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Global Health Case Competition Tackles Child Obesity in Mexico

Tue, 03/15/2016 - 11:00

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 16, 2016) — Multi-disciplinary University of Kentucky student teams recently vied for the honor of competing in the second annual Global Health Case Competition, which this year is focused on finding solutions to tackle childhood obesity in Mexico.

 

The competition was hosted on the UK campus by the Global Health Initiative, whose goal is to provide advanced research and educational programs for students to improve the health of people throughout the world.

 

Each year, UK teams are challenged to create strategies that address a global health issues and then present their plans to a panel of judges. From those presenting, a winning team is selected to represent UK at the International Global Health Case Competition, which takes place in April at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. The winning national team will share $6,000.

 

Team 12 won the UK competition with members:

·       Karly Kindoll, of Louisville, Kentucky, an undergraduate in human health sciences in the College of Health Sciences; 

·       Anton Abdul Fatah, of Indonesia, a graduate student in the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration;

·       Olivia Pokoski, of College of Wildwood, Missouri, a freshman in the College of Public Health 

·       Nadine Stella Achenjang, of Lexington, a first-year medical student in the College of Medicine 

 

“Our job was to come up with solutions for the childhood obesity crisis that Mexico is facing right now,” said Kindoll. “They have unprecedented rates of childhood obesity nationwide, especially in school-aged children. So, our task was to come up with a comprehensive approach involving the communities as well as a governmental approach.”

 

Team 12 won the competition with their three-level plan. At the national level, they would use the ANSA task force to “act as a collaborator between all branches of the government,” said Pokoski.

 

The second (local) level would enact a community health leader program. “The goal of this program is to motivate the individuals in the different communities to live a healthier lifestyle,” she said.

 

The third solution the team proposed was to increase the national soda tax.

 

After all presentations were completed, four teams were selected to be finalists. Those teams were then given a “twist” to include in their presentations. The twist was that the Secretary of Health was worried that the president of Mexico’s cabinet as well as other influential stakeholders would not fully support the solutions.

 

Team 12 members said they were fortunate in that they already had a plan in place to get the government and other key players working together all on the same page.

 

Fatah said it was, however, difficult to change the language “from convincing just one person to convincing all persons.”

 

Achenjang said she thought her team won the competition because her team had “a simpler approach than the other participants.

 

“It was very cost-effective and also it was something that involved a lot of people,” Achenjang said. “And it targeted a lot of different aspects of the issue: the food part, exercise part, and the cultural awareness part.”

 

Other UK teams competing included:

 

Second Place: Team 11

·       Sean Butterbaugh, College of Medicine

·       Shreya Berlia, College of Public Health

·       Holly Pan, College of Pharmacy

·       Joy Coles, College of Nursing

 

Third Place: Team 9

·       Devon Collins, College of Public Health

·       Samjhanaj Shakya, College of Public Health

·       Sarah Tabayehnejad, College of Pharmacy

·       Lucy Hollingsworth Williamson, College of Nursing

 

Fourth Place: Team 6

·       Leila Mende, College of Medicine

·       Kai Zhang, College of Public Health

·       Jennifer Walch, College of Public Health

·       Jade Daugherty, College of Pharmacy

·       Christopher Kositzke, College of Arts and Sciences

 

The UK teams were evaluated by guest judges: Monica Kennison, chair of nursing at Berea College; Keith Martin, executive director of Consortium of Universities for Global Health; M. Raynor Mullins, faculty emeritus, UK College of Dentistry; Richard Clayton, faculty emeritus, College of Public Health; Perry Pugno, former chair of the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors; and Javier Sevilla Martir, Indiana University Department of Family Medicine.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

New Co-chair Announced for iNET Board

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 17:22

Lexington, Ky. (March 15, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information recently announced that current Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNET) advisory board member Randall Stevens will serve as the board co-chair.

 

Although an academic certificate program within the College of Communication and information, iNET is open to all UK students and maintains a network of partners at the UK and beyond that supports iNET’s goals to prepare students to be future innovators and entrepreneurial leaders. The network includes stakeholders in entrepreneurial education and representatives from UK colleges and programs as well as the local entrepreneurial community. Advisory board members serve as mentors, coaches and competition judges and collaborate on innovative ideas and common goals.

 

“The goal of iNET is to offer UK students, across all colleges, courses and extracurricular opportunities to engage in entrepreneurial ways of thinking,” Stevens said.

 

Stevens replaces Jamie Leddin as board co-chair, and along with co-chair Dan O’Hair, dean of the College of Communication and Information, will be responsible for leading the direction of the advisory board.

 

“The iNET chairs develop overall direction for the program and present it to the board for feedback and guidance,” Stevens said. “The board is designed to bring together a diverse group of people from both the university and external entrepreneurs and leaders to help guide the direction of the initiative.”

 

Stevens believes there is no better way to learn than by studying stories of those who have seen success within the entrepreneurial field.

 

“One of my goals is to ensure that additional local entrepreneurs are participating in the program,” Stevens said. “I find it of extreme importance to expose the students to individuals who have lived through it and walked the walk. Starting a company is easy, but being successful is more difficult."

 

Stevens graduated from the UK College of Architecture (now named the College of Design) and is an entrepreneur in the software and technology market. He owns a software company, ArchVision, which develops 3D graphics technology used in the architecture, engineering and construction markets.

 

Stevens taught part time at the UK College of Design, from 1991-2007.   He recently returned to academia to teach an undergraduate course titled "Intro to Entrepreneurship" in the Gatton College of Business and Economics and is active in the local entrepreneur community.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155

SelfMade Health Network Partners with UK College of Public Health to Reduce Tobacco-Related Cancer

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 16:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 16, 2016) – The incidence of tobacco-related cancer persists in Appalachia, a geographic region disadvantaged by a number of socioeconomic factors related to demographics, health care accessibility, screening behavior and environmental risks.

 

To address tobacco-related health disparities in Appalachia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated a coalition based at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health as the newest member of the SelfMade Health Network (SMHN). The CDC’s SelfMade Health Network is a national network of dedicated professionals, organizations and communities seeking to eliminate tobacco-related health disparities in underserved or high-risk populations. The UK College of Public Health, in coordination with the Kentucky Cancer Program and the Kentucky Cancer Consortium, will serve as a Regional Resource Lead Organization (RRLO) within the SMHN.

 

The UK-based RRLO, in partnership with the Kentucky Cancer Program at the University of Louisville, will lead efforts to increase early lung cancer screening, treatment and survivorship in Appalachia. The coalition will work to enhance tobacco cessation support among male populations, including uninsured, low-income employees and unemployed adult tobacco users residing in primarily rural and medically underserved areas.

 

SelfMade Health Network (SMHN) is a member of the CDC’s Consortium of National Networks to Impact Populations Experiencing Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities. The consortium of national networks advances commercial tobacco use prevention and cancer prevention in populations experiencing tobacco-related and cancer health disparities. The SMHN focuses on those populations with low socioeconomic status characteristics residing in rural, urban and frontier regions.

 

"We are excited about this opportunity to address lung cancer disparities in Southern Kentucky with a particular focus on worksites with predominantly male employees,” Jennifer Knight, an assistant professor in UK College of Public Health Department of Health Management and Policy and principal investigator on the project, said. “With the existing partnerships within the Kentucky Cancer Program, Kentucky Cancer Consortium and UK College of Public Health, we are well-poised to make a difference by working with communities to develop, implement and evaluate tailored interventions to positively impact the health of Southern Kentuckians."  

 

“With among the highest rates of tobacco-related illnesses, including cancer, in the U.S., Kentucky must be a leader in the elimination of this deadly and costly disease that causes the suffering of so many,” Nancy Schoenberg, associate dean for research in the UK College of Public Health, said.

 

The UK-based RRLO aims to advance Healthy People 2020 Objectives to eliminate health disparities across counties and states. The UK-based RRLO team will serve as the community resource hub leading efforts targeting eight Kentucky counties, including Clay, Ohio, Warren, McCracken, Christian, Perry, Jackson and Casey counties. This project will involve the coordinated efforts of the Kentucky Cancer Program East based at UK and the Kentucky Cancer Program West based at the University of Louisville.

 

“We are honored that a well-respected institution with a rich history and reputation such as the University of Kentucky, along with other organizations, have committed to promoting cross-sector collaboration as we strive to address disparities,” Dwana Calhoun, director of the SMHN, said.

 

Additional information about national and regional initiatives are posted on the SelfMade Health Network website.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

First Class of IPE Fellows Bridge Gaps Between Health Professions through Learning

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 15:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016) — University of Kentucky faculty members across health care colleges and disciplines were recognized as members of the first class of Interprofessional Education (IPE) fellows on March 9.

 

Sixteen faculty members representing the UK College of Medicine, the UK College of Public Health, the UK College of Nursing, the UK College of Health Sciences, the College of Social Work and the UK College of Pharmacy were named associate or full fellows to the Center for Interprofessional Health Education. Fellows are recognized as champions of multidisciplinary education through their involvement in research, learning and service opportunities bringing together a diverse group of professions. IPE prepares students for collaboration with other disciplines in real-world health care environments, and develops team-oriented faculty committed to improving health care delivery.

 

As fellows and associates, these faculty members will assist the Center in its mission to disseminate interdisciplinary curriculum to UK faculty and students in the six health sciences colleges on campus. Fellows and associates were either nominated by a member of the academic community or self-nominated.

 

Congratulations to the following fellows and associates:

  • Patricia Burkhart, UK College of Nursing
  • Cathy Catlett, UK College of Nursing
  • Lynne Jensen, UK College of Nursing
  • Darlene Welsh, UK College of Nursing
  • Mollie Aleshire, UK College of Nursing
  • Emily Dressler, UK College of Public Health
  • James Norton, UK College of Medicine
  • Erika Erlandson, UK College of Medicine
  • Mandy Jones, UK College of Pharmacy
  • Melody Ryan, UK College of Pharmacy
  • Joseph Fink, UK College of Pharmacy
  • Stacy Taylor, UK College of Pharmacy
  • Janice Kuperstein, UK College of Health Sciences
  • Kevin Schuer, UK College of Health Sciences
  • Karen Badger, UK College of Social Work
  • Patricia Cook-Craig, UK College of Social Work

“In the modern health care environment, it’s imperative to create synergy and a sense of teamwork across disciplines,” said Jim Norton, a Fellow and director of the Center. “The Fellows are advocates of opportunities to bring together a diverse group of individuals, who all possess unique skills and knowledge to improve health care delivery. Everyone has something they can bring to the table in IPE.”

 

The Center for Interprofessional Education is devoted to facilitating the design, implementation and evaluation of interprofessional education experiences for students and provide interprofessional development opportunities for faculty. The Center maintains partnerships with faculty in the UK College of Dentistry, UK College of Health Sciences, UK College of Medicine, UK College of Pharmacy, UK College of Public Health, UK College of Social Work and UK College of Communication and Information.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK HealthCare's Christopher Doty Recognized for Resident Education Work

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 14:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016)  UK HealthCare's Dr. Christopher Doty was awarded the Joe Lex Educator Award by the American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM) at the 22nd annual Scientific Assembly.

 

The Joe Lex Educator of the Year Award is named after long-time emergency medicine educator, Dr. Joe Lex, recognizing an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to AAEM through work on educational programs. Doty, vice chair and residency director in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Kentucky, was recognized for his outstanding contributions to AAEM through his work in educational programs and serving as the co-chair of the planning committee, contributing to the success of the Scientific Assembly.

 

"Chris was recognized for providing leadership to our residents, helping them become better doctors in a demanding environment," said Dr. Roger Humphries, chair of the UK Department of Emergency Medicine. “He has shown tremendous success building upon educational innovations and medical trends, and this award is an apt reflection of his capabilities.”

 

As an associate professor of emergency medicine, Doty has been awarded numerous national teaching awards in the research interests of cognition, andragogy, residency education and acute decompensated heart failure.

 

“I am very pleased to have my work recognized by such an amazing organization and an inspiring group of educators,” said Doty. “The award motivates me to continue to place a strong focus on educating others to provide the best care for our patients.”

 

 

As the premier clinical conference in emergency medicine, AAEM recognizes emergency medicine as an independent specialty and is committed to its role in the advancement of emergency medicine worldwide. 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

New UK Libraries Collections Chronicle the Sounds of Kentucky

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 13:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016) — Two new collections being donated to the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center will capture the story and quite literally some of the sounds of Kentucky for generations to come. Later this month, the center will become home to collections of both the Reel World String Band, a celebrated old time and traditional music mainstay in the Commonwealth, and Men of Note, one of the most iconic jazz bands of the Bluegrass.

 

To mark the dedications of two major collections of musical history in Kentucky, UK Libraries will celebrate the donations with programs filled with music of course.  

 

Reel World String Band performs "Who Owns Appalachia."

 

First, the festivities surrounding the donation of the Reel World String Band Archives will not only christen the archival work, but also celebrate the Kentucky Foundation for Women’s 30th anniversary. The band, Kentucky Poet Laureate George Ella Lyon, novelist Silas House and other guests will be on hand to sing some of the group's songs and provide tributes to highlight the band's history. In addition, an exhibit of items including band posters and photographs from the collection will also be on display. This program will begin 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 23, in the Great Hall of the Margaret I. King Library. A reception of dessert and coffee will immediately follow.

 

The following week, the big band sounds of Men of Note will take center stage at a concert of music from the band's book of arrangements featuring the UK Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Miles Osland, professor of saxophone and director of UK Jazz Studies; the UK Repertory Jazz Band, under the direction of Brad Kerns, assistant professor of trombone; and guest performances by members of the popular band itself. This concert, which includes a program featuring reproductions from the collection, will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 31, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall. A reception of cookies and drinks will immediately follow the concert.

 

Both dedication ceremonies for Reel World String Band and Men of Note are free and open to the public.

 

The Reel World String Band's music career spans 39 years and its history represents a body of cultural and feminist activism that has influenced and supported dozens of social movements in Kentucky and the Appalachian region. Since 1977, the band has toured all through the United States, Canada and Italy, played on picket lines, at women’s festivals and square dances, as well as thousands of other venues including many memorable events at UK's own Singletary Center.

 

Influenced by traditional and old time music with a touch of country, swing, blues and jazz, Reel World String Band's soulful songwriting and instrumental virtuosity make for American roots music with a rare fire and authenticity. The band includes Sue Massek on banjo, Bev Futrell on guitar and harmonica, Karen Jones on fiddle, Elise Melrood on piano, and Sharon Ruble on bass.

 

The Reel World String Band Collection at UK Special Collections Research Center will chronicle the band's entire career and includes photographs, posters, set lists and correspondence. 

 

"The Reel World String Band is part of the history of Kentucky's music culture, women's rights, and social justice movements. Their collection represents this and will be valuable to students and researchers for generations to come," said Deirdre Scaggs, associate dean for Special Collections.

 

Made up of music professors, doctors, lawyers and other career types, who also had a passion for music, Men of Note began as a group of friends who enjoyed playing together for fun. Over the years, the ensemble's popularity grew and the band played historic locations and events like the prestigious Greenbrier Inn in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, and the inaugurations of Govs. Martha Layne Collins and Wallace Wilkinson, as well as local gigs around central Kentucky.

 

"What they furnished to Lexington is high-quality popular and jazz-inflected music produced locally by folks who were involved with music as a vocation or avocation," said Dick Domek, professor emeritus of UK School of Music and member of Men of Note. "The band offered music for listening, dancing, relaxing and celebrating at events like weddings, outdoor concerts, dances, company and private parties, governor’s inaugurations, street fairs, and so on. Their music was enjoyed by a cross section of people of all ages. An organization like that should be — and was — a great source of civic pride for Lexington." 

 

The Men of Note Collections document the long-running Lexington big band's history from 1967 to 2009. Among the materials collected are recordings, performance memorabilia, and the band's book of arrangements, which is actually an historic, passed-down collection of more than 300 charts dating back to the early 1940s arrangements belonging to five earlier bands.

 

The collection also includes oral histories. In 2014, Domek teamed up with Gail Kennedy, arts and outreach librarian at UK, to conduct interviews with former members of the band. To date, seven interviews have been completed, which focus on the band's recollections of their own history and thoughts on jazz in general. 

 

A third component of the archival collections is the personal memorabilia of Byron Romanowitz, noted Lexington architect and jazz musician, who anchored the Men of Note beginning in the 1980s until the band's dissolution in 2009. 

 

Romanowitz, who began playing jazz at 11 years of age, hopes the public will enjoy the wealth of the Men of Note resources for years to come.

 

"We donated our music library to UK because it contains some of the best musical arrangements from popular local big bands dating from the 1950s to 2009," Romanowitz said. "We thought that this music had historical significance to central Kentucky, and that it would continue to hold an appeal for future generations."

 

UK Special Collections Research Center is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center and the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection. The mission of the Special Collections Research Center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

For more information on the Reel World String Band Collection or the events surrounding its dedication, contact Deirdre A. Scaggs, associate dean of UK Libraries Special Collections, at deirdre@uky.edu or 859-257-3653.

 

For more information on the Men of Note Collections or the events surrounding its dedication, contact Gail Kennedy, arts and outreach librarian, at gail.kennedy@uky.edu  or 859-257-4631.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Celebrate Creative Arts Therapies Week with UK HealthCare's New Creative Arts Clinical Coordinator

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 13:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016)UK Arts in Healthcare will be celebrating Creative Arts Therapies week with a new member on its team. The new creative arts clinical coordinator, Cheryl Benze, joined the staff at the beginning of March in the newly created position.

 

Benze joins the Arts in HealthCare Program from North Carolina, where she earned her bachelor's degree in psychology and music therapy as well as a master's degree in music education in music therapy. One of Benze's goals is to continue to expand the music and art therapy programs currently established at UK. By facilitating communication within the programs she hopes to see it expand within the UK community as well as the Lexington community. Benze hopes to bring continued recognition to the programs offered by UK HealthCare and the staff that keep them running.

 

Patients, staff, family and friends have a chance to celebrate the more than 15,000 Creative Arts Therapists practicing in the United States and around the world March 13-19, during Creative Arts Therapies Week. The growing Creative Arts Therapy Program at UKHC offers services like art and music therapy; therapists see patients throughout the UK HealthCare enterprise including the Markey Cancer Center, the Kentucky Children's Hospital and Department of Pediatrics and at Eastern State Hospital. Art expression, under the direction of a trained therapist, can help relieve stress and reduce pain for those going through difficult situations. These highly skilled and trained professionals are dedicated to using their arts to improve physical, mental and emotional health. Benze says of the program, "We are arts, we are science and we are healing."

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

UK HealthCare Hosting Transplant Games Flag this Thursday

Sun, 03/13/2016 - 17:44

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) – The Transplant Games of America's National Flag Tour will stop at UK HealthCare this Thursday, March 17, to celebrate organ donors and recipients on its way to the 2016 Games in Cleveland this June.

 

The Transplant Games of America (TGA) is an Olympics-style sport festival held every two years to show how transplants can transform lives. To compete, participants must be either transplant recipients, living donors, or a member of a donor family.

 

Prior to the TGA, the official flags of the event travel across the country to help raise awareness of organ donation and of the event itself. The flags are also signed by the members of each state's TGA team. Members of Team Kentucky will be present to sign the flag this Thursday.

 

Karen Michul, a UK HealthCare employee and living kidney donor, will be participating in the Games for the second time this year, competing in several bowling events.

 

"Seeing the comraderie of the donor families and recipients at the Games is amazing," Michul said. "And some of these people are meeting for the first time! It's an emotional ride."

 

The flag will be on display and available for Team Kentucky to sign this Thursday at 10 a.m. inside the atrium of University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Hospital Pavilion A. Attendees are encouraged to wear blue and green, the colors of the Donate Life organization. Following the flag-signing and a few short remarks, attendees are encouraged to stay for a short photo session to celebrate the gift of life.

 

Registering to become a donor is the most effective way to ensure you can save lives through donation and serves as a sign of hope to those who continue to wait. Everyone can register as a donor today at www.donatelifeky.org or by saying “YES” when you renew your driver’s license.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Center Announces Grant Recipients

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 18:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — Several U.S. communities will enhance local efforts to address child poverty and hunger with the help of funding from the Rural Child Poverty Nutrition Center at the University of Kentucky.

 

Located in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s School of Human Environmental Sciences, the center uses cutting-edge solutions in child nutrition to reduce food insecurity for children in the some of the nation’s most persistently poor rural counties. It is a partnership between the university and the U.S Department of Agriculture and is led by Ann Vail, the school’s director.

 

About 85 percent of all persistently poor counties in the United States are in rural areas and children are one of the most vulnerable groups.

 

The center awarded 17 grants last week, ranging from more than $50,000 to almost $100,000, to implement creative strategies for improving collaboration among the USDA’s Child Nutrition Programs and other nutrition assistance programs. State and local governments and nonprofit organizations in 324 counties were eligible to apply for the grants.

 

Grant recipients and their targeted counties are:

 

·         Auburn University- Alabama Cooperative Extension System in Marengo, Alabama

·         West Alabama Area Health Education Center in Sumter, Alabama

·         The Family Center Food Bank of the Delta in Phillips, Arkansas

·         East Arkansas Enterprise Community in St. Francis, Arkansas

·         Crisp County Community Council in Crisp, Georgia

·         Clinton County Community Foundation in Clinton, Kentucky

·         Fulton County Schools in Fulton, Kentucky

·         PreK-12 and Beyond in Madison, Louisiana

·         Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity Inc. in Sharkey, Issaquena, Humphreys and Yazoo, Mississippi

·         Whiteville City Schools in Columbus, North Carolina

·         Action Pathways (Second Harvest Food Bank of Southeast North Carolina) in Robeson, North Carolina

·         The Chickasaw Nation in Johnson, Oklahoma

·         Center for Community and Economic Development Inc. in Allendale, Colleton, Jasper, Bamberg, Orangeburg and Hampton, South Carolina

·         Summit School District No. 54-6 in Roberts, South Dakota

·         The University of Tennessee in Johnson, Tennessee

·         The University of Tennessee in Lake, Tennessee

·         Texas Hunger Initiative; Baylor University in Starr, Cameron and Hildago, Texas

 

Additional partners in the center include the UK Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky, the UK Center for Business and Economic Research, the Altarum Institute and the Southern Rural Development Center.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774

 

UK Director, Professor Receives McClure Excellence in Education Award

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 17:10

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 15, 2016) — Jeff Huber, University of Kentucky School of Information Science director and professor, was selected by the Medical Library Association (MLA) to receive the 2016 Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award for his contributions to the field of health sciences librarianship.

 

The award was established in 1998 and honors professionals “who demonstrate skills in one or more of the following areas: teaching, curriculum development, mentoring, research or leadership in education at local, regional or national levels.”

 

“We are honored to be awarding the Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award to Dr. Jeffrey Huber, director and professor at the University of Kentucky School of Information Science. The award is given to outstanding library educators in the field of health sciences librarianship and informatics,” said MLA President Michelle Kraft.

 

“The many letters of support from former students exemplify Dr. Huber’s dedication and focus to developing the next generation of health sciences librarians. His commitment to the profession is reflected through his service to MLA as an editor for JMLA, member of MLA juries including the Janet Doe and Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, and his many publications. It is a privilege to honor Dr. Huber’s devotion to his students as well as to the profession with this award.”

 

Huber joined the School of Information Science in 2008 as an already established leader in the health information profession. By 2013, the school held a top 5 ranking in health librarianship according to U.S. News & World Report. Huber has done extensive research about information access for public health professionals and health care consumers, community health informatics, health literacy, and HIV/AIDS information and communication.

 

Dan O’Hair, dean of the College of Communication and Information, said, “It is a distinct honor for Dr. Huber to be named as this year’s recipient of the prestigious Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education award by the MLA. The college is very proud of Dr. Huber’s many accomplishments and knows that this award is well deserved.”

 

This year marks Huber’s 15th year serving as a member on the editorial board for the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), a peer-reviewed quarterly journal authored by field professionals to advance the practice and research of health sciences librarianship. His most recent contribution to the journal, “Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians” (2014), outlines the adaptation and evolution of the health sciences librarian role and responsibilities as health disparities in the United States increase. Huber co-authored the article with mentee, MLA colleague and award nominator, Robert Shapiro.

 

“Dr. Huber continues to inspire countless students, at UK and across the country, to use the knowledge developed in library and information science programs to impact the health of individuals and communities. I can think of no greater achievement in our field,” Shapiro said.

 

Huber will be recognized at the MLA Presidents’ Awards Dinner scheduled for May 17, at Mosaic ‘16 in Toronto, Canada.

 

“Today, the effective delivery of health care requires an informed citizenry at multiple levels and I have strived to contribute to that effort,” Huber said. “I am honored to be named the 2016 recipient of MLA’s Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award.”

 

Huber received his Master of Science in Library Science from the UK School of Library and Information Science in 1987 and his doctoral degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1991. He joined MLA in 1990 and became an active committee member in 2001.

 

The MLA believes that quality information is essential for improved health. MLA aspires to be the association of the most visible, valued and trusted health information experts. To that end, MLA fosters excellence in the professional practice and leadership of health sciences library and information professionals in order to enhance the quality of health care, education and research throughout the world.

 

The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a Master's of Science in Library Science, School Media Certification, Master's of Science in Information Communication Technology, bachelor's degrees in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

FCPS Superintendent to Hold Listening Sessions on UK Campus

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 16:26

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — Fayette County Public Schools Superintendent, Emmanuel “Manny” Caulk, is seeking input on the future direction of the school district. In partnership with the University of Kentucky Office of Community Engagement, Caulk is hosting two listening sessions this month for any and all UK employees with an opinion about the current state of the Fayette County Public Schools.

 

The superintendent’s “Listening, Learning and Leading” entry plan has included quantitative and qualitative data collection through school and program visits, one-on-one meetings, surveys, and an organizational and structural review of the district across 10 domains. External agencies also conducted curriculum and program audits in career and technical education, and the services provided for students with special needs, students identified as gifted and talented, and students learning English as a second language.

 

Caulk is holding feedback sessions for community members from across Fayette County to inform his recommendations for making sure that every student achieves his or her unlimited potential. Two listening sessions are being held specifically for UK employees:

  • 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 16, in the Lexmark Room, 209 Main Building
  • 1 p.m. Thursday, March 24, in the Lexmark Room, 209 Main Building

Please RSVP by email to rodney.creager@uky.edu or by phone at 859-257-7144 no later than March 15. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

UK Debate Team Heads to National Finals With a Top 16 Ranking

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 15:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The similarities between coaching a nationally ranked basketball team and coaching a nationally ranked debate team are undeniable.

 

First, there is recruitment — spring and summer weeks on the road that slip into months without notice, traveling from one talented high school student’s living room to the next, exhorting the opportunities of their institution.

 

Then, there is the agonizing choice between one gifted youngster and another, all the time recognizing that there are dozens of coaches out there anxious to steal your rising star. At some point in this time frame, both the athletic and the academic coaches judiciously distribute the available scholarships.

 

Teams are finally assembled and months of practice begin — one team in the gym, one team in the library, but both making freshman mistakes, learning to trust their team and their coach, finding a way to win, and celebrating together when it all finally gels.

 

Then, the coaches and teams face competition season’s mind-numbing months on the road … together, because that’s the only way to survive the ordeal. They travel from one competition to the next, practice constantly, and sacrifice. Through it all, they are still university students, with classes to attend, exams to take, and family to visit.  

 

At the end of the regular season, if these students and coaches have learned enough and sacrificed enough, they are rewarded with the final challenge, post-season tournaments and a shot at championship glory.

 

For the first time since 1994, the University of Kentucky has a nationally ranked (top 16) debate team on its way to the national finals in a few weeks with two first-round “byes” in its pocket, and UK Debate Coach David Arnett could not be more proud. After all, as in a basketball tournament, a debate tournament bye is earned by a consistently excellent performance throughout the season.

 

“Each member of my team spends an average of 40 hours each and every week, from July through April, actively practicing and competing,” Arnett said. “Most of that time is spent in library research, which is comparable to an athletic team’s intense gym practice. That doesn’t include the time they devote to their classes.

 

“It’s a long, grueling, unforgiving experience, but not without its rewards, especially when it takes you to the finals,” Arnett said.

 

An average of 50 to 60 universities and colleges will be represented at the National Invitational Debate Tournament, held this year in Binghamton, New York. UK will compete with three two-person competition teams; two of UK’s teams won first-round byes. Only two other schools, the University of California, Berkeley, and Emory University, are represented by two teams with two first-round byes. Only six schools qualified three teams to the National Debate Tournament. 

 

UK’s 10-person tournament debate team includes senior Donald Grasse, senior Jonathan Geldof, junior Ava Vargason, sophomore Theo Noparstak, senior Marcel Roman, sophomore Holmes Hampton, junior Amar Adam, freshman Calen Martin, freshman Jacinda Rivas and freshman Cameron Baller.

 

Grasse, Geldof, Vargason and Noparstak received the first-round byes. Roman has qualified for the National Debate Tournament four times, while Hampton has qualified twice.

 

The debate team is housed in the UK College of Communication and Information, but the debate students’ majors are all across the board. Some are fairly predictable, like political science or pre-law, others not so much. Varguson, is a junior majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in gender studies, Arnett’s first in 20 years of coaching, and “she’s killing it,” Arnett said. “Ava is the first female with a first round tournament bye since 1986.”

 

The team’s cumulative grade-point average is an enviable 3.8.

 

Debating is more than just public speaking, although the same confidence is required, said Arnett. The team must research both the pros and the cons of an issue, because each competitor must be able to attack and defend either point of view with cold hard facts. They must be physically prepared as well; a typical tournament lasts for three 12-hour days.

 

The nation’s university-affiliated debate teams all receive a very broad topic in July that will be the topic of the national debate in April, nearly a year later. The questions are deliberately vague and complicated, like “Should America reduce its armed forces worldwide?”

 

“And no one knows if they will be defending the pro or the con point of view. So the students have to keep up with current events at the micro level. They have to predict what the opposition will bring up. It makes for a long, arduous experience,” Arnett said.

 

“But I believe with this team, we can take it all the way."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK, Coalition Create Guidelines to Help Students Obtain Violence Protective Orders

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 15:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The College of Arts and Sciences' Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women (OPSVAW) at the University of Kentucky and the Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence (KCADV) Monday jointly released guidelines for how schools and universities can effectively ensure that students can access interpersonal protective orders (IPOs). 

 

IPOs were created through HB 8 of the 2015 General Assembly, which became effective Jan. 1, 2016. They extend civil protections to victims of dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.

 

”The passage of 2015 HB 8 was an extraordinary accomplishment; it means little, however, if our students don’t know that civil protective orders are now available to them. The true effectiveness of our legislative effort, then, is wholly dependent upon what we can teach our students and what we can guide our educational institutions to do. That is the ultimate purpose for these new guidelines,” said Carol E. Jordan, executive director of the OPSVAW.

 

“This is an opportunity to finally protect some of our most vulnerable citizens. Students living in campus housing or attending classes will now be able to go about their daily lives without being in constant fear,” said Sharon Currens, KCADV executive director. 

 

Access to civil protective orders for high school and college students is a critical part of Kentucky’s response to dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. National studies have suggested that one in five women may be sexually assaulted while in college, and that women within the typical age bracket of college students experience the largest per capita rate of nonfatal intimate partner violence and the highest rate of stalking.

 

Finally, the U.S. National Crime Victimization Survey reported that women aged 16 to 19 are four times more likely than the general population to report rape or attempted rape.

 

“These data represent a clarion call for ensuring that high school and college students have access to IPOs,” Carol Jordan said. “Each statistic comes with a name and a face — a person who we need to protect.”

 

“The availability of protective orders for students will present schools across the Commonwealth with the opportunity to do just that. Instead of dating violence going undetected and unaddressed, IPOs will give school administrators and staff a powerful and effective tool to deal with these potentially dangerous situations. A court order will clarify which protective measures the court deems appropriate and thus will give a school the framework upon which to craft a plan which creates a safe learning environment for students and staff,” said Mary Savage, KCADV’s legal counsel.

 

The partnership between the OPSVAW and the KCADV has produced two resource documents for schools: one designed for post-secondary institutions (colleges, universities and community/technical colleges) and the second tailored to secondary institutions (K-12).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Spring Break Parking and Transit Changes

Fri, 03/11/2016 - 09:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — During Spring Break, demand for student parking and transportation is greatly reduced. As a result, Parking and Transportation Services reduces campus bus service and eases restrictions on most student parking lots.

 

Most student lots will require any valid permit, which may include employee permits, with the following exceptions that will remain on control for the specific permit for the lot: R6, R8, R16, R17, and R18. All Employee (E) lots will remain on control as normal. All lots will resume normal control on Monday, March 21.

 

The Purple Route (UK HealthCare Shuttle), the Pink Route (Kentucky Clinic Shuttle) and the MoveWell Shuttle will continue to run their normal schedule. One campus bus will operate on the Break Route from 7 a.m.to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. All other campus bus service, including the Lextran Blue and White Routes (Route 14), will cease during Spring Break.

 

The On-Demand Night Service will run on Sunday, March 20, with service beginning at 7 p.m. All other campus bus service will return to normal operations on Monday, March 21.

 

For more information, visit www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_break-parking_spring-break.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Student, UK Nursing Researcher Help Launch Citywide Substance Abuse Resource

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 16:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016) — When an individual with a substance abuse disorder reaches out for help, the opportunity for intervention is transient.

 

“That moment when somebody is willing to go to treatment is actually a very fleeting moment in time,” said Alex Elswick, a University of Kentucky graduate student who is in long-term recovery from heroin addiction. 

 

Elswick, who advocates for the local nonprofit Voices of Hope-Lexington, understands the importance of simplifying access to substance abuse treatment. At many low points in his struggle with pain relievers and heroin, Elswick contacted his family members seeking treatment, but changed his mind when he considered the reality of a grueling recovery process.

 

In a collaborative effort to connect individuals with drug treatment resources, Elswick and Amanada Fallin, an assistant professor in the UK College of Nursing and vice president for Voices of Hope-Lexington, joined a coalition of community members and city government officials to develop an online treatment database, GetHelpLex.org. The coalition leveraged an existing database at UK to build an online database of treatment resources and facilities around Central Kentucky. The user-friendly website was created in October 2015 to facilitate a customizable search for treatment resources based on a variety of features, including insurance coverage, gender, and preferences for inpatient or outpatient services.

 

“The value of this locator is that it’s simple, it’s straightforward, and it gives you legitimate options,” Elswick said.

 

According to Fallin, a lack of community awareness further complicates the process of connecting people to treatment resources. Google searches conducted by frantic family members during the critical moment when their loved one reaches out for help can turn up facilities that no longer exist, have long waiting lists or are not in close proximity.

 

“GetHelpLex.org is an example of a successful, cross-sector collaboration to put the university’s existing data into the hands of patients and their families in a usable format,” Fallin said.

 

GetHelpLex was created with support from the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention Program (SAVI), Voices of Hope-Lexington, OpenLexington, LexLadiesCode and Code for Boston. David Maynard, an addiction specialist in the UK HealthCare trauma department, contributed data for the database.

 

Elswick hopes GetHelpLex.org will connect more people dealing with substance use disorders with resources. He knows the devastation of addiction first-hand. In a matter of nine months, Elswick’s addiction took him from studying to take the LSAT in his Centre College dorm to homelessness.

 

Elswick experienced a number of cycles of recovery followed by relapse before graduating from Centre College and pursuing his master’s degree in counseling at UK. Elswick now shares his story and promotes recovery resources to give hope to others who want to break the chains of addiction.

 

“One of the things I learned in recovery is you can only keep what you have by giving it away,” Elswick said.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Dining Adjusts Operating Hours During Spring Break

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016)  Spring Break begins today, Friday, March 11. Although many students will be leaving Lexington for the week, some are sticking around campus.

 

To accommodate students, faculty and staff who will be on campus throughout the break, UK Dining has adjusted hours of operation at all campus dining locations. The image below reflects the adjusted hours.

 

For more information and to view the altered hours, visit https://uky.campusdish.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK's Rick Honaker Awarded $1 Million for Rare Earth Elements Recovery

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 14:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 14, 2016) — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory has awarded nearly $1 million to Rick Honaker, professor and chair of the University of Kentucky Department of Mining Engineering, to develop a mobile pilot-plant facility for the recovery of rare earth elements from coal.

 

Honaker and his team, which includes collaborators at Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, will develop and test a mobile processing facility that can efficiently recover the rare earth elements present in coal and coal byproducts in an environmentally friendly manner.

 

"Previous research conducted by UK scientists and others have found that the critical materials needed for renewable energy technologies, such as cell phones and other electronics, are found in coal and coal byproducts at concentrations that may be economical to recover," Honaker said.

 

Rare earth elements, or REEs, are a series of chemical elements found in the Earth’s crust. Due to their unique chemical properties, REEs have become essential components of many technologies spanning a range of applications including electronics, computer and communication systems, transportation, health care and national defense. The demand, cost and availability of REEs has grown significantly over recent years stimulating an emphasis on economically feasible approaches for REE recovery.

 

The U.S. has 10.9 million tons of rare earth resources in coal deposits located in just five western and four eastern states, including Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia, according to the U.S. Geological Survey Coal Quality Database.

 

"If advanced separation technologies become available, the resource base will increase substantially," Honaker said.

 

With those technologies, the coal industry could potentially produce approximately 40,000 tons of REEs annually, which is more than twice the amount consumed in the U.S.

 

As Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers (KY-05) supported funding for REE recovery projects in the federal budget for fiscal year 2016.

 

“Our coal-producing states are working diligently to recover from the devastating loss of coal mining jobs in today’s economy. In fact, Kentucky alone has suffered the loss of nearly 11,000 coal mining jobs since 2009. Experimental projects, like UK’s mobile REE recovery plant, could save and create new coal-related jobs and opportunities in eastern Kentucky,” said Congressman Rogers. “I applaud Professor Honaker and the vision of UK’s leaders to find new applications for coal and coal byproducts for the development of everyday technologies, such as smart phones, computers and rechargeable batteries. This effort to find more uses for our country’s most plentiful resource could put many people back to work in the coalfields.”

 

Honaker's project is one of only 10 projects awarded and is the only one that is focused on physical concentration methods as a means for recovering REE directly from the coal sources rather than from a coal combustion byproduct.

 

The DOE is funding $999,797, while $320,212 will come from other project partners. Total funding for the mobile facility design is $1,320,009 in Phase I. The team will also work with industrial participants, which include Arch Coal, Blackhawk Mining, Bowie Refining, Eriez Manufacturing and Minerals Refining Company. If Phase I is successful, Phase II ($6 million) will involve construction and testing of the mobile facility.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Chef Russell Moves From Boone Center to The Club at Spindletop

Thu, 03/10/2016 - 13:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2016)The Club at the University of Kentucky's Spindletop Hall has named Chef Seth Russell the new culinary director. Russell has served as the executive chef at the Hilary J. Boone Center for the past five years. 

 

He spent his formative years in Lexington and Versailles and steadily worked his way into higher profile establishments such as Amelia’s Field, Roy and Nadine’s, and Dudley’s. He later traveled to France for a year apprenticeship in a Michelin-starred inn in the Burgundy region of France and ultimately graduated near the top of his class from the French Culinary Institute in New York City.

 

Russell returned to Lexington to begin work at Idle Hour Country Club as a pastry chef and assistant chef. In 2008, he joined the Boone Center team and was named as executive chef in early 2010.

 

"It has been a great pleasure working with Chef Russell as he has developed a culinary team that consistently delivers high quality, handcrafted food to the members and guests of the Boone Center," said Gerald Marvel, general manager of Spindletop and the Boone Center. "I’m elated to have him bring the same talents to bear for the dining pleasure of the members of The Club at UK’s Spindletop Hall. His food is really fabulous!"

 

Drawing inspiration from around the world, Russell sources the freshest local ingredients to put a twist on traditional Kentucky cuisine.

 

"I am excited to bring my culinary expertise and love for great food to our members of The Club," Russell said. 

 

The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall is running a spring promotion that allows 50 percent off membership initiation fees for UK faculty and staff through April 30. For more information, visit the employee discount site at http://spindletophall.clubsoftlinks.com/upload/O8hynfc-l9Mst.pdf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

 

 

 

The Club at Spindletop Hall Offers Special Promotional Rate

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 18:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016)The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall is kicking off its annual spring promotion, offering 50 percent off membership initiation rates for faculty and staff of the University of Kentucky though April 30. In addition to a lower initiation rate, the monthly dues can be payroll deducted.

 

Club amenities include:

· Year-round programming such as family activities, Book Club, Wine Club, Bourbon Club, Gardening Club, and more

· Various membership levels for families, couples, single parents, individuals and seniors

· Chipping and putting greens; swimming pools; tennis courts; volleyball courts; picnic areas; exclusive access to Lexington's Legacy Trail; outdoor event space; and access to Spindletop Hall Mansion

· World-class dining at Roxie's, the upscale casual member dining room; dining on the Veranda in spring, summer and fall; and the Tiki Bar and Grill during the summer

 

The Club also announces Chef Seth Russell as the new culinary director. He has served as the executive chef of the Hilary J. Boone Center for the past five years.

 

Status as faculty, staff or member of the UK Alumni Association is a requirement for membership with The Club at UK's Spindletop Hall, but alumni status is not required to join the Alumni Association as an associate member.

 

For more information, visit the employee discount site at http://spindletophall.clubsoftlinks.com/upload/O8hynfc-l9Mst.pdf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

Conference to Highlight Changes in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Fields

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 16:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Medicine Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery and the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute will host an accredited event to bring health care providers up to date on care practices dealing with neurology and neurosurgery.

 

On April 29, health care providers who treat patients with neurological issues from primary care physicians to occupational and physical therapists are invited to join the Practical Update in Neurology and Neursurgery — several forums discussing new evidence-based practices in neurology. Presentations will cover advances in medical management for headache, memory complaints, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and acute ischemic stroke.

 

The event is free, but participants must register through CE Central before April 11 to reserve a spot. Onsite registration and breakfast will start the day at 8 a.m. in the Pavilion A auditorium of the U.K. Albert B. Chandler Hospital with the welcome and introduction beginning at 9:30 a.m. The event ends at 4 p.m. Participants attending this event will receive free validated parking in the hospital parking garage at the corner of South Limestone and Leader Avenue

 

To register visit http://www.cecentral.com/live/11652

 

For questions regarding this event please call 859-218-5074 or email ukneuroeducation@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

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