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UK Debate Prepares to Build on Historically Successful Season

Fri, 08/12/2016 - 14:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 15, 2016)  The University of Kentucky Debate Team arrives on campus a week before classes begin for their annual work retreat. It is an intensive weeklong work session that involves 12-hour days packed full of lectures, research and practices.

 

The stakes are large for the current team.

 

The 2015-16 squad completed one of the most successful seasons in school history. Kentucky was in the elite eight, or better, at almost every national tournament they attended.

 

In addition, three two-person units (debate teams face off in pairs) reached the elimination rounds of the National Debate Tournament for the first time in school history.

 

The director of the program, Dave Arnett, put the success of the program in perspective.

 

“The last six years have been about rebuilding the program. Last year we were a top 10 team with the likes of Harvard, Berkeley and Northwestern,” Arnett said. “With a system in place, and another incredible recruiting class, we are poised to be in the conversation for a national championship regularly.”

 

For the first time in school history, the team has recruited two high school national champions in the same class. Anthony Trufanov from Glenbrook North High School in Chicago won a national championship as a junior. He will debate with Dan Bannister, from Highland Park High School in Saint Paul, Minnesota, who won the prestigious Tournament of Champions, hosted by UK in April.

 

Trufanov and Bannister are joined by a number of other impressive recruits, including Maria Sanchez from Northside High School in Chicago. Sanchez was selected as the National Association of Urban Debate Leagues Debater of the Year.

 

In addition to its competitive aspirations, Kentucky Debate has been focusing on a number of other projects including a diversity initiative, as well as outreach with international debate organizations.

 

“Kentucky Debate is focused on a multitude of objectives,” Arnett explained. “We want to be a top 10 program, but we also want to strive to fulfill our commitment to our students and community by providing unique growth opportunities. We believe that debate is a powerful tool that can change people’s lives and outreach will continue to be an absolute priority for us.”

 

Over the past few years the UK Debate Team has worked closely with urban debate leagues across the country to help expand its recruiting base and provide opportunities to exceptionally talented students.

 

The team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, will open its competitive season at Georgia State University in mid-September.

 

You can follow Kentucky Debate at https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

VIDEO: Making Every Wildcat Feel Welcomed Motivates UK's Sarah Nikirk

Fri, 08/12/2016 - 11:42

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2016) — For most people, the thought of moving doesn’t exactly conjure up happy thoughts. 

 

But for Sarah Nikirk, executive director of Auxiliary Services, lifting boxes and carrying suitcases is actually one of the highlights of her year.

 

“It is like Christmas,” Nikirk said. “There’s nothing like it.”

 

Of course, this type of heavy lifting has less to do with moving trucks and more to do with offering a smile, welcoming a family from across the country and connecting with the university’s newest faces as part of the UK 2016 Move-In.

 

This year, Nikirk and hundreds of others from across campus will welcome students and their families during four major Move-In days over the next week:

  • Saturday, Aug. 13
  • Wednesday, Aug. 17
  • Friday, Aug. 19
  • Saturday, Aug. 20

"It is so important that we do it right because it is not only important for the student, but it’s important for the entire family," said Nikirk. "The most important job that we do all day long is to come out and be nice."

 

Nikirk takes seriously the charge from UK’s strategic plan to focus on student success from their first day on campus. 

 

“It's been a strategic plan of mine that everyone feel welcome since I've been here,” Nikirk. said. “It only happens once. You have that one day and what you do that day is going to set the tone for that week and that experience.”

 

She says it’s a mission that takes an enormous effort from people throughout the Wildcat family.

 

“Move-In has evolved over the years but my main role is to bring all of the people together that have a part in Move-In,” Nikirk said. “The UK Police Department creates the traffic plan so we work directly with Chief (Joe) Monroe and his staff, to make sure that our traffic plan works each year.”

 

But Move-In at UK goes far beyond traffic plans. Nikirk’s team has to handle logistics from parking and shuttles to the carts students use to haul their belongings into their residence halls. She works closely with Parking and Transportation Services as well as the UK Supply Center, which distributes all the carts. 

 

"We work with our partners in housing and dining and the Residence Life team, as well," Nikirk said. "We also team up with our Living Learning Program partners, Physical Plant, campus ministries and many individual volunteers. So, while we sort of orchestrate it, there are a lot of people and departments that come together to make it happen."

 

Watch the video above for an inside look at how Nikirk and her team of volunteers make Move-In run smoothly each and every year. 

 

This is the first video in our new UKNow series, “Kentucky’s Heartbeat - The Pulse of Our Institution." The goal is to highlight the people who are working every day in various colleges, departments and areas across our campus to help each and every student succeed inside and outside the classroom.  

 

If you know of someone who you think should be featured because of their dedication to the student experience, please email us. Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature or series on UKNow!

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MOVE-IN MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 270-566-3988; blair.hoover@uky.edu

 

MOVE-IN VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu, or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

 

BREATHE Nursing Researchers Collaborate with Geologists to Map Radon Risks in Kentucky

Fri, 08/12/2016 - 11:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 15, 2016) — A blending of ideas, expertise and perspective allows research teams to consider every angle of a public health problem, leaving no stone unturned in the search for a solution.

 

For Ellen Hahn, a professor in the UK College of Nursing and director of the Bridging Research Efforts and Advocacy Toward Healthy Environments (BREATHE) initiative, understanding the risk potential of radon across Kentucky’s diverse geological landscape required digging beneath the surface of the issue.

 

Radon is a radioactive gas emitted from rock formations below the ground. As the element uranium rises from the earth, it decays to become radon, which releases hazardous particles into the atmosphere. Exposure to these radioactive particles can alter DNA in human cells and cause lung cancer, especially when combined with exposure to tobacco smoke. Only a radon test can detect radon in a home or building structure.

 

Radon test kits measure the levels of radon in a home, but household radon levels can vary from neighbor to neighbor. While the occurrence of positive radon tests above the earth’s surface can predict the presence of radon, the rock formations below the soil surface also indicate the radon potential for a particular geographic area.

 

In an effort to understand the variability of radon risk potential in households across Kentucky, Hahn and colleagues in the UK College of Nursing recently collected the results of more than 60,000 radon test kits from radon measurement laboratories recorded as early as 1986. But because radon potential is also tied to geological makeup, the radon test data was only one way to understand radon potential. BREATHE researchers were missing complementary geological data, another indicator of radon potential, to connect with their public health data.

 

Geologists at the University of Kentucky had already mapped the dynamic geological formations underneath Kentucky and identified specific rock formations associated with a heightened risk of radon exposure. In fact, researchers in the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at UK had mapped, measured and digitized rock formation data for the entire state. After reading a column about the risks of radon in Kentucky written by Hahn in 2013, Bethany Overfield, a geologist at the KGS, contacted Hahn with the proposition of merging their data into a comprehensive radon risk map of Kentucky.

 

The two departments overlaid Hahn’s public health data with the KGS geological formation data to develop a comprehensive radon risk potential map of Kentucky. The geologic map of Kentucky includes color-coded sections to indicate the level of radon risk. Whereas a map designed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assigned a level of risk for each county, the BREATHE initiative map accounted for multiple risk factors and shows the gradient radon potential within counties and across geographic features. The team published a paper on their initial findings from an analysis in north-central Kentucky in a 2015 issue of Preventive Medicine Reports.

 

Using the more recent data from over 60,000 home radon tests, the researchers designed maps specific to 15 Kentucky counties, which were selected based on lung cancer risk factors and existing local radon programs. The maps depict the variability of radon potential within a county, showing a range of radon risk levels. Hahn and BREATHE researchers are partnering with local health organizations to distribute the maps to local stakeholders and inform citizens of the radon risks in their geographic location and to promote radon testing.

 

Interdisciplinary research collaborations are common among colleagues in the six health colleges at the University of Kentucky, including the College of Nursing, the College of Medicine, the College of Pharmacy, the College of Health Sciences, the College of Dentistry, and the College of Public Health. But as health researchers target the environmental determinants of health, they are interlocking efforts with researchers who understand the environment, including geologists and environmental scientists. 

 

“It is a collaboration between two disciplines that might not traditionally be seen as related,” Hahn said. “There is a new and emerging emphasis on geology as we think about other disciplines, in this case, nursing and public health.”

 

Overfield said Kentucky’s karst topography contributes to its high radon emissions. Karst topography is landscape formed from the dissolution of soluble rock, such as limestone, which creates sinkholes and cavernous underground formations that provide routes for uranium to move and escape into the atmosphere. The constituents of the rocks, or the sediments and particles comprising the rocks, are the origins of uranium gas that becomes radon. For this reason, radon risks are not defined by political boundaries but rather by the rock formations underneath the ground despite county lines. For instance, the radon risk inside a house constructed on a sandstone formation may be lower than a house constructed on shale or limestone.

 

“Radon is directly associated with rocks and soil,” Overfield said. “It is much more dynamic than a county line, and that is the impetus for the whole research collaboration.”

 

Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. The triple threats of smoking (the leading cause of lung cancer), radon exposure, and secondhand smoke compound the risk of developing lung cancer in Kentucky. Through the radon mapping collaboration, Hahn has identified areas of Kentucky where public health prevention and intervention can reduce these three lung cancer threats. Smoking, radon exposure, and secondhand smoke are all preventable or treatable conditions. Hahn hopes to use the maps to target specific geographic areas with interventions to reduce smoking rates, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, and mitigate radon potential.

 

“The reason I am interested in radon is because of its synergy with tobacco smoke exposure,” Hahn said. “Most of the cases of radon-induced lung cancer are in people who are current or former smokers or have been exposed to secondhand smoke. If you have ever smoked or have been exposed to secondhand smoke, it’s even more important to test for radon in the home and where you work.” 

 

Radon mitigation systems reduce exposure by removing trapped or contained radon gas from homes and other buildings. Kentuckians residing in high radon potential areas should test their house for radon through a free or low-cost take-home kit. Levels of radon are measured by picoCuries, which measure as one-trillionth of one gram of radon, per liter of air. Property owners should call a certified radon professional if the test kit reads at or above 4.0 pCi/L. Homeowners and property owners should test for radon every two years.

 

For more information about radon, tobacco smoke or lung cancer risks, contact BREATHE at www.breathe.uky.edu or call 859-323-4587.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu; Mike Lynch, mjlync2@uky.edu

 

 

WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Puts Spotlight on New UK Art Museum Exhibit

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 16:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2016) WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Joining him today is Janie Welker, curator at the UK Art Museum, discussing a new exhibit devoted to the photography of Kentucky author James Baker Hall. The exhibit runs through Nov. 27.

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/james-baker-hall-trades-words-images.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Popkin Receives National Endowment for the Humanities Grant

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 16:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2016)  University of Kentucky Professor of History Jeremy Popkin was recently awarded a prestigious Public Scholar program award of $50,400 from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

 

The grant will fund Popkin’s research and writing, leading to the publication of his manuscript on the French Revolution, “Free and Equal: The Story of the French Revolution.” The NEH Public Scholar program is meant to support scholars in the humanities who are writing books that will bring the best of current research to a broad general audience.

 

This book will "give readers new perspectives about the French Revolution by incorporating, among other things, my own research on the role of the media during the revolution and the importance of the revolutionaries' struggles about slavery in the French colonies," Popkin said.

 

"The project is an opportunity for me to try to bring together four decades of research on the French Revolution, starting with my Ph.D. dissertation back in the 1970s," he said.

 

Popkin, the William T. Bryan Chair Professor, is an acknowledged expert in the history of the French and Haitian revolutions. His most recent book “From Herodotus to H-Net: The Story of Historiography” was published by Oxford University Press in 2015.

 

Popkin has held fellowships from the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation, the National Humanities Center, the NEH, the Fulbright Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Studies, and the Newberry Library, and has been a visiting professor at Brown University and at the College de France.

 

In 2012, Popkin was a short-term visiting professor at Australian National University in Canberra, Australia, and in 2013 he was named the Christian Wolff Visiting Professor at the Martin Luther University in Halle, Germany.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

VIDEO: Making Every Wildcat Feel Welcomed Motivates UK's Sarah Nikirk

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 15:54

 

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2016) — For most people, the thought of moving doesn’t exactly conjure up happy thoughts. 

 

But for Sarah Nikirk, associate vice present for Auxiliary Services, lifting boxes and carrying suitcases is actually one of the highlights of her year.

 

“It is like Christmas,” NIkirk said. “There’s nothing like it.”

 

Of course, this type of heavy lifting has less to do with moving trucks and more to do with offering a smile, welcoming a family from across the country and connecting with the university’s newest faces as part of the UK 2016 Move-In.

 

This year, Nikirk and hundreds of others from across campus will welcome students and their families during four major Move-In days over the next week:

  • Saturday, Aug. 13
  • Wednesday, Aug. 17
  • Friday, Aug. 19
  • Saturday, Aug. 20

"It is so important that we do it right because it is not only important for the student, but it’s important for the entire family," said Nikirk. "The most important job that we do all day long is to come out and be nice."

 

Nikirk takes seriously the charge from UK’s strategic plan to focus on student success from their first day on campus. 

 

“It's been a strategic plan of mine that everyone feel welcome since I've been here,” Nikirk. said. “It only happens once. You have that one day and what you do that day is going to set the tone for that week and that experience.”

 

She says it’s a mission that takes an enormous effort from people throughout the Wildcat family.

 

“Move-In has evolved over the years but my main role is to bring all of the people together that have a part in Move-In,” Nikirk said. “The UK Police Department creates the traffic plan so we work directly with Chief (Joe) Monroe and his staff, to make sure that our traffic plan works each year.”

 

But Move-In at UK goes far beyond traffic plans. Nikirk’s team has to handle logistics from parking and busses to the carts students use to haul their belongings into their residence halls. She works closely with Parking and Transportation Services as well as the UK Supply Center, which distributes all the carts. 

 

"We work with our partners in housing and dining and the Residence Life team, as well," Nikirk said. "We also team up with our Living Learning Program partners, Physical Plant, campus ministries and many individual volunteers. So, while we sort of orchestrate it, there are a lot of people and departments that come together to make it happen."

 

Watch the video above for an inside look at how Nikirk and her team of volunteers make Move-In run smoothly each and every year. 

 

This is the first video in our new UKNow series, “Kentucky’s Heartbeat - The Pulse of Our Institution." The goal is to highlight the people who are working every day in various colleges, departments and areas across our campus to help each and every student succeed insided and outside the classroom.  

 

If you know of someone who you think should be featured because of their dedication to the student experience, please email us. Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature or series on UKNow!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MOVE-IN MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 270-566-3988; blair.hoover@uky.edu

 

MOVE-IN VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu, or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

NEH Grant Helps Transform Graduate Education at UK

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 15:24

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 15, 2016) — The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has launched a major initiative to transform the culture of graduate education and to implement changes that will broaden the career preparation of a doctoral student beyond a teaching career. The University of Kentucky and 27 other colleges and universities received a total of $1.65 million in grants to plan the transformation.

 

UK’s program, Careers Beyond the Professoriate, will provide resources and support to humanities and social science graduate students who are interested in exploring diverse career paths. Careers Beyond the Professoriate is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences and a NEH Next Generation Humanities PhD Grant.

 

As a recipient of a $25,000 planning grant from NEH, UK will also be a member of the new Council of Graduate Schools/NEH Next Generation Humanities PhD Consortium.

 

Led by project director Sarah Lyon, UK’s planning grant will enable:

1) integration of multiple career outcomes early in a students’ experience in graduate school;

2) revisions to curriculum and degree requirements in order to better prepare students for a diverse array of future occupations;

3) maximization of faculty buy-in for a transformed doctorate degree and methods for supporting students beyond teaching-focused funding;

4) initiation of partnerships with non-academic institutions, and

5) development of an evaluation plan for future activities and implementation.

 

Higher education is currently experiencing profound transformations and an accompanying decline in the availability of full-time academic positions. Today, non-academic and alt-academic careers are no longer a viable option for many graduate students. Careers Beyond the Professoriate will help graduate students prepare for the harsh realities of the 21st century job market.

 

“The academic-focused future we’re accustomed to training graduate students for is disappearing,” NEH Chairman William D. Adams said. “If graduate programs wish to make a case for the continuation of graduate education in the humanities, they’re going to have to think about the professional futures of their students in entirely different ways.”
 

Next Generation PhD is the first time that NEH, a longtime public funder of the humanities, is tackling the issue of how doctorate students who immerse themselves deeply in graduate humanities research and writing can look to apply their skills and experience beyond teaching and professor positions to a broader range of careers.

 

NEH is an independent federal agency that funds humanities projects in fields such as art history, literature, philosophy and archaeology. Created in 1965, NEH awards grants three times a year to top-rated proposals as examined by panels of independent reviewers.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

Incoming UK Freshman Helps to Beautify Burkesville

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 09:56

 

Video by Jeff Franklin/UK Ag Communications. 

 

BURKESVILLE, Ky., (Aug. 16, 2016)  Molly Morgan takes pride in her hometown of Burkesville. As a high school junior, the 4-H’er set out to make the town and Cumberland County a more beautiful place.

 

“I attended the Rogers Scholars program two years ago, and they really encourage you to go home and give back to your community,” Morgan said. “Burkesville is known for its tourism, because we are right on Dale Hollow Lake, so I thought about beautification activities I could do in the county.”

 

Morgan and her mother Amy, approached Elijah Wilson, the county’s University of Kentucky cooperative extension agent for 4-H Youth Development, about ways she could do this. The result was a committee headed by Morgan and comprised of local leaders.

 

Two years later, Morgan and the committee she started, Partners with P.R.I.D.E., have added rock and landscaping to three of the town’s welcome signs and have installed flower beds along the roads going through the Southern Kentucky town.

 

“You wouldn’t believe the positive responses we have had from the landscaping,” Wilson said. “It really has changed the perception of people in our community and the people who visit our community. When you come into Burkesville, you feel like you have arrived somewhere. We want to move forward with more things like this.”

 

The committee has made the community enhancements with funding from a $10,000 Appalachian Regional Commission grant that Morgan and Wilson received. Morgan obtained the matching funds for the grant by convincing local residents and businesses to sponsor the project.

 

“It’s been a learning experience and has helped me communicate better with my own age group and has given me more confidence to approach leaders in my community,” she said.

 

Groups, such as Extension Master Gardeners, not only sponsor a sign but also provide upkeep for their sign’s landscaping. The Master Gardeners installed rock and landscaping at the Burkesville welcome sign on State Route 90.

 

“I enjoy looking at the welcome signs in surrounding communities. Some of them are really pretty, so it’s nice that we have something comparable,” said Joan Radford, former president of the Cumberland County Master Gardeners.

 

Other local organizations including the Cumberland County High School Future Farmers of America chapter and the city have helped with maintenance of the areas.

 

While Morgan is entering UK this fall as a health sciences major and plans to become a doctor, the committee’s work will continue in her absence.

 

“We are getting new sponsorships each year, and we just started getting renewal sponsorships,” she said. “I hope it grows even more.”

 

Wilson hopes this project can spark ideas and interest in other young leaders in the county community that numbers 6,800 people.

 

“We need young people to step up, because they are going to make our community successful in the future. They are our future,” he said.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774, Jeff Franklin, 859-257-9088, Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200.

 

 

New Curriculum Management System Now Available at UK

Thu, 08/11/2016 - 09:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 15, 2016)  The University of Kentucky is pleased to announce the launch of a new online curriculum management system. The transition to replace eCATS with Curriculog™ as UK’s course proposal system will begin today, Aug. 15. New submissions will no longer be accepted in eCATS after Oct. 3, 2016.

 

Curriculog was selected for the following reasons:

• Ease of use
• High configurability
• Process transparency
• Mobile device compatibility
• Committee agendas
• User-specific dashboards
• Reporting capabilities
• Error handling
• Cloud hosting and reliability

 

Changes to curriculum will be proposed using standard forms, evaluated using procedures consistent with University Senate rules, and monitored and reported on by requesters, councils and administrators. Curriculog will allow UK to maintain consistency among course proposals, systems of record and published bulletins.

 

Course proposals must be approved at the director/chair, college, undergraduate and/or graduate council, and university senate level before they can be implemented. Some proposals also require UK Core Committee, and/or Health Care Colleges Council approval, which are included in the workflow as appropriate.

 

Users must log in with their same Link Blue ID and password used when connecting to many campuswide systems.

 

Visit https://uky.curriculog.com for more information.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

PTS Offering Special Saturday Office Hours During Big Blue Move

Wed, 08/10/2016 - 17:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2016) — Over the next few weeks, expect to see plenty of hustle and bustle around the University of Kentucky campus as the student population returns. In order to best serve the needs of the student population on weekend Move-In days, Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) will offer special Saturday office hours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 13, 20 and 27, to accommodate students who wish to obtain a bicycle permit, purchase a motor vehicle parking permit or ask questions.

 

The PTS office is located in the Press Avenue Garage (PS #6), found at 721 Press Ave.

 

For more information, call the PTS office at 859-257-5757 or email UKParking@lsv.uky.edu.

Hildebrandt Honored at ACS Belles & Beaus Ball

Wed, 08/10/2016 - 16:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center's Dr. Gerhard Hildebrandt was honored at the American Cancer Society (ACS) Belles & Beaus Ball held Aug. 6.

 

Hildebrandt, chief of the Division of Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation at UK, was chosen as one of the 10 honorees this year for his support of the ACS Lexington Hope Lodge via patient referrals, participating in dinner groups and being an outspoken advocate of ACS lodging programs. Additionally, Dr. Hildebrandt is a member of the Lexington Leadership Council “Stay Well” Committee which works to promote cancer prevention methods in the central Kentucky community. 

 

Honorees are selected by the Belles & Beaus Executive Board based on specific criteria, including community outreach in the greater central Kentucky area; dedication to community, wellness, education and quality of life; and their talents and achievements their health care and professional careers.

 

"Dr. Hildebrandt is committed to making Kentucky a healthier Commonwealth, and has recruited colleagues and staff to advance medical possibilities here at home," said Mark Filburn, UK HealthCare Ambulatory Director for Cancer Services. "He resonates hope and compassion to all patients, families and friends entering our care center, and I can think of no one more deserving for this distinction."  

 

Media Contact: Allison Perry, allison.perry@uky.edu

Family Manages Challenges of Diabetes with Help from Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center

Wed, 08/10/2016 - 15:27

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2016) – A natural instinct for parents is to protect their children by keeping them healthy and safe; but what do you do as a parent when not just one, but both your children are diagnosed with a chronic illness like diabetes, as well as your spouse, and all within a relatively short amount of time?

 

After shaking one young family to their very core, they picked themselves up and took the reins, and now meet the challenge head on, every day, and literally around the clock, with the help of the University of Kentucky's Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center.

 

James and Lisa Middleton look like the couple next door. Lisa, an energetic and personable young woman, received her doctorate degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy and later was a research assistant professor in the College of Medicine. She is currently a lecturer at Eastern Kentucky University.  James "JC" Middleton is an avid long-distance cyclist and a software engineer at Valvoline. It was quite a shock when, 12 years ago at age 29, he was diagnosed with diabetes.

 

JC suddenly dropped 20 pounds from his already slim physique. He was constantly tired, stayed thirsty, and drank more than usual which led to going to the bathroom more frequently, even throughout the night. Weight loss, excessive thirst, and frequent urination are common symptoms of diabetes. Lisa was puzzled by her husband's initial diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, sometimes referred to as 'adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes,' because he didn't completely fit the profile. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs in older adults and can be aggravated by unhealthy eating habits, inactivity, and obesity. None of these traits describe JC.  Following a visit to the endocrinologist, JC’s diagnosis was changed to Type 1 and that day he began insulin therapy.

 

Lisa describes her husband as "independent and incredibly smart." He was immediately able to learn carbohydrate counting and quickly did the math to calculate his insulin doses. While the diagnosis presented a huge change in JC's life, she said "he just handled it."

 

The Middleton's have two children, Kara, a lively and self-confident 7-year-old who loves horses and wants to be a famous singer, and Max, an active and strong willed 2-year-old who likes to run, jump and climb.

 

About a year ago, the Middleton's noticed something unusual about baby Max. He stopped gaining weight and produced a lot more wet diapers. Late one evening while JC was testing his blood glucose level, on a whim he decided to test Max's glucose level. He couldn't believe his eyes.

 

"It was off the charts; it simply registered high," he said.

 

The next day, Max’s pediatrician strongly suspected, that at age 20 months, the Middleton's youngest child had Type 1 diabetes, and their world seemingly turned upside down.  

 

"It crushes you," JC said. "We were all but on the floor crying."

 

Their pediatrician immediately directed the Middleton's to UK's Kentucky Children's Hospital where Max was hospitalized. The first night, as Max lay sleeping, Lisa took out her smart phone and read everything she could on diabetes, the latest on clinical trials and advances in diabetes research.

 

Today, Max wears an insulin pump connected to a strap around his waist that delivers constant short-acting insulin through a catheter placed under the skin. The pump offers freedom from multiple injections and can be programmed based on what Max eats throughout the day and his activity level. A continuous glucose monitor, called a Dexcom, is attached to Max's upper arm. This allows JC and Lisa to continuously monitor his glucose levels every 5 minutes, 24-hours a day.  If his glucose level reads too low or too high, the Dexcom will send an alarm to JC's and Lisa's smart phone to warn them, which is especially important throughout the night when everyone is asleep.

 

"He handles his diabetes like a rockstar," Lisa said. "Once you see your two-year-old handling their diabetes better than you are, you have to get over it and move forward."

 

About six-weeks ago, while on a family vacation in Lisa's home state of Michigan, Lisa noticed Kara wet the bed during the night and thought she had a possible urinary tract infection.

 

"I think it was always in the back of my mind that diabetes could also happen to Kara, but honestly, I thought we were in the clear with her. We had one child with diabetes, surely we wouldn't have another," Lisa said. "My mom had some urine test strips and I tested Kara. Her urine was full of sugar."

 

That day Kara was taken to a hospital in Michigan, was diagnosed, and began treatment for Type 1 diabetes. During that time, the Middleton’s also contacted UK to consult with Max's pediatric endocrinologist, Dr. Alba Morales, associate professor of pediatric endocrinology and Barnstable Brown faculty member; and their primary diabetes educator Angela Hepner, about Kara's treatments.

 

"They were incredibly helpful, supportive and confirmed treatments," Lisa said. "As soon as we returned home to Kentucky, Kara was seen at Barnstable Brown immediately." 

 

Kara is currently taking four to six shots every day and checking her blood sugar by herself six to 10 times per day. She also will be starting on an insulin pump and Dexcom next week thanks to the quick work of the staff and doctors at Barnstable Brown. 

 

According to the American Diabetes Association, there is a three to five percent chance siblings will develop diabetes. Hepner said they are seeing more sibling sets with diabetes in their clinic and they also have several families where one parent has Type 1.

 

"Our team is committed to making families like the Middletons have as positive an experience with diabetes as possible," Hepner said. "For our younger children, we focus our educational efforts toward the parents, and also emphasize to the kids that diabetes should never stop them from doing what they love."

 

Morales says it is a huge challenge to manage children with diabetes because they are changing and growing on a daily basis and their management has to evolve with them.

 

"The mother has been wonderful in the way she manages her children's diabetes on a daily basis. It is more difficult than anyone can imagine," Morales said. "She is really good at keeping us informed here so that we can all work as a team."

 

While the Middletons say they are fortunate because both their children were diagnosed early before they got extremely sick, their biggest challenge is managing their worry.

 

"Like all parents, we want the best for our children and want them to lead as normal a life as possible, and a diagnosis of diabetes is just a detour in the road," JC said.

 

"I try not to blame myself for my kids' diabetes because in all likelihood, I passed it on to them. There are so many potential things that may cause diabetes, you can't blame it all on genetics."

 

Morales says that the reason there is no cure for diabetes yet is because they don't have all the answers to what causes the disease.

 

"It's a combination of factors and genetics is only one. We believe there are undiscovered environmental factors as well," she said. "Diabetes is impossible to predict in children, even if both parents have diabetes."

 

Lisa said JC knows the seriousness of the disease and is involved in every aspect of their children's care, but as the mother and the only non-diabetic in the family, she worries about them all.

 

"I worry whose blood sugar is up and whose is down. I have to keep track of checking glucose levels and who ate what and when and if they got their insulin. Now that Kara is in the mix, it's even more worrisome. I have to work every day to keep my family alive,” she said.  “Worrying can consume all of the energy I have that I could be putting somewhere else; so I have to push nervousness to the back of my mind and focus.”

 

"Diabetes is an invisible disease. My kids are not obviously diabetic. They are normal and active. We can easily hide the monitors and pumps with clothes but the seriousness of the disease is always present."

 

JC adds, "there is light at the end of the tunnel. You can live a normal healthy life with diabetes.  Hopefully our children will see a cure for Type 1 Diabetes in their lifetime."

 

Dr. John Fowlkes, director of the Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center, said the clinical team at Barnstable Brown is about much more than just seeing patients and prescribing treatment.

 

"Diabetes doesn't just impact the individual, it can potentially impact the entire family whether there is one diabetic or several. We strive to educate our patients on how to live a full and healthy life with diabetes, and serve as a medical home that addresses all their needs.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu.

 

 

Gray Named Philanthropy Director for College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

Wed, 08/10/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Aug. 11, 2016)  When Pamela Gray begins her new role as senior director of philanthropy for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment on Sept.1, she will be coming home to a campus she once roamed as an undergraduate.

 

Gray, who grew up on a dairy farm in Wisconsin, earned an undergraduate degree in communications from UK. 

 

“I came to UK to walk on the volleyball team plus I grew up watching UK Wildcat basketball,” she said. “I was a first-generation college student being the youngest of six and the first to attend college. UK offered the best program for me as a student and it felt like home. I am excited that this position gives me the opportunity to make an impact on students who are like me. Also, much of my volunteer work is in agriculture, and this position marries my roots in agriculture and my love for this university.”

 

As senior director, Gray will provide leadership and vision for the college’s philanthropic programs and continue to build and develop a robust fundraising operation. She will also be responsible for managing and growing the philanthropy office and staff.

 

She has experience in all levels of fundraising and has served in many roles throughout her career — chief executive officer, fundraising data manager, major gifts officer, principal gifts officer, planned giving/gift planning officer and most recently as director of development, gift planning at Rice University in Houston, Texas. In addition to her UK degree, Gray has a graduate degree from the University of Denver with an emphasis in philanthropic leadership.

 

“This is an exciting time for the college, as we prepare to implement an expanded philanthropy program to move forward several ambitious facility priorities and to expand our fundraising team,” said Nancy Cox, dean of the college. “We are happy to have Pamela Gray in this leadership position; her experience and expertise will enable the college to better serve the Commonwealth as well as our own faculty, staff and students.”

 

The college has an exceptionally close and productive working relationship with the university’s Office of Philanthropy, and collaborates closely with centralized principal gift, planned giving and annual giving programs, as well as major gifts and corporate/foundation fundraising.

 

  

UK is  the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue
 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Laura Skillman, 859-323-4761, laura.skillman@uky.edu    

UK Researchers Use Imaging Technique to Predict Dementia Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

Tue, 08/09/2016 - 14:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 10, 2016) – Researchers at the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging found that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a noninvasive imaging technique, might help distinguish between people with Down syndrome who have dementia and those who do not. The researchers describe their findings in an article published in the journal, NeuroImage: Clinical.

 

People with Down syndrome have a third copy of chromosome 21, and that chromosome is the same one responsible for the production of a molecule called amyloid precursor protein. Since amyloid overproduction causes the brain plaques that are a cardinal feature of Alzheimer's disease, virtually 100 percent of people with Down syndrome have Alzheimer's pathology in their brain by the time they are 40. But for unknown reasons, many who display this pathology show no traces of dementia. A method for detecting early neurochemical indicators of whether a given person with Down syndrome will develop dementia could ultimately help researchers find new ways to delay or prevent its onset.

 

"Typically, people develop Alzheimer's disease in their 60s, 70s, or 80s," said Elizabeth Head, Ph.D., a professor at the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and a co-principal investigator for the Down Syndrome and Aging Study at Sanders-Brown. "It's a little easier to study Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome because of the predictability of the age at which this population develops signs of the disease."

 

The research team at Sanders-Brown, led by Head and Professor Frederick Schmitt, Ph.D., used MRS to measure the levels of key brain metabolites in 22 adults with Down syndrome. The team was able to identify specific metabolic deficiencies that were indicative not only of dementia status, but also of cognitive function, in study participants both with and without dementia.

 

“This is a great first study of its kind in Down syndrome,” said Head. “We hope to extend the study as we follow people over time. Ultimately, the technique may be useful in future clinical trials of dementia treatments in people with Down syndrome.”

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

UK College of Dentistry starts Oral Medicine Externship

Tue, 08/09/2016 - 13:05

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 10, 2016) – The University of Kentucky College of Dentistry now provides students the opportunity to participate in an oral medicine externship. The unique opportunity blends clinical clerkships within the fully accredited Orofacial Pain Program, the dynamic activities of UKCD's Division of Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine and Oral Radiology.

 

The externship provides graduate level training in biological sciences, oral medicine, clinical and pathologic correlations as well as experiences unavailable to privately practicing dentists or typical Academy of General Dentistry residents. Participants will have the opportunity to learn and observe intravenous and conscious sedation, oral mucosal disease, orofacial pain management, general dentistry, and management of complex dental patients.

 

“The UK College of Dentistry Oral Medicine Externship is an outstanding opportunity for practicing dentists and young faculty members to learn about oral medicine through direct access to world renown leaders in a vibrant, state-of-the art clinical setting," said Dr. Craig Miller, externship director and chief of Division of Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Radiology.

 

Throughout the externship, emphasis is placed on evidence-based diagnostic processes, dental management of medically complex patients, diagnosis and management of acute and chronic orofacial pain conditions, conscious and intravenous sedation techniques and the development of advanced diagnostic skills.

 

A significant portion of externs’ time will be devoted to observing comprehensive dental care with emphasis on diagnostic techniques and therapeutic skills in elderly populations. This patient pool is uniquely challenging as many patients have complex levels of medical compromise, diverse oral disease and already sought care from several practitioners without finding adequate relief. Here the benefits of having multidisciplinary a diagnostic approach is seen on a daily basis.

 

Completion of the program results in a Certificate of Clinical Externship in Oral Medicine awarded by the University of Kentucky. For more information on UKCD’s Oral Medicine Externship, visit our website or contact Dr. Craig Miller.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859)257-1076

 

 

Lake Tanganyika Fisheries Declining from Global Warming

Tue, 08/09/2016 - 11:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 10, 2016) The decrease in fishery productivity in Lake Tanganyika, Africa's oldest lake, since the 1950s is a consequence of global warming rather than just overfishing, according to a new report from an international team led by a University of Arizona (UA) geoscientist that includes the University of Kentucky's Michael McGlue, who is Pioneer Professor of Stratigraphy in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

 

The lake was becoming warmer at the same time in the 1800s the abundance of fish began declining, the team found. The lake's algae — fish food — also started decreasing at that time.

 

However, large-scale commercial fishing did not begin on Lake Tanganyika until the 1950s.

 

The new finding helps illuminate why the lake's fisheries are foundering, said study leader Andrew S. Cohen, a UA Distinguished Professor of Geosciences.

 

"Some people say the problem for the Lake Tanganyika fishery is 'too many fishing boats,' but our work shows the decline in fish has been going on since the 19th century," Cohen said. "We can see this decline in the numbers of fossil fish going down in parallel with the rise in water temperature."

 

Lake Tanganyika yields up to 200,000 tons of fish annually and provides about 60 percent of the animal protein for the region's population, according to other investigators.

 

The team acknowledges that overfishing is one cause of the reduction in catch. However, they suggest sustainable management of the Lake Tanganyika fishery requires taking into account the overarching problem that as the climate warms, the algae — the basis for the lake's food web — will decrease.

 

Cohen and his colleagues figured out the lake's environmental history 1,500 years into the past by taking cores of the lake's bottom sediments and analyzing the biological and chemical history stored in the sediment layers.

 

The team's findings have important conservation implications. The largest and deepest of Africa's rift lakes, Lake Tanganyika is famous for the great diversity of species unique to the lake.

 

"The lake has huge biodiversity — hundreds of species found nowhere else," Cohen said.

The warming of the lake has reduced the suitable habitat for those species by 38 percent since the 1940s, the team found.

 

"The warming surface waters cause large parts of the lake's floor to lose oxygen, killing off bottom-dwelling animals such as freshwater snails," Cohen said. "This decline is seen in the sediment core records and is a major problem for the conservation of Lake Tanganyika's many threatened species and unique ecosystems."

 

The paper, "Climate warming reduces fish production and benthic habitat in Lake Tanganyika, one of the most biodiverse freshwater ecosystems," by Cohen, McGlue and their co-authors, was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Aug. 8. A complete list of authors and funders is at the bottom of this release.

 

Previous research by Cohen's colleagues found Lake Tanganyika began warming in the mid-1800s and that the lake had warmed in the latter part of the 20th century faster than any similar time period since the year 500.

 

The lake's fish production had also slumped in the latter part of the 20th century. Cohen has been studying the paleoenvironment of Lake Tanganyika and the surrounding region for decades. He wondered whether the drop in fish productivity was from increased fishing or because the lake was getting warmer.

 

In tropical lakes, increases in water temperature reduce the seasonal mixing between the oxygenated top layer of the lake and the nutrient-rich but oxygen-free bottom layer of the lake, Cohen said. Fewer nutrients in the top layer mean less algae and therefore less food for fish.

 

In addition, as a tropical lake warms, the mixing doesn't reach as far down into the lake. As a result, the oxygenated top layer becomes shallower and shallower. As the top layer gets shallower, the oxygenated area of the lake bottom shrinks, reducing habitat for bottom dwellers such as molluscs and arthropods.

 

The remains of fish, algae, molluscs and small arthropods are preserved in the annual layers of sediment deposited in the bottom of Lake Tanganyika. By examining cores from the bottom of the lake, Cohen and his colleagues reconstructed a decade-by-decade profile of the lake's biological history going back 1,500 years.

 

The team found that as the lake's temperature increased, the amount of fish bits, algae and molluscs in the layers of sediment decreased. Based on instrumental records of oxygen in the lake water, the scientists calculated that since 1946 the amount of oxygenated lake-bottom habitat decreased by 38 percent.

 

"We're showing the rising temperatures and declines in fish food are resulting in a decrease in fish production — less fish for someone to eat. It's a food security finding," Cohen said.

 

"We know this warming is going on in other lakes," Cohen said. "It has important implications for food and for ecosystems changing rapidly. We think that Lake Tanganyika is a bellwether for this process."

 

Other co-authors are Elizabeth Gergurich, now at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma; Benjamin Kraemer and Peter McIntyre of the University of Wisconsin-Madison; James M. Russell of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island; Jack D. Simmons, now at Weston Solutions Inc. in Austin, Texas; and Peter W. Swarzenski, now at the International Atomic Energy Agency of Monaco.

 

The National Science Foundation, the Lake Tanganyika Biodiversity Project, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists Foundation-Geoscientists Without Borders Program, the Packard Foundation and the Nature Conservancy funded the research.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Big Blue Move to Impact Traffic

Tue, 08/09/2016 - 11:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2016) — Safety is always a priority at University of Kentucky and especially now when thousands of new students are transitioning to campus at a time when vehicle and pedestrian traffic are heavy and streets are re-routed. UK Police will be out in full force to assist with Move-In, and everyone is urged to be patient and travel safely.

 

UK Move-In is an exciting time for our campus community and an important time to begin fostering student success — our top priority at all levels in everything that we do.

 

This year, we will welcome students and their families during four major Move-In days over the next week:

  • Saturday, Aug. 13
  • Wednesday, Aug. 17
  • Friday, Aug. 19
  • Saturday, Aug. 20

Move-In — combined with current construction occurring on campus — will impact parking and transportation routes throughout the campus at various times. Among the more than 5,600 students moving to campus housing, about 2,300 students are expected to arrive on Saturday, Aug. 13; 2,000 are expected on Wednesday, Aug. 17; 780 on Friday, Aug. 19; and 550 on Saturday, Aug. 20.

 

Those participating in Move-In are encouraged to use the WAZE app in conjunction with the Big Blue Move map. Area drivers are also encouraged to use the WAZE app for real-time road closures and other traffic information.

 

UK thanks all community members in advance for their patience and help during this process. Below is information regarding student move-in traffic flow and parking impacts over the next week, including important information about one-way streets, no parking areas, and high traffic locations.

 

ONE-WAY STREETS: (see map)

  • One-way southbound: Martin Luther King Boulevard between Good Samaritan parking lot and Avenue of Champions
  • One-way southbound: Lexington Avenue between Maxwell Street and Avenue of Champions
  • NOTE: Employee (E) lot entrance north of the Joe Craft Center CLOSED at Lexington Avenue; enter and exit only at Rose Street
  • One-way westbound: Avenue of Champions between Rose Street and Limestone (no thru traffic)
  • One-way westbound: Huguelet Drive between University Drive and Rose Street
  • One-way eastbound: Hilltop Avenue between University Drive and Woodland Avenue
  • One-way northbound: Woodland Avenue between Hilltop Avenue and Columbia Avenue
  • One-way southbound: Sports Center Drive between Woodland Avenue and the Employee (E) lot north of the Nutter Football Training Facility.

NO PARKING AREAS:

 

Due to the need to quickly unload vehicles near residence halls, several areas of campus will be NO PARKING zones from 12:01 a.m. to 6 p.m. on each of the Move-In days. Additionally, several streets on and bordering campus will have closures or other changes to traffic flow to accommodate Move-In. Watch for NO PARKING signs and bagged meters in these areas.

 

Vehicles parked in the NO PARKING areas listed below will be TOWED. Owners will be responsible for all tow-related charges.

 

Saturday, Aug. 13; Wednesday, Aug. 17; Friday, Aug. 19; Saturday, Aug. 20:

  • UNIVERSITY DRIVE (BOTH SIDES): from Cooper Drive to Hilltop Avenue
  • SPORTS CENTER DRIVE: between Woodland Avenue and the Employee (E) lot north of the Nutter Football Training Facility
  • AVENUE OF CHAMPIONS: metered parking in front of Roselle Hall
  • LIMESTONE STREET: The nine parking spots on the east side between Avenue of Champions and the sidewalk north of Holmes Hall
  • MARTIN LUTHER KING BOULEVARD: between Maxwell Street and Avenue of Champions
  • LEXINGTON AVENUE: area between the Employee (E) lot entrance and Avenue of Champions
  • E LOT BETWEEN KELLEY BUILDING and MED CENTER ANNEX #5: the five spots in the lane just north of Medical Center Annex #5
  • WOODLAND AVENUE: between Hilltop Avenue and Sports Center Drive, no parking anytime

MOVE-IN PARKING AREAS: (see map) 

 

Students and parents participating in Move-In will be permitted to park in the following designated parking areas:

  • South Limestone Garage (PS #5): all four move-in dates listed above
  • Sports Center Garage (PS #7): all four move-in dates listed above
  • Blue Lot at Commonwealth Stadium: all four move-in dates listed above
  • Red Lot at Commonwealth Stadium: all four move-in dates listed above
  • Green Lot at Commonwealth Stadium: Saturday, Aug. 13, and Saturday, Aug. 20
  • Orange Lot at Commonwealth Stadium: Saturday, Aug. 13, and Saturday, Aug. 20
  • Memorial Coliseum Lot: Saturday, Aug. 13, and Saturday, Aug. 20

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Libraries Hosts International Session on Digitization of News

Tue, 08/09/2016 - 09:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 10, 2016) University of Kentucky Libraries is hosting the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) 2016 News Media Satellite Session, Aug. 10-12, at the Hilton Downtown Lexington. Keynote speakers include Patrick Fleming, of the British Library at St. Pancras Campus, and award-winning newspaper columnist Tom Eblen, of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

 

The session will look at how different news preservation players serve news content creators through digital curation and preservation support, with emphasis on examining strategies toward legal deposit and preservation on local, state and national levels.

 

UK Libraries has played a major role in newspaper preservation and digitization. One of the first institutions to participate in the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) United States Newspaper Project (USNP), UK catalogued and microfilmed more than three million pages of historic Kentucky newspapers over 20 years. In 2005, UK Libraries was again on the cutting edge of newspaper preservation, as one of the first six institutions awarded the NEH-funded National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant. UK Libraries was awarded four consecutive NDNP awards, the last of which concluded in 2013. In addition, UK developed meta|morphosis, a film-to-digital institute that brought people from around the world for hands-on training in newspaper digitization. 

 

IFLA keynote speaker Patrick Fleming, a journalist and former newspaper editor, is head of Business Change at the British Library's St. Pancras Campus. The British Library serves business and industry, researchers, academics and students in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Every year, six million searches are generated by the British Library’s online catalogue and more than 100 million items have been supplied to users.

 

Tom Eblen, the second keynote speaker, is the metro/state columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. He was the Herald-Leader's managing editor from 1998 to 2008. Eblen returned to his hometown in 1998 after 14 years with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he was a regional/national reporter, a business reporter and editor, and an Olympics reporter and editor. Eblen is a former board member of the Associated Press Managing Editors and a member of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

 

IFLA is the leading international body that represents the interests of library and information services and their users. As the global voice of the library and information profession, IFLA has more than 1,300 members in approximately 140 countries. 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

Pittard's 'Listen to Me' Still Impressing Critics

Mon, 08/08/2016 - 17:37

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 9, 2016)  Hannah Pittard, University of Kentucky assistant professor of English and creative writing, continues to impress the literary world with her third novel, “Listen to Me.”

 

Designated as “an emerging voice,” Pittard’s “Listen to Me” was on Buzz Book’s list of must-read books in 2016. On July 5, Washington Post’s mysteries and thrillers reviewer Patrick Anderson called “Listen to Me” a “captivating” novel. In Saturday’s New York Times, critic Erica Wagner said Pittard “creates…the feeling of emotional truth.”

 

Pittard’s thriller/mystery is about a young couple who fear their marriage is driving them both crazy. The young wife hasn’t recovered from a terrifying mugging; her husband thinks she’s taking it all too seriously. The husband is horrified when she begins collecting deadly weapons; his wife surrenders to obsessive, paranoid Internet surveillance. Such is their marital status when they embark on a cross-country road trip with their neurotic dog Gerome in the back seat and a “storm of the century” on the horizon. And what could possibly go wrong on the back roads of West Virginia?

 

As the Post’s reviewer writes, “All anyone has to do to rediscover the existential anxiety of the frontier in the 21st century is to get into a car and drive.”

 

Pittard’s first novel, “The Fates Will Find Their Way,” was an O, The Oprah Magazine, selection, an Indie Next pick, a Powell's Indiespendible Book Club Pick, and a "best of" selection by The Guardian, Chicago Tribune, Details magazine, The Kansas City Star, Chicago magazine, Chicago Reader and Hudson Booksellers. Her second novel, "Reunion," garnered Pittard several honors, including a Millions' Most Anticipated Book, a Chicago Tribune Editor's Choice, a BuzzFeed Top-5 Great Book, a Best New Book by People Magazine, a Top-10 Read by Bustle Magazine and LibraryReads, a Must-Read by TimeOut Chicago, and a Hot New Novel by Good Housekeeping. She is the winner of the 2006 Amanda Davis Highwire Fiction Award and a MacDowell Colony Fellow. 

 

Pittard’s fourth novel, “Atlanta, 1962 will be published by Houghton Mifflin in 2017.

 

Jeffory Clymer, chair of UK's English department, said, “Hannah Pittard is a literary star whose third novel cements her reputation for writing elegant, provocative fiction. She is a key member of a new generation that is taking our well-established creative writing program to the next level of national prominence.” 

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Holmes Hall and Boyd Hall Open Their Doors to the Community

Mon, 08/08/2016 - 17:18

 

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 9, 2016) — Two new residence halls located at the corner of South Limestone and Avenue of Champions will open their doors today. Holmes Hall and Boyd Hall are part of a nearly $2.1 billion campus transformation — a project that includes new residence halls, classrooms, research facilities, dining facilities and athletic venues.

 

The community is invited to attend a reception in Holmes Hall and tour Boyd Hall from 4-6 p.m. today (Tuesday), Aug. 9. 

 

Holmes Hall and Boyd Hall will add more than 1,500 beds to the more than 5,200 built within the last four years — a project made possible through UK's public-private partnership with Education Realty Trust (EdR).

 

Holmes Hall will be home to 645 residents throughout seven floors. Students will reside in two-bedroom suites, in which each students has his or her own private bedroom. Holmes Hall will also house two Living Learning Programs (LLP) — the Creative Arts Residential College and the LEXengaged Community. A full list of LLPs can be found here.

 

Boyd Hall will be home to nearly 500 residents throughout seven floors. Students in this residence hall will live in a two-bedroom deluxe suite or a four-bedroom suite.

 

Both residence halls will provide common areas designed to build community, study spaces and classrooms to allow students to learn where they live.

 

"Holmes Hall and Boyd Hall are part of a campus transformation that is changing more than our landscape and physical space, it's changing the way we educate students at the University of Kentucky and prepare them for life beyond our campus," said President Eli Capilouto. "While these spaces will provide vibrant, 21st century living-learning communities, the names that adorn our new residence halls honor the history of two significant women who were deeply committed to student success in their time."

 

The opening of Holmes Hall and Boyd Hall complete Phase II of the UK's housing transformation.

 

Phase III will progress accordingly:

  • Phase III-A: University Flats

o   To be completed in August 2017

o   771 upperclass, professional and graduate student beds

o   $74 million investment

 

  • Phase III-B: Lewis Honors College

o   To be completed fall 2017

o   346 beds and home to the new Lewis Honors College

o   $37.1 investment

 

Parking for guests attending the open house is availabe in the South Limestone parking garage (Parking Structure #5).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

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