucky Refugee Ministries and serves on the steering committee for the Kentucky Rural-Urban Exchange convened by Art of the Rural and Appalshop. He has served on the board of directors for Squallis Puppeteers and is one of the founding organizers of PosSOUPbility (a meal-based community event that generates micro-grants for innovative grassroots initiatives). Covault strives to remain active as a musician, and has twice stage-directed Bourbon Baroque and Squallis Puppeteers' collaborative production of the one-act opera "Les Sauvages."

 

GSA is a public/private partnership inaugurated in 1987 by The Kentucky Center, the Commonwealth of Kentucky and numerous private supporters. Today, the vital funding required to make GSA a reality is provided by the state through the leadership of the Governor's Office and the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, as well as The Kentucky Center Endowment Fund, Toyota Motor Manufacturing and more than 300 corporations, parents, educators, alumni and friends of GSA.

 

The mission of The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts is to lead and enrich the artistic, educational and economic vitality of the region by providing unparalleled programming and cultural events. The center serves Kentucky through education and initiatives which expand and diversify audiences while enhancing their understanding, appreciation and support for the arts.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Ag to Host Discussion on Benefits, Safety of GMO Crops Oct. 17

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 16:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016)  Today’s crops, which are grown for both food and non-food uses, are bred for better field performance, such as resistance to insect pests and diseases. In some cases, certain crop improvements are the result of many years of scientific research leading to the development of genetically modified crops, commonly referred to as GMO (genetically modified organisms) crops.

 

This year, University of Kentucky Extension Professor of Plant Pathology and UK’s Coordinator of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (SARE) Paul Vincelli, is leading an effort designed to further educate UK students, faculty, staff and the greater community about GMO crops.

 

In recent years, Vincelli hosted scientists who were skeptical about the safety of certain GMO crops.

 

On Monday, Oct. 17, a pair of leading industry scientists will give their side of the story. The program, titled “A Question and Answer Session on the Benefits and Safety of GMO Crops,” will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m., in room 321 of the new Don & Cathy Jacobs Science Building at UK.

 

John Vicini and Jay Petrick, scientists with the Monsanto Corporation, will make a short presentation to begin the forum, followed by a Q-&A session.

 

“These gentlemen are scientists, and as a scientist myself, I appreciate their willingness to discuss this controversial issue and answer questions in a public setting,” Vincelli said. “Sharing data and examining a topic from different perspectives sheds more light on an issue, which in turn makes all of us more effective citizens, better able to make informed decisions.”

 

Admission to the event is free. Parking will be available in Parking Structure # 2, located on Rose Street, alongside the Jacobs Science Building.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu

UK Forestry Celebrates National Forest Products Week

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 16:21

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 14, 2016) National Forest Products Week runs from Oct.16–22 and recognizes the sustainable benefits of wood materials and their important role in the nation’s economy. In recognition of the role these products play in Kentucky, Gov. Matt Bevin has proclaimed it Forest Products Week in the state.

 

Kentucky is one of the top producers of hardwood timber in the nation, with logging operations in every county, a characteristic that drives thriving wood products industries in the state. The University of Kentucky Department of Forestry, part of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, supports the industry throughout the year with its land-grant mission of teaching, research and extension.

 

The wood products and forestry industry supports more than 66,000 direct and indirect jobs and contributes $14.6 billion annually to the Kentucky economy. With the global marketplace for green building materials expected to reach $529 billion by 2020, support is growing for the innovative uses of wood in construction. Kentucky forests produce timber from such species as red and white oak, walnut and maple. These species are used for household furnishings, mouldings, cabinets, flooring, barrel staves and paper.

 

“As educators and active supporters of the industry, we welcome the recognition that National Forest Products Week gives the many wood products we all use and appreciate in our daily lives,” said Terrell “Red” Baker, chair of UK Forestry.

 

An Eastern Kentucky arm of the forestry department, the Wood Utilization Center, part of UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability in Quicksand, offers programs for all ages. The 14,000 square foot facility contains an industrial hardwood furniture manufacturing laboratory, classrooms, computer lab and a hardwood lumber dry kiln.

 

The center offers programs such as Win With Wood, which introduces the region’s youth to forestry and wood industries and opens the door to career opportunities by bringing them together with forest and wood industries' owners, industry leaders, and UK extension agents and specialists. This year, 230 young people attended the event on Oct. 11.

 

The center’s Wood Products Entrepreneur Program acts as an incubator for individuals who are building wood products manufacturing businesses. The program provides mentoring in product design, machinery operation, business plans, marketing and financing. It also minimizes initial start-up costs by providing space, equipment and utilities until the new business has enough cash flow to secure its own space and equipment.

 

As the boom in new distilleries continues in the state, the demand for barrels and the white oaks that supply the stave wood has become a topic of concern. Recently, UK forestry extension held a workshop in Rowan County to discuss the sustainability of white oaks in Kentucky forests. More than 140 people attended, divided evenly between landowners and representatives of the logging industry.

 

“Bourbon is a wood product. You can’t do it without wood,” said Jeff Stringer, UK extension forestry professor. “It is not a particularly fast-growing tree and there is some concern over long-range supply issues.”

 

Since Kentucky’s No. 1 wood export is barrels, the concern is well-founded. Researchers in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s newly formed Forest Health Research and Education Center are studying white oak genetics in the hopes of getting ahead of future supply problems.

 

“Made from renewable resources and easily recycled, the products our members make are a true environmental success story,” said Robert Glowinski, American Wood Council president and CEO.

 

In Kentucky, the industry is represented by several groups: the Kentucky Woodland Owners Association, the Kentucky chapter of the Society of American Foresters, the Kentucky Association of Consulting Foresters and the Kentucky Forest Industries Association.

 

Additional information about the UK Department of Forestry’s research and outreach activities can be found online at http://forestry.ca.uky.edu.

 

Additional information on the role of wood products in North America, environmental advantages and environmental product declarations are available from the American Wood Council at www.awc.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324, cspence@uky.edu

Sculptor Donald Lipski to Speak at UK

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 14:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) The University of Kentucky Art Museum will welcome to campus celebrated sculptor Donald Lipski 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 17, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall. As part of this free public talk, Lipski will discuss his sculpture and large-scale installations, including "Pieces of String Too Short to Save" on display now at the museum. 

 

"Pieces of String Too Short to Save" is comprised of industrial mesh cages filled with found objects. Since 1979, Lipski’s work has been defined by his ingenious manipulation of common materials in small and large sculptures and installations. Drinking straws, bits of wire, bottles, cigarettes, flags, musical instruments and countless other everyday items have been assembled into precise formal studies.

 

Lipski's sculpture is often a two-part acknowledgment — seeing a recognizable object and then appreciating the artist’s engagement with it. This can involve isolating a single item for contemplation, presenting vast quantities of things brought together for maximum impact, or altering materials through processes of slicing, weaving, wrapping, piercing and stacking.

 

In his steadfast use of commercial objects, Lipski continues the legacy of 20th-century artists, including Arman, Joseph Cornell and Marcel Duchamp. His ongoing investigations into conditions of materiality, composition and site specificity affirm a connection to the Dada, Surrealism, Pop and Minimalism art movements. Lipski was born in Chicago in 1947. His work is in the collections of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Menil Collection, Houston.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the UK Art Museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

The UK Art Museum, located in the Singletary Center at Rose Street and Euclid Avenue, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. For more information on membership, contact Lyndi VanDeursen at 859-257-8164 or lyndi.vandeursen@uky.edu.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

Bix Named Adjunct Faculty in Australia

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 12:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) — Dr. Gregory Bix, associate professor and the Paul G. Blazer Jr. Professor of Stroke Research in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and director of the Center for Advanced Translational Stroke Science, has been named an adjunct associate professor in the School of Biomedical Sciences at the Queensland University of Technology. Bix is also an honorary Clinical Lecturer at the University of Glasgow, Scotland.

 

 

 

Songs for Sound Event Supports Research and Outreach of UK’s Cochlear Implant Program

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 12:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2016) – Imagine going from total silence to hearing again. A Cochlear implant, a small electronic device implanted just behind the ear, can provide the miracle of hearing to many people who suffer from profound hearing loss.

 

The University of Kentucky’s Hearing Program, under the direction of Dr. Matthew Bush, associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, and the Lexington Hearing and Speech Center are partnering with Songs for Sound Hear the Music Project, for the third year to bring to Lexington some of country music’s most elite songwriters to share their music and the stories behind the lyrics. This year’s event will take place at 5:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 6 at the Manchester Music Hall.

 

Songs for Sound, a 5013c charity, is dedicated to improving the quality of life for the 260 million people worldwide who suffer from profound hearing loss. The charity was founded by Jamie and Kevin Vernon of Nashvill, parents of Alexis, “Lexi,” who at 1½ years of age, was diagnosed with profound hearing loss. The Vernons learned that Lexi was eligible for a cochlear implant which took their daughter from a world of silence and allowed her to blossom into an active, speaking and hearing child.

 

Songs for Sound travels across the country hosting “Hear the Music” events with the help of friends from Nashville’s music industry, in an effort to raise awareness of profound hearing loss. The organization provides free hearing screenings and access to needed resources, such as the resources found at UK, the primary cochlear implant center of Central and Eastern Kentucky since 1989.

 

“Songs for Sound “‘Hear the Music’ is such an important event for our patients, the University of Kentucky and our region" Bush said.  "It represents a collaborative effort among dedicated clinicians, amazing patients, and the generous Songs for Sound team. Our cochlear implant program has grown progressively over the past 20 years and this event will enable us to expand our research and extent our reach to provide the absolute best hearing healthcare for patient throughout Kentucky and beyond. This will be a fantastic event that will highlight top country artists and patients who, in spite of their hearing loss, have regained the ability to ‘hear the music.’”

 

Sponsorship tickets for the event start at $30 per ticket or $50 for two, and go up from there. General admission tickets can be purchased for $10. Tickets and sponsorships can be purchased from the Songs for Sound website  http://songsforsound.com/events-2/htmconcerts/.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

 

 

Grant Received for Southland Drive Public Pop-up Space

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 10:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) As part of the ongoing Southland Drive corridor redesign, the city has launched a new project called “Retrofitting the RETRO” — a public pop-up green space that will be used to both increase aesthetics and pedestrian mobility in the area. Lexington Division of Planning teamed up with University of Kentucky’s School of Interiors, Department of Landscape Architecture and Department of Historic Preservation to provide design assistance on the project.

 

The Blue Grass Community Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Donor Advised Fund recently donated $10,000 to the city to help take the project from a concept to a reality. The funding will go toward design and construction of a temporary public space.

 

“We are excited to support 'Retrofitting the RETRO,' which will explore innovative ways to revitalize shared public places, which dovetails perfectly with Blue Grass Community Foundation’s efforts to help Lexington be the most vibrant, dynamic community it can be. Walkable, bike-able, connected neighborhoods are key to these efforts,” said Lisa Adkins, president/CEO of Blue Grass Community Foundation

 

In the past few years, the Southland corridor has undergone significant improvements with new businesses, bike lanes and community involvement. This pop-up green space will continue that progress, and help enhance the $1.5 million publicly funded sidewalk project in a unique, collaborative way.

 

“People enjoy inviting public places,” said Derek Paulsen, commissioner of Planning, Preservation and Design. “The neighbors around Southland Drive have already done a lot of work to improve the corridor. 'Retrofitting the RETRO' is the next step.”

 

The Lexington Division of Planning partnered with UK’s School of Interiors, Department of Landscape Architecture and Department of Historic Preservation to provide data collection and design assistance on the project. To date, students have conducted research into the history of the corridor, hosted community meetings, and have conducted interviews with area merchants and residents. 

 

“Community engagement is a key strategy for meaningful teaching, research and service in the UK School of Interiors,” said Patrick Lee Lucas, director of the School of Interiors. “Working with campus collaborators — the talented students and faculty in the Department of Landscape Architecture and the terrific staff of the Tracy Farmer Institute — we join together with community partners to use design to meet the opportunities in the Southland area which, in turn, benefit the city. There can be no greater lesson for students than that.”

 

Community Input
To help make this project successful, the city is seeking public input and encouraging citizens to complete a brief online survey about how often they frequent the Southland corridor, what they like, dislike and what improvements they would like to see. 

 

The collaborative "Retrofitting the RETRO" project has been championed by Urban County Councilmembers as well.

 

“My hope is that the ideas shared with the students will be a springboard for residents, business owners, and the Southland Association to enhance places where residents can walk, talk, share and have social connections while retaining the unique character of the corridor,” said 10th District Councilmember Amanda Bledsoe, who represents a large portion of the Southland Drive corridor.

 

Next Steps in 'Retrofitting the RETRO'
The Division of Planning, along with the UK design students, is currently working to gather community input to develop conceptual masterplans and identify key public space locations in the district.

 

Once completed, the Division of Planning will launch a student design contest for the project. The design contest is expected to launch in November 2016, with design submittals presented to the public in December. Construction for the pop-up public space is anticipated in 2017. 

 

For more information or to sign up to email updates about the project, go to southlandsidewalks.com and/or contact Brandi Peacher in the Division of Planning at bpeacher@lexingtonky.gov.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Faculty Chosen for SEC Travel Program

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 10:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) More than 100 faculty members from all 14 Southeastern Conference (SEC) universities will take part in the 2016-17 SEC Faculty Travel Program, the league office announced Oct. 6. Of the more than 100 participants, nine are faculty at the University of Kentucky. The program, in its fifth year, provides support for selected individuals to collaborate with colleagues at other SEC member institutions.

"The SEC Faculty Travel Program continues to garner significant interest from faculty members across the conference, and we are encouraged by how our universities have identified a range of individuals to participate," said Torie Johnson, executive director of the SEC's academic initiative, known as SECU. "This program allows us to facilitate collaboration that stretches from the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields to include the arts and community engagement."

Through the program, the SEC provides financial assistance for its faculty members to travel to other SEC universities to exchange ideas, develop grant proposals, conduct research and deliver lectures or performances.
 

The nine chosen from UK to participate in the SEC Faculty Travel Program are:

· Sunday "Tayo" Adedokun, an assistant professor of animal and food sciences in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment;

· Melinda Ickes, assistant professor of kinesiology and health promotion in the College of Education;

· Yang Jiang, an associate professor in behavioral science in the College of Medicine;

· Youngseek Kim, assistant professor of library and information science in the College of Communication and Information;

· Yoko Kusunose, assistant professor of agricultural economics in the College of Agriculture, Food and Enviornment;

· Rebekah Radtke, assistant professor of interiors in the College of Design;

· Monica Visona, associate professor of art history in the College of Fine Arts;

· Irina Voro, professor of piano in the College of Fine Arts; and

· Jonathan Wenk, assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering.


Program participants from each SEC university will travel throughout the academic year.

The SEC Faculty Travel Program is part of SECU, the academic initiative of the Southeastern Conference. The SEC supports and promotes the endeavors and achievements of the students and faculty at its 14 member universities.

Visit the SECU online at www.thesecu.com/programs/sec-faculty-travel-program/2016-2017-sec-faculty-participants/ for a full list of 2016-17 SEC Faculty Travel Program participants.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu or Caroline Kelsey, coke222@g.uky.edu

 

UK Professor's Credits Include US Architectural Masterpiece

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 09:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) The design work of Martin Summers, an assistant professor of architecture at University of Kentucky College of Design, and his former colleagues at Morphosis executed at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science recently received national recognition.

 

The building, located in Dallas, Texas, was included in the list of "10 overlooked architectural masterpieces in the U.S." published on The Real Deal, a popular New York real estate website. The article from The Real Deal complimented the Perot Museum's "sharp angles and futuristic look" for making it "one of the most cutting-edge buildings in America."

 

Morphosis designed the museum to stimulate a wide audience of visitors in hopes of ultimately broadening individuals’ and society’s understanding of nature and science. The award-winning design's immersive experience of nature within the city begins with a visitor’s approach to Perot Museum, through two native Texas ecologies: a forest of large native canopy trees and a terrace of native desert xeriscaping, which gently slopes up to connect with the museum’s stone roof. The overall building is conceived as a large cube floating over the site’s landscaped base. The acre of undulating roofscape is comprised of rock and native drought-resistant grasses to reflect the city’s indigenous geology and demonstrate a living system that will evolve.

 

This intersection of the two ecologies defines the main plaza, a gathering and event area for visitors and an outdoor public space for Dallas. From the plaza, the landscaped roof lifts up to draw visitors through a compressed space into the more expansive lobby. The topography of the lobby’s undulating ceiling reflects the dynamism of the exterior landscape surface, blurring the distinction between inside and outside, and connecting the natural with the manmade. Moving from the entry, a visitor's gaze is drawn upward through the sky-lit atrium. Upon arrival to the top floor, the fully glazed façade opening provides visitors a bird’s eye view of downtown, the landscaped roof and entry plaza below.

 

"I have several favorite moments in the project," said Summers, who was a senior designer on the project. "The first is the moment where you enter the building. You know the atrium is there as you can see parts of it from the exterior, but it is not until you walk past the overhead glazing that you see the full extent and complexity of the circulation above you."

 

Another favorite moment for Summers can be found when riding the escalators to the top floor. "On the first escalator you move through the lobby ceiling and the building once again opens to your view, both to the interior and exterior though neither is at that moment accessible. You again emerge at the top of the second escalator to views of the city, the site below and the interior of the atrium where you sense you are floating in the space."

 

From the top floor, visitors proceed downward in a clockwise spiral. The descending path weaves in and out of the building’s galleries and main atrium, alternately connecting the visitor with the internal world of the museum and with the external life of the city beyond. The visitor becomes part of the architecture, as the eastern facing corner of the building opens up toward downtown Dallas to reveal the activity within.

 

Summers was deeply involved with the design of the Perot Museum during his time at Morphosis. He was responsible for the design and development of the museum's atrium and the circulation associated with the public sequence through that space. Summers also was responsible for the early building envelope development and led the façades team on the project by integrating the multiple systems and their detailing.

 

“It is exciting to have someone consider a project you worked on a 'masterpiece,' and to draw attention to it so that it can be experienced by a broader audience. I feel fortunate to have been able to lend my talents as part of an exceptional team and firm. A lot of my recent professional work, research and teaching have been influenced by my experience on the Perot Museum.”

 

Summers has two decades of experience across a variety of project types and scales. After founding PLUS-SUM Studio in 2012, his first project was recognized as part of the 2013 AIA Emerging Professionals Exhibition in Washington, D.C. At the eighth IDA (International Design Awards) three of his projects received five total awards, including the top prize “Architectural Design of the Year 2014.”

 

At UK, Summers leads advanced studios focused on iterative digital processes and teaches electives in high performance building envelopes. Before coming to UK, he worked 10 years at Morphosis in Santa Monica, California. He holds a bachelor's degree in architecture from UK and a master's degree in architecture from University of California, Los Angeles.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Behind the Blue: Poet Frank X Walker Reflects on Work as Writer, Professor

Wed, 10/12/2016 - 18:25

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 13, 2016) — “Affrilachia” is the word coined by poet Frank X Walker to signify the importance of the African-American presence in Appalachia, and he's a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets. Walker says he has "accepted the responsibility of challenging the notion of a homogeneous all-white literary landscape in this region.”

 

A native of Danville, Kentucky, Walker is a graduate of the University of Kentucky, currently serves as associate professor in the UK Department of English, and was the 2013-14 poet laureate for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. He was founder and executive Director of the Bluegrass Black Arts Consortium, former program director of the UK's Martin Luther King Center and a Kentucky Arts Council Al Smith Fellowship recipient. He has lectured, conducted workshops, read poetry and exhibited at more than 300 national conferences and universities and was the recipient of the 2006 Thomas D. Clark Literary Award for Excellence.

 

In this edition of Behind the Blue, Kody Kiser of UK Public Relations and Marketing talks with Walker about his work, reflections on UK both as a former student and now as a professor, and more.

 

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of "Behind the Blue" each week. UK's latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

 

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu, or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

 

Click here for "Behind the Blue" on iTunes.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu 

College of Nursing Receives $2.6 Million Grant to Promote Rural Caregivers’ Cardiovascular Health

Wed, 10/12/2016 - 16:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 13, 2016) — In a self-sacrificial role, caregivers of chronically ill patients often neglect their own psychological and physical health while attending to the needs of a loved one.

 

The demands of caregiving can cause emotional distress and reduce the time caregivers are able to devote to their personal health. In rural areas, additional barriers prevent caregivers from attaining and maintaining cardiovascular health. All of these factors increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). 

 

A national grant awarded to two professors, who are also co-directors of the Research and Intervention for Cardiovascular Health (RICH) Heart Program in the UK College of Nursing, will address cardiovascular disease risk factors in rural caregivers through an intervention promoting psychological health, CVD risk-reduction measures, and self-management. Debra Kay Moser, professor and Linda C. Gill Endowed Chair of Nursing, and Misook Lee Chung, a professor in the UK College of Nursing, were awarded a $2.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Nursing Research to implement and test outcomes from the Rural Intervention for Caregivers’ Heart Health intervention (RICHH).

 

The RICHH intervention aims to reduce CVD risks and depressive symptoms in rural caregivers by helping them overcome environmental and socioeconomic barriers to health maintenance. Barriers in rural communities include high poverty rates and limited healthcare and social resources. The researchers will examine the short- and long-term effects of a treatment condition by measuring CVD risk factors, self-care behaviors and depressive symptoms. Participants receiving the intervention condition will attend individual video conferencing sessions through an application on a digital device. The sessions include information and resources for preventing CVD and maintaining personal health.

 

“Often the demands of a chronically ill family member detract from our own health,” Moser said. “We know rural caregivers are especially vulnerable to CVD because they lack the social support and health resources to help them maintain their physical health and deal with depressive symptoms that accompany the caregiver’s role. Our intervention is designed to address each of these factors so the caregiver does not become the patient.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

VIDEO: What Motivates UK Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis?

Wed, 10/12/2016 - 15:54

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2016) — When Lisa Cassis isn’t in her cardiovascular research lab, you’ll find her leading the research enterprise at the University of Kentucky. 

 

How does the UK researcher balance her time in the lab and in the office? What motivates her each morning? 

 

Watch the video above to find out what keeps Cassis motivated and why a special talent is her favorite way to relax after a long day of work.

 

About Lisa Cassis

Lisa Cassis earned a bachelor's degree in pharmacy and a doctoral degree in pharmacology from West Virginia University, followed by postdoctoral positions as an Alexander Von Humboldt Fellow in Pharmacology at Wurzburg, West Germany, and within the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Virginia. Cassis joined the faculty at UK in 1988, and is currently a faculty member within the College of Medicine Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional SciencesSaha Cardiovascular Research Center, the Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center and the College of Pharmacy.

 

Research within the Cassis laboratory has been continuously supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for more than 27 years, contributing to more than 130 scholarly publications. She has mentored many scientists, been the recipient of national and local research awards, and served for 10 years as program director of an NIH Training Grant in Nutritional Sciences. She currently serves as program director for an NIH grant that supports the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) focusing on obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

  

As vice president for research, Cassis reports directly to the president and oversees research proposal development, grants and contracts administration, federal relations, human subjects protection, 10 non-degree granting and multidisciplinary research centers, and an array of shared-use core facilities that serve UK researchers.

 

The University of Kentucky is one of only eight universities in the country with the full range of undergraduate, graduate, professional and medical programs on one contiguous campus. That range of programs — world-class poets and writers working minutes away from nationally renowned researchers in cancer and energy — enlivens interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary initiatives in learning and discovery. UK is currently one of only 22 public institutions with a trifecta of federal designations of excellence — for aging, in cancer and in translational science.

 

This video is part of our “5 Questions” monthly UKNow series where we strive to introduce you to Lisa Cassis, the person. 

 

The goal is to learn more about the people leading, teaching, healing, discovering and learning at the University of Kentucky. If you think of someone in our community who you would like to see featured, please email us. Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next “5 Questions with …” conversation on UKNow!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu; or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

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