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Providing Dental Care in Appalachia, Reducing Student Loan Debt

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 17:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2016) — By supporting a region that desperately needs dental providers, two University of Kentucky College of Dentistry students will have their student loan debt significantly reduced. Drs. Candace Flora and Adam Tackett were each awarded $100,000 through the Appalachian Dental Loan Forgiveness Program.

 

Started in 2015 through the bipartisan efforts of then Governor Steve Beshear, a Democrat, and United States Representative Hal Rogers, a Republican, this program works to encourage dental providers to practice in Appalachia Kentucky. The dental schools at the Universities of Kentucky and Louisville administer the program.

 

After completing UK's dental program, Flora will practice pedicatric dentistry and Tackett will begin his work as an orthodontist.

 

Flora, a native of Whitley County, chose to participate in the program to help the people of a community where she has ties. She welcomes the opportunity to share her skills and knowledge with the people of Eastern Kentucky.

 

"I want to help take care of the children of Appalachia and help educate parents on how to better their oral health," Flora said. "It has been a goal and dream of mine to return back to the area that I grew up and give to the community."

 

Tackett, who is originally from Floyd County, is also looking forward to the work he can do in Appalachia and what the award will mean for his family and career.

 

"I’m excited to return there with my family because the people of these small town communities are so genuinely nice and caring," Tackett said. "I hope to reciprocate those feelings through my orthodontic practice and community service there."

 

According to the Kentucky Oral Health Coalition's 2015 Overview, Kentucky has the fifth highest rate of toothlessness among residents 65 and over. Additionally, a 2007 survey revealed one in three children experienced one or more oral health problems. The Appalachian Dental Loan Forgiveness Program is part of the Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) initiative whose goal is to "expand job creation, enhance regional opportunity, innovation, and identity, improve the quality of life, and support all those working to achieve these goals in Appalachian Kentucky."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, 859-257-1076

 

 

BLOG From Terry Allen: We Are UK and We Are Orlando

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 16:32

In the aftermath of this weekend’s horror in Orlando, the call went out across a grief-stricken community, asking for volunteers to donate blood to aid the wounded and critically injured.

 

By early Sunday morning, the line around the Orlando blood bank reportedly stretched for more than a mile. People — most of whom didn’t know a victim — waited in the baking Florida sun for more than six hours.

 

They wanted to help. And in so doing, they painted a powerful picture, a compelling symbol, of what it means to be a member of a community.

 

We are all different — different colors, different perspectives, religions, identities, genders and ethnicities.

 

But we are members of a community. The people of Orlando understand that.

 

At the University of Kentucky, our community, too, is heartbroken and filled with deep sadness over the tragic events in Orlando.

 

We are the University for Kentucky. But, in a powerful way, we are Orlando, too. And we want to join in humanity’s chorus that is unified behind the idea that our differences and our diversity are what collectively make us and our community stronger.

 

To show our support and honor those who lost their lives in this tragedy, as well as those who will be impacted long after the physical injuries have been tended, the following buildings will be illuminated in various colors during the next few days.

 

The colors represent the rainbow that stands for many as a symbol of the LGBTQ* community:

  • Memorial Hall 
  • Lyman T. Johnson Hall – Red
  • Central II – Purple
  • Haggin Hall and K-Lair – Green
  • The 90 – Orange   

A memorial gathering entitled "We are UK. We are Orlando" also will take place from noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 15, in the VIP (Violence Intervention and Prevention) Center. The entire campus community is welcome to join for reflection, conversation and food.

 

As a university campus, as a home for discourse and debate, dialogue and discussion, one of the best ways we know to deal with the horror of what happened is to join together in the search for meaning and for how best we can move forward together.

 

Wednesday’s memorial — and the symbolic lighting of our signature campus building (Memorial Hall) and our residence halls — represent a step forward. Many more must follow.

 

To that end, we also know that members of the LGBTQ* community at UK may be filled with a sense of anxiety and pain in the aftermath of Orlando. We all are.

 

Your UK community is here for you.

 

The VIP Center has support services available for those who are feeling the impact of this tragedy. Over the coming days, we will continue to share support, information and resources. We continue to be in solidarity with the LGBTQ* community, the Latino community, and the Muslim community, as well as others around the globe, who are committed to ending violence and hate.

 

Below are some resources at UK, and elsewhere, that may be helpful during this time:

If you need immediate health and safety related support, contact the UK Counseling Center at 859-257-8701 or the UK Police Department at #UKPD.

 

On the night that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. died, Robert F. Kennedy stood on the top of a flatbed truck in Indianapolis, and told the gathering throng, for the first time, what happened.

 

Quoting the Greek poet, Aeschylus, Kennedy told those gathered that, “even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.”

 

Kennedy went on to say that “what we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country …”

 

Let us resolve, some 50 years later, to continue on the journey toward justice for everyone, in every community. At UK, let us resolve to be a beacon of light and hope for those who would join us on that path.

 

#WeAreUK and #WeAreOrlando.

 

 

Terry Allen

Interim Vice President for Institutional Diversity

UK College of Public Health Faculty Selected for National Executive Leadership Program

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 16:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016)University of Kentucky College of Public Health professors Kathryn Cardarelli and Nancy Schoenberg recently joined the 2016-2017 class of fellows for the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program at Drexel University College of Medicine.

 

Cardarelli and Schoenberg were among 54 women chosen for participation in the

22nd class for ELAM, the only program in North America dedicated to preparing women for senior leadership roles in academic health science institutions. ELAM Fellows enhance institutional leadership diversity while contributing to organizational strategy and innovation. The one-year, part-time program combines three week-long in-residence sessions with distance learning, designed to take the leadership lessons gained from the classroom to practice in the fellows’ institutions.

 

Cardarelli serves as associate dean of academic and student affairs and an associate professor of health behavior in the College of Public Health. Schoenberg is the associate dean for research in the College of Public Health and the Marion Pearsall Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science in the UK College of Medicine.

 

Upon completion of the one-year Fellowship in April 2017, the 54 members of this class will join a community of more than 1,000 alumnae, who are all accomplished women serving in a variety of leadership positions around the world, including as department chairs, research center directors, deans and college presidents, as well as chief executives in health care and accrediting organizations.

 

ELAM is a core program of the Institute for Women’s Health and Leadership at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Institute continues the legacy of advancing women in medicine that began in 1850 with the founding of the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, the nation’s first women’s medical school and a predecessor of today’s Drexel University College of Medicine. For more information on the ELAM program curriculum, faculty and participants, visit www.drexelmed.edu/elam.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

 

Behind the Blue: UK's Suzanne Smith Talks Drones

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 15:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016)  The drone revolution continues to impact numerous industries — photography, real estate and public safety are just a few. But drones are also presenting unprecedented opportunities for research in numerous other fields like agriculture, atmospheric science, biology, engineering and more.

 

University of Kentucky faculty and students have been at the forefront of using unmanned aerial vehicles for research and recently received a blanket certificate of authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct research with drones across the nation.

 

At the same time, safety remains a top priority and a new UK drone policy will ensure compliance and well-being of all campus community members.

 

In this week’s edition of the “Behind the Blue” podcast, UK College of Engineering's Suzanne Smith, director of the UK Unmanned Systems Research Consortium, discusses UK's research efforts using drones, the impact of the drone industry on Kentucky and the future of drones.

 

You can download this edition and others of "Behind the Blue" at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/behind-the-blue/id1114911777?mt=2#episodeGuid=8da5caa459bdb1dd190505ea1549257c, or search "Behind the Blue" in your Podcasts app. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Cavanaugh Awarded Cambridge Fellowship; Mingst Named Interim Director of Patterson School

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 15:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016) — Carey Cavanaugh, director of the University of Kentucky Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, has been awarded a fellowship at Cambridge University’s Clare College. Established in 1326, Clare College is the second oldest of Cambridge’s community of 31 independent colleges.

 

Cavanaugh has also been selected to be an executive-in-residence and fellow at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP) beginning July 1. The Swiss government established GCSP in 1995 to promote the building and maintenance of peace, security and stability. GCSP has become one of Europe’s leading academic and research centers, providing executive education and practical training to foreign policy and military professionals from around the world.

 

After 10 years of service as Patterson School’s director, Cavanaugh will spend this fall semester on sabbatical, writing and conducting research on international conflict resolution.

 

At Cambridge, he will be analyzing the inherent contradiction between two fundamental competing principles: acknowledging people's right to self-determination, but also backing support for maintaining the territorial integrity of states. He will also be probing the political challenge of how to prepare publics to support compromise solutions that have been negotiated in secret and are not yet fully known.

 

In Switzerland, Cavanaugh’s focus will be more policy-oriented, exploring diplomatic options to address the renewed fighting in the South Caucasus. Violence between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh flared up in April, with the greatest loss of life since a ceasefire was brokered between the two nations in 1994. Cavanaugh will also work with the Austrian Study Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution. Vienna hosts the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe which continues to play a key mediation role in peace efforts in the Caucasus.

 

Retired UK political science professor Karen Mingst will return to UK on July 1 to serve in an administrative capacity as interim Patterson School director through December.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

US Army Research Office Awards Grant to UK Physicist for New 2D Material

Mon, 06/13/2016 - 08:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 14, 2016) — University of Kentucky Professor Madhu Menon, of the Center for Computational Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, has been awarded a $50,000 Short Term Innovative Research (STIR) grant from the U.S. Army Research Office.

 

The grant will fund Menon's work to synthesize the new 2D material he predicted using theoretical simulations. In February, he predicted that a new one atom-thick flat material — made up of silicon, boron and nitrogen — could upstage the wonder material graphene and advance digital technology.

 

Menon will collaborate with an experimental group at the University of Louisville, led by Professor Mahendra Sunkara.

 

The Materials Science Division of the U.S. Army Research Office seeks to realize unprecedented materials properties by embracing innovative, long-term, high-risk, high-payoff basic research opportunities for the U.S. Army with special emphasis on four programs: Materials by Design, Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Physical Properties of Materials, and Synthesis and Processing.

 

To learn more about Menon's work, visit http://uknow.uky.edu/content/university-kentucky-physicist-discovers-new-2d-material-could-upstage-graphene

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Peers Say Olson Displays Lifetime Achievements

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 16:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — Robert Olson’s “The Kurdish Nationalist Movement in the 1990s: Its Impact on Turkey and the Middle East” (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) was reissued recently by Mazda Publishers.  

 

A University of Kentucky distinguished emeritus professor of history, Olson wrote a new five-page introduction about the current status of the Kurdish question in Middle East politics for the new volume. He also published “Turkish Air Force’s Role in the Development of Turkish and Kurdish Nationalism” (Kürt Tarih) in March 2016.

 

Olson gave the plenary talk “Fifth Years with the Kurds” at the Kurdish Studies Association meeting in Denver in November 2015. For his career-spanning interest in the peoples of the Middle East, Olson was awarded a “Lifetime Achievement Award in Recognition of Exceptional Contribution to the Field of Kurdish Studies.”

 

Olson and his colleague, Michael Gunter of Tennessee Technical University, are the principal co-founders of Kurdish studies in the United States, said Olson.  The two professors authored 22 books, 10 edited books, 275 scholarly articles and 390 book reviews. Of these, Olson authored 10 books, edited four, published 106 scholarly articles, 60 essays and 240 book reviews.

 

Until the publication was shut down by the Turkish government in March 2016, Olson was an op-ed writer for Today’s Zaman, an English-language newspaper published in Istanbul, Turkey, and widely read in Europe and throughout the Middle East. He also writes for LobLog, which is edited by Jim Lobe and John Feffer and deals with critical issues concerning U.S. foreign policy.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

UK Receives $4.6 Million in Funding as Part of National Quality Health Initiative

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 16:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — The University of Kentucky is partnering with the Indiana University School of Medicine in a $46 million grant-funded initiative with the aim of improving healthcare while lowering costs. UK will receive $4.6 million in funding to lead the Kentucky arm of a four-state quality improvement effort funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

 

The Great Lakes Practice Transformation Network (GLPTN) trains and deploys "quality improvement advisors" to transform the way over 10 million patients are cared for by more than 15,500 medical professionals throughout Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Kentucky.

 

The network is a collaboration among nearly three dozen university and state-connected partners designed to reduce unnecessary visits and testing, while potentially saving $1 billion.

This network will provide technical assistance to equip approximately 1,875 Kentucky clinicians with tools, information, and network support needed to improve quality of care, increase patients’ access to information, and spend healthcare dollars more wisely.

 

“Changes in reimbursement by Medicare and Medicaid are affecting frontline physicians, administrators and health care leaders in new ways,” said Dr. Malaz Boustani, principal investigator of GLPTN. “We are pleased to have the University of Kentucky on board to provide dedicated support to health care professionals across Kentucky to improve the quality and value of healthcare.”

 

As a member of the Great Lakes Practice Transformation Network, UK’s Kentucky Regional Extension Center and partners will support more than 15,500 clinicians to expand their quality improvement capacity, learn from one another, and achieve the common goals of improved care, better health, and reduced cost. The network will provide implementation science, process improvement and personalized population health management to help participating clinicians meet the initiative’s phases of transformation and associated milestones.

 

“This work showcases the leadership and innovation of our research and will support Kentucky’s health care providers to remain on the frontline of the changes ahead in health care," said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. "It will allow us to improve patient care and outcomes and improve overall health care value across this region.” 

 

This initiative is part of federal efforts to transition Medicare spending away from volume-driven payment to value-based, patient-centered health care services and payment. 

 

Media Contact: Kristi Lopez, kristi.lopez@uky.edu, 859-323-6363

UK HealthCare Athletes Ready to "Survive the Night" to Raise Cancer Awareness

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 15:18

 

 

Video by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) – In most work environments, teambuilding exercises usually don't require actual physical activity.

 

But for the UK HealthCare employees participating in this weekend's second Survive the Night Triathlon, bonding will form over 140.7 miles of swimming, biking and running through the night into the early morning. Developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center radiation oncologist Dr. Jonathan Feddock (an avid triathlete himself), the event is a relay that allows up to 10 people to take on different sections of the race, playing to their personal strengths.

 

Team Running on Vapor, comprising nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologists who work in the brachytherapy suite with Feddock, is taking a second go-round at the overnight triathlon after competing last year. Team members Robbie Campbell and John Fletcher competed last year and say they're looking forward to a repeat performance.

 

"We had a really good time last year," Campbell said. "We developed a lot of camaraderie as a department."

 

"We don't really see each other until lunch or a break," Fletcher added. "With this event, you got to see everyone in a completely different environment."

 

Pharmacy resident Beth Cady, captain of Team Sun Shall Shine, heard about the event through the Bluegrass Cycling Club. As a former high school teacher and coach, and an athlete herself, Cady decided to gather a team of pharmacy specialists from the UK Markey Cancer Center, UK Transplant Center, and other parts of UK HealthCare to enter the competition this year. Cady says her team has two main objectives going into the race.

 

"Our goals are to complete something none of us have ever done, and also to just be an inspiration to others," Cady said. "We're just looking to have fun and spread a positive message."

 

Team Sun Shall Shine's inspiration comes from someone very close to the UK pharmacy community: Shane Winstead, who served as a pharmacy specialist for UK HealthCare for more than 20 years and continues to mentor young pharmacists at the university. Diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer in January 2015, Shane's positivity in light of a dire situation has rallied everyone around her.

 

"Her personality, her positive attitude, and her zest for life have been very infectious," Cady said. "She's been a driving force in our department. We were looking for some way to honor her, but also to exemplify the life she's been living for the past two years."

 

Cady's group also has a special secret weapon. To further energize their team, Shane's daughter Madison -- an elite swimmer who will enter UK as a freshman this fall -- will swim a few laps at the beginning of the race. Due to her training for the Olympic trials, the swimming will be more symbolic than competitive, but it's one more way the team is honoring Shane and showing their strength as not just co-workers, but as family -- or "pharmily," as they affectionately call themselves.

 

"So Madison's going to swim a few laps followed by a few of us not-so-qualified swimmers," Cady said. "But we've got some triathletes on our team. We're not necessarily looking to win, but we feel like we're gonna do a darn good job out there."

 

Beginning this Friday at 7:30 p.m., teams Running on Vapor and Sun Shall Shine will take to the pool on UK's campus alongside 22 other teams to kick off the Survive the Night Triathlon.

 

While the teams trickle in to the finish line at Commonwealth Stadium on Saturday morning, the Lexington Cancer Foundation is also hosting its annual Roll for the Cure bike event at Commonwealth to raise awareness and funds for cancer care. Participants can choose the length of their ride: 95, 50, 35, or 10 miles through Kentucky horse farms, or a short Family Fun ride around the stadium. The longer rides will include rest stops at Buffalo Trace and Woodford Reserve.

 

All proceeds from both Survive the Night and Roll for the Cure will benefit the UK Markey Cancer Center, providing funding for patient care, research and more.

 

Knowing that this event was created by a Markey doctor and directly benefits the patients at the cancer center is another reason Campbell felt compelled to compete again this year.

 

"It's really motivating to see Dr. Feddock put himself out there for his patients," Campbell said. "It feels like we're all taking some ownership of the hospital."

 

"I'm sure everyone knows at least someone in their life who has been affected by cancer," Cady said. "So we wanted to raise awareness, potentially fundraise, and just do something good."

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

College of Health Sciences, Jockeys’ Guild Unveil Concussion Management Protocol Pilot Study

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 14:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) —The University of Kentucky and the Jockeys’ Guild today announced a three-year pilot study, supported by a broad cross-section of Thoroughbred organizations, that is designed to evolve into the first comprehensive concussion management protocol for jockeys.

 

Carl Mattacola, the director of the Graduate Athletic Training Program and a professor in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Kentucky, will oversee the study at all of Kentucky’s thoroughbred racetracks: Turfway Park, Keeneland Race Course, Churchill Downs, Ellis Park and Kentucky Downs. It is scheduled to begin this summer.

 

“We want to give the jockeys who suffer head injuries the best science has to offer, and an important first step towards that goal is to generate data from which an appropriate management protocol can be developed,” said Mattacola. “This project will leverage the full resources and knowledge base of UK’s Sports Medicine Research Institute (SMRI) and the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center (SCoBIRC) to help create the first national protocol for concussion management in jockeys.”

 

For the study, jockeys will undergo a Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT 3) test to develop a baseline score so that pre- and post-fall responses can be compared. The SCAT3 is an instrument used to assess sign/symptoms, physical, and cognitive function for concussion. A specialized health care provider trained in concussion assessment and sport injury will be available at each track to perform the assessments.

 

Mattacola said the jockeys will be required to have an active account with the Jockey Health Information System, which stores medical and injury information on riders and will serve as a database for the study.

 

By developing a comprehensive concussion management protocol for jockeys, racing is following the lead of other major sports such as the NFL, NBA, MLS, MLB, NCAA, and NASCAR and international horse racing authorities such as the British Horseracing Authority, the Irish Turf Club, and the FEI (international show jumping).

 

“The pilot study and resulting concussion management protocol will finally bridge the gap that exists between horse racing and other major sports to further protect our human athletes,” said Terry Meyocks, national manager of the Jockeys’ Guild. “We would like to thank all of the industry organizations that contributed to this important initiative.”

 

The list of supporting organizations incudes the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences, Churchill Downs, Keeneland, Turfway Park, Ellis Park, Kentucky Downs, KTA-KOTB, The Jockey Club, Breeders’ Cup, TOBA, NTRA and the National HBPA.

 

A licensed athletic trainer, Mattacola received his bachelor's degree in athletic training from Canisius College in Buffalo, New York and his Masters and PhD degrees in sports medicine from the University of Virginia. His research has focused on factors that relate to athletic injuries and rehabilitation.

 

Jockeys’ Guild Inc., the organization representing professional jockeys in Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing in the United States, was founded in May 1940 and has approximately 1,270 members, including active, retired and disabled jockeys. The purpose is to protect jockeys, strive to achieve a safer racing environment, to obtain improved insurance and other benefits for members, and to monitor developments in local, state and federal laws affecting the racing industry and, in particular, the jockeys. More information can be found at jockeysguild.com and facebook.com/jockeysguild.

 

The University of Kentucky was founded in 1865 and its College of Health Sciences (CHS) was founded in 1966. The SMRI was launched last year with a $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to support injury prevention and performance optimization in the U.S. Special Forces, with an aim to incorporate applicable strategies for athletes of all ages.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Kristi Lopez, (859) 323-6363

Two UK Students Awarded BIACS Scholarships

Fri, 06/10/2016 - 10:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — Two incoming University of Kentucky students received scholarships at the Bluegrass Indo-American Civic Society (BIACS) 29th Annual Awards Banquet last month for their impressive high school achievements.

 

BIACS is a nonprofit civic organization made up of Indo-American residents living across the Bluegrass state. For the past 28 years BIACS has awarded scholarships to over 200 graduating high school seniors. This year, UK students Alexis Nichole Morris and Jared Tate Greene are among the 17 total scholarship recipients.

 

Morris, a National Honor Society member for two years, recently graduated from Morgan County High School. Morris was not only an NHS member but president of EdRising for three years, secretary of Art Club for one year, and editor-in-chief of her high school yearbook.

 

Morris will start at UK this fall and plans to study biology. 

 

"I instantly fell in love with the campus,” Morris said about her first visit to UK. “I love Lexington and coming out here and going to Keeneland and everything. It’s the feel of this city and it feels like home. I realized this is where I wanted to be.”

 

Greene recently graduated from Prestonsburg High School. While earning his diploma, Greene was a member of the Academic Team and a captain for one year, the 2015 Governor's Scholars Program, and a starting football player for three years.

 

Greene will be attending UK in the fall and plans to go into the pharmaceutical industry.

 

"My grandfather graduated from the UK College of Pharmacy in 1963, so I’ve grown up around the pharmaceutical industry and it’s something that I love and something I’ve always wanted to go into," Greene said.

 

Both recipients received a trophy and $1000 as part of their scholarship.

 

In addition to the award recipients, the banquet on May 1 featured chief guest and award presenter Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, and keynote speaker Diane Snow, professor of neuroscience and director of the Honors Program and Undergraduate Research at UK. 

 

“As I addressed this group of students on the importance of tenacity for their future success, I was taken back to my own high school graduation," said Snow. "It was a time when everything seemed so  enormous and there was so much uncertainty. Because of this, I was so happy to have the opportunity to encourage, support, and celebrate these accomplished young people. The feedback I got was remarkable -  I know I was supposed to inspire them, but it was definitely a two-way street! I congratulate all of the students -- especially UK-bound students, Alexis and Jared -- and wish them well!"

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

Reaching Rural Veterans Extends Aid Through Food Banks

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 16:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2016) — Food banks in five Kentucky counties are conducting outreach programs and targeting services to veterans.

 

Anderson, Clay, Hardin, Madison, and Shelby counties are all home to food banks that received grant funds through Reaching Rural Veterans, the University of Kentucky and Purdue University program funded by the Veterans Affairs Administration and administered by the Military Family Research Institute at Purdue. The program aims to increase veterans' access to needed resources, including food and clothing.

 

UK’s involvement in this project is coordinated through the Family and Consumer Sciences Extension in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. Tyrone Atkinson, coordinator for Military Family Programs, provided leadership for the grant award process and continues to support the monthly programs conducted at the participating food pantries.

 

“In the early stages, I conducted training at these sites to insure that staff and volunteers were familiar with military culture and the unique issues facing veterans," Atkinson shared. "It’s been rewarding for me to watch as each of these food pantries held monthly events for veterans, providing food and other needed items and connecting veterans to service agencies in each local community.”

 

In addition to insuring the veterans are receiving food assistance, the program has provided monthly educational programs along with opportunities for consultation with local resource agencies. At the local level, agents and paraprofessionals from the county Extension offices have engaged in the project, providing nutrition education each month.

 

For the food banks, this grant project has provided a unique opportunity to meet the needs of a targeted audience and give back to those who have served our country. Cheri Montgomery, with Open Hands Food Pantry in Anderson County, said that "because of the work we’re doing as a community, we have helped many veterans and their families. I have seen veterans get connected to other community resources including the health department services, building a ramp for a disabled veteran, and supplying a washer and dryer to a family. The means are not always coming through our pantry, but because of the connectedness of the community we have been able to see needs being met."

 

Since the program was initiated in October, more than 2,500 veterans and their family members have been impacted. A grant proposal has been submitted to potentially continue the program for a second year.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200, carl.nathe@uky.edu

Cho Sisters Share Passion for Nursing

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 15:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2016) — Joanna and Mary Cho have more in common than just their parents — they’ve taken the nursing profession by storm, with one sister a December 2015 graduate of the UK College of Nursing and the other expected to enter the profession in December 2016.

 

“She’s my partner in the crime,” Mary Cho, the older of the two by one year, said. Mary now works as a nurse in pulmonary care at the UK Chandler Hospital.  

 

The pair came to the United States from South Korea in 2005 at ages 14 and 15. At a young age, they moved to Kentucky from Michigan so their father could attend Asbury Seminary and pursue his career as a pastor.

 

Mary’s interest in nursing peaked after their father had unforeseen symptoms of appendicitis, an unusual occurrence in an otherwise healthy family. The last time the girls had been to a hospital was when their younger brother, 16, was born.

 

“I thought, ‘I have to do something!’ This might happen again to someone in my family,” Mary said.

 

As for Joanna, nursing was not a likely profession until Mary chose it. That — in combination with her father’s illness and her volunteer work at the Thomson-Hood Veteran’s Center in Wilmore — led her to the UK College of Nursing only two semesters behind Mary.

 

“During my time here and from my past experiences I’ve learned that nursing is not just about physical health, but more about therapeutic, holistic care,” Joanna said. 

 

The sisters have grounded each other through a mutual understanding of what it takes to be a nurse — from working long hours, to caring physically and emotionally for patients, to continually learning new methods — they’re on the journey together. Joanna has always appreciated Mary’s leadership.

 

“As the younger sister, I’d say I’m the one who’s benefiting more. (Mary) has helped me study, she’s cooked me dinner and even done my laundry when she knew I was struggling. She just always knew what I was going through and that was comforting.”

 

“I think it makes such a difference when someone’s following behind you,” Mary said. “I couldn’t fail in nursing because I knew I had Joanna right there. I had to leave a good image for her. She was always my motivation.”

 

Upon graduation, Joanna hopes to work at the bedside in either cardiovascular or trauma nursing before potentially returning to school to earn her Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). For now, the sisters continue to stand beside each other in a clinical setting and at home, but most of all, they’re always thinking about their patients.

 

“I’m excited to learn more about this field,” Mary said. “As a nurse, you might not change the world, but you might change a patient’s perspective of the world.”

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Social Theory Journal disClosure Now Available Online

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 15:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2016) — The 25th volume of the University of Kentucky’s social theory journal, disClosure, which focuses on the topic of “transnational lives,” was released recently. The current issue’s theme brings together a variety of genres, including creative pieces, analytical articles, interviews and art, as it explores concepts related to the topic.

 

disClosure is an annual thematic publication dedicated to investigating and stimulating interest in new directions in contemporary social theory. The journal has been entirely redesigned and incorporates artwork by Lexington-based artist Lina Tharsing.

 

“Simple words such as ‘home’ or ‘religion’ take on an entirely new meaning when they are considered across transnational spaces,” said co-editor of the journal’s current issue Catherine Gooch, a graduate student in the UK College of Arts and Sciences Department of English.

 

“In addition, there are larger implications, on both personal and public levels. If we think about our economic system and how globalization has caused capitalism to expand transnationally, around the world, we see how this economic expansion impacts everything from our personal lives to the higher education system,” Gooch said, adding that Mahmood Mamdani addresses the topic further in an interview in the current issue.

 

“We were also lucky to have two UK faculty write reflective pieces for us, Ted Schatzki and Arnold Farr,” said Ashley Ruderman, co-editor of the issue and graduate student in the UK Department of Gender and Women’s Studies. “Both Dr. Schatzki and Dr. Farr were involved in the founding of the Social Theory Program.”

 

In 2014, disClosure transitioned from print publishing to digital publishing and began publishing to issuu this year.

 

“This addition allows us to give our readers the option to download articles (in pdf format), as well as enjoy the experience of reading the journal like an e-book,” Ruderman said.

 

The spring 2016 issue of disClosure can be found at https://socialtheory.as.uky.edu/disclosure and includes a link to the issuu version.

 

Gooch is a doctoral candidate specializing in African-American literature. Her current research examines literary and cultural representations of the Mississippi River, focusing specifically on the river’s relationship to black artistic production, labor and economics in 20th century African-American literature.

 

Ruderman earned a master’s degree in English and a certificate in social theory prior to starting her doctoral work in the UK Department of Gender and Women’s Studies. Her research examines cultural representations of lesbian criminality in relationship to state surveillance practices from the mid-century to present. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Only Three 'Grand Night' Performances Left

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 14:25

 

Promotional ad for "It's a Grand Night for Singing!" Provided by UK Opera Theatre. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — University of Kentucky Opera Theatre will conclude its 24th production of "It's a Grand Night for Singing!" with its last three performances June 17-19, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

 

Since 1993, this popular event has kicked off the start of Central Kentucky's summer arts season, with an unbelievable turnout and multiple sold-out shows. "It's a Grand Night for Singing!" is a highly anticipated production in Lexington, with not only regional performers, but UK performers showing off their talents. The event features popular Broadway tunes as well as Top 40 hits to entertain guests of all ages.

 

The last three performances begin 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 17 and June 18, and 2 p.m. Sunday, June 19. "Grand Night" tickets are $45 for general admission, $40 for seniors and UK faculty, and $15 for students with a valid student ID. Tickets for "Grand Night" are available through the Singletary Center ticket office, by phone at 859-257-4929, online at www.scfatickets.com, or in person at the venue. All applicable fees will be added to tickets upon purchase transaction. Valet parking will be available for all performances from 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and from 12:30 p.m. Sunday.

 

In addition, each performance will also have a limited number of select seats available to UK staff for only $25. The special staff price is presented in memory of Russ Williams, the university's first representative of the staff on UK's Board of Trustees who died in 2009. Staff tickets must be purchased in person with a valid staff ID.

 

UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Football Season Ticket Sales Enter New Phase June 14

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 13:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016) — With the upgrade process for current season ticket holders nearing completion, fans will be able to purchase new season tickets and select their seats beginning Tuesday morning, June 14. Tickets will be available at UKFootballTix.com  or by calling 800-928-2287.

 

New season ticket holders will be able to use the Kentucky Football Virtual Venue to review and compare available season locations. The system also allows fans to see a 360-degree virtual view from the seats in Commonwealth Stadium.

 

Buying season tickets gives fans the best choice of seat locations for the 2016 season. Additionally, season ticket holders are eligible for Season Ticket Surprises drawings all summer long. Upcoming prizes include an authentic Kentucky football helmet signed by Mark Stoops, movie night in a Commonwealth Stadium hospitality area for you and 10 guests, and exclusive, early access at Kentucky football Fan Day.

 

UK Athletics has worked hard to create a variety of pricing options throughout the stadium. General public season tickets cost $280, including many that come with no corresponding K Fund donation attached. Full-time faculty and staff are able to once again purchase tickets at a discounted rate. Regular full-time faculty and staff can receive a 20 percent discount on the cost of tickets (up to two seats priced $280 and above), including a 50 percent discount on the K Fund donation (up to two seats), if selecting seats at the $525 donation level or below. The 50 percent K Fund discount does not apply to premium seating areas, including suites, loge and club seating.

 

There are also new $210 season tickets in the north upper level, as well as a brand-new Kentucky Football Pocket Pass that UK Athletics is excited to announce.

 

The Pocket Pass includes a mobile ticket to all seven home games for $175. This unique season pass gives fans the opportunity to watch games from different viewpoints in the stadium with a different seat each game. Your seat location will be delivered electronically to your mobile device through the Kentucky Wildcats Gameday app. Only 500 passes will be sold this season, and pass holders are guaranteed to sit in the lower level for at least two home games.

 

Kentucky football Mini-Packs will go on sale later this month through UKFootballTix.com (or by calling 800-928-2287). These two- and three-game Mini-Packs offer additional flexibility.

 

On July 19 at 9 a.m. ET, single-game tickets to all seven home games will go on sale to the general public through UKFootballTix.com (or by calling 800-928-2287), based on availability. Away game ticket orders will be accepted from the general public beginning in late June.

 

Student season tickets will go on sale later this summer, and students will receive more information by email later this month.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-559-5396; Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200

 

 

Cheer on UK for a Good Cause at Design Slam

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 13:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2016) Several University of Kentucky architecture students and recent graduates will compete in this weekend's AIA (American Institute of Architects) East Kentucky Design Slam supporting Lexington Habitat for Humanity and AIA Kentucky. The Bluegrass is invited to take in the competition and vote on their favorite design June 11, at West Sixth Brewing.

 

"This is a fantastic way to support the local design that helps make Lexington unique," said Heather Chapman, resource development coordinator of Lexington Habitat for Humanity. "I can't wait to see the fresh perspective the UK architecture students will bring to the competition."

 

The fourth annual AIA East Kentucky Design Slam is a no-holds-barred live competition where teams of local architects race the clock to come up with the best design for an urban space in Lexington. The teams must be ready for anything, since the design prompt for their creation will only be given to them at the beginning of the hour. Teams can use any digital media to create, render or illustrate their work.

 

Video highlights of the 2014 Design Slam.

 

The public can cheer the designers on, shout suggestions, and vote for their favorites as the teams’ work is showcased on overhead screens. Votes are $1 each and will be tallied at the end of the competition.

 

This year's four competing local teams are from Ross Tarrant Architects; Omni; UK School of Architecture; and a combined team with UK architecture students and representatives of Sherman Carter Barnhart and CMW. The students competing for the UK team are:

·       2016 graduate Kevin Bloomfield, from Lexington;

·       2016 graduate Michael S. Foster, from Corbin, Kentucky;

·       senior Thomas Lanham, from Lebanon Junction, Kentucky; and

·       senior Joshua Powell, from Lexington.

The UK competitors on the team with Sherman Carter Barnhart and CMW are 2016 graduate Jackie Sanchez, from Managua, Nicaragua, and graduate student Nathaneal Zellers, from Leitchfield, Kentucky.

 

The competition supporting local design and affordable housing will run from 5-8 p.m. Saturday, June 11, at West Sixth Brewing, located at 501 W. Sixth St. Proceeds will benefit AIA Kentucky and Lexington Habitat for Humanity. You can purchase tickets at the door or online at: https://secure.qgiv.com/for/lexhabitat/event/770737/.

The 2016 AIA East Kentucky Design Slam is organized by the East Kentucky Chapter of the AIA, and sponsored by Louisville Tile, Thermal Equipment, Advanced Solutions, Shrout Tate Wilson and Lynn Imaging.

 

In addition to participating in this year's Design Slam, many UK students work with Lexington Habitat for Humanity yearround as part of the university's chapter. To learn more about the campus chapter visit: www.facebook.com/ukhabitat/ or http://uknow.uky.edu/content/see-blue-selfie-amanda-hickey

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Helps St. Catharine Students With Transfer Requests

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky is helping St. Catharine College students continue their education in the aftermath of last week's announcement that the college in Springfield, Kentucky, would close at the end of July.

 

The UK Office of Undergraduate Admission and the Transfer Center are assisting students who are interested in transferring to UK. The $50 application fee is being waived for all students applying to transfer to UK on or before June 30, 2016, including St. Catharine students.

 

"The University of Kentucky recognizes the unique needs of transfer students, particularly those from St. Catharine College," said Mike Shanks, director of the UK Transfer Center. "We encourage each student interested in transferring to contact the Transfer Center to aid in transcript evaluation and admission information.

 

"Our Transfer Center provides resources to help students transition to UK.  Our staff collaborates with other on-campus units to provide the necessary resources for successful progress toward graduation."

 

At the Transfer Center, students can:

 

·         Discuss transfer course equivalencies prior to admission

·         Resolve specific transfer related issues by connecting with a UK staff member

·         Discuss transfer planning strategies prior to enrolling at UK

 

For more information on how to contact a staff member or to learn more about transferring to UK, call the UK Transfer Center at 859-218-1724; email to UKTransfer@uky.ed; or visit the center at 11 W.D. Funkhouser Building on the UK campus. 

 

The website is www.uky.edu/Transfer. Application information is also available at: www.applyuk.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Rebecca Stratton, 859-323-2395, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu

KNI Stroke Center Receives High Designation from American Heart Association

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 10, 2015) - UK HealthCare's Kentucky Neuroscience Institute (KNI) has received the "Get With The Guidelines - "Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award" by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for maintaining nationally recognized standards for the treatment of stroke patients.
 

KNI also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. Over 12 months, at least 75 percent of the hospital’s ischemic stroke patients received tPA within 60 minutes of arriving at the hospital (known as door-to-needle time). Stroke patients who receive tPA within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover more quickly and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

 

This year marks the sixth year that KNI has received Gold Plus designation. KNI has been named to the Target: Stroke Honor Roll the past three years and repeats for the 'elite' level that was introduced last year.

 

Kentucky patients aren't the only ones benefiting from this achievement.

 

"By participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program, we are able to share our expertise with other member hospitals around the country, including access to the most up-to-date research, clinical tools and resources, and patient education resources," said Dr. Jessica Lee, medical director of the KNI Comprehensive Stroke Center.

 

Dr. Larry Goldstein, chair of the UK Department of Neurology and co-director of KNI, said that “Comprehensive Stroke Center status reflects our capability to provide the most advanced care for patients with stroke. These awards further underscore the hard work of our multidisciplinary team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, emergency physicians, nurses, therapists and others to optimize care delivery for stroke patients right here in Lexington.”

 

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. In Kentucky, cardiovascular disease (which includes stroke) is the leading cause of death.  On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 785,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

 

The KNI Stroke Center is also also certified as a “Comprehensive Stroke Center” by The Joint Commission – its highest honor.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

World's Largest Math Proof Produced at 200 Terabytes

Thu, 06/09/2016 - 09:19
LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 13, 2016)  The world's largest mathematical proof — at a massive 200 terabytes — has been produced and a longstanding math mystery has been solved by University of Kentucky Professor Victor Marek and collaborators.

 

How big is 200 terabytes? The journal Nature reported that the proof is "roughly equivalent to all the digitized text held by the US Library of Congress."

 

“It is, indeed quite big," said Marek, a professor in the UK Department of Computer Science.

 

The team, including Marek, Marijn J. H. Heule of The University of Texas at Austin, and Oliver Kullmann of Swansea University in Wales, was working to solve the boolean Pythagorean Triples problem. (Remember the Pythagorean theorem? a2 + b2 = c2.)

 

The problem asks if it is possible to color each positive integer either blue or red so that no Pythagorean triple a, b and c are all of the same color.

 

The supercomputer-assisted proof revealed that it was possible to color the integers in multiple ways up to 7,824 integers. But at 7,825 and beyond, it is impossible for every Pythagorean triple to be multicolored.

 

The team's findings are featured pre-print at http://arxiv.org/abs/1605.00723. Marek, Heule and Kullmann have already been rewarded for their work. Ronald Graham, the mathematician who proposed the problem in the 1980s, pledged back then to give $100 to whoever solved the problem. He followed through on his promise last month, presenting a check to Heule at a scientific conference.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

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