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Symposium Brings Together Industry Insiders to 'Rethink' Historic Preservation

Wed, 03/30/2016 - 09:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 31, 2016) — Adaptive reuse is one of many topics of discussion planned for the University of Kentucky College of Design's 2016 Historic Preservation Symposium, “Rethinking Historic Preservation.” The free public symposium featuring an elite group of industry insiders will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, April 1, at the Downtown Arts Center, located at 141 E. Main St.

 

Presented by the Department of Historic Preservation at the UK College of Design, “Rethinking Historic Preservation” will encourage brainstorming by industry insiders in a discussion on new ideas in preservation. In addition, the event will also commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

Speakers participating in “Rethinking Historic Preservation," are as follows:

· Nate Allbee, political strategist and community organizer from San Francisco, California;

· Andrew Hurley, a professor of history at University of Missouri-St. Louis;

· Richard Longstreth, director of the graduate program in historic preservation at George Washington University;

· Cy Merkezas, architect at ARCHETYPE; and

· Belinda Reeder, co-founder of ARCHETYPE.

 

Based in San Francisco, Nate Allbee's work has focused on the preservation of culture, nightlife and art created by minority communities and the effects of gentrification and displacement on small business and tourism. Allbee has worked with organizations like San Francisco Heritage, and California Music and Culture to expand the traditional definitions of preservation to protect bars, restaurants, nightclubs and music venues from closure.

 

Andrew Hurley, a professor and former chair of the Department of History at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, is the author of "Beyond Preservation: Using Public History to Revitalize Inner Cities." His research and teaching help to develop strategies for inclusive urban revitalization, where urban history becomes a tool for organic, place-based community development.   

 

Richard Longstreth, a professor of American studies and director of the graduate program in historic preservation at George Washington University, is a past president of the Society of Architectural Historians and, most recently, the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. Over the past 35 years, Longstreth has devoted most of his research to the history of late 19th- and 20th-century architecture in the U.S. His most recent books include "Looking Beyond the Icons: Midcentury Architecture, Landscape, and Urbanism" and "The American Department Store Transformed, 1920-1960." His "City Center to Regional Mall" (1997) and a complementary study, "The Drive-In, the Supermarket, and the Transformation of Commercial Space in Los Angeles" (1999), have won four national awards in the fields of architectural history, urban history and historic preservation.

 

Belinda Reeder is co-founder of ARCHETYPE, an award-winning architectural firm that has practiced out of Washington, D. C., since 1976. The firm is a studio of architects, including Cy Merkezas, and other design professionals that has a national reputation in the areas of master planning, preservation and infill of historic buildings; building communities, building sites and museum design; and energy-conscious and environmentally responsible building, community and site design.

 

“Rethinking Historic Preservation" is being made possible with support from Preservation Kentucky and the Kentucky Heritage Council.

 

One AIA (American Institute of Architects) learning unit (LU) of health safety and welfare (HSW) continuing education credit is available for each session with a total of four sessions being offered via the symposium.

 

For more information on the 2016 Historic Preservation Symposium, contact the UK College of Design at 859-257-7617.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Adolescent Psychiatrist, Pharmacist Urge Collective Action to Prevent Overdose Deaths

Tue, 03/29/2016 - 22:43

ATLANTA, Ga. (March 30, 2016) — Solving the complex problem of prescription drug and opioid abuse in Kentucky requires a coordinated response involving all facets of the health care profession.

 

Dr. Catherine Martin, the director of child and adolescent psychiatry at UK HealthCare, and Daniel Wermeling, a UK College of Pharmacy professor, represented a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to reducing opioid overdose deaths during a March 29 session at the National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit. As co-presenters of “Rescuing the Opiate Overdose: From Receptors to Relatives to Regulators,” the two UK experts identified critical opportunities for intervention and treatment across the spectrum of substance abuse behaviors, from extending mental health and addiction resources to at-risk teens to dispensing the drug Naloxone to individuals who might succumb to a near-death situation.

 

Through her Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services grant, Martin is working with a team to provide care to adolescents in Kentucky engaged in substance abuse. She will collaborate with local schools to develop methods of identifying and working with families impacted by substance abuse. Martin listed a number of risk factors that increase an adolescent’s risk of opioid abuse, which included having a family member who abuses opioids. Helping teens at risk also provides interventionists with a channel for reaching adults who struggle with substance abuse.

 

“Opioid use, abuse and overdose are at epidemic proportions in Kentucky,” Martin said. “It is on all of us — any health care provider, any concerned parent or grandparent, any school system — to figure out how to reach out to families and kids to watch for opioids in the household and make sure they are safe and to identify the kids and family members who are at risk of overdose.”

 

Wermeling, who developed an innovative nasal spray of Naloxone that gives victims of heroin overdose a life-saving hour, implores pharmacists to get into the local communities to distribute this life-saving drug. He echoed Martin’s insistence that more intervention must occur at the community level, and increasing availability of Naloxone is critical for helping decrease the tragedies caused by opioid overdose.

 

UK HealthCare is a supporting sponsor of the National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit. For more information, click here.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

WUKY News Garners 8 Associated Press Nominations

Tue, 03/29/2016 - 17:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2016)WUKY, Lexington’s NPR news station at the University of Kentucky, has received eight statewide Associated Press (AP) news award nominations, the most of any radio station in the Lexington metro market.

 

First, second and third place winners will be announced at the AP's annual banquet to be held in Louisville April 30.

 

“It’s a testament to the talent and dedication of our news team,” said WUKY News Director Alan Lytle. “It’s especially gratifying because these nominations are the result of a rigorous assessment process from our colleagues and counterparts outside of Kentucky,” Lytle added. “These men and women listen to reams of recorded material to determine the best of the best. We are especially proud that so much of our work has been selected for top honors.”

 

The nominations are:

 

Best Long Light News Feature: Josh James: “Breathing New Life Into 2001: A Space Odyssey”

 

Best Long Sports Feature:  Alan Lytle: “What It Was Was Base Ball”

 

Best Political Coverage: Josh James and Karyn Czar: “Gay Marriage In Kentucky”

 

Best Continuing Coverage: Josh James and Karyn Czar: “Gay Marriage In Kentucky”

 

Best Short Newscast: Alan Lytle, Karyn Czar and Josh James

 

Best Use of Sound: Alan Lytle: “What It Was Was Base Ball”

 

Best Radio Reporter: Josh James

 

Best Radio Anchor: Alan Lytle

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155; kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Lafayette Seminar Invites Mayors to Talk Value of University Cities

Tue, 03/29/2016 - 16:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2016) — The relatively new concept of university cities is the focus of the 2016 Lafayette Seminar in Public Issues presented by the University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities. This year's event will bring together Lexington Mayor Jim Gray and Mayor Wade Troxell, of Fort Collins, Colorado, in a lunch discussion on the value of a community being considered a "university city." "University Cities: A Conversation with Mayors" begins noon Thursday, April 7, at Commerce Lexington Inc., located at 330 E. Main St. in downtown Lexington.

 

Often referred to as a college town, Lexington has evolved into a "university city" in recent years according to research by Lexington's own Scott Shapiro, senior advisor to Mayor Jim Gray, which was confirmed in an analysis by UK Department of Statistics Professor and Chair Arnold Stromberg.

 

 

As university cities, Lexington and Fort Collins, Colorado, are part of a small group of six communities across the U.S. that fit this new classification. Being classified as a university city is simple — each has a major research university in its urban core, a population between 250,000 and 1 million, and students making up at least 10 percent of its population. Other communities matching this description are Madison, Wisconsin; Ann Arbor, Michigan; Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and Lincoln, Nebraska.

 

Research shows the advantage of these select communities is that relationship between the university and city. "With universities there's research money that flows in, they hire a lot of people — a lot of well-educated people — and they tend to ride out recessions pretty well, so they're an anchor of stability in any community," Shapiro said. "That’s true of any research university. But when you have a college town, you can only leverage that so much. When you grow into a university city, with a diversified economy, there's all kinds of network effects that happen."

 

Research from labor economist Enrico Moretti shows that having more highly degreed people in a university city not only raises median income for those individuals, it also raises productivity and income for those without degrees in the same city. Other research finds the prevalence of entrepreneurship and patents available in university cities raises the level of patent use by companies that have no direct connection to the university. In addition, university cities often feature outsized arts and culture sectors that in turn morph the city into what Shapiro calls a "culturally rich idea-filled community."

 

Like large cities, university cities have high rates of educational attainment, new business startups and economic growth. But similar to small towns, university cities also have low cost of living, low unemployment rates and low violent crime rates. More on Shapiro's research can be found here: https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/what-is-a-university-city-new-definition-urban-typology.

 

As mayor of Lexington, Jim Gray represents a vibrant university city of 300,000 surrounded by the most beautiful horse farms in the world. In his first term, Mayor Gray drew upon his experience as CEO of Gray Construction, an international design-build firm, to bring an executive’s approach to government. Facing deficits, his administration instituted a series of major reforms. Gray cut in half the city’s annual health insurance costs while improving employee satisfaction through an on-site medical clinic and pharmacy. His reform of the police and fire pension system preserved the retirements of more than 1,000 retirees while saving the city $45 million in just three years. Those savings in turn allowed Gray to invest in public safety, including hiring more police officers and replacing outdated equipment.

 

Now in his second term, Gray continues to focus on his three core themes: creating jobs, running government efficiently and building a great American city. Gray holds a bachelor's degree from Vanderbilt University and previously received a Loeb Fellow appointment from Harvard University.

 

Elected mayor of Fort Collins, Colorado, in April 2015, Wade Troxell took a new post serving his community after two terms representing the city's District 4 as a councilmember from 2007 through 2015. Troxell is a lifelong resident of Fort Collins. When he was 14 years old, he was “Mayor for a Day” for then-mayor Karl Carson. He grew up in the community, attended local schools, and was a Colorado State University (CSU) student-athlete. He earned three degrees in engineering at CSU, and has been on the CSU mechanical engineering faculty for 30 years.

 

A Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Troxell's scholarly research focuses on creative innovation, philosophy of engineering and intelligent control of distributed systems. His business experience includes co-founding Sixth Dimension Inc., a provider of a communications and control network for the electric power industry integrating in distributed energy resources. As president/COO, Troxell led this early-stage company through three rounds of venture financing involving some of the top energy venture firms before it was acquired in 2003 by Comverge Inc. He is a cofounder and member of both the Colorado Clean Energy Cluster and the Water Innovation Cluster, partnerships of public organizations and private companies whose purpose is to make northern Colorado the “go to” place for clean energy and water innovation.

 

Mayors Gray and Troxell will explore these benefits and more for their communities at the "University Cities" lunch. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Individuals wanting to attend are asked to RSVP by April 1 here. Details on parking availability is included within the registration information. This year's seminar is co-sponsored by Commerce Lexington Inc.

 

Presented annually, the Lafayette Seminar in Public Issues provides an opportunity for Lexington community members, elected officials, and faculty and students to discuss issues facing the community. Previous topics have explored the local economy, town and gown relations, community gardening, public art and the creation of successful downtown spaces.

 

Founded in 1984 by a generous gift from John and Joan Gaines, the Gaines Center for the Humanities functions as a laboratory for imaginative and innovative education on UK's campus. Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the center is devoted to cultivating an appreciation of the humanities in its students and faculty. The center embraces varied paths of knowledge and particularly strives to integrate creative work with traditional academic learning.

 

Commerce Lexington Inc. focuses on promoting entrepreneurial start-ups, business expansion and retention, and new job creation; advocacy; workforce development; connecting people and businesses; community, minority, and small business development; and the cultivation of local and regional leadership. The organization's mission is to represent its members, creating the environment and opportunity for economic prosperity and quality living in central Kentucky.

 

For more information about the 2016 Lafayette Seminar, contact the Gaines Center at 859-257-1537.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: March 30, 1912

Tue, 03/29/2016 - 16:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 189th diary entry from March 30, 1912, recalls spending all day working on the yearbook in the Annual Room yet again.

 

March 30th. All day again! That Annual Room is a holy sight, but the dummy is half done. Are we tired???????

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Career Center Hosts Nonprofit, Government Networking Event Today

Tue, 03/29/2016 - 14:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2016) — The University of Kentucky James W. Stuckert Career Center is hosting their Nonprofit and Government Networking Social for students today. During the event, students will be able to talk to more than 30 agencies about career, volunteer and internship opportunities from a local and a national perspective.

 

The social, which will include light refreshments, will be held 3-6 p.m. today (Wednesday), March 30, at the Singletary Center for the Arts. Casual attire is suggested. For more information and a list of the agencies that will be attending the event click here.

 

As part of the UK Division of Undergraduate Education, the James W. Stuckert Career Center mission is to prepare students to successfully connect with employers and post-graduate educational opportunities. The Stuckert Career Center is here to help students connect their passions with purpose by exploring their college major options and career goals, engage in the process of expanding their knowledge and experience of the work place, and to connect with those who can help students on their career path. For more information on the Stuckert Career Center and how the staff can provide assistance, visit www.uky.edu/careercenter.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

UK HealthCare VP Moderates Opening Panel at National Rx and Heroin Summit

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 20:12
ATLANTA, Ga. (March 29, 2016)UK HealthCare Vice President for Administration and External Affairs Mark D. Birdwhistell moderated a panel conversation about combating prescription drug and heroin abuse during the keynote session of the National Rx Drug and Heroin Abuse Summit

 

After the Welcome Keynote address given by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Sec. Tom Vilsack, Birdwhistell was joined on stage by Vilsack, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin of West Virginia. UK HealthCare and University of Kentucky leaders will continue to serve as presenters, moderators, panelists and experts on the issue of prescription drug and opioid abuse throughout the summit organized by Operation UNITE. 

 

The panelists commented on broad issues pertaining to the drug epidemic, including the stigma associated with opioid and prescription drug abuse and the impact of addiction on workforce development. They emphasized the importance of a coordinated response involving federal and state legislators, researchers, clinicians, and community members and organizations in a united effort to enact change. 

 

"This issue is so paramount that it transcends partisan politics," Birdwhistell said.  "As Sen. Manchin noted tonight, this isn't a Democrat issue or Republican issue. It's an American issue. I appreciate Congressman Rogers' invitation to participate on the panel, and I look forward to seeing the continued progress of these efforts to combat opioid abuse."

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Alum's Locally Made Cheese Showcases Commitment to Ky. Food Economy

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 16:50

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing.  Please click on the "CC" icon to see closed captioning for this video.  

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — Ed Puterbaugh, owner of Boone Creek Creamery, the first artisan cheese producer in the state of Kentucky, is also a University of Kentucky alumus. As a proud Kentuckian, Puterbaugh not only sells cheese made in-house in his Lexington shop, but also a variety of locally made products in his Kentucky Proud store.

 

Puterbaugh received his degree from UK in microbiology, allowing him to thoroughly understand and oversee the biological processes involved in cheese-making.

 

“Our cheese is as natural as you can get,” said Puterbaugh. “We don’t use any of the junk that factory cheeses use: chemicals, enzymes, steroids or hormones.”

 

Boone Creek Creamery is one of the University of Kentucky’s local food partners. They provide cheese for catered events and football games, and even supply all the mozzarella cheese for pizzas made at two of UK Dining’s locations, The 90 and Blazer Cafe.

 

MK Cole, senior operations chair for UK Dining, said the partnership with Boone Creek Creamery exemplifies UK’s two-fold commitment to supporting the local food economy and providing the highest quality meals for students.

 

“We’ve been out exploring new partnerships to bring in more Kentucky pride and local purchases and vendors.” Cole said. “Obviously we serve a lot of pizzas here, so one of the first things we wanted to do was make a Kentucky Proud pizza.”

 

As part of the partnership between Aramark and the University of Kentucky, UK Dining is dedicated to engaging and supporting local businesses. In the first year of the institution’s dining contract, not including beverages, UK increased its local food purchases by approximately 20 percent. Moreover, UK is the only university in America with a global food partner who has made a multimillion-dollar commitment to growing the local food economy.

 

“I am extremely proud of the university and Aramark for taking the initiative to do that,” Puterbaugh said. “I really think that’s quite remarkable.”

 

Local food purchases will continue to increase throughout the duration of the contract.

 

“Right now we're just working to build our vendor pool and partnerships,” said Cole. “With some of the farms here, we have to tell them in advance many, many years so that they can actually grow the products.”

 

In addition to local food partners, the University of Kentucky also has an academic partnership, the Food Connection. The Food Connection is an unprecedented public-private partnership between UK and Aramark, housed in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. It is designed to leverage the innovation and research of UK and the market position of Aramark to substantively grow a vibrant food economy in Kentucky.

 

“For me, it’s kind of a full circle,” said Puterbaugh. “In a lot of ways I feel that I am returning that education back to the university with a product that wouldn’t have existed without that education. It’s cool on so many levels.”

 

As the University for Kentucky, UK is dedicated to continue growing its local partnerships, supporting the Kentucky food economy and providing quality, nutritional dining options for the UK community.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, 859-257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

Virginia Tech Shooting Survivor to Speak at UK

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 15:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Student Government Association (UKSGA), in conjunction with the University of Kentucky Police Department (UKPD) is pleased to announce that Kristina Anderson will be speaking to campus 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, March 29, in the William T. Young Library Athletics Auditorium. The event is titled “Safety is Personal: Lessons Learned as a Survivor of the Virginia Tech Tragedy” and is free and open to the public.

 

"With the increase in active shooter incidents that have plagued our country, it is of the utmost importance to be informed on the necessary steps to take if such a tragedy were to occur on our campus," said Drew Henderson, UKSGA’s director of campus safety. "It is a fact that the large majority of active shooter scenarios are over before the police arrive on the scene. We, as students, must plan for an active shooter situation now, not when the incident is unfolding."

 

Anderson, a survivor of the Virginia Tech tragedy in April 2007, has since dedicated herself to the important issues of campus safety and emergency planning. She is the chief evangelist for the LiveSafe smartphone app and the founder of a nonprofit organization for safer schools. Anderson is a frequent speaker and resource for violence prevention experts and survivors. She believes in the positive impact that increased communication and knowledge provide and leads LiveSafe’s efforts to share the revolutionary nature of the LiveSafe solution with the world.

 

After Anderson’s lecture, UKPD will provide additional information on specific active shooter training for our campus and promote a new video contest for the LiveSafe smartphone app. UKSGA is offering $500 to the student organization with the highest percentage of members in attendance. Attendees will have the opportunity to win an Apple Watch.

 

“We hope that hearing Kristina Anderson’s powerful story will encourage students to take a more proactive role in their safety on campus and utilize the LiveSafe app when they need our assistance,” UK Police Chief Joe Monroe said.

 

The University of Kentucky became the first higher education institution in Kentucky to adopt the LiveSafe smartphone app. Available to UK students, LiveSafe is designed to empower communities to stay safe by communicating with law enforcement in the event of virtually any situation where the user feels at risk or wishes to share information. The app is available to UK students, faculty and staff to download for free in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

 

The mission of the UKSGA is to represent all undergraduate, graduate and professional students enrolled at the university. UKSGA exists to increase student influence over academic policy, provide necessary student services, protect and expand student substantive and procedural rights and to better represent the student body in relations with the faculty, administration, Board of Trustees and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

The mission of UKPD is to promote a safe and secure campus environment for students, faculty, staff and visitors at the University by providing quality police services ethically, fairly and equally in partnership with the members of the community.

 

For questions or concerns regarding this event, contact Weston Loyd at publicrelations@uksga.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Bus Tracking App Helps Keep Campus Moving

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 15:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) – University of Kentucky students, employees and visitors looking for a ride around campus should look no further than the TransLoc Rider app. TransLoc Rider is a GPS-based tracking system that tracks all campus buses — as well as the Red Mile (Lextran 15) service frequently used by the campus community.

 

“Our goal is to make the campus bus system as simple and user-friendly as possible,” said UK Parking and Transportation Services Director Lance Broeking. “Having real-time campus bus tracking at their fingertips allows our students and employees to plan travels in and around campus, predict bus arrivals and ultimately save time.”

 

TransLoc Rider allows riders to track buses on-the-go. The service is updated in real-time, helping riders plan for delays caused by traffic, accidents or inclement weather. TransLoc Rider helps UK Parking and Transportation Services provide better all-around bus service by providing reports on the efficiencies of each route.

 

TransLoc Rider offers free iPhone and Android apps for on-the-go tracking. Riders without a smartphone can access route information via SMS messaging; users may send a text message to 41411 with UKY and the appropriate stop number to receive a message back listing the next three arrival times for that stop.

 

In the app, users may select routes or individual stops, save their favorite stops for quicker arrival information and provide feedback on their experience.

 

Through the TransLoc Rider app, PTS has the ability to send announcements directly to riders via the app in the event of an emergency closure or other impacts to bus service.

 

Bus tracking has been in use on UK campus buses since 2011. In 2015, 21,708 users used TransLoc Rider to track campus buses. This number includes app users, those who were updated via text messaging and users that accessed TransLoc via mobile and desktop versions.

 

Last month, UK’s TransLoc app saw 42,161 hits for a total of 3,781 users.

 

Note, both Lextran and the University of Kentucky should be selected under Current Transit Systems in order to include the Blue and White Routes and Route 15 data on the app.

 

For more information, visit the TransLoc Rider website or visit http://uky.transloc.com/.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship Recipients Announced

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 14:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research and UK Education Abroad recently awarded $5,000 for the spring 2016 Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarships (UGRAS) to junior biology student, Holden Hemingway; senior equine science student, Haley Reichenbach; and senior English and philosophy double major, Alexander Parmley. All three awardees will be conducting independent research projects abroad this summer.

 

“UGRAS gives students the opportunity to participate in original, cutting-edge research and promotes interaction with international scholars through immersion in the research environment,” said Evie Russell, assistant director of the Office of Undergraduate Research.

 

Hemingway will be conducting research in Scotland with UK professor Magdalena Muchlinski of the College of Medicine, as well as a local mentor. He will be exploring the muscular structure of primates, with his research project title being “Quinticeps? Investigating a possible fifth head of the quadriceps femoris in non-human primates.”

 

Reichenbach is taking her research to Denmark where she will work with a professor at Aarhus University. Reichenbach will investigate the effects of pregnancy on Holstein cows’ feeding behavior. Her research project is titled “Feed Intake and Feeding Behavior of Cows at Calving.”

 

For his research project titled “Exploitation and Ecotourism: Documenting the Lives of Costa Rica’s Indigenous Peoples,” Parmley will go to Costa Rica, where he will be mentored by a local developer to guide him both in his field research and in the summary of his findings.

 

“My goal is to explore the relationship between the exploitation of Costa Rica’s indigenous groups and the nation’s hugely successful ecotourism trade, all through the lens of a documentarian,” Parmley said. “I hope that my research might shed more light upon the facts surrounding the discrimination which Costa Rica’s indigenous peoples currently face.”

 

Parmley said the opportunity to do research abroad carries a number of added benefits besides the benefits of traditional research.

 

“It [research abroad] offers a medium in which one can develop cross-cultural communication skills and a greater global and cultural awareness,” Parmley said. “Exposure to diverse ideas and viewpoints, I hope, will be beneficial to my academic career, as well as my personal life.”

 

The UGRAS is awarded each March to undergraduate students interested in independent research projects abroad. To submit a proposal, applicants must have previously conducted research at UK with a faculty member, be highly recommended by said faculty member; and participate in an eight-week research abroad program. Find more information about this scholarship here.

 

About UK Education Abroad

UK Education Abroad is a unit of the UK International Center. Its primary responsibility is to facilitate high quality, academically sound and experientially rich study abroad, research abroad and intern abroad programs for University of Kentucky students. More information about the International Center can be found at http://www.uky.edu/international/.

 

Connect with UK Education Abroad on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, our blog, enKompass, Youtube, and Snapchat (@ukyabroad). Visit 315 Bradley Hall to talk with an Education Abroad Peer Ambassador, email educationabroad@uky.edu, call (859) 257-4067 or go online to www.uky.edu/educationabroad for more information.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

###

United States Army Field Band, Soldiers' Chorus to Perform at UK

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 14:21

 

U.S. Army Field Band & Soldiers' Chorus to Perform at UK April 2 from University of Kentucky on Vimeo.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — The internationally renowned United States Army Field Band and Soldiers' Chorus will make a stop in the Bluegrass as part of a national tour. Regional audiences can hear them in concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 2, at the University of Kentucky Singletary Center for the Arts Concert Hall. This concert is free and open to the public, but tickets are required for entry.

 

As the premier touring musical representative for the United States Army, the Field Band travels thousands of miles each year, thrilling audiences of all ages throughout the nation and abroad. Since its formation in 1946, the Field Band has appeared in all 50 states and in more than 30 countries on four continents. U.S. Army Field Band is considered by music critics to be one of the most versatile and inspiring musical organizations in the world. Some of the finest musical talent in America, members are selected through a highly competitive audition. More than six decades as the military's most traveled musicians have earned them the title, "The Musical Ambassadors of the Army."

 

The Soldiers' Chorus, which was founded in 1957, is the vocal complement of the U.S. Army Field Band. The 29-member mixed choral ensemble travels throughout the nation and abroad, performing as a separate component and in joint concerts with the concert band. The chorus has performed and entertained audiences of all ages in all 50 states, Canada, Mexico, India, the Far East and throughout Europe. The musical backgrounds of Soldiers' Chorus personnel range from opera and musical theatre to music education and vocal coaching. In addition to presenting selections from the vast choral repertoire, Soldiers' Chorus performances often include the music of Broadway, opera, barbershop quartet and Americana.

 

The United States Army Field Band At-A-Glance video.

 

The concert featuring the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers' Chorus is presented by UK Bands and UK Opera Theatre at the School of Music in the UK College of Fine Arts.

 

Individuals attending this concert should be seated by 6:45 p.m. Tickets for the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers' Chorus concert can be reserved through the Singletary Center ticket office.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: March 29, 1912

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 14:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 188th diary entry from March 29, 1912, looks back at a day and night spent working on the yearbook, The Kentuckian.

 

March 29th. We just naturally skip everything and put in the day and night on the Annual. Mr. Utley comes to our aide, and the Civil Dance bothers us not at all. Get back to the hall in the wee small hours, but have done great things on the 1912 Annual.

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish.

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Director Position Available Through SAB

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 12:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016)  The Student Activities Board director of Engaging Issues position is available for application. Director applications can be submitted on the SAB website at uksab.org or delivered to the SAB office located at 365 Blazer Hall. Applications are due no later than noon Monday, April 4.

 

With no prior involvement required, SAB is looking for hard-working and passionate students who want to unite the campus and community by bringing exciting events to campus. Programming directors are responsible for directing a committee to plan, promote, execute and evaluate events. Directorship provides the opportunity to earn internship credit, such as COM 399 and JAT 399.

 

SAB provides a place for any student to become involved through a variety of positions. Involvement is an important part of any student’s experience and growth at the University of Kentucky. Directors receive hands-on, real-world experience from the planning to the execution of each event. Through this process, directors have the chance to develop as individuals, professionals and leaders.

 

All information detailing the position can be found on the SAB website. Interviews will be held  from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 6. Applicants are highly encouraged to visit the SAB office before the application deadline. If you have any questions, please email Olivia Senter, SAB president, at president@ukab.org.

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the university annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Lexington community.

 

Connect with SAB at http://www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB or like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email Jazmine Byrd at publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Jazmine Byrd, publicrelations@uksab.org, (859) 257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, (859) 257-1909/(859) 323-2395 

"see blue." #selfie: Jordan Mason

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 12:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we're excited to introduce "see blue." #selfie - a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. This week, the 2016 president of Public Relations Student Society of America, Jordan Mason.

 

Jordan Mason, a senior integrated strategic communication major from Louisville, Kentucky, is this year's Public Relations Student Society of America president for the University of Kentucky chapter.  Jordan is so passionate about PRSSA because she believes that it unites a group of students with the same interests and pushes students to be successful in the public relations field. Learn all about this spunky, dedicated and enthusiastic leader in her see blue. #selfie!

 

UKNow: What is your major and where are you from?

Jordan Mason: I am a senior, integrated strategic communication major from Louisville.  

 

UK: Tell me about your position in PRSSA.

JM: I am currently president of PRSSA, so I'm in charge of contacting speakers for meetings, organizing events and overseeing the executive board.

 

UK: When did you become involved with PRSSA?

JM: I became involved my second semester of sophomore year, so the spring of 2014.

 

UK: What made you want to invest in PRSSA? 

JM: I was part of SAB a long time, and it made me want to get more involved with an organization that went along with my major….so I went with a public relations club!  

 

UK: Why are you so passionate about the organization? 

JM: I love PRSSA because it unites a group with the same interests. I love that it's a national organization that prides itself in making sure students succeed and they pave a path for you.  It's an organization where they want you to be as successful as you can possibly be.

 

UK: What is your favorite part about the organization?

JM: My favorite part, I think, is when I get other students to be involved. I like when you reach that point that they are interested and you get to keep immersing them in all the program has to offer.  It's a rewarding feeling when they become just as passionate about it as you.

 

UK: What has been your most memorable event during your time in PRSSA?

JM: I think it was the West Sixth Tour. It was the first tour where I was on the board. I thought it was the neatest thing. We took something that had nothing to do with public relations and made it about public relations and asked the behind the scenes marketing questions. It was such a fun event! 

 

UK: What is your favorite UK tradition? 

JM: Saturday football games. I have been going to those since I was 2.  My cousin played for UK. It's in my blood.

 

UK: How much planning goes on behind the scenes for PRSSA? 

JM: It’s not so much how much planning, it’s when you do it. It’s fairly easy to find speakers if you do it in the right amount of time. If we are planning for January, we start prepping in November. We have learned our lesson where we have waited until the last minute and had to scramble. Also, we ask what trending topics in the field that will interest members. Our last speaker was Marc Whitt. He came to focus on how to keep a good social media presence while job hunting. You want to make meeting topics personable and something you know will help members.  

 

UK: Has anything embarrassing ever happened to you during a PRSSA event?

JM: Oh gosh, probably. I'm sure I've done something stupid. Oh, I fell down the ramp at Keeneland last fall.

 

UK: Since you're from Louisville, what made you decide to attend UK?

JM: I've never been a UofL fan. When it came to UK, that was the only school I applied to. I had my application for Louisville ready, and I never put it in the mailbox. So, after that I was just hoping to get into UK. I decided I wanted to go to UK in middle school. It’s surreal sometimes that I’m at my dream school.

 

UK: Growing up, what did you want to be? 

JM: I always wanted like 15 jobs - the doctor the lawyer and the artist. I finally settled on being a writer. I wanted to write books. When I came to UK I wanted to do journalism, then that changed to public relations.

 

UK: What is your favorite thing to do off campus in Lexington?

JM:  Pazzo's. I think it’s so fun! Pazzo's reminds me of home; it brings back Louisville to me. 

 

UK: Since you're constantly immersed with public relations, what's your go-to social media? 

JM:  I would say Twitter. It used to be Instagram, then I got tired of all the changes. I love that you can connect with so many people. For the longest time I didn’t understand Twitter, but now I love it.

 

UK: What would you tell an incoming freshman? 

JM: Don’t take two 8 a.m.'s in a row because you will not survive. I’m just telling you now. You think you can do it because you did it the second semester….you’re mistaken.

 

UK: What is your favorite part of being an ISC major? 

JM: The family aspect. I feel like you can go to anybody in the department at any time and talk to them and tell them what is wrong. It’s like a second home to me. I love that.

 

UK: How can a prospective student get involved in PRSSA? 

JM: They can start by coming to the meetings at the beginning of the semesters. After that, you’re available to talk to exec board members and learn more about how to become a member! 

 

UK: What are the benefits of PRSSA?

JM: It's a national club, so if you put it on a resume, people will know what it is. We are the only club that focuses purely on public relations. I love the work that nationals does as well. They send you newsletters, and they have national and regional conferences. They are set on making sure members have the greatest opportunities that they can have.

 

UK: Since UK is out, who are you rooting for to win the NCAA tournament?

JM: No one. I don't believe in watching it after the Cats are gone. I had them winning on my bracket.

 

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Singletary Center Lot Unavailable March 30 and March 31

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 12:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — The Singletary Center for the Arts E lot (located off Patterson Drive) on the University of Kentucky campus will be unavailable for general parking Wednesday, March 30 and Thursday, March 31, to facilitate set-up and staging for the Old Crow Medicine Show concerts; the concerts will be held on both Wednesday, March 30 and Thursday, March 31. The lot has 33 spaces.

 

Members of the University community with valid E permits who normally park their vehicles in this lot may park in other E lots on campus. E lots in the vicinity include the Linden Walk Lot, the King Alumni Lot, the Career Center Lot, the Coliseum Lot and the College View Lot.

 

Go to www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_parking-maps to view a campus parking map.

 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Kentucky Academy of Science Offering Free Membership to UK Students, Faculty, Staff

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 11:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2016) —The University of Kentucky has been named a 2016 Kentucky Academy of Science (KAS) Enhanced Affiliate. Faculty, staff and students of UK may join KAS for free thanks to the Enhanced Affiliate Membership Program. KAS is a nonprofit organization fostering scientific discovery and understanding in the Commonwealth and currently has more than 3,000 members — an all-time high.

 

Membership in KAS is open to anyone with an interest in science. Members receive news, announcements, and job and research opportunities from KAS. They can also apply for research grants and publish in the Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science, receive complimentary electronic access to the journal and are entitled to discounted KAS annual meeting registration fees.

 

Other benefits to joining include opportunities to interact with scientists in other disciplines of science throughout Kentucky. Members can also become part of a community of scientists represented in government, education and industry while improving science literacy through the KAS science education partnership with the Kentucky Science Center.

 

The Kentucky Academy of Science is a nonprofit organization, founded in 1914, whose mission is to foster scientific discovery and understanding in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Faculty, staff and students of the University of Kentucky may become members of the Kentucky Academy of Science at http://kyacademyofscience.net.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155

Nominations for UK Staff Trustee Open April 7

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — Nominations for the position of staff trustee to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees will be accepted April 7-21. The staff representative to the Board of Trustees serves a three-year term. To be eligible to run and serve as staff representative to the Board of Trustees, one must be a regular, full time, (1.0 FTE) staff member and have served for at least one year of continuous employment at the university.

 

To declare as a candidate, a staff member must submit a petition with 25 signatures from full-time university staff members. The eligibility of candidates will be determined by the UK Staff Senate during the week of April 22-28. Following verification, candidates will be invited to a public debate Thursday, May 12 during the monthly meeting of the Staff Senate. 

 

Ann Eads, chair of the Staff Senate Elections Committee, which facilitates the process, encourages those who are interested in serving as staff trustee to discuss a potential candidacy with supervisors and colleagues.

 

“It's an exciting time for the staff at UK," Eads said. "We are readying for an election to determine our representative to the University's Board of Trustees."

 

The Board of Trustees consists of 16 members appointed by the governor, two members of the faculty, one member of the non-teaching personnel, and one member of the student body. The staff and two faculty trustees are elected by their constituents. The student trustee is also the elected president of the Student Government Association. The position of non-teaching, or staff, trustee is described in UK Governing Regulation, 164.131, part 4.

 

The trustee election will be held May 13-27. Any UK staff member with .75 FTE or greater is eligible to participate in the online vote.

 

The Board of Trustees has jurisdiction over UK's financial, educational, and operational policies, as well as the university’s relations with the state and federal government.

 

Further information about the Board of Trustees and its duties can be found at www.uky.edu/Trustees. For information about the election, including rules for nomination, the nomination form, campaigning, and official obligations of the staff trustee, contact Eads at aeads2@uky.edu

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Recognizing Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, UK HDI Highlights Resources Available to Kentuckians

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 08:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, and the University of Kentucky’s Human Development Institute (HDI) stands at the forefront of this movement to make sure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, such as autism and Down syndrome, have access to valuable resources utilized throughout the nation and in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

HDI offers educational seminars about available resources for people with developmental disabilities; programs and resources to benefit individuals with disabilities through the lifespan; and regular updates about issues impacting the disability community.

 

HDI holds a Fall and Spring Seminar Series with free educational presentations about topics related to developmental disabilities. The institute has an upcoming presentation from 1-3 p.m. Friday, April 15, by an occupational therapist about how to collaborate with individuals with autism spectrum disorders and their families. Those who are interested can attend the seminar in person at the HDI Conference Room in the University of Kentucky Mineral Industries building, or view the seminar via live stream.  To register for the seminar, visit http://www.hdi.uky.edu

 

 

"The HDI Seminar Series is an opportunity to increase your knowledge about the needs of persons with developmental disabilities and their families," said HDI Preservice Training Coordinator Walter Bower. "All groups who engage with children with autism, including family members, professionals, educators, and caregivers, can benefit from the upcoming seminar."

 

In addition, many programs for families and individuals with developmental disabilities can be explored online at http://www.hdi.uky.edu/for-individuals-and-family-members.. The programs range from books and websites for new and expectant parents learning about a diagnosis of Down syndrome to peer support programs for students with developmental disabilities to health and wellness initiatives and supported employment programs. HDI also offers resources and directories for Kentuckians to navigate services for people with disabilities, including the popular “Kentucky Disability Resources Manual” in English and Spanish and a Recreation Manual.

 

Moreover, individuals can stay up-to-date on the latest disability-related news through the HDI website, newsletter and social media updates. The institute regularly shares the latest news, popular stories and videos, and cutting-edge innovations. Sign up for the quarterly newsletter at http://www.hdi.uky.edu and follow social media updates at https://www.facebook.com/ukhdi/.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Stay Dry With New Umbrella Loan Program UK Campus

Mon, 03/28/2016 - 07:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 29, 2016) — Forget your umbrella - ella - ella?  No worries if you're on the University of Kentucky campus on a rainy day. LoanBrellas is here to keep you dry.

 

Some 800 umbrellas, in 80 display units have been placed in 21 locations throughout UK's campus.  They are on loan for rain emergencies.  Visit  http://uknow.uky.edu/sites/default/files/umbrella_map_2.jpg to view the locations.

 

LoanBrellas is the brain child of David Bertram, vice president of Campus Marketing and Digital Media for UK Sports & Campus Marketing, part of JMI Sports, which holds the multimedia contract for UK. The LoanBrellas project was developed in partnership with sponsor Coca Cola.

 

"JMI's role on campus is to develop sponsorship opportunities that provide meaningful benefits to students, faculty, staff and visitors to UK.  It is in that spirit that my daughter Katherine and I came up with an umbrella sharing idea," Bertram said.  "The concept is simple — if you are caught in the rain without an umbrella, then borrow one of ours, but please return it to one of 80 convenient bins around campus when you are through with it." 

 

"This is a practical and helpful program for the UK campus community and one that we appreciate JMI launching," said Eric Monday, executive vice president for finance and administration.

 

The full size umbrellas are branded with the UK LoanBrellas logo as well as that of Coca Cola. Bertram said they hope to place additional umbrellas very soon with a new sponsor, as well.   

 

"To the best of our knowledge, we are the first college campus to launch an umbrella sharing program," Bertram said.  "We certainly hope it becomes a permanent and successful program, but much of that depends on how well people embrace the concept and kindly return the umbrellas for the next person to use." 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

 

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