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WUKY News Wins Eight Associated Press Awards

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 19:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016)WUKY, Lexington’s NPR news station at the University of Kentucky, received eight statewide Associated Press (AP) Broadcasters awards, the most of any radio station in the Lexington radio market.

 

First, second and third place winners were revealed at the AP’s annual banquet in Louisville April 30.

 

“It’s a testament to the dedication of our news team. It’s especially gratifying because these honors are the result of a rigorous assessment process from our colleagues and counterparts outside of Kentucky,” said WUKY News Director Alan Lytle. “These men and women listened to reams of recorded material to determine the best of the best. We are especially proud again to be the Lexington radio market’s most honored news organization. None of this would be possible without the generous support of our loyal listeners.”

 

WUKY News won first-place awards in the following categories:

 

Best Radio Anchor: Alan Lytle

Best Radio Reporter: Josh James

Best Political Coverage: Josh James and Karyn Czar for “Gay Marriage In Kentucky”

Best Continuing Coverage: Josh James and Karyn Czar for “Gay Marriage In Kentucky”

Best Long Light News Feature: Josh James for “Breathing New Life Into 2001: A Space Odyssey”

Best Long Sports Feature: Alan Lytle for “What It Was Was Base Ball”

 

Other AP honors:

 

Best Short Newscast: Third Place: Alan Lytle, Karyn Czar and Josh James

Best Use of Sound:Third Place: Alan Lytle for “What It Was Was Base Ball”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155

UK CAER Receives $2.4M Grant for US-China Clean Energy Research Center

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 18:01

LEXINGTON, Ky (May 4, 2016) — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) for a five-year renewal of its United States-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) grant. CERC was created in 2009 by DOE, the China Ministry of Science and Technology and the China National Energy Administration to facilitate joint research and development on clean energy by teams of scientists and engineers from the U.S. and China.

 

The DOE grant totals $2.4 million over five years and will support CAER efforts to develop advanced coal technologies. Kunlei Liu will serve as UK’s principal investigator, along with his co-investigators Mark Crocker and Don Challman. Liu, an advanced combustion and pollution control expert, and Crocker, a leader in utilizing algae to mitigate CO2, will each serve as technical leads for specific research areas, while Challman serves on the U.S. Steering Committee and on the bilateral U.S.-China Intellectual Property Experts Working Group.

 

"CAER is a global leader in developing carbon capture and storage technologies," UK President Eli Capilouto said. "This grant will help advance promising research and development in this area, as UK CAER and its industry partners in Kentucky, across the nation and throughout the world seek sustainable energy solutions."

 

UK CAER is a founding member of CERC’s Advanced Coal Technologies Consortium, led by West Virginia University and also including the University of Wyoming and Washington University in Saint Louis; geological surveys (Wyoming and Indiana); national laboratories (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos and the National Energy Technology Lab); leading non-government organizations working in China on carbon capture and storage and clean energy development (World Resource Institute and U.S.-China Clean Energy Forum); and various industrial sponsors. The consortium’s purpose is to advance American and Chinese leadership and collaboration in advanced coal technologies, particularly as directed to carbon capture and utilization, advanced combustions systems and geological sequestration.

 

"This grant will help maintain UK CAER's international leadership in developing and advancing carbon capture technologies," said Rodney Andrews, director of the UK CAER. "The development of proven and economical clean coal technologies is crucial to sustaining economic and community development and improved quality of life in Kentucky and in communities throughout the world."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK Design Exhibition Showcases Students' Talents

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 17:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Design (CoD) will close the academic year with its seventh End of Year Show highlighting a year's worth of achievement by students studying architecturehistoric preservation and interiors. The exhibition of work from 2015-16 will run from 5-8 p.m. Thursday, May 5, at Pence Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

 

This annual exhibition showcases the innovative research, design and partnerships taking place at CoD through the work of the most noteworthy studios. Studios presented in the show are revolutionizing design solutions for problems experienced on a global level and even more locally within the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

As part of the celebration of the students' accomplishments, music and food will be provided.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK College of Education Welcomes Breckinridge Elementary Students

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 17:11

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2016) — University of Kentucky College of Education students stood in front of Dickey Hall last week holding signs welcoming 125 third graders from Breckinridge Elementary to the UK campus.

 

The elementary education majors had been preparing for Breckinridge’s visit since the beginning of the semester. UK literacy methods instructors Mary Shake and Joni Meade consulted with Breckinridge third-grade teachers and Principal Michael Price to determine the broad areas they would be addressing in science and social studies at the end of April. UK students then began planning literacy intense instructional units with either a science or social studies content focus that would align with instructional standards and ongoing classroom curricula.

 

As the project developed, mathematics methods instructors Cindy Jong and Lisa Amick became involved, working with the university students to also plan mathematics activities for the Breckinridge students.

 

“This type of partnership is beneficial to all parties,” said Mary Shake, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. “We believe it is extremely important for elementary students to experience the university, as this helps set their goals toward higher education. This experience is also integral to our teacher candidates’ learning. It allows teacher candidates to bring to life a project that is in depth and multifaceted. This hand-on, minds-on experience could not happen without our elementary school partners.”

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

From LA to UK: Professional Violinist Orchestrates New Career in Law

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 16:35

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — Intricate patterns of notes and rhythms coming together to form a beautiful piece of music isn't magic — it's an amazing analytical framework, according to Chris Stewart.

 

And to study and practice music means to critically analyze and think creatively to conquer new challenges. So when people ask Stewart how he made the transition from being a professional violinist in Los Angeles to studying law at the University of Kentucky, it's not hard for him to connect the dots.

 

"When I took the LSAT, I did logic games and these games had multiple factors you had to keep in mind with certain rules," said Stewart, a graduate of the California Institute for the Arts and a May 2016 graduate of the UK College of Law. "I assigned each of them a note in my head and let them build a chord so that I wouldn't forget them."

 

The Owensboro, Kentucky, native was known for his versatility with the violin — bluegrass, reggae, Eastern European — and "even used an electric violin and pedal board to create music for an award-winning zombie movie."  But after becoming disgruntled with the music industry in LA, he knew it was time to rekindle some old loves — political science, government and law.

 

"I was always aware and concerned with social justice issues," he said. "To become the best advocate I possibly could, I knew legal education was the best way to go."

 

What he didn't know was where to start that journey. He applied to numerous schools, but it was an act of Franklin Runge, faculty services librarian and then interim director of admissions, that made UK stand out among the rest. Before sending an acceptance letter to Stewart, Runge remembered what Stewart noted in his application essay — he is blind.

 

So instead of mailing the letter, Runge called Stewart up and asked if he'd rather receive it by email, allowing screen reading software on his computer to read it aloud to him.

 

"That kind of personal attention and attention to detail was huge," Stewart said.

 

"Legal training instills in you a sense of fairness and a desire to communicate clearly," Runge said. "In working with Chris, I wanted him to know that he will be part of the UK Law family, and that if he is willing to come here to learn, we are willing to do what it takes to make him successful. So many members of the faculty and administration stepped up during the summer before Chris’s arrival to ensure a smooth transition."

 

It was later at an event with the incoming fall class that Stewart and his wife, Emily, met Dean David Brennen.

 

“When I met Chris, I instantly knew he was the kind of person who turns obstacles into opportunities,” Dean Brennen said. “He has already made a lasting impact on the law school community, doing more for us during his time here than we could ever do for him.”

 

Stewart is accustomed to people asking to pet his trusted guide dog, Baron, and proceeding to pat Baron lightly on the head. He was quite surprised though when Dean Brennen descended to the floor for a full-on hug with Baron, wrapping his arms around the large, friendly English lab. 

 

"We drove away from that knowing UK was the place for me," Stewart said. "I've been treated better here by far than anywhere else; the decision was easy."

 

Since arriving at UK, Stewart has taken hold of every opportunity to mold himself into the advocate he yearns to be. In his last year, he has served as president and senior editor of the Election Law Society; co-president of the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy student chapter at UK; and a member of the Kentucky Law Journal (KLJ), UK's flagship law review.

 

"But," Stewart said, "What is most important to me is that my example allows for future blind students to serve on KLJ."

 

In those roles he not only gained experience solving real world problems within the practice of law, but he also picked up practical skills in practicing law as a blind person. How to tell down to the letter and the punctuation mark that articles and briefs are exactly right; which words are italicized and which are bold — "those nit-picky, fine-point aspects of legal research and writing."

 

Using advanced screen reading software, going line by line and character by character, Stewart knows every detail of every character in documents he's worked on.

 

"I've been listening to this (screen reading software) since I was five or six years old, so I have it at such a fast speed that I can complete all this in the same amount of time as someone looking at the document," he said.

 

As for how he handled not only excelling in his courses but also extracurricular activities Stewart said he just became involved in things that interest him, such as election law and employment law. Plus, law school is really good at teaching time management.

 

"You learn a lot about how to make the most of your day," he said. "And if everything I had to do felt like work, putting in 12 to 14 hours a day would be a lot harder." 

 

Besides the invaluable practical experience and exposure to top-notch legal scholarship, Stewart has also had the opportunity to connect with blind students heading to law schools across the country. During his first year at UK Law, he joined a blind law mailing list and has since been part of a tight-knit network of blind college students, law students and lawyers.

 

"It's especially cool when a blind senior reaches out to me and then later I hear about them being accepted into law school," he said.

 

And when they do reach out, he often tells them "no one should ever think of their disability as a characteristic that defines them." But having said that, he encourages students to make sure they address their situation with prospective schools and explore which schools can meet their needs. He points to a UK Parking and Transportation Services pilot program that assists students with mobility issues and the Disability Resource Center as examples of support from UK. 

 

But perhaps the best support Stewart has received has been from his friends, his classmates.

 

"They have been absolutely incredible — any time I've needed anything or had an issue arise, there's always been a fellow student there to help," he said. "It's been an incredible blessing to be surrounded by so many thoughtful, intelligent and courteous people, and I will miss all of them terribly."

 

Runge said the class of 2016 is an interesting cast of characters that span political views, socioeconomic background, musical tastes and favorite restaurants.

 

"Chris (and Baron) are part of the constellation of amazing graduates," he said. "They are part of the UK Law family, and it will be fun in the years to come to catch up with Chris at alumni events and hear about his future triumphs in the profession."

 

What's next for Stewart, besides graduating with his law degree this Friday? A federal judicial clerkship, a prized position for graduating law students and a key stepping stone for a successful legal career. Stewart will work closely with a federal judge, learn the ins and outs of the judicial system and put his legal writing and research skills to work over the next two years.  

 

He'll be busy, to say the least. But he won't leave his music behind. He still plays every opportunity he gets, often with his wife Emily.  

 

"I've deconstructed judicial opinions that stood for a particular rule of law in the same way that I would deconstruct a symphony … I will always be a musician."

 

This week, UKNow is featuring stories about our May and August 2016 graduates who will participate in the May 2016 Commencement Ceremonies this Sunday, May 8, at Rupp Arena. Undergraduate ceremonies will take place at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., and the Graduate and Professional ceremony will take place at 7 p.m. More than 2,400 undergraduates and approximately 500 graduate and professional students are expected to participate, marking the largest Commencement in UK's history. Overall, more than 3,200 undergraduate and 1,500 graduate and professional degree candidates have been submitted to the UK Board of Trustees for approval. For more information, visit www.uky.edu/commencement

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Last Weeks to See First-of-its-Kind UAE Art Exhibit

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 13:58

 

Video by Jenny Wells/UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — Time is running out to visit the first major touring exhibition of art from the United Arab Emirates in the U.S. as the University of Kentucky Bolivar Art Gallery wraps its presentation of the exhibition "Past Forward: Contemporary Art from the Emirates.” The free public show will end Friday, May 13, at the gallery located in the new UK Art and Visual Studies Building.

 

“Past Forward,” organized by Meridian International Center and the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), tells the story of the UAE’s rich history, culture and rapid development. A special highlight of "Past Forward" is the display of works that features facets of Emirati culture, including a strong equestrian heritage and a culture deeply rooted in hospitality. The UAE — which is home to more than 200 different nationalities — and the Commonwealth of Kentucky share a proud culture of hospitality that makes visitors feel at home.

 

"'Past Forward’ presents the UAE’s culture and history as told through the eyes of the country’s best contemporary artists, and how the country has preserved its traditions while developing into the modern, open and tolerant place it is today," said UAE Ambassador to the United States Yousef Al Otaiba. "'Past Forward’s final stop in Lexington, Kentucky, is the last chance to view some of these talented Emiratis’ artwork in the U.S., and we are excited to share this moment in a city where we have so much in common."

 

The exhibition showcases more than 50 paintings, photographs, sculptures, video installations and other media by 25 notable Emirati artists. Emirati artists are a multifaceted group of men and women who have maintained a sense of national identity while also promoting their vision and aspirations for the future. Early proponents of contemporary art in the UAE forged a path for the art world over 40 years ago, making the discipline a key aspect of today’s culture.

 

The Emirati artists included in this exhibition are: Ebtisam AbdulAziz, Shamma Al Amri, Ammar Al Attar, Khalid Al Banna, Zeinab Al Hashemi, Shaikha Al Mazrou, Maitha Al Mehairbi, Farah Al Qasimi, Mohammed Al Qassab, Abdul Qader Al Rais, Alia Saeed Al Shamsi, Hamdan Buti Al Shamsi, Afra Bin Dhaher, Mattar Bin Lahej, Maitha Demithan, Alaa Edris, Lamya Gargash, Mohammed Saeed Harib, Alia Lootah, Najat Makki, Lateefa bint Maktoum, Khalid Mezaina, Salama Nasib, Khalid Shafar and Obaid Suroor.

 

Housed in the UK Art and Visual Studies Building, the Bolivar Art Gallery is the primary gallery space of UK's School of Art and Visual Studies at the College of Fine Arts. The gallery features exhibition programming showcasing work by visiting artists, as well as UK students and faculty in the School of Art and Visual Studies, an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design that offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies, and art education.

 

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., Meridian International Center is a premier international leadership organization that provides valuable insight and experiences across borders, cultures and sectors. Meridian works with U.S. Department of State partners in the government, private, NGO, and educational sectors globally to create lasting international partnerships through leadership programs and cultural exchanges. Meridian also connects U.S. and foreign governments with the private sector to respond to global challenges and sustain impact. Meridian’s mission is to create innovative exchange, educational, cultural, and policy programs that advance three goals: strengthen U.S. engagement with the world through the power of exchange, prepare public and private sector leaders for a complex global future, and provide a neutral forum for international collaboration across sectors.

 

The UAE is a source of stability, tolerance, innovation, and growth in the Arabian Gulf and around the globe. The United States and the UAE are reliable allies, with historical and present-day shared security and economic interests. In fact, the UAE is the largest export market for U.S. goods in the Middle East and more U.S. naval vessels visit UAE ports than any other port outside the United States. The United States and the UAE also enjoy growing social and cultural ties, and many U.S. institutions in education, health care and the arts have formed collaborative partnerships with UAE entities. For more information: www.uae-embassy.org

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Rachel Walker Recognized as 2016 Student Employee of the Year

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 12:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2016) — Rachel Walker, promotion and outreach assistant for University of Kentucky Education Abroad, is the winner of the 2016 Student Employee of the Year Award.

 

Walker was one of 10 finalists chosen from more than 50 nominations submitted by supervisors at UK. Each finalist, along with their supervisor and family members, were invited to attend a banquet at the Hilary J. Boone Center to honor their accomplishments and contributions to the university.

 

In his nomination, Anthony Ogden, executive director of Education Abroad, highlighted Walker's contributions on promotional materials that have been shared at presentations nationwide.

 

"Ours is not an easy environment for student workers. The pace is fast, expectations are high and initiative is vital," Ogden wrote in his nomination. "Rachel demonstrated initiative, creativity and depth of knowledge. I am so terribly proud of her!"

 

The 10 finalists were:

  • ReDell Atkinson, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Office of Diversity
  • Logan DeHoff, Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences
  • Hannah Forte, Ag Equine Programs and Gluck Equine Research Center
  • Kevin Haney, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Mary Kinee, Pharmacy Services
  • Hannah Lowndes, Office of Philanthropy, Office of Annual Giving
  • Tasha Ramsey, College of Arts and Sciences, Hive
  • Kelsey Rutheford, Biostatistics
  • Ethan Thomas, Pharmacy Services
  • Rachel Walker, Education Abroad

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Office of Work Life Recognizes 2016 Supervisor of the Year

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 12:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — Each year, the University of Kentucky Office of Work-Life recognizes supervisors who have been nominated by their direct reports and colleagues for the Supervisor of the Year Award. This award is in place to formally recognize supervisors who are highly regarded by their employees for creating a work environment that enables their team's success and encourages work-life effectiveness. 

 

This year, the honor was awarded to the following individuals and nominees.
 
2016 Supervisor of the Year Award winners include:

 

Angela Dalton-Tibbetts, Practice Manager III, General Surgery
Dalton-Tibbetts was nominated because she is “a leader, mentor and inspiration.” Another nomination noted her focus on her team and patients: “She is genuinely focused on recognizing individual contributions, while also reinforcing the comprehensive goal and purpose of the General Surgery Clinic’s role in providing quality patient outcomes and positive patient experiences.” Additionally, nominations noted, “the attention she dedicates to her providers, staff and patients is one to be a model for UK excellence.”

 

Kristy McMillan, Radiology Technical Manager II, Imaging Services
McMillan was nominated by her team because “she is always thinking about her staff and patients and how to improve everything that surrounds them.” Her team also appreciated that “she is right there with us when we are in the ‘trenches’ and praising us for our great work when we are at the top.” And as one member of her team noted, “I am and will forever be grateful for the opportunity that I was given to work with her.”

 

2016 Supervisor of the Year nominees include:

  • James Allen IV, Community and Economic Development of Kentucky (CEDIK)
  • Kahlil Baker, Martin Luther King Center
  • Nina Barnes, Cancer Services - Inpatient
  • Todd Cheever, Medical Education
  • Linda Combs, Surgery
  • Rob Edwards, EVPHA Administration
  • Janell Hacker, Pediatrics - Neonatology
  • Jennifer Haynes, Pediatrics
  • Sarah Hermsmeier, Office of Student Involvement
  • Daniel Hogue, CKMS
  • Meg Marquis, Honors Program
  • Carlos Marin, Area Health Education Center
  • Huajing Maske, Office of China Initiatives and Confucius Institute
  • Barb McHone, Compensation
  • Cameron Morrison, Physical Plant - Medical Center
  • Ryan J. Pennington, Imaging Services
  • Joe Reed, Internal Audit
  • Ernie L. Scott, Center for Excellence in Rural Health
  • Jillianne Smith, Alumni Association
  • Annette Smith, Gill Heart Institute
  • Ben Smith, Surgical IBU
  • Mary Kathryn Starkey, Advanced Analytics Team – UK Analytics and Technology
  • Nikki Stone, College of Dentistry and Mobile Dental Outreach Program, Hazard

The Office of Work-Life appreciates each person who nominated their supervisor or a peer for this year’s award. Congratulations to all of this year’s winners and nominees. Nominations for the 2017 award will open in February 2017.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK College of Engineering Employee Giving Campaign Raises Over $90,000

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 10:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Engineering has announced that its faculty and staff have raised $94,342.17 in its inaugural employee giving campaign, easily exceeding the pre-campaign goal of $60,000. Further, the campaign achieved its objective of 25 percent participation among the faculty and staff. The fundraising initiative, named “PI: Participate & Inspire,” was led by a committee of entirely volunteer faculty and staff.

 

“For our college to get this kind of participation in our first employee giving campaign is astounding,” Dean John Walz said. “But it shows how much our faculty and staff believe in the work we are doing. Helping students earn an engineering education is something we can all take pride in.”

 

“Dean Walz and the College of Engineering faculty and staff are to be commended for their tireless and enthusiastic commitment to philanthropy at the University of Kentucky,” affirmed Mike Richey, vice president for philanthropy. “The college’s employee giving campaign is a perfect example of how we can further our efforts developing a culture of philanthropy at UK. We congratulate the college on this successful effort and encourage other colleges, centers and units at UK to follow Engineering’s leadership.”

 

The campaign officially commenced March 25 with “pie socials” in each department and ended April 15. A celebration event took place on May 2 where the final giving tallies were announced. Faculty and staff giving to the campaign were able to designate their gifts to the program of their choice.

 

Prior to the campaign, several faculty and staff members openly shared why they were already financial supporters of the college.

 

“Thanks to my experience in the civil engineering program, I was able to jump right into a challenging career. Supporting the college now is a way for me to honor my roots — the people and program that taught me to succeed,” said Samantha Wright, a lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering.

 

Kozo Saito, Tennessee Valley Authority Professor in Mechanical Engineering and director for the UK Institute of Research for Technology Development, explained his gift in terms of personal responsibility. “I strongly believe in Joseph Mulley’s quote, ‘Service to society is the rent we pay for living on this planet.’ To me, giving back to the college is the same as the rent that Joseph Mulley believes we should pay.”

 

The PI campaign was coordinated through the College of Engineering Office of Advancement.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Researchers Discover Three New Primate Species

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 09:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — Three new species of mouse lemurs — the smallest primates in the world — have been discovered by scientists at the University of Kentucky, along with collaborators at the German Primate Center and Duke Lemur Center.

 

"We didn't go into this work looking for a new species, but there was no real way to get around the fact that there are three new species here to describe," said Scott Hotaling, lead author on the Molecular Ecology paper and a doctoral candidate in the UK Department of Biology.

 

Twenty years ago, there were only two species of mouse lemurs. Today, including the newly-discovered species Microcebus ganzhorni, Microcebus manitatra and Microcebus boraha, mouse lemurs comprise 24 species, which are only found in the highly biodiverse island of Madagascar.  

 

Microcebus ganzhorni was named after the ecologist Professor Jörg Ganzhorn from Hamburg University, who has been engaged in research and protection of lemurs for decades. Microcebus manitatra's name symbolizes the expansion of the range of a subgroup from western Madagascar. The third new species, Microcebus boraha, is named after its location on the Island of Sainte Marie, also known as Nosy Boraha.

 

"From a conservation perspective, knowing what's there is important," Hotaling said. "These animals are facing diminishing habitats and tremendous pressures."

 

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, 94 percent of lemurs are threatened with extinction. Of the 101 surviving lemur species, 22 are critically endangered, 48 are endangered and 20 are vulnerable — making them one of the most threatened groups of vertebrates on Earth.

 

But almost as important as the species discovered is how they were discovered — using recently developed methods that allowed researchers to statistically model the evolutionary process, which meant logging hundreds of hours of processing time on UK's supercomputer. This objective approach to assessing genetic differences between individuals has significant potential for clarifying diversity in other species.

 

"We're trying to get across this idea that the uncovering of cryptic species needs to be done not with subjective interpretations, but in a statistical framework so that people can judge the validity of these things," said Associate Professor of Biology David Weisrock, who is a senior author of the study.

 

In addition to Hotaling and Weisrock, three former UK undergraduates contributed to the research and are co-authors on the study, a rare feat for undergraduates. Mary Foley and Jose Bocanegra generated the sequence data and Nicolette Lawrence was vital to the computational work.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Markey, LLS Host Fifth Annual 'Meet the Researchers Day'

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 15:16
LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society hosted their fifth annual "Meet the Researchers Day" last week. Meet the Researchers Day is a field trip given as a prize to two schools in the region who successfully raise more than $1,000 for the LLS's Pennies for Patients campaign.

 

This year, students from Bluegrass Baptist School (BBS) in Lexington, Ky., and Kenneth King Middle School (KKMS) in Harrodsburg, Ky., won the opportunity to visit the Biomedical/ Biological Sciences Research Building (BBSRB) on UK's campus and learned more about how the money they raised for Pennies for Patients will help further cancer research.

 

After a formal introduction by UK researchers Tianyan Gao and Craig Vander Kooi, the students received a tour of cancer research lab space in the BBRSB and learned how to use some basic lab equipment from Gao, Garretson Epperly, and Jianhang Jia. The event also featured short talks by Henry Clay student and cancer survivor Rod Jackson, the LLS Honored Hero, and UK pediatric hematologist/oncologist Dr. John D'Orazio.

 

Pennies for Patients is the annual fundraiser for the Student Series of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. It encourages students to collect spare change during a set three-week time frame early in the year. Funds raised support leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma research; patient and community service; public health education; and professional education.

 

For this year's campaign, 445 schools across the region participated. Kentucky schools participating in Pennies for Patients had to raise a minimum of $1,000 to win the chance to attend Meet the Researchers Day. BBS and KKMS were chosen in a random drawing, raising a combined $3,617.64 for LLS.

 

To learn more about the Pennies for Patients program, visit http://www.studentseries.org/

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

Two Students Take National Honors at Translation Contest

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 15:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Two University of Kentucky students in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures received high honors at the recent Maurine Dallas Watkins National Greek and Latin Translation exams, sponsored by the Eta Sigma Phi honorary society for classical studies.

 

Sophia Decker, a classics and linguistics freshman, placed first in the Advanced Latin division, second in Advanced Greek, and first in Latin Prose Composition. Drury Bell, a classics and mathematics sophomore, received an honorable mention in Advanced Latin.

 

Decker, who took Latin classes in high school and taught herself Greek, came to UK with the career goal of becoming a professor of the classics. “UK's classics program is, in my opinion, the very best in the country,” she said.

 

“Thanks to professors Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, UK is the only university in the entire country that offers classes with Latin as the language of instruction. There are even several informal opportunities to speak Latin and ancient Greek every week.”

 

“Sophia Decker's achievement is unparalleled since no classics program nationwide can boast to have placed a single student in the top positions in all three competitions for the last five years,” said Valerio Valeri, assistant professor of classics and Eta Sigma Phi advisor.

 

He added that the students’ achievement “is no mean accomplishment given the national scope of the contest. In the past, we have had other students who did quite well … but our students' latest feat is on a different scale; it was nearly a clean sweep of all the advanced competitions for UK and the classics program this year.”

 

Eta Sigma Phi sponsors the annual translation contest for students of Greek and Latin at schools with active chapters. The contest has been conducted for over 60 years and is named in honor of American playwright Maurine Dallas Watkins. The general mission of the society is to develop and promote interest in classical study among college students; to promote closer fraternal relationship among students who are interested in classical study, including inter-campus relationships; and to engage generally in an effort to stimulate interest in classical study, and in the history, art and literature of ancient Greece and Rome.

 

Valeri added that students must be enrolled in an ancient Greek or Latin course at the intermediate or advanced level to be eligible to compete in one or more of these categories: classical Greek (intermediate or advanced level), Koine Greek, Latin (intermediate or advanced level), or Latin prose composition (advanced level). After students take the written exams at UK in late February, their papers are mailed to a distribution center and sent out from there to be evaluated anonymously by judges at universities elsewhere in the country. The winners receive monetary awards as well as national recognition.

 

“Both Sophia and Drury are gifted students who have been taking courses in Hellenistic poetry and Latin composition,” Valeri said, adding that in Latin composition, instructors and students speak Latin exclusively.

 

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Kentucky is integral to the goals of the College of Arts and Sciences. The mission of the department is to advance the understanding and appreciation of language and cultural study through fundamental research and education domestically and abroad. The department seeks to fulfill this mission through comprehensive teaching and training at the undergraduate and graduate levels, original research advancing knowledge in the study of language and a vast array of cultural products (art, film, folklore, literature, music, mythology, religion, theatre), service to communities within and outside the Commonwealth and outreach in the schools to fulfill needs with respect to language instruction and cultural awareness.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

UK is Home to 2016 Campus Kitchen of the Year

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — The Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky has been named the 2016 Campus Kitchen of the Year. The Campus Kitchens Project (CKP) national office recently announced awards at the third annual Food Waste and Hunger Summit at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. 

 

Founded in 2011, the Campus Kitchens Project is the leading national nonprofit empowering students to fight hunger and food waste.

 

The Campus Kitchen of the Year is selected from 51 Campus Kitchens across the nation. The honor recognizes the Campus Kitchen that excels not only in safe and efficient operations, but in community partnerships, participating in the CKP network, volunteer engagement and more.   

 

“Since their launch just two years ago, the Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky has had a significant impact on the issues of food waste and hunger in their community,” said Laura Toscano, director of the national organization. “Their innovative work includes not only providing meals, but also creating an intergenerational mentoring program that decreases isolation for older adults, which is one of the underlying root causes of hunger for the senior population. It is our pleasure to recognize their work through the Campus Kitchen of the Year Award.”

 

The Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky (CKUK) is an on-campus, student service organization established with faculty and staff support in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition in April 2014. It creates sustainable solutions to decreasing food waste while providing healthy meals to those struggling with hunger.

 

Sandra Bastin, chair of the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition (DHN), praised the CKUK student leaders and advisors including Tammy Stephenson, DHN assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies, and Amanda Hege, DHN director of community outreach.

 

“The department is proud to support these efforts and is especially pleased that this group of individuals have been recognized for their passion and hard work. They are a perfect example of uniting individuals from diverse backgrounds to work toward a common goal; in this case feeding those experiencing hunger. The program not only builds camaraderie and teamwork among the volunteers but individually promotes personal growth and self-esteem. I am humbled to be associated with the Campus Kitchen,” Bastin said.

 

"It has not only been an amazing opportunity to pursue my passion of service, but also allowed me to grow as a student leader,” said Ash Thenappan, CKUK president, “Receiving the Campus Kitchen of the Year Award shows the amazing work our leadership team and volunteers are making in ending hunger in Lexington."

 

Since November 2014, 1,180 UK students recovered 2,751 pounds of prepared food from UK Dining and gleaned 1,153 pounds of fresh produce through GleanKY and the UK South Farm. They served 4,080 meals to children, youth and older adults experiencing hunger and homelessness in Lexington.

 

“Whether our students are leading volunteers in the kitchen or establishing community partners, they are developing a commitment to service and building leadership skills that they carry with them into their future,” Hege said.

 

The Campus Kitchen at UK is an affiliate of the Campus Kitchens Project and is proudly supported by the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Food Connection, Student Sustainability Council and Student Government Association at UK. To learn more about the Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky (CKUK) visit: https://dhn-hes.ca.uky.edu/CKUK.

 

CKUK is operating this summer. If you are interested in volunteering, sign up online:

http://vhub.at/ckuk.

 

On 51 university and high school campuses across the country, student volunteers with the Campus Kitchens Project transform unused food from dining halls, grocery stores, restaurants and farmers’ markets into meals that are delivered to local agencies serving those in need. Each Campus Kitchen goes beyond meals by using food as a tool to promote poverty solutions, implement garden initiatives, participate in nutrition education and convene food policy events. To learn more about the Campus Kitchens Project, visit www.campuskitchens.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Terrance Wade, terrance.wade@uky.edu, 859-257-8716; Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200.

Two Obstetrics and Gynecology Researchers Study Problems of Fertility with Lalor Fellowships

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Two investigators in the UK HealthCare Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were recently awarded fellowships from the Lalor Foundation for projects designed to enhance women’s reproductive health and resolve problems of infertility.

 

Dr. Patrick Hannon and Dr. Yohan Choi were each selected to receive $50,000 to support their research activities during a 12-month period. Lalor fellows conduct postdoctoral research on reproductive biology related to issues of fertility. The Lalor Foundation provides assistance and encouragement to early stage investigators who are engaged in the area of mammalian reproductive biology as it relates to the regulation of fertility. 

 

In an effort to better understand the mechanisms that control ovulation, Hannon and Choi are seeking to advance treatment options for infertility and advance women’s health care. The release of the egg during the process of ovulation is paramount for fertility, and defects in ovulation attribute to more than 25 percent of all cases of female infertility.

 

Contributing to the knowledge base of this field, Hannon discovered levels of secretogranin II (SCG2), a protein with an unknown role in the ovary, are up-regulated, or positively stimulated, in response to treatment with luteinizing hormone (LH), the hormone that triggers ovulation, in human ovarian cells. These findings suggest that this protein might be involved in the onset of ovulation. Previous studies have shown that SCG2 is involved in regulating hormone action, the development of new blood vessels and the migration of immune cells. These processes are necessary for ovulation and fertility, but scientists have never before tested whether SCG2 preforms these tasks in the ovary to aid in ovulation. Hannon’s project will utilize human, monkey and mouse ovarian samples to understand when and how SCG2 is regulated in response to the ovulatory LH stimulus, and to determine how SCG2 drives ovulation across species. 

 

Choi studies the mechanisms involved in the production of prostaglandins (PGs) in ovulatory follicles in women. PGs are a group of physiologically active lipid compounds whose synthesis is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen. These types of drugs have been reported to block ovulation in women, demonstrating the importance of PGs in the ovulatory process. Because nothing is known about PG production and secretion in human ovaries, Choi has proposed identifying the regulatory mechanisms by which the LH surge and its key down-stream mediators coordinate the rise in PGs in human ovulatory follicles using in vivo and in vitro models. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Dining Adjusts Operating Hours During Finals Week

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 13:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Today, Monday, May 2, begins finals week at the University of Kentucky.

 

To accommodate students, faculty and staff, UK Dining has adjusted hours of operation at all campus dining locations. The image below reflects the adjusted hours.

 

As seen in the image below, Starbucks located in William T. Young Library will be open 24 hours.

 

For more information and to view the altered hours, visit https://uky.campusdish.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Welcome 2016-17 K Week Coordinators

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 12:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) — Summertime to most University of Kentucky students means getting ahead in summer courses, internships, studying abroad, employment or vacationing with family and friends. For two juniors, Pete Comparoni and Trent Patrick, it means devoting their time to leading hundreds of student leaders (K Crew) in putting the final touches on K Week, the university’s fall welcome week.

 

Designed to make the transition to college life at UK as smooth as possible, K Week is nine days with approximately 250 activities, sessions and social activities planned — each one offering a unique and exciting experience for incoming students.

 

Both Comparoni, a sociology major and criminology minor, and Patrick, a political science and sociology major with a pre-law track, signed up as freshmen for K Crew, followed by Super Crew as sophomores and finally they accepted the 18-month commitment as K Week coordinators.

 

Patrick, coming from a graduating high school class of 63 to a class of 5,000 here at UK, spoke about his transition as an incoming freshman and how his goal as a coordinator is to provide “the best way to help these new students transition in a way that would lead to their success.”

 

Comparoni’s favorite part of K Week is K Week Kick-off. "It is the first time the entire incoming class is in once place, and it is incredible to watch."

 

Patrick cites Big Blue U as his favorite event. “I love watching the excitement of new students as they sit with their class in Commonwealth Stadium,” Patrick said.

 

During his freshman year, Patrick says Big Blue U was the first moment where his life as a college student became reality.

 

Comparoni’s advice for incoming freshmen is simple: get involved.

 

"Get involved and take advantages of all the opportunities that UK has to offer,” Comparoni said.

 

Patrick agrees, “Enjoy the experience because it will pass quickly.”

 

Student organizations and departments interested in submitting a K Week event can do so here: https://orgsync.com/85753/forms/197711. Those interested in participating in We Are UK, an event that celebrates the uniqueness of the UK community, can submit their registration here: https://orgsync.com/85753/forms/196030.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Ashley Cox, 513-464-2548, aco264@uky.edu; or Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Ambati Named Among Top 100 Most Influential People in Ophthalmology

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 10:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2016) – Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, professor of physiology and vice chair of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been named to The Ophthalmologist Power List 2016 'Top 100 Most Influential People in the World of Ophthalmology.' This international list features the most influential and innovative individuals in the worlds of ophthalmic surgery, research and industry.

 

Ambati is an internationally recognized authority who has pioneered innovative concepts in macular degeneration, a blinding disease that affects nearly 200 million people worldwide. His lab has reported numerous seminal advances in top-tier scientific journals such as Nature, Cell, Nature Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and The Journal of Clinical Investigation, elucidating the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and ocular angiogenesis. Ambati's prolific body of research also more broadly addresses central questions in vision science and retinal disease.

 

Ambati, who is the Dr. E. Vernon & Eloise C. Smith Endowed Chair in Macular Degeneration, has received numerous prestigious awards including the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and  elected to The Association of American Physicians, The American Society for Clinical Investigation, and The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Recently, he became the first individual at UK to be induceted into The National Academy of Inventors. He also serves on the editorial boards of multiple journals including Ophthalmology, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, and Translational Vision & Science Technology. 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

 

 

Whistleblower Stanton Glantz Reflects on Tobacco Control Progress, Emerging Challenges

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 17:02

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — The name Stanton Glantz is revered by community health advocates and dreaded by the tobacco industry.

 

The University of California-San Francisco professor and distinguished tobacco control researcher led the movement to call out deceptive marketing messages disseminated by Big Tobacco companies and expose the dangers of tobacco products during the 1990s. His research illuminated the risks associated with secondhand smoke, as well as the correlation between high smoking rates and heart attack deaths in populations. His research has shown the power of strong smoke-free laws in reducing cardiovascular disease.

 

But despite progress made in the past 20 years to subdue persuasive marketing tactics from the tobacco industry, the work isn’t complete in states like Kentucky, where tobacco-related illness is the leading cause of preventable death. On April 28, Glantz addressed unfinished business in the fight against tobacco and identified modern threats posed by the tobacco industry during his keynote address at the Kentucky Center for Smoke-Free Policy’s annual conference titled “Mobilizing an Army of Smoke-free Advocates.” He commended community advocates in all corners of Kentucky for protecting individual rights to clean air and healthy environments for the more than 70 percent of Kentuckians who aren’t smokers.

 

“The whole battle is a battle about social norms and social acceptability, and once you win these fights, and you have a law that’s sticking —which takes a while — you don’t go back. And the tobacco companies understand that, and that is why they fight so hard,” Glantz said during his keynote address. “In the end, when you win, you’ve won. And the fight itself is an important part of making these laws work.”

 

After a stack of papers known as the “cigarette papers” landed at his doorstep in 1994, Glantz analyzed thousands of documents to build evidence against cigarette companies. The documents revealed that tobacco executives were aware of the dangers of their products while using aggressive marketing tactics to put these products in the hands of young adults and adolescents. Glantz published a groundbreaking book, The Cigarette Papers, as an indictment against the tobacco executives and marketers who were misleading the public.

 

Health experts and smoke-free advocates, including Glantz, have witnessed a resurgence of tobacco industry marketing efforts to target young people and normalize the use of the latest dangerous tobacco product on the market — electronic smoking devices or e-cigarettes.  Glantz applied the lessons he learned through exposing the secrets of Big Tobacco in the 90s to the tobacco challenges of today, and said the dangers of tobacco marketing still persist in American society. He also discussed strategies for researchers, activists, and health care workers to resist pro-tobacco sentiments and reduce the burden of tobacco-related illness in their communities.

 

The KCSP also recognized efforts to promote the health across Kentucky by honoring local communities and municipalities that enacted smoke-free legislation in the past year. The City of Pikeville and the City of Ashland received awards for amending legislation to include e-cigarettes in their smoke-free ordinances. Hazard Community and Technical College received the 2016 Tobacco-free Campus Award. The City of Middlesboro earned the 2016 KCSP Smoke-free Indoor Air Excellence Award for passing a smoke-free workplace ordinance in May 2015.

 

The 2016 Smoke-free Youth Advocate Award went to the 2015 Middlesboro Destination Imagination Team, a nonprofit group comprising seven fourth- and fifth-graders, their parents, and teachers. The group delivered a presentation about the hazards of secondhand to the Middlesboro City Council and garnered more than 400 signatures for a petition supporting smoke-free legislation, which was adopted in May 2015. 

 

“Embracing this year’s theme of mobilizing an army to end the burden of tobacco, we’re keenly aware of the fact that the tobacco companies have not loosened their grip in Kentucky,” Ellen Hahn, director of the KCSP and the Marcia A Dake Professor in the UK College of Nursing, said. “We’re proud of the communities that are taking a stand against tobacco in all its forms, and it is exciting to see children and adults alike making a big difference in their communities. Still, as Stan Glantz said in his keynote address, our work isn’t finished in Kentucky or across the nation.”

 

The Kentucky Center for Smoke-free Policy, housed in the UK College of Nursing, conducts research, collects data, and provides resources and strategies to assist advocates working on smoke-free campaigns across Kentucky. The conference was sponsored by UK HealthCare. 

 

For a full list of award winners and press releases, contact Elizabeth Adams at elizabethadams@uky.edu.

 UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

UK Cardiologist is Leading a Study to Explore a New Way to Heal Resistant Hypertension

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 16:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2016) — What does your blood pressure have in common with a garden hose? Quite a lot, in fact.

 

Increasing the pressure in a garden hose (whether by opening your faucet to full force or by plugging the end of the hose opening) can cause it to become rigid or even burst.

 

Blood in the arteries functions in much the same way. Consistently high blood pressure -- also called hypertension -- damages the tissues of the artery walls. While it's fairly easy to replace a garden hose, hypertension can lead to serious medical problems and even death.

 

Hypertension is defined as a chronic condition in which the systolic blood pressure (the top number in the measurement that your health care provider gives you) exceeds 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) exceeds 90 mmHg. Although it's normal to experience minor fluctuations throughout the day, one in three Americans experience high levels of blood pressure (exceeding 140/90) even without activity or stress. That can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney disease and even death. This increased risk is compounded in people with diabetes, high cholesterol, or smokers.

 

Generally, patients with hypertension can help control their high blood pressure by adopting healthy lifestyle habits such as:

·      Losing weight

·      Exercising more

·      Stopping smoking

·      Reducing stress

·      Eating a balanced low-salt diet

 

When lifestyle changes aren't adequate, there are numerous drug therapies that can be used separately or in combination to reduce hypertension. Occasionally, however, some people have what's called "resistant hypertension," which despite lifestyle changes and medications cannot be brought under control.

 

Researchers are exploring a novel approach to treat hypertension by manipulating the sympathetic nervous system signals that contribute to high blood pressure. The sympathetic nervous system regulates the vital functions of the body by connecting the brain to major organs such as the heart, kidneys and blood vessels. If the sympathetic nerves connecting the kidney to the brain are overactive, blood pressure rises.

 

One study is exploring the effect of renal denervation, a minimally invasive procedure that may potentially decrease the sensitivity of nerves lining the walls of the kidney arteries, thereby reducing the signals that cause hypertension.

 

Because it has no direct symptoms, hypertension is known as the "silent killer." The best first step is to know your blood pressure readings and work with your doctor to control high blood pressure if necessary. If you've exhausted all other options, talk with your doctor about clinical trials such as this one that may contribute to better control of your hypertension.

 

For more information about this study, call 859-323-5259 or email  h.shinall@uky.edu.

 

Dr. Khaled Ziada is an interventional cardiologist at UK HealthCare’s Gill Heart Institute

 

This column appeared in the May 1, 2016 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Previews The Arboretum's Arbor Day Event Saturday

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 16:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today he talks to The Arboretum Director Molly Davis about plans for their annual Arbor Day celebration tomorrow, Saturday, April 30. 

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/arboretum-branching-out-arbor-day.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

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